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munssif
08-04-2008, 10:14 AM
Assalamu Alaikum,

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

I would like to open this thread to discuss about the issues youth are facing in their society....

JazakALLAH
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Iftikhar
08-11-2008, 07:13 PM
Originally Posted by munssif
Assalamu Alaikum,

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

I would like to open this thread to discuss about the issues youth are facing in their society....

JazakALLAH
Muslim Youths

Muslim youths are angry, frustrated and extremist because they have been mis-educated and de-educated by the British schooling. Muslim children are confused because they are being educated in a wrong place at a wrong time in state schools with non-Muslim monolingual teachers. They face lots of problems of growing up in two distinctive cultural traditions and value systems, which may come into conflict over issues such as the role of women in the society, and adherence to religious and cultural traditions. The conflicting demands made by home and schools on behaviour, loyalties and obligations can be a source of psychological conflict and tension in Muslim youngsters. There are also the issues of racial prejudice and discrimination to deal with, in education and employment. They have been victim of racism and bullying in all walks of life. According to DCSF, 56% of Pakistanis and 54% of Bangladeshi children has been victims of bullies. The first wave of Muslim migrants were happy to send their children to state schools, thinking their children would get a much better education. Than little by little, the overt and covert discrimination in the system turned them off. There are fifteen areas where Muslim parents find themselves offended by state schools.

The right to education in one’s own comfort zone is a fundamental and inalienable human right that should be available to all people irrespective of their ethnicity or religious background. Schools do not belong to state, they belong to parents. It is the parents’ choice to have faith schools for their children. Bilingual Muslim children need state funded Muslim schools with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods. There is no place for a non-Muslim teacher or a child in a Muslim school. There are hundreds of state schools where Muslim children are in majority. In my opinion, all such schools may be designated as Muslim community schools. An ICM Poll of British Muslims showed that nearly half wanted their children to attend Muslim schools. There are only 143 Muslim schools. A state funded Muslim school in Birmingham has 220 pupils and more than 1000 applicants chasing just 60.

Majority of anti-Muslim stories are not about terrorism but about Muslim
culture--the hijab, Muslim schools, family life and religiosity. Muslims in the west ought to be recognised as a western community, not as an alien culture.
Iftikhar Ahmad
www.londonschoolofislamics.org.uk
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------
08-11-2008, 07:16 PM
:salamext:


Guys - seeing women indecently dressed, lisnin to messed up raps by tupac and co, chattin up next women...

Girls - going out dressed indecently, lisnin to lovey dovey songs, goin out wiv guys...


want more?
Reply

munssif
08-12-2008, 06:28 AM
Salam Brothers,

There are three types of people in the world,

i. the people who are in the righteous way ( ALLAH's way).
ii. the people who are in astray(way of Shiathan).
iii.and there are some in both category.

I think both of you have pointed out the negative side of our youth.
Yes, it is true, I accept, but there are more youth who are willing to do changes in the world. Who are following the religion as ALLAH's guidance.

So, it is better to discuss the issues the youth are facing when they are going to practice Islam, and on their education, POlitics.etc too.

Wassalam
Reply

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TrueStranger
08-13-2008, 02:41 AM
:sl:

I can’t personally talk about the issues that are facing the Muslim youth, but I can point out some issues which I have to face as a Muslim youth. The most difficult part is the society itself. The surrounding is filled with disbelief, the air is poisoned with sins, and the environment is decorated with the deceptions of Satan and the world. They no longer fight you or oppose your views, no. They welcome you with materialistic objects, mislead you in a friendly manner, and they will place in front of you all things that summon up one’s lowly desires. You turn from place to place, your eyes have became attached to the ground, and your mind is in constant battle with the thoughts that are invading your conscious. Being in a non-Muslim society, you would have to patiently guard your eyes and ears. Our minds and hearts are attached to the worldly objects, physical objects, and the notions, values and viewpoints that are continuously being displayed and acted upon by the society at large. We do consume some of the ideas, perspectives, and beliefs that are non-Islamic sub-consciously. You are surrounded with filth, it seems like you have entered the house of Satan himself. The College Campus is a nightmare during the summer. There isn’t any specific place where one could pray at, so you would have to do a little searching for a place that is quiet and clean to pray at. Allah’s ground is so vast, yet it is being occupied with everything that could be haraam and kufr.


It is at times hard for any practicing Muslim, especially one that is barely educated about the deen. You recite the few verses you know or the few duas you know over and over again. You try to be God-Conscious all the time, and it works for the most part, except when I put down my shield and shatan pierce me with arrows. And self-****ation can’t be avoided at the end of the day. At times you wonder where are the Muslims? Where are those who are taking the right path to their Lord. The road is empty, no sound, only vanishing footsteps of those who probably walked alone down the right path towards their Lord.

I really do have a hard time contemplating on the fact that there could be so many people that are completely and utterly heedless about their God, and I pray that Allah keeps me away from becoming like them.


There is little support around College Grounds, but Sufficient is Allah for His Servants.
:)

:w:
Reply

munssif
08-13-2008, 12:03 PM
Originally Posted by TrueStranger
:sl:

I can’t personally talk about the issues that are facing the Muslim youth, but I can point out some issues which I have to face as a Muslim youth. The most difficult part is the society itself. The surrounding is filled with disbelief, the air is poisoned with sins, and the environment is decorated with the deceptions of Satan and the world. They no longer fight you or oppose your views, no. They welcome you with materialistic objects, mislead you in a friendly manner, and they will place in front of you all things that summon up one’s lowly desires. You turn from place to place, your eyes have became attached to the ground, and your mind is in constant battle with the thoughts that are invading your conscious. Being in a non-Muslim society, you would have to patiently guard your eyes and ears. Our minds and hearts are attached to the worldly objects, physical objects, and the notions, values and viewpoints that are continuously being displayed and acted upon by the society at large. We do consume some of the ideas, perspectives, and beliefs that are non-Islamic sub-consciously. You are surrounded with filth, it seems like you have entered the house of Satan himself. The College Campus is a nightmare during the summer. There isn’t any specific place where one could pray at, so you would have to do a little searching for a place that is quiet and clean to pray at. Allah’s ground is so vast, yet it is being occupied with everything that could be haraam and kufr.


It is at times hard for any practicing Muslim, especially one that is barely educated about the deen. You recite the few verses you know or the few duas you know over and over again. You try to be God-Conscious all the time, and it works for the most part, except when I put down my shield and shatan pierce me with arrows. And self-****ation can’t be avoided at the end of the day. At times you wonder where are the Muslims? Where are those who are taking the right path to their Lord. The road is empty, no sound, only vanishing footsteps of those who probably walked alone down the right path towards their Lord.

I really do have a hard time contemplating on the fact that there could be so many people that are completely and utterly heedless about their God, and I pray that Allah keeps me away from becoming like them.


There is little support around College Grounds, but Sufficient is Allah for His Servants.
:)

:w:
Salam Sister,

I accept all the points what you have mentioned. Though you are speaking from your environment, this is applicable for almost all the countries no matter whether that is a Muslim country or Non-Muslim country.

Therefore, as youth we have to take the duty which ALLAH places on our shoulders : ". It is He Who has sent His Messenger with Guidance and the Religion of Truth, that he may proclaim it over all religion, even though the Pagans may detest (it)[61:09].
If we join together to establish this purely, we will be rewarded the best from Almighty ALLAH in here and hereafter.

And I can add a verse "Allah is the Protector of those who have faith: from the depths of darkness He will lead them forth into light [2:257].

Wassalam
Reply

munssif
08-14-2008, 08:27 AM
Salam,

This is the article I got from World bank's website. This is their views of Youth.

"Who are Youth?

One of the most common definitions of youth in quantitative terms comprises persons between the age of 15 and 24. It is used by both the United Nations and the World Bank and is applied in many statistics and indicators. Young people are grouped together to form a statistical entity, making it possible to compare data across time and countries. However, this crude definition must be qualified somewhat, when youth is defined in qualitative terms.

Defining Youth

Different scholars have provided different ways of defining youth. Curtain (2002), quoted in the U.N. World Youth Report 2003, defines it as a phase when a person moves from a time of dependence (childhood) to independence (adulthood) and identifies four distinct aspects of this move:

*Leaving the parental home and establishing new living arrangements;
*Completing full-time education;
*Forming close, stable personal relationships outside of the family, often resulting in marriage and children; and
*Testing the labor market, finding work and possibly settling into a career, and achieving a more or less sustainable livelihood.

These transitions are interconnected, i.e. leaving home and setting up one’s own personal economy require an independent source of income, and to reach this stage a young person generally has to acquire qualifications and to have succeeded in demonstrating his or her skill in the labor market.

Young people, when faced with uncertain employment prospects and financial insecurity, are likely to avoid establishing stable personal relationships, postpone marriage, and/or put off having or accepting the responsibility for children. In the absence the prospects for a sustainable livelihood, more extreme social behavior may occur, e.g. engagement in illegal activities such as drug trafficking, violent crime or gang activities. Poor economic prospects may also contribute to antisocial behavior, including exposing others to HIV/AIDS through the practice of unsafe sex.

This transition model exposes the problems of moving from one developmental phase to another. The role of youth policy in this context is to create favorable conditions for success by preparing young people for the roles and responsibilities of adulthood. It also entails the idea that childhood and youth are in themselves valuable stages of life, more than just necessary stops on the way to adulthood. Youth policy, therefore, becomes not only a source of guidance towards adulthood, but a means of providing and ensuring the requirements for a safe and productive live for children and youth. This means viewing children and young people as subjects (not objects) in every respect – not only at the personal level, but in society as a whole, participating in decision-making and the debates that surround it.


Implications for Programming

A recent World Bank review of successful youth interventions found that:

The presence of a responsible adult and or role model in a young person’s life is of paramount importance. While there is no substitute for a good parent, having a relationship with a positive role is remarkably effective in reducing the presence of risky behavior in young people.

Youth probably have more in common with adults than with children. The lifecycle model offers a useful conceptual framework for starting to think about the overall links between age sectors. However, it is important to recognize that many of the challenges youth face such as unemployment and risky sexual behavior are more closely related to adults than children.

A problem-based approach is less effective than a comprehensive approach. It is becoming increasingly clear that working on an issue separately from the general developmental framework is sub-optimal. Considering how challenges are interlinked, it is probably wiser to address youth issues more holistically than piecemeal.

A sophisticated understanding of the heterogeneity of the target group is key. While youth are their own ‘group’, they are comprised of many subgroups, each requiring its own sophisticated understanding."
.

Please comment the point where we can agree and where we have disagree as Muslims.
Reply

qassy!
08-18-2008, 12:19 AM
Originally Posted by - Serene -
:salamext:


Guys - seeing women indecently dressed, lisnin to messed up raps by tupac and co, chattin up next women...

Girls - going out dressed indecently, lisnin to lovey dovey songs, goin out wiv guys...


want more?
Thats so steryotypical
My sister shes 17, she never meets boys, or dresses like a you knnow what

and thers nothing wrong with rap, 50 cent ftw! or 2pac
Reply

BlackMamba
08-18-2008, 12:33 AM
It is very hard being a Muslim Youth in America. Period.
Reply

qassy!
08-18-2008, 12:35 AM
Originally Posted by Shakoor15
It is very hard being a Muslim Youth in America. Period.
I have problems living in London and being a youth, can you explain the problems you have?
Reply

Orn
08-18-2008, 04:18 PM
Originally Posted by - Serene -
:salamext:


Guys - seeing women indecently dressed, lisnin to messed up raps by tupac and co, chattin up next women...

Girls - going out dressed indecently, lisnin to lovey dovey songs, goin out wiv guys...


want more?
Sister you've just described bangladesh
Reply

munssif
08-19-2008, 02:24 AM
Salam,

I read most of the brothers saying living in western countries is very difficult. Yes, there is a different between western countries and others. But this is common for all countries including Arab world. Brother, this is what I can say about you people, who says difficult to live in their surroundings shows that YOU are religious, you are trying to practice Islam as it guides us. Firs of all, May ALLAH guide you and bestow HIS mercy.

And brothers you know the Promsie what ALLAH made for you "We relate to thee their story in truth: they were youths who believed in their Lord, and We advanced them in guidance(18:13)".

Further, brothers and sisters never give this effort what you are doing for the sake of ALLAH. If you are in the way of ALLAH in young age, then ALLAH will provide us the shadow of HIS ARSH in the day of judgment.

This is what im quoting finally from ALLAH's words "O ye who believe! Persevere in patience and constancy; vie in such perseverance; strengthen each other; and fear Allah. that ye may prosper(3:200)".
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Orn
08-19-2008, 03:34 AM
Jazak Allahu khayran brother
Reply

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