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pridefulmuslim
04-13-2008, 08:07 PM
I want to compare the story of Prophet Musa (pbuh) from the Islamic version an the Christian Version....

What are the differences?
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pridefulmuslim
04-16-2008, 06:01 AM
can someone help....
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glo
04-16-2008, 06:18 AM
The account of Moses in the Bible is very long, pridefulmuslim, so you may need to be a bit more specific in what you are looking for.
I will help you if I can, but I don't have much time at the moment ...

As you want to compare different religious views, it may be better to post your question in the comparative religions section, rather than in 'Learn about Islam'

Peace
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Keltoi
04-16-2008, 12:12 PM
There are several differences between Moses in the Bible(Torah) and in the Qu'ran.

1. In the Qu'ran, it is the wife of Pharaoh, Asiya, who rescues Moses and convinces her husband to let him be raised in the palace. There is no mention of the Pharaoh's wife in the Bible(Torah).

2. Another difference is the tone of the exchange between God and Moses. In the Bible(Torah), Moses has doubts and insecurities and seems reluctant to accept the role that God has chosen for him. In the Qu'ran, Moses is portrayed as a more willing participant.

3. In the Bible(Torah), the Festival of Passover is derived from the story of the ten plagues and the exodus of the Jews from Egypt. In the Qu'ran there is no mention of the story of Passover.

4. A difference in the Golden Calf episode. In the Bible(Torah), Aaron is a willing participant in the creation of the idol. In the Qu'ran he was overpowered and forced to be a participant.

5. In the Qu'ran, all of the people begged for mercy and forgiveness, but in the Bible(Torah) it is only the Levites who join Moses.

6. The Qu'ran makes no mention of why Moses was kept from the Promised Land. In the Bible(Torah), it explains that God punished Moses for not admitting it was God who brought forth water from the rock and not Moses himself.

7. One final difference is the character known as Haman, which is not mentioned in the Biblical Story of Moses but is in the Qu'ran. Haman is mentioned in the Book of Esther, but is considered an evil enemy of the Jewish people.
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- Qatada -
04-16-2008, 12:25 PM
I just want to clarify some mistakes; :) hope you dont mind:



Originally Posted by Keltoi

4. A difference in the Golden Calf episode. In the Bible(Torah), Aaron is a willing participant in the creation of the idol. In the Qu'ran he was overpowered and forced to be a participant.
He was overpowered but he did not get involved, rather his people didn't obey him when he called them against it.



6. The Qu'ran makes no mention of why Moses was kept from the Promised Land. In the Bible(Torah), it explains that God punished Moses for not admitting it was God who brought forth water from the rock and not Moses himself.

Prophet Moses couldn't enter the blessed land because of his peoples' rebellion against the commandmant of Allah. It wasn't the fault of Moses, but since he was their leader - he was unable to enter, because the only way the people could enter the Promised land was through physical strife (Ji had), but since his people did not obey him - they had to wander in the desert for 40years, until a new generation came, by which Prophet Moses aswell as the rebellious children of Israel [jacob] had died, and the new generation fought and entered the blessed land and Prophet David became king.




And Allah knows best.
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Keltoi
04-16-2008, 12:45 PM
Originally Posted by - Qatada -
I just want to clarify some mistakes; :) hope you dont mind:





He was overpowered but he did not get involved, rather his people didn't obey him when he called them against it.






Prophet Moses couldn't enter the blessed land because of his peoples' rebellion against the commandmant of Allah. It wasn't the fault of Moses, but since he was their leader - he was unable to enter, because the only way the people could enter the Promised land was through physical strife (Ji had), but since his people did not obey him - they had to wander in the desert for 40years, until a new generation came, by which Prophet Moses aswell as the rebellious children of Israel [jacob] had died, and the new generation fought and entered the blessed land and Prophet David became king.




And Allah knows best.
Thanks for the clarification
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pridefulmuslim
04-18-2008, 11:00 PM
i heard that moses (pbuh) grew up with the pharaohs son, then when he left Egypt and came back it was the pharaohs son that became the new pharaoh and thats the one who challenged the God of moses....is this true?

sorry if u dont understand the question....

thanks qatada and keltoi!
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- Qatada -
04-19-2008, 07:44 PM
:salamext:


I've heard that too, and that's according to Biblical sources. I think there isn't any mention of that in the Qur'an or Sunnah though. And Allah knows best. :)
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FatimaAsSideqah
04-19-2008, 07:51 PM
As Salaam Alaykum Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuhu

For Christians, Moses (PBUH) — mentioned more often in the New Testament than any other Old Testament figure — is often a symbol of God's law, as reinforced and expounded on in the teachings of Jesus (PBUH). New Testament writers often compared Jesus' (PBUH) words and deeds with Moses' (PBUH) to explain Jesus' (PBUH) mission. In Acts 7:39–43, 51–53, for example, the rejection of Moses (PBUH) by the Jews that worshiped the golden calf is likened to the rejection of Jesus (PBUH) by the Jews that continued in traditional Judaism.

Moses (PBUH) also figures in several of Jesus' (PBUH) messages. When he met the Pharisees Nicodemus at night in the third chapter of the Gospel of John, he compares Moses' (PBUH) lifting up of the bronze serpent in the wilderness, which any Israelite could look at and be healed, to his own lifting up (by his death and resurrection) for the people to look at and be healed. In the sixth chapter, Jesus (PBUH) responds to the people's claim that Moses provided them manna in the wilderness by saying that it was not Moses (PBUH), but God, who provided. Calling himself the "bread of life", Jesus (PBUH) states that he is now provided to feed God's people.

He, along with Elijah, is presented as meeting with Jesus (PBUH) in all three Gospel accounts of the Transfiguration of Jesus (PBUH) in Matthew 17, Mark 9, and Luke 9, respectively. Later Christians found numerous other parallels between the life of Moses (PBUH) and Jesus (PBUH) to the extent that Jesus (PBUH) was likened to a "second Moses." For instance, Jesus' escape from the slaughter by Herod in Bethlehem is compared to Moses' (PBUH) escape from Pharaoh's designs to kill Hebrew infants. Such parallels, unlike those mentioned above, are not pointed out in Scripture. See the article on typology.

In the Qur'an, the life of Moses (PBUH) (Arabic: Musa) is narrated and recounted more than any other prophet recognized in Islam. The Qur'an narrates much of Moses' (PBUH) life in relation to God. The Qur'an and the Bible are similar on the basic outline of Moses' (PBUH) life. But some distinctive accounts, such as the story of Moses (PBUH) and Al-Khidr, are found only in the Qur'an.

In Islam, Moses (PBUH) was born into a family of Israelites living in Egypt. The ruling Pharaoh, on the advice of his soothsayers, ordered the killing of all new-born Israelite males. To protect her son, Moses' (PBUH) mother put him in a basket and set him adrift on the Nile. He was discovered by the Pharaoh's wife, Asiya, who adopted him.

Moses (PBUH) grew up as a member of the Pharaoh's household. However, this changed when in rescuing an Israelite from an abusive Egyptian, he accidentally killed the Egyptian. Due to this incident, Musa (PBUH) was deemed a criminal and was to be punished, but escaped into the desert. After travelling the desert for a long time, he arrived at a place called Midian and came into the company of the prophet Shoaib (Jethro, in Biblical traditions), who recognized Moses (PBUH) as a man of God. Shoaib arranged a marriage between his daughter Safoorah (Zipporah in Biblical and Hebrew tradition) and year after year Moses (PBUH) had worked for him for either eight or ten years.
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MustafaMc
04-19-2008, 10:37 PM
Originally Posted by Keltoi
There are several differences between Moses in the Bible(Torah) and in the Qu'ran.
Keltoi did a good job of explaining the differences with important clarifications by Qatada.

Another point of difference is that there is a narrative of Moses (as) on a journey with "one of Our servants (Khidhr by tradition) whom We had blessed with special favor from Ourselves and whom We had given special knowledge of Our own" Qur'an 18:65. This story mentions 3 instances where Khidhr 1) made a hole in a boat of someone that was helping them cross a body of water, 2) killed a boy, and 3) rebuilt a wall near a town that refused to accept them as guests. There was a moral to each circumstance to teach Moses (as) deeper knowledge as summarized with All this was done as a mercy from your Rabb. What I did was not done by my own will. That is the interpretation of those actions which you could not bear to watch with patience. Quran 18:82
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jd7
04-20-2008, 02:34 AM
Righteous Lady, you have me confused “to his own lifting up (by his death and resurrection)”.

I was under the impression that Islam taught that Jesus didn’t die on the cross as the bible teaches.

Am I wrong?
JD7
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YusufNoor
04-20-2008, 05:19 AM
Originally Posted by jd7
Righteous Lady, you have me confused “to his own lifting up (by his death and resurrection)”.

I was under the impression that Islam taught that Jesus didn’t die on the cross as the bible teaches.

Am I wrong?
JD7
Peace be upon those who follow the guidance,

here's what you missed:


this blue part:

For Christians, Moses (PBUH) — mentioned more often in the New Testament than any other Old Testament figure — is often a symbol of God's law, as reinforced and expounded on in the teachings of Jesus (PBUH). New Testament writers often compared Jesus' (PBUH) words and deeds with Moses' (PBUH) to explain Jesus' (PBUH) mission. In Acts 7:39–43, 51–53, for example, the rejection of Moses (PBUH) by the Jews that worshiped the golden calf is likened to the rejection of Jesus (PBUH) by the Jews that continued in traditional Judaism.

Moses (PBUH) also figures in several of Jesus' (PBUH) messages. When he met the Pharisees Nicodemus at night in the third chapter of the Gospel of John, he compares Moses' (PBUH) lifting up of the bronze serpent in the wilderness, which any Israelite could look at and be healed, to his own lifting up (by his death and resurrection) for the people to look at and be healed. In the sixth chapter, Jesus (PBUH) responds to the people's claim that Moses provided them manna in the wilderness by saying that it was not Moses (PBUH), but God, who provided. Calling himself the "bread of life", Jesus (PBUH) states that he is now provided to feed God's people.

He, along with Elijah, is presented as meeting with Jesus (PBUH) in all three Gospel accounts of the Transfiguration of Jesus (PBUH) in Matthew 17, Mark 9, and Luke 9, respectively. Later Christians found numerous other parallels between the life of Moses (PBUH) and Jesus (PBUH) to the extent that Jesus (PBUH) was likened to a "second Moses." For instance, Jesus' escape from the slaughter by Herod in Bethlehem is compared to Moses' (PBUH) escape from Pharaoh's designs to kill Hebrew infants. Such parallels, unlike those mentioned above, are not pointed out in Scripture. See the article on typology.

while this green part is:

In the Qur'an, the life of Moses (PBUH) (Arabic: Musa) is narrated and recounted more than any other prophet recognized in Islam. The Qur'an narrates much of Moses' (PBUH) life in relation to God. The Qur'an and the Bible are similar on the basic outline of Moses' (PBUH) life. But some distinctive accounts, such as the story of Moses (PBUH) and Al-Khidr, are found only in the Qur'an.

In Islam, Moses (PBUH) was born into a family of Israelites living in Egypt. The ruling Pharaoh, on the advice of his soothsayers, ordered the killing of all new-born Israelite males. To protect her son, Moses' (PBUH) mother put him in a basket and set him adrift on the Nile. He was discovered by the Pharaoh's wife, Asiya, who adopted him.

Moses (PBUH) grew up as a member of the Pharaoh's household. However, this changed when in rescuing an Israelite from an abusive Egyptian, he accidentally killed the Egyptian. Due to this incident, Musa (PBUH) was deemed a criminal and was to be punished, but escaped into the desert. After travelling the desert for a long time, he arrived at a place called Midian and came into the company of the prophet Shoaib (Jethro, in Biblical traditions), who recognized Moses (PBUH) as a man of God. Shoaib arranged a marriage between his daughter Safoorah (Zipporah in Biblical and Hebrew tradition) and year after year Moses (PBUH) had worked for him for either eight or ten years.
is that clearer?

:D

:w:
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