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wth1257
10-17-2008, 11:25 PM
I have two translations and to be honest I'm not to happy with either.

"The Qur'an: Text, Translation, and Commentary"
by Abdullah Yusuf Ali

and

"The Koran Interpreted"
by A.J. Arberry

Does anyone know of any better translations?


thanks:statisfie
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Hamayun
10-17-2008, 11:49 PM
I really like the Picthall translation.

You can access an interactive version of it here: http://quranexplorer.com/Quran/Default.aspx
Reply

wth1257
10-17-2008, 11:59 PM
Originally Posted by Hamayun
I really like the Picthall translation.

You can access an interactive version of it here: http://quranexplorer.com/Quran/Default.aspx

I think I've skimmed that one.

I'll look at it again:)

I also know of one by Maulana Muhammad Ali
Reply

Hamayun
10-18-2008, 12:17 AM
I personally didn't like the Maulana Muhammad Ali translation. I would say the Picthall translation is one of the easiest and most accurate translations. Although like everyone says the Quran is extremely difficult to translate since there are several words in Arabic that can not be translated into another language.

For example when you tell someone an English joke in German. It loses its effect. Someone who speaks Arabic can really appreciate the Quran in its true glory.
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YusufNoor
10-18-2008, 12:38 AM
Originally Posted by wth1257
I think I've skimmed that one.

I'll look at it again:)

I also know of one by Maulana Muhammad Ali

this character is NOT a Muslim, he is an Ahmadiyyan!
:sl:

you'll find that a great many of the English translations are based on Pickthal.

personally, i really disliked Yusuf Ali, it seemed more like Shakespeare or the King James Bible.

i REALLY enjoyed The Message of the Quran : New 2004 Authorized Edition (Muhammad Asad):

http://islamicbookstore.com/b8257.html

it's my favorite single volume just because i enjoyed his notes and his style. that volume is also beautiful one.

you should also check out The Noble Qur'an (M. Muhsin Khan, M. Taqi-ud-Din Hilali):

http://islamicbookstore.com/b8089.html

and the The Qur'an : Saheeh International : Arabic Text with Corresponding English Meanings : Revised Edition (Umm Muhammed)

http://islamicbookstore.com/b5269.html

here's a site where you can compare translations:

http://quran.islamicnetwork.com/

:w:
Reply

Hamayun
10-18-2008, 12:48 AM
You can read the Mohammad Asad translation online here with explanations http://www.geocities.com/masad02/
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MustafaMc
10-18-2008, 12:53 AM
Personally, I like reading the Majestic Quran by the Nawawi Foundation.

http://ikitab.com/store/product_info...a238136e92e56c
Reply

Lukas
10-18-2008, 01:05 AM
www.islamicpulse.com has the saheeh international translation which is pretty good but not nearly as good as Ahmed Ali's written translation.
Reply

Hamayun
10-18-2008, 01:07 AM
I think the brother might get confused which one to get lol. I personally found the Picthall translation easy to follow and widely available. You can't go wrong.
Reply

Lukas
10-18-2008, 01:10 AM
The reason why I like the Saheeh International and Ahmed Ali translations is because, unlike the Pikthal and Yusuf Ali translations, they are written in contemporary english.
Reply

YusufNoor
10-18-2008, 01:30 AM
Originally Posted by MustafaMc
Personally, I like reading the Majestic Quran by the Nawawi Foundation.

http://ikitab.com/store/product_info...a238136e92e56c
:sl:

is this the translation committee headed by note Sufi historian Abdul Hakim Murad?

the online Asad doesn't come close to the version that i like. his was the FIRST Qur'an [and actually, English translations are more like simplifies Tafsirs than "translations"] in which i checked all of his notes which referred to other notes on other pages. and where his "translation' was lacking, he usually provided some from Scholars from times past.

AND he discussed Razi ALOT which is a field of interest all on it's own!:thankyou:

i would like to see the pages from the Murad version to see the style and examples!

i would also like to find a hardbound Saheeh International!

:w:
Reply

MustafaMc
10-18-2008, 02:35 AM
Originally Posted by YusufNoor
is this the translation committee headed by note Sufi historian Abdul Hakim Murad?
According to this website this person was an editor not a translator for the Majestic Quran. I also have the Muhammad Al-Hilali & Muhsin Khan, Marmaduke Pickthall, Yusuf Ali, and T.B. Irving translations and I have found the Majestic Qur'an the best for me.
http://www.wardahbooks.com/main/prod...products_id=64


The Majestic Qur’an
Translation Committee - Ali Ozek, Nureddin Uzunoglu, and Tevfik R. Topuzoglu
Edited by Abdal Hakim Murad, Mostafa al-Badawi and Uthman Hutchinson

Jointly published by the Nawawi Foundation and the ibn Khaldun Foundation, this new translation of the Holy Qur’an is truly majestic. Arabic, commentary and parallel English translation is provided.
The Majestic Quran is distinctive among the existent English translations of the Quran because of the fluidity and clarity of its language. The modern Standard English makes the message of the Qur’an easily accessible to the modern reader.
Reply

MustafaMc
10-18-2008, 02:51 AM
I also found this by a member of the translation committee.

http://darulislam.info/Sections-article61-p1.html

WHAT IS THE Qur’an?
One may answer this question by the following definition: “The Qur’an is a book of guidance which is itself a miracle.” It is a book of guidance because it was sent direct to mankind along the path of happiness and salvation, and it is a miracle because it was vouchsafed as a revelation to the blessed prophet of Islam. An understanding of the book, therefore, demands an understanding of these two concepts. The Arabic word “Qur’an” is a verbal noun which gives the sense of reading and reciting. The word is thus used inside the Qur’anic text itself: “Do not move your tongue [with the revelation] to hasten it. Ours it is to gather it and recite it. But when we have recited it, follow its recital. Then ours it is to make it clear.” (76: 16-19)
Although it has this general meaning, the word Qur’an in the course of time came to be applied to mushaf, the entirety of the revealed text which is composed of surahs (chapters) and ayat (verses), and which begins with Suratu’l-Fatiha and ends with Suratu’n-Nas.
The word Qur’an is applied to the book in its entirety, and also to any individual component thereof. Although The Qur’an has a has a considerable number of names, including the Book (al-Kitab), the Criterion (al-Furqan), the Remembrance (al-Dhikr), and the sending Down (al-Tanzil), the best known name is “the Qur’an.”
The word Qur’an is also used in conjunction with a range if adjectives, including the Clear/Clarifier (al-Mubin), the Light (al-Nur), the Guidance (al-Huda) the Mercy (al-Rahmah), the Cure (al-Shifa), the Admonition (al-Maw’izah), the Good News (al-Bushra), the bringer of Good News (al-Bashir), the Warner (al-Nadhir), the Precious/Noble (al-Aziz).
In its specific, technical meaning, the “Qur’an” is “the book progressively revealed to the Prophet Muhammad (upon whom be peace) over a period of twenty three years, which constitutes a miracle both in its language and sense, and the recitation by which God is worshiped.”
The Qur’anic text is distinguished by the following five characteristics:
1) Gradualness of revelation.
2) Revealed status.
3) Status as a miracle, both in its text and concepts.
4) Status as an instrument of worship.
5) Status as God’s own speech.
The fact that the Majestic Qur’an was revelled gradually over a twenty-three year period reflects the human need for gradual, progressive education and guidance. To grow accustomed to something radically new and then to adopt it requires of time and energy, both for the habitation and reflection. More than anything, a new religion should give people time to grow used to its injunctions and norms. Hence the Qur’an’s gradual revelation.
The Qur’an is a revelation from heaven, cast by the Archangel Gabriel into the heart of the prophet Muhammad (upon whom be peace). It is, hence, the word of God, not of man. The Blessed Prophet received it as revelation, and he, in turn, recited it to his people without the least addition or subtraction every word and letter is hence from God.
Both the words and the concepts of the Qur’an are miraculous. In Islam, a miracle is defined as an event which cannot be emulated by man. In all the specific features of the Book: its revelation, recitation, writing, preservation, arrangement, style of addressing issues, furnishing of information about the Hereafter, and the accuracy of the facts it brings to mankind, it differs from the works of literature which are produced by human minds. The ancient Arabs used to call a poetic anthology a diwan, whose parts were termed qasidah, its lines bayt, and its rhyme qafiyah. But the Book sent from Allah to His Messenger is called Qur’an, its parts or chapters are called surah, its verses ayah, and the ends of its ayahs, or fasilah.
Human literary productions are either in poetry of prose. The Majestic Qur’an, however, is in neither of these genres. Nether can it be turned music, although it posses a system of tonality and rhythm that is aesthetically superb, being of Divine authorship.
Another feature of the Qur’an is that it is a Book the recitation of which is itself an act of worship. In addition to its liturgical use in the Salat (the indispensable five-times daily worship of the Muslims), it is recited independently as a devotional act. To teach it, to learn it, to gear it, even to look at its writing is an act of worship.
As salat is a duty upon every Muslim, male and female, and reciting passages from the Qur’an is an indispensable part of the salat, it is necessary for every Muslim to learn and be able to recite at least a few verses of the Book. This must be done in the Arabic of the original Revelation.
The Qur’an is the eternally pre-existent Speech of God. The text and its constituent verses, which we recite with our tongues, listen to with our ears, write with our hands, look at with our eyes, and touch with our fingers, is a manifestation of God’s pre-existent Speech in this material world. The source-book of the Qur’an is called al-Lawh al-Mahfuz (the “Well-preserved Tablet”). The first stage in its manifestation took place when God revealed it collectively (inzal) to the metaphysical location known as Baytul- Izzah (the “Abode of Glory”). From there is was revealed to our Prophet through Gabriel individually (the process known as tanzil). Words revealed by God literally to His prophet are thus called Qur’an, and are distinguished from words revealed in meaning only, not in literreal form, which are called Hadith Qudsi (“Sacred Tradition”). Words, acts and affirmations preceding the Blessed Prophet are called Hadith Nabawi (“Prophetic Tradition”).
The Prophet Muhammad (upon whom be blessings and peace) described the Majestic Qur’an as:
“…the Book of God. It contains the story of what was before you the news of what will come after you and a Law that judges between you. It is the definitive statement. It is not a jest. Whoever abandons it out of arrogance, God will utterly destroy, and whoever seeks guidance apart from it, God will lead astray. It is God’s strong rope [of salvation]. It is the wise reminder. It is the Straight Path. It is that which capricious passions cannot divert and tongues cannot pervert. The people of learning cannot satisfy their appetite for it. It will never wear thin from much repetition. Its wonders will never cease. [It is the Book] which, when the spirits heard it [recited], they could not part before saying: “We have head a wondrous Recital, which guides to uprightness.” Whoever speaks in accordance with it is believed. Whoever acts in accordance with it, will be [highly] rewarded. Whoever judges in accordance with it, will be just. Whoever summons [others] to it, will be guided to a straight path.” (At-Timirmidhi in the Chapter of What Has Been Transmitted Regarding the Excellence of the Qur’an.)
The Qur’an was sent down in Arabic. Was this because the blessed Prophet was sent among the Arabs, who ere the best-suited nation to follow a new religion, or is there another reason? It would seem futile to attempt a precise answer to this question, since had it been set in another language, the identical question would have arisen. Such matters belong to the unseen and can be known only imperfectly.
The Qur’an is sent to all mankind, despite the fact of its Arabic revelation; and its Prophet, while an Arab, is a Prophet for all mankind. How then may the Book’s message be proclaimed to the world? Either mankind may be asked to study and master Classical Arabic—an unfair demand—or the attempt should be made to convey its concepts in other languages.
Hence the Majestic Qur’an’s impact on mankind takes place through two channels:
1) As a revealed text, the repetition of whose words bring grace. The Arabic Qur’an is memorised, read and listened to, recited in prayers, thereby affecting the souls of mankind.
2) The Qur’an has been translated in to hundreds of languages, in some of which commentaries have also been written.
The influence of the Book on today’s world is incalculable. It appears that in almost every country, young people are finding inspiration in its message. And in the West, too, our experience is that conversions place in many cases through the channel of the Qur’an, often in the most unexpected ways. Here again we are forced with the books miraculous nature, which seems certain to continue its influence in our age, and, God willing, until the Day of Judgement.
Prof. Ali Ozek
Istanbul
The Majestic Qur’an – An English Rendition of its Meanings.
Translation Committe: Ali Ozek, Nureddin Uzunoglu, Tevfik R. Topuzoglu, Mehmet Maksutoglu.
Edited by: Abdul Hakim Murad, Mustafa Badawi, Uthman Hutchinson.
The Nawawi Foundation (Chicago).
Reply

Yanal
10-18-2008, 02:53 AM
:w:
Try Quran explorer.com
Reply

YusufNoor
10-18-2008, 12:44 PM
Originally Posted by MustafaMc
According to this website this person was an editor not a translator for the Majestic Quran. I also have the Muhammad Al-Hilali & Muhsin Khan, Marmaduke Pickthall, Yusuf Ali, and T.B. Irving translations and I have found the Majestic Qur'an the best for me.
http://www.wardahbooks.com/main/prod...products_id=64


The Majestic Qur’an
Translation Committee - Ali Ozek, Nureddin Uzunoglu, and Tevfik R. Topuzoglu
Edited by Abdal Hakim Murad, Mostafa al-Badawi and Uthman Hutchinson

Jointly published by the Nawawi Foundation and the ibn Khaldun Foundation, this new translation of the Holy Qur’an is truly majestic. Arabic, commentary and parallel English translation is provided.
The Majestic Quran is distinctive among the existent English translations of the Quran because of the fluidity and clarity of its language. The modern Standard English makes the message of the Qur’an easily accessible to the modern reader.
:sl:

i DID look at that sight, but i was hoping to see some of the pages. how much commentary verses translation?

part of the beauty of the Asad version WAS his clumsiness at times! you usually followed it up in the notes by adding how some scholar had translated it [IN which i WOULD be struck by the beauty of the translation!] i almost got the feeling that Asad was attempting keep it foremost in our minds that English DOES NOT portray the Qur'an properly!

i WOULD like to see more about this version, but mainly because i grant Murad some credit as historian [as long as his Sufism remains in the background]

can you post some pages?

:w:
Reply

MustafaMc
10-18-2008, 01:13 PM
Originally Posted by YusufNoor
:sl:

i DID look at that sight, but i was hoping to see some of the pages. how much commentary verses translation?
There is not much commentary.
part of the beauty of the Asad version WAS his clumsiness at times! you usually followed it up in the notes by adding how some scholar had translated it [IN which i WOULD be struck by the beauty of the translation!] i almost got the feeling that Asad was attempting keep it foremost in our minds that English DOES NOT portray the Qur'an properly!

i WOULD like to see more about this version, but mainly because i grant Murad some credit as historian [as long as his Sufism remains in the background]

can you post some pages?

:w:
Sorry, but I was unable to find any example pages. I actually had a hard time finding where one could buy a copy anyway. If you had an ayat in mind, I copy type it into a post.
Reply

doorster
10-18-2008, 02:18 PM
Compendium of Muslim Texts - 3 translations

Note that any translation of the Qur'an immediately ceases to be the literal word of Allah, and hence cannot be equated with the Qur'an in its original language
edit:
In 1982, in response to criticism by a Pakistani scholar, Pickthall's translation was scrutinized by the Islamic Ideological Council of Pakistan and found to be a satisfactory translation. Earlier, his successor as editor of Islamic Culture, Muhammad Asad produced a new translation of the Qur'an after expressing dissatisfaction over Pickthall's knowledge of Arabic. Similarly, Professor Ahmed Ali of Pakistan prefaced his translation that he had undertaken the work to correct Pickthall's errors.
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doorster
10-18-2008, 02:25 PM
is this what you are looking for?

Reply

SixTen
10-18-2008, 02:32 PM
I would not use the Yusuf Ali version, as I feel it seems to vary too much from the traditional translations - it seems to be modernised, but in my opinon it has some negative aspects, such as giving off different interpretation of the verse if read, compared to that of authentic tafseers. Pickthall, is a good choice imo.
Reply

YusufNoor
10-18-2008, 02:41 PM
Originally Posted by doorster
is this what you are looking for?

:sl:

THAT is what i am looking for!

can you post the rest of the page? or more pages. i am really interested in the note discussing the Sabbath. as a former student of the different aspects and versions of what is now called Christianity, i would like to see how the Muslim Scholars deal with those issues [sadly, because they usually blotch them]

do you own this version Shabir Ahmed ibn Abdul Rahman?

if so, can you post some of Suratul Kahf?

JazakAllah Khayr!

:w:
Reply

doorster
10-18-2008, 03:02 PM
No I do not own it but had downloaded a single page from fonsvitae.com some time ago (I did not like to post link for obvious reasons)

:w:
edit
I do have Tafsir of al-kahf by Abul Ala Maududi if you lke
Reply

YusufNoor
10-19-2008, 12:40 AM
Originally Posted by MustafaMc
There is not much commentary.Sorry, but I was unable to find any example pages. I actually had a hard time finding where one could buy a copy anyway. If you had an ayat in mind, I copy type it into a post.
:sl:


now that i think of it, could you post Al Fatiha when you have time?

and Al-Ikhlas?

unless you'd like to post Suratul Kahf? :D

i only ask about Al Kahf because i try to read it every Jummua'ah BUT in the English language. :-[

:w:
Reply

MustafaMc
10-19-2008, 01:10 AM
Originally Posted by YusufNoor
:sl:


now that i think of it, could you post Al Fatiha when you have time?
1. Praise be to Allah, the Lord of the Worlds;
2. The All-Merciful, the Compassionate;
3. Master of the Day of Judgment.
4. You alone do we worship, and Your help alone do we seek.
5. Guide us to the Straight Path;
6. The path of those whom You have favored;
7. Not of those who have incurred Your wrath, nor of those who are astray.
and Al-Ikhlas?
1. Say: "He Allah, is One!
2. Allah, the eternally Besought!
3. He has not begotten, nor been begotten,
3. And equal to Him there is none."
unless you'd like to post Suratul Kahf? :D

i only ask about Al Kahf because i try to read it every Jummua'ah BUT in the English language. :-[
1. Praise be to Allah who has sent down the Book to His servant and has not placed in it any crookedness.
2. [But has made it] straight, to give warning of stern punishment from Him, and to proclaim to the believers who do righteous deeds that they will have an excellent recompense,
3. Wherein they will remain forever.
4. And to warn those who say that Allah has chosen a son,
5. Of this they have no knowledge, nor [had] their fathers. Dreadful is the word that comes out of their mouths. They utter nothing but a lie.
6. It may be that you will torment your soul with grief for their sake, if they do not believe in this Message.

Is there a certain passage that you would really like me to quote?
Reply

جوري
10-19-2008, 01:10 AM
Originally Posted by doorster
is this what you are looking for?

Is this by Muhammad Asad? the former Leopold weiss?

I think his is pretty easy, given that the origial especially Pickthal was a British (Allah yer7amo) and his language is a bit Archaic compared to ASAD who used almost standard American English..

Anyhow, here is an abridged version of ASAD it is for free, before you commit to purchasing it from amazon, where the members have given it a five star review

http://geocities.com/masad02/
Reply

MustafaMc
10-19-2008, 01:15 AM
Originally Posted by Skye Ephémérine
Is this by Muhammad Asad? the former Leopold weiss?
No, it is The Majestic Qur’an by a Translation Committee of Ali Ozek, Nureddin Uzunoglu, and Tevfik R. Topuzoglu and edited by Abdal Hakim Murad, Mostafa al-Badawi and Uthman Hutchinson.
Reply

YusufNoor
10-19-2008, 02:07 AM
Originally Posted by MustafaMc
1. Praise be to Allah, the Lord of the Worlds;
2. The All-Merciful, the Compassionate;
3. Master of the Day of Judgment.
4. You alone do we worship, and Your help alone do we seek.
5. Guide us to the Straight Path;
6. The path of those whom You have favored;
7. Not of those who have incurred Your wrath, nor of those who are astray.1. Say: "He Allah, is One!
2. Allah, the eternally Besought!
3. He has not begotten, nor been begotten,
3. And equal to Him there is none."
1. Praise be to Allah who has sent down the Book to His servant and has not placed in it any crookedness.
2. [But has made it] straight, to give warning of stern punishment from Him, and to proclaim to the believers who do righteous deeds that they will have an excellent recompense,
3. Wherein they will remain forever.
4. And to warn those who say that Allah has chosen a son,
5. Of this they have no knowledge, nor [had] their fathers. Dreadful is the word that comes out of their mouths. They utter nothing but a lie.
6. It may be that you will torment your soul with grief for their sake, if they do not believe in this Message.

Is there a certain passage that you would really like me to quote?
:sl:

JazakAllah Khayr,

how about Ayatal Kursi?

:w:
Reply

MustafaMc
10-19-2008, 02:18 AM
Originally Posted by YusufNoor
:sl:

JazakAllah Khayr,

how about Ayatal Kursi?

:w:
Allah! There is no god but He, the Living, the Sustainer. Neither slumber nor sleep overtakes Him. His is what is in the heavens and what is in the earth. Who can intercede with Him except by His permission? He knows what is before them and behind them, and they grasp only that part of His knowledge He wills. His Pedestal embraces the heavens and the earth, and it tires Him not to uphold them both. He is the High, the Formidable.
Reply

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