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Thread: The History of New Years Celebrations!

  1. #1
    Fi Aman'Allah Array sabr*'s Avatar
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    Lightbulb The History of New Years Celebrations!

    As-Salāmu `Alaykum (السلام عليكم):

    A'udhu billahi minash-shaytaanir rajim:

    A common commentary to how people live thier lifes not understanding the customs they promote and why they
    promote them. Not understanding if the customs have origins in paganism or religious practices opposed to
    what they claim to believe. A duty of the knowledgable to enlighten.

    Al-Fatiha (The Opening) 1:6-7
    نَــــا الصِّرَاطَ المُستَقِيمَ
    (1:6)
    Ihdina alssirata almustaqeema

    1:6 (Y. Ali) Show us the straight way,

    صِرَاطَ الَّذِينَ أَنعَمتَ عَلَيهِمْ غَيرِ المَغضُوبِ عَلَيهِمْ وَلاَ الضَّالِّينَ (1:7)
    Sirata allatheena anAAamta AAalayhim ghayri almaghdoobi AAalayhim wala alddalleena

    1:7 (Y. Ali) The way of those on whom Thou hast bestowed Thy Grace, those whose (portion)
    is not wrath, and who go not astray.
    __________________________________________________ __________
    The tradition of the New Year's Resolutions goes all the way back to 153 B.C. Janus, a mythical king of early Rome was placed at the head of the calendar.

    With two faces, Janus could look back on past events and forward to the future. Janus became the ancient symbol for resolutions and many Romans looked for forgiveness from their enemies and also exchanged gifts before the beginning of each year.

    The New Year has not always begun on January 1, and it doesn't begin on that date everywhere today. It begins on that date only for cultures that use a 365-day solar calendar. January 1 became the beginning of the New Year in 46 B.C., when Julius Caesar developed a calendar that would more accurately reflect the seasons than previous calendars had.

    The Romans named the first month of the year after Janus, the god of beginnings and the guardian of doors and entrances.

    He was always depicted with two faces, one on the front of his head and one on the back. Thus he could look backward and forward at the same time. At midnight on December 31, the Romans imagined Janus looking back at the old year and forward to the new.

    The Romans began a tradition of exchanging gifts on New Year's Eve by giving one another branches from sacred trees for good fortune. Later, nuts or coins imprinted with the god Janus became more common New Year's gifts.
    In the Middle Ages, Christians changed New Year's Day to December 25, the birth of Jesus. Then they changed it to March 25, a holiday called the Annunciation. In the sixteenth century, Pope Gregory XIII revised the Julian calendar, and the celebration of the New Year was returned to January 1.

    The Julian and Gregorian calendars are solar calendars. Some cultures have lunar calendars, however. A year in a lunar calendar is less than 365 days because the months are based on the phases of the moon. The Chinese use a lunar calendar. Their new year begins at the time of the first full moon (over the Far East) after the sun enters Aquarius- sometime between January 19 and February 21.

    Although the date for New Year's Day is not the same in every culture, it is always a time for celebration and for customs to ensure good luck in the coming year.
    Ancient New Years

    The celebration of the New Year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, Babylonians celebrated the beginning of a new year on what is now March 23, although they themselves had no written calendar.

    Late March actually is a logical choice for the beginning of a new year. It is the time of year that spring begins and new crops are planted. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.
    The Babylonian New Year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison.

    The Romans continued to observe the New Year on March 25, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun.
    In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the New Year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the New Year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

    Global Good Luck Traditions

    With New Year's upon us, here's a look at some of the good luck rituals from around the world. They are believed to bring good fortune and prosperity in the coming year.

    AUSTRIA - The suckling pig is the symbol for good luck for the new year. It's served on a table decorated with tiny edible pigs. Dessert often consists of green peppermint ice cream in the shape of a four-leaf clover.

    ENGLAND - The British place their fortunes for the coming year in the hands of their first guest. They believe the first visitor of each year should be male and bearing gifts. Traditional gifts are coal for the fire, a loaf for the table and a drink for the master. For good luck, the guest should enter through the front door and leave through the back. Guests who are empty-handed or unwanted are not allowed to enter first.

    WALES - At the first toll of midnight, the back door is opened and then shut to release the old year and lock out all of its bad luck. Then at the twelfth stroke of the clock, the front door is opened and the New Year is welcomed with all of its luck.

    HAITI - In Haiti, New Year's Day is a sign of the year to come. Haitians wear new clothing and exchange gifts in the hope that it will bode well for the new year.

    SICILY - An old Sicilian tradition says good luck will come to those who eat lasagna on New Year's Day, but woe if you dine on macaroni, for any other noodle will bring bad luck.

    SPAIN - In Spain, when the clock strikes midnight, the Spanish eat 12 grapes, one with every toll, to bring good luck for the 12 months ahead.

    PERU - The Peruvian New Year's custom is a spin on the Spanish tradition of eating 12 grapes at the turn of the year. But in Peru, a 13th grape must be eaten to assure good luck.

    GREECE - A special New Year's bread is baked with a coin buried in the dough. The first slice is for the Christ child, the second for the father of the household and the third slice is for the house. If the third slice holds the coin, spring will come early that year.

    JAPAN - The Japanese decorate their homes in tribute to lucky gods. One tradition, kadomatsu, consists of a pine branch symbolizing longevity, a bamboo stalk symbolizing prosperity, and a plum blossom showing nobility.

    CHINA - For the Chinese New Year, every front door is adorned with a fresh coat of red paint, red being a symbol of good luck and happiness. Although the whole family prepares a feast for the New Year, all knives are put away for 24 hours to keep anyone from cutting themselves, which is thought to cut the family's good luck for the next year.

    UNITED STATES - The kiss shared at the stroke of midnight in the United States is derived from masked balls that have been common throughout history. As tradition has it, the masks symbolize evil spirits from the old year and the kiss is the purification into the new year.

    NORWAY - Norwegians make rice pudding at New Year's and hide one whole almond within. Guaranteed wealth goes to the person whose serving holds the lucky almond.

    Chinese New Year

    Except for a very few number of people who can keep track of when the Chinese New Year should be, the majority of the Chinese today have to rely on a typical Chinese calendar to tell it. Therefore, you cannot talk of the Chinese New Year without mentioning the Chinese calendar at first.

    A Chinese calendar consists of both the Gregorian and lunar-solar systems, with the latter dividing a year into twelve month, each of which is in turn equally divided into thirty- nine and a half days. The well-coordinated dual system calendar reflects the Chinese ingenuity.

    There is also a system that marks the years in a twelve-year cycle, naming each of them after an animal such as Rat, Ox, Tiger, Hare, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Boar. People born in a particular year are believed to share some of the personalities of that particular animal.


    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/245213


    Lā ilāha illā-llāhu waḥdahu lā sharīka lahu lahu-l-mulku
    Wa lahu-l-hamdu yuḥyi Wa yumītu Wa huwa ḥayyu-llā yamūtu abadan abada
    ḏū-l-jalāli wa-l-ikrām, biyadihi-l-khayr
    wa huwa ‘alā kulli Shay’in qadīr.

  2. #2
    Tu kaun hai paiiii? Array Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн's Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!



    BarakAllaahu feek bro.


    *Without Allah, without Islam, life would be meaningless. If I've ever learned patience, it's because of this. Alhamdulillah...*

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    death...chasing u! Array Haya emaan's Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!

    JAZAKALLAH khairn for sharing.


    HIJAB IS MY PRIDE

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    FytinInDaWayofAllaah Array Muj4h1d4~'s Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!

    It's normal to celebrate new years, people need to not go extreme!

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    One Ummah Array Vision's Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!

    This has to be one of the most ridicilous articles i've read. There's no difference in making an intention (Speaking in the Islamic sense) and making a resolution, both are more less are the same thing! I make resolutions/intentions all the time, and at the start of the year i set myself goals and hope to reach them InshAllah. Whats so wrong about that?

    Haram police seem to be out in force lately, quit this nonsense please.

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    Tu kaun hai paiiii? Array Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн's Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!

    l.o.l.


    *Without Allah, without Islam, life would be meaningless. If I've ever learned patience, it's because of this. Alhamdulillah...*

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    Full Member Array syed_z's Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!

    Asalaam O Alaikum...


    I just believe that brother has a point. Its nothing wrong with new year resolution but whats wrong is and what is being emphasized i.e. New Year celebrations of the Western World have become part of the Muslim world and Muslim lives that we've made them a permanent part of our lives and have forgotten and abandoned the Islamic Hijrah Year which begins with the Month of Muharram.

    We celebrate the New year of the modern world and many in the Ummah are not even aware what Islamic Hijri year we're in ? Many do but many have forgotten.


    We call Friday which is day of greek/roman goddess named fri and Sunday as the day of Sun. These days have as well become part of our lives and we've almost forgotten the Islamic names of the days of weeks.

    So in that sense i see the post positive.

  8. #8
    Allah swa knows best Array Fighting Nafs's Avatar
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    Default Re: The History of New Years Celebrations!

    Interesting historical read.

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