PDA

View Full Version : Barack Obama will pledge to heal rift with Islam



Uthman
06-01-2009, 08:22 AM
President Barack Obama will offer a "personal commitment" to bridge differences between the United States and Muslims in a eagerly anticipated speech in Egypt this week.

The address at the University of Cairo on Thursday is the centrepiece of Mr Obama's second overseas tour as president. The trip begins in Saudi Arabia and includes stops at a former concentration camp in Germany and ceremonies in Normandy to mark the D-Day anniversary.

Robert Gibbs, the White House spokesman, said the president would "review particular issues of concern, such as violent extremism and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict" and "discuss new areas for partnership".

"The speech will outline his personal commitment to engagement, based upon mutual interests and mutual respect," he said.

It is intended to be the president's most striking attempt – delivered in the heart of an Arab capital – to reassure Muslims of American goodwill and to repair the damage done to his country's reputation by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the controversial tactics of George W Bush's "war on terror".

The effort started at Mr Obama's inauguration and continued in Istanbul, when he said Islam had nothing to fear from the West.

The president, whose middle name is Hussein, is likely to play up his Muslim associations, having downplayed them for domestic consumption.

Denis McDonough, the deputy national security adviser, said that Mr Obama had "experienced Islam on three continents before he has been able to visit the heart of the Islamic world".

He cited the president's "upbringing" in Indonesia, where he spent four years as a child, and how Muslim Americans were "a key part of Illinois and Chicago", Mr Obama's base.

The president will also hold a meeting with Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian president, and visit a mosque, advisers said.

Mr McDonough said the president would probably stress how "many of the advances that come out of the Muslim world" had benefited Americans.

However, Mr Obama has faced criticism that his efforts to mend fences have so far yielded few results.

His conciliation towards Iran has yet to be reciprocated, while the new Right-wing Israeli government has ignored demands to stop Jewish settlement-building in the Palestinian West Bank. A discreet approach to the North Koreans was rebuffed with a second nuclear weapons test.

Ed Royce, the top Republican congressman on the house foreign affairs committee, said: "It's more important what countries do than what they say, and the Obama administration has overestimated the importance of being liked."

Source
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
Uthman
06-01-2009, 11:40 AM
Barack Obama extends hand of friendship to Muslim world

President Obama will seek to forge a new American relationship with the Muslim world this week during a long-awaited speech in Egypt in which he will heap praise on Islamic culture and give a personal commitment to a new era of co-operation.

The address in Cairo will harness Mr Obama’s own ancestral ties to the religion as he begins the daunting task of reducing the deep mistrust of America felt by many of the world’s one billion Muslims.

The speech will be rich in Mr Obama’s lofty rhetoric but at its core it is guided by a hard-headed, hugely ambitious foreign policy objective: to mobilise support in the Muslim world to help him to achieve peace in the Middle East and an end to Iran’s nuclear weapons programme.

The choice of Egypt is also significant. It has dismayed the country’s dissidents who oppose the autocratic and increasingly unpopular rule of President Mubarak. It reflects Mr Obama’s break with George W. Bush’s “democracy agenda” as he attempts to co-opt moderate Sunni Arab states — even undemocratic ones — against Iran, Islamic terrorism and into greater co-operation with Israel.

White House aides stressed that Mr Obama will be particularly focused on the Muslim world’s youth. “Egypt is, like much of the Muslim world, a young country with a burgeoning younger population that the President looks very much forward to engaging directly in his speech,” said Denis McDonough, Mr Obama’s Deputy National Security Director.

Robert Gibbs, Mr Obama’s press secretary, said that the President “will outline his personal commitment to engagement, based upon mutual interests and mutual respect. He will discuss how the United States and Muslim communities around the world can bridge some of the differences that have divided them.”

Asked if Mr Obama would meet the Egyptian Opposition, Mr McDonough said that the “full range of political actors in Egypt” had been invited to the speech, which will be delivered at the University of Cairo and co-hosted by al-Azhar University, an ancient centre of Islamic scholarship.

Mr Obama, whose Kenyan father was Muslim, lived for several years as a child in predominately-Muslim Indonesia. He pledged during his presidential campaign to improve relations with Muslims after the hostility caused by events such as the Iraq war and the Abu Ghraib prisoner scandal.

White House aides warned that the speech will contain few detailed policy prescriptions for the region. Yet they hope that the simple fact of a black American President with a middle name of Hussein, pledging respect for Islam in a leading Arab country, will generate excitement, and less cynicism, in the Muslim world.

The speech is the latest move by Mr Obama to improve America’s standing with Muslims. He delivered a video message to the Iranian people earlier this year and reassured Muslims that the US was not at war with Islam during a speech inside the Turkish parliament. Thursday’s Cairo address is part of a broader itinerary this week. Mr Obama begins his fourth trip abroad as President with a stop on Wednesday in Saudi Arabia.

He ends the trip in France to commemorate the 65th anniversary of the Normandy invasion, where Gordon Brown and President Sarkozy will also give speeches.

Source
Reply

nocturnal
06-01-2009, 08:51 PM
This is akin to George Bush delivering a speech on diplomacy to a conference of pacifists. He has been in the White House since January 20th, and even though admittedly that is quite ephemeral, surely he had the ability to take some concrete steps towards placating the apprehensions of the Muslim world, especially pertaining to the Palestinian issue.

Inviting Netanyahu and Abbas to Washington, without threatening even nominally to curtail US assistance to israel unless in reverses its policies on settlements, check points, the seige on Gaza and its unhindered extrajudicial killings and arrests of Palestinians.

No one will really be surprised if he steps up to deliver another rousing piece of oratory devoid of any real committment to peace.
Reply

Wyatt
06-03-2009, 12:58 AM
Originally Posted by nocturnal
No one will really be surprised if he steps up to deliver another rousing piece of oratory devoid of any real committment to peace.
:? So, you don't at the least have any enthusiasm that he is not going to use misleading rhetoric to damage the image of Islam?
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
Joe98
06-03-2009, 01:22 AM
Originally Posted by Uthmān
President Barack Obama will offer a "personal commitment" to bridge differences between the United States and Muslims.

Perhaps somebody can tell us what these differences are.

Please list them here for us.

-
Reply

Uthman
06-03-2009, 12:05 PM
Barack Obama says US must lead by example

President Barack Obama has stated that the United States should not lecture other countries on good governance, arguing that it should lead by example to encourage the development of "universal principles" such as freedom of speech and worship.

Speaking on the eve of a major speech in Cairo designed to build bridges with the Muslim world, the US president said that closing the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba was essential to demonstrate that the US remained true to the values it espoused.

"The danger I think is when the United States or any country thinks that we can simply impose these values on another country with a different history and a different culture," he told the BBC.

"Democracy, rule of law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion - those are not simply principles of the West to be hoisted on these countries, but rather what I believe to be universal principles that they can embrace and affirm as part of their national identity," he added.

As he has prepared to travel to Saudi Arabia and then Egypt, critics have asked if the president has placed enough emphasis on encouraging the advance of democracy and liberty in the Arab world and elsewhere, an agenda that inspired his predecessor George W Bush in the first phase of his presidency.

Mr Obama said: "The United States' job is not to lecture, but to encourage, to lift up what we consider to be the values that ultimately will work not just for our country, but for the - the aspirations of a lot of people."

Aware of criticism from some Republicans that he risks surrendering America's global leadership, he added: "I think the thing that we can do most importantly is serve as a good role model."

He resisted the characterisation of his speech as an "apology" for the Bush era, but admitted that no single speech could bring rapid change.

"There are no silver bullets. There are very real policy issues that have to be worked through that are difficult," said Mr Obama, who departs on Tuesday for Riyadh and will speak at Cairo University on Thursday.

Mr Obama insisted that despite early resistance to its call for compromise from the new Right-wing coalition in Israel peace was attainable.

Source
Reply

crayon
06-03-2009, 12:09 PM
He's arrived in Saudi now.. There are US and Saudi flags lining the road to the airport.
Reply

Uthman
06-03-2009, 12:11 PM
Obama's 'I'm not Bush' tour of the Middle East

As he sets off for Saudi Arabia and Egypt, the President is under pressure to make good his pledge to mend a fractured relationship.

President Barack Obama risks being tripped by over-inflated expectations as he departs Washington tonight for a tour that starts with talks with King Abdullah in Saudi Arabia tomorrow but will be dominated by his long-advertised address to the Muslim world in Egypt on Thursday.

It is Mr Obama's second major trans-Atlantic foray, following his visits to the G20 and Nato summits in April. As well as the Middle East, he will dip once more into European diplomacy, visiting the former concentration camp at Buchenwald in Germany and attending weekend ceremonies to mark the 65th anniversary of the D-Day landings. Beyond the pageantry, he is due to hold private bilateral talks with the leaders of France and Germany.

But it is at Cairo University that Mr Obama, while blessed with undoubted rhetorical skills, faces the biggest challenges. He first promised all the way back in 2007 to deliver an address to the world's 1.5 billion Muslims if he were to become President. This will be that moment, even though he gave something of a preview when he spoke of a new era of "mutual respect" between Muslims and the US in Istanbul at the end of his last trip.

Aides have been working to downplay expectations, insisting that the speech will include no new concrete initiatives and will be more general in nature. "I want to use the occasion to deliver a broader message about how the United States can change for the better its relationship with the Muslim world," Mr Obama said last week after meeting the Palestinian President, Mahmoud Abbas, in Washington.

This all on its own may disappoint Muslims in the Arab world and beyond, who are looking for evidence of real change from an America that many grew to despise during the Bush years, when its military invaded Afghanistan and Iraq and was exposed for prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib prison.

The President is certain to try to separate himself from George Bush, if only by stressing his own personal connections to the Islamic world, such as having people of the Muslim faith in his own family, including his late father from Kenya, and spending part of his childhood in Indonesia, the most populous Muslim nation in the world.

But in Cairo, where an extraordinary security clampdown is taking place ahead of his visit, Mr Obama will find himself pursuing several goals at once. His audience will want to hear first what he can do to revive still-stalled progress towards an Israeli-Palestinian settlement. Imparting new momentum towards attaining a two-state solution will be the focus of his talks tomorrow in Riyadh as they were at meetings with regional leaders including the Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, and President Abbas at the White House in recent weeks.

But Mr Obama will also be seeking a regional consensus in the Middle East on dealing with the nuclear ambitions of Iran and countering the threat of extremist terrorism within groups like the Taliban and al-Qa'ida.

The President also faces dilemmas born of his decision to deliver the speech in Cairo, which is historically the cradle of Islamic intellectual thought. He will be aware of the record of his host, President Hosni Mubarak, in repressing political freedoms during the 28 years of his rule.

The White House this week said that among those invited to attend his speech will be "political actors" in Egypt, a list that is likely to include activists who are opposed to President Mubarak's regime.

The danger that Mr Obama will disappoint is widely recognised. "The best he could hope to accomplish is to move Arab public opinion about the United States and make it easier for their governments to work with Washington. We need it for our general influence in the area," noted Elliott Abrams, from the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

Handicapping Mr Obama will be the absence of any real evidence that he is succeeding in moving the Israeli-Palestinian peace process forward. He has notably failed, for example, to persuade Israel to stop construction of new settlements in the occupied West Bank, even after the glad-handing with Mr Netanyahu at the White House.

"How the United States addresses the conflict is how citizens of the region are likely to regard the United States," said Steve Grand, an expert on US-Islamic relations at the Brookings Institution. Mr Obama, he went on, "has been great at a rhetorical level, but he has to provide details about what the United States is going to concretely do to reach out to the Muslim world."

The security apparatus of Egypt is on high alert. To prepare for Thursday's visit by Mr Obama, it has conducted a huge security sweep of the streets that the motorcade will travel on the way to the university campus.

"It's a massive security operation, the biggest we have seen yet," a security official in Egypt said yesterday. Hundreds of students have also been rounded up for questioning ahead of the speech.

Since taking office, Mr Obama has taken steps designed to ease suspicions of the US in the Muslim world, including his order on his first day in office to close the Guantanamo complex within one year.

The first television interview he gave after taking office was to the Arab-language network Al-Arabiya. He recorded a video message speaking directly to the Iranian people to mark Nowruz, the Iranian New Year, and has made overtures to the regime in Tehran about improving relations and ending the nuclear stand-off.

Source
Reply

Uthman
06-03-2009, 12:17 PM
Obama interview to the BBC: Video

Obama interview to the BBC: the transcript
Reply

Uthman
06-03-2009, 12:52 PM
Comment by Tariq Ramadan:

Action must follow Obama's words

Obama's speech to Muslims will mean little if its symbolism is not followed up by concrete measures to restore trust.

The relationship between the United States and Muslims has been so damaged after eight years of the Bush administration that the whole world is now wondering: what is Barack Obama going to say to Muslims? What should he say to restore confidence and trust?

First it's necessary to analyse the main causes of the deep mistrust we find today, not only in Muslim majority countries, but among African, Asian and western Muslims as well. For decades, and especially since the 11 September 2001, Muslims around the world have been getting messages from the US that are disturbing in both their substance and their form.

The former president, George W Bush, was perceived as aggressive, often arrogant, narrow-minded and even deaf when he had to tackle Islamic issues and matters related to Muslim majority countries or the Middle East. Beyond his words of respect, Muslims always kept in mind his first spontaneous religious references to a "crusade" and the "axis of evil". The "war on terror", the bombing of Afghanistan, the invasion of Iraq, the lies about weapons of mass destruction, the extraordinary renditions and the evidence of torture that came to light have had a cumulative effect in testifying that Muslims' lives and dignity seemed to be of almost no value. Beyond Bush's rhetoric, his administration showed neither respect nor any sense of justice towards Muslims, and its blind and unilateral support of Israel added to this testimony.

Barack Obama has this legacy to reverse. In talking to the Muslims, he should talk to the US and the west as well, for the scars of mistrust are deep. Obama has been very smart and cautious in delivering his political messages during the first months of his presidency. He repeatedly expressed his respect towards Islam and Muslims, announcing the closure of Guantanamo and cessation of torture and even becoming tougher towards the Israeli government regarding settlements. These are positive steps one should not deny.

Yet, symbolic acts and speeches are not enough. What we expect from the new president is effective and necessary action as well as a change in attitude. Humility is a key factor. In our global age, the United States might still be the most powerful nation in the world, but it does not have the monopoly on what is good and right. Being open to the world starts with being open to all civilisations and by acknowledging the potential positive contribution of every religion and culture. Islam is a great civilisation and Barack Obama should bring a message of true and deep respect by announcing that we all have to learn from each other and that he will commit himself to spreading knowledge of cultural and religious diversity in the United States itself. Humility means we all have to learn from one another and America should be ready to learn from Islam and Muslims as well as from the Hindus or the Buddhists. Paradoxically, how Obama intends to deal with education and religious diversity at home will be the true indicator of his real policy towards Islam and Muslims in the world.

No civilisation can claim to have a monopoly on universal values and no one can claim to be always faithful to his own values. President Obama must stress the ideal values and human rights the United States stands for but he has also to acknowledge mistakes, failures and contradictions when it comes to their implementation. Lack of consistency is a weakness shared by all nations. The best way for the president to be heard when he calls for human rights and democratisation and announces the start of a new era in relations with Muslims would be to start by being constructively self-critical and acknowledging that the US can and will do much better in respecting the values it stands for. It should do so by implementing just policies towards the Muslim world and poor countries. This humble attitude, based on the imperative duty of consistency, is not a position of weakness but the exact opposite: in this way, Obama can remind leaders as well as ordinary Muslims of their own inconsistencies and duties. Only a consistent and self-critical US president can remind Muslims that they have to act against corruption, extremism, dictatorships, lack of educational policies, discrimination towards women and poor people and be heard with a minimum of trust.

Muslims are waiting for action and they know from experience (with the US as well as with their own governments) that politicians are good at words. Barack Obama has a very special status today in the world and especially in the Muslim world. He is one of the only US presidents who has had both the background and the capacity to be more than simply a symbol spreading beautiful words. It would be sad to lose this historic opportunity and one must hope he has a vision and an efficient strategy for his country and the world. On domestic issues, when it comes to discrimination, security, immigration and equal opportunities, Barack Obama must help us to forget that he is African-American by promoting promote equal rights and justice. At the international level he should help us forget that his father was a Muslim by refusing to be shy or apologetic and respecting the rights of both individuals and populations in Palestine, Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere. The message he is to send to Muslims should come from a president positioning himself beyond specific colour and religious belonging with humility, consistency and respect. While delivering his speech he should make it clear that after many years of deafness in Washington, he has begun to listen.

Source

Tariq Ramadan is a Professor of Islamic Studies. He teaches at Oxford and at Erasmus University.
Reply

Sister_Zee
06-03-2009, 02:49 PM
Salaam,

Every new US president comes up with a "new plan" for this region though it is not new the tactics simply change. He will not give this region back its rights because that is against Israeli interest.
Reply

Intisar
06-03-2009, 02:58 PM
:sl: In out ear, and out the other.

Personally, I think the zionists (who obviously control America) helped get Barack to the presidency so it can set a precedent for them. It'll make it easier for a Jew to become president since an African-American already was one. Kind of like, you scratch my back, I scratch yours.

He doesn't care about the Muslims, he only wants to change the image of America in the eyes of the rest of the world. Because of Bush everyone thinks Americans are: dumb, fat and bigots who have an extreme dislike for Muslims.
Reply

Keltoi
06-03-2009, 10:10 PM
Obama and the current Israeli government do not see eye to eye on much at all. Obama has called for an end to settlements and Netanyahu supports them, for example. That, however, doesn't mean the U.S. and Israel will or should become enemies. That wouldn't help anyone. Especially not the Palestinians.
Reply

IbnAbdulHakim
06-03-2009, 10:12 PM
i do not trust that man


i do not trust him at all


not one bit, no sir, NOT AT ALL
Reply

NYCmuslim
06-04-2009, 12:35 PM
I dont trust him one bit.

How can he deliver such a speech when he is spreading wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Not to mention there are still troops in Iraq.

A two-state solution is not in the interest of the zionists. Actions speak louder than words. I've had enough of Obama's fancy oratories.

Peace
:w:
Reply

Whatsthepoint
06-04-2009, 04:02 PM
Originally Posted by Keltoi
Obama and the current Israeli government do not see eye to eye on much at all. Obama has called for an end to settlements and Netanyahu supports them, for example. That, however, doesn't mean the U.S. and Israel will or should become enemies. That wouldn't help anyone. Especially not the Palestinians.
But the fact is that Isarel cannot do without you so if the US took a tougher stance on them, they'd eventually have to obey.
Reply

Zafran
06-04-2009, 05:27 PM
salaam

lets see how Obama lives up to his words.
Reply

Wyatt
06-04-2009, 07:09 PM
I am watching it right now. :D I quite like it.

He is speaking very well, even though he said "hajib" instead of "hijab". :rollseyes
Reply

north_malaysian
06-04-2009, 09:03 PM
I think that his speech was so impressive... :D
Reply

GreyKode
06-04-2009, 09:34 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
I think that his speech was so impressive... :D
What was so impressive about it?.
Reply

Tony
06-04-2009, 09:38 PM
Originally Posted by Ameena*
:sl: In out ear, and out the other.

Personally, I think the zionists (who obviously control America) helped get Barack to the presidency so it can set a precedent for them. It'll make it easier for a Jew to become president since an African-American already was one. Kind of like, you scratch my back, I scratch yours.

He doesn't care about the Muslims, he only wants to change the image of America in the eyes of the rest of the world. Because of Bush everyone thinks Americans are: dumb, fat and bigots who have an extreme dislike for Muslims.
yes he was far too honest
Reply

glo
06-04-2009, 09:48 PM
Originally Posted by TKTony
yes he was far too honest
How can somebody be 'too honest'?
What do you mean by that? :? Do you think he is insincere?
Reply

HopeFul
06-04-2009, 09:51 PM
He is all words, so that he can appear nice and peaceful but do as he wants, and no one will beable to confront or accuse them as he would be widely known as a nice person.

I dont trust him and I wont like ANY US president, perhaps, EVER!
Reply

Trumble
06-04-2009, 10:13 PM
Originally Posted by nocturnal
Inviting Netanyahu and Abbas to Washington, without threatening even nominally to curtail US assistance to israel unless in reverses its policies on settlements, check points, the seige on Gaza and its unhindered extrajudicial killings and arrests of Palestinians.
How do you know he hasn't made such threats? Only a clueless idiot would make such threats in public at this stage, and Obama doesn't come across to me as a clueless idiot.

I do agree that is the only way progress will be made, though, certainly with the current Israeli administration.
Reply

Hamayun
06-04-2009, 10:20 PM
I see a ray of hope.

I think as Muslims we should give him a chance before making accusations.

Peace.
Reply

Zafran
06-04-2009, 10:21 PM
Originally Posted by Hamayun
I see a ray of hope.

I think as Muslims we should give him a chance before making accusations.

Peace.
salaam

I agree - you cant realy expect a lot from any president but Obama is going in the right direction.
Reply

north_malaysian
06-05-2009, 07:45 AM
Originally Posted by GreyKode
What was so impressive about it?.
well ... how many american presidents greeted "assalamualaikum" and quoted verses from Koran...:D

I dont know why... but I felt that... this is the guy who really want to make it right ... I mean, the relationship between usa and the muslim world...
Reply

north_malaysian
06-05-2009, 08:08 AM
Remarks of President Barack Obama
June 4, 2009
Cairo University

Cairo, Egypt
Thank you very much. Good afternoon. I am honored to be in the timeless city of Cairo, and to be hosted by two remarkable institutions. For over a thousand years, Al-Azhar has stood as a beacon of Islamic learning; and for over a century, Cairo University has been a source of Egypt's advancement. And together, you represent the harmony between tradition and progress. I'm grateful for your hospitality, and the hospitality of the people of Egypt. And I'm also proud to carry with me the goodwill of the American people, and a greeting of peace from Muslim communities in my country: Assalaamu alaykum.


We meet at a time of great tension between the United States and Muslims around the world—tension rooted in historical forces that go beyond any current policy debate. The relationship between Islam and the West includes centuries of coexistence and cooperation, but also conflict and religious wars. More recently, tension has been fed by colonialism that denied rights and opportunities to many Muslims, and a Cold War in which Muslim-majority countries were too often treated as proxies without regard to their own aspirations. Moreover, the sweeping change brought by modernity and globalization led many Muslims to view the West as hostile to the traditions of Islam.

Violent extremists have exploited these tensions in a small but potent minority of Muslims. The attacks of September 11, 2001 and the continued efforts of these extremists to engage in violence against civilians has led some in my country to view Islam as inevitably hostile not only to America and Western countries, but also to human rights. All this has bred more fear and more mistrust.

So long as our relationship is defined by our differences, we will empower those who sow hatred rather than peace, those who promote conflict rather than the cooperation that can help all of our people achieve justice and prosperity. And this cycle of suspicion and discord must end.

I've come here to Cairo to seek a new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world, one based on mutual interest and mutual respect, and one based upon the truth that America and Islam are not exclusive and need not be in competition. Instead, they overlap, and share common principles—principles of justice and progress; tolerance and the dignity of all human beings.

I do so recognizing that change cannot happen overnight. I know there's been a lot of publicity about this speech, but no single speech can eradicate years of mistrust, nor can I answer in the time that I have this afternoon all the complex questions that brought us to this point. But I am convinced that in order to move forward, we must say openly to each other the things we hold in our hearts and that too often are said only behind closed doors. There must be a sustained effort to listen to each other; to learn from each other; to respect one another; and to seek common ground. As the Holy Koran tells us, "Be conscious of God and speak always the truth." That is what I will try to do today—to speak the truth as best I can, humbled by the task before us, and firm in my belief that the interests we share as human beings are far more powerful than the forces that drive us apart.

Now part of this conviction is rooted in my own experience. I'm a Christian, but my father came from a Kenyan family that includes generations of Muslims. As a boy, I spent several years in Indonesia and heard the call of the azaan at the break of dawn and at the fall of dusk. As a young man, I worked in Chicago communities where many found dignity and peace in their Muslim faith.

As a student of history, I also know civilization's debt to Islam. It was Islam—at places like Al-Azhar—that carried the light of learning through so many centuries, paving the way for Europe's Renaissance and Enlightenment. It was innovation in Muslim communities it was innovation in Muslim communities that developed the order of algebra; our magnetic compass and tools of navigation; our mastery of pens and printing; our understanding of how disease spreads and how it can be healed. Islamic culture has given us majestic arches and soaring spires; timeless poetry and cherished music; elegant calligraphy and places of peaceful contemplation. And throughout history, Islam has demonstrated through words and deeds the possibilities of religious tolerance and racial equality.

I also know that Islam has always been a part of America's story. The first nation to recognize my country was Morocco. In signing the Treaty of Tripoli in 1796, our second President, John Adams, wrote, "The United States has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Muslims." And since our founding, American Muslims have enriched the United States. They have fought in our wars, they have served in our government, they have stood for civil rights, they have started businesses, they have taught at our universities, they've excelled in our sports arenas, they've won Nobel Prizes, built our tallest building, and lit the Olympic Torch. And when the first Muslim American was recently elected to Congress, he took the oath to defend our Constitution using the same Holy Koran that one of our Founding Fathers—Thomas Jefferson—kept in his personal library.

So I have known Islam on three continents before coming to the region where it was first revealed. That experience guides my conviction that partnership between America and Islam must be based on what Islam is, not what it isn't. And I consider it part of my responsibility as President of the United States to fight against negative stereotypes of Islam wherever they appear.

But that same principle must apply to Muslim perceptions of America. Just as Muslims do not fit a crude stereotype, America is not the crude stereotype of a self-interested empire. The United States has been one of the greatest sources of progress that the world has ever known. We were born out of revolution against an empire. We were founded upon the ideal that all are created equal, and we have shed blood and struggled for centuries to give meaning to those words—within our borders, and around the world. We are shaped by every culture, drawn from every end of the Earth, and dedicated to a simple concept: E pluribus unum—"Out of many, one."

Now, much has been made of the fact that an African American with the name Barack Hussein Obama could be elected President. But my personal story is not so unique. The dream of opportunity for all people has not come true for everyone in America, but its promise exists for all who come to our shoresand that includes nearly 7 million American Muslims in our country today who, by the way, enjoy incomes and educational levels that are higher than the American average.

Moreover, freedom in America is indivisible from the freedom to practice one's religion. That is why there is a mosque in every state in our union, and over 1,200 mosques within our borders. That's why the United States government has gone to court to protect the right of women and girls to wear the hijab and to punish those who would deny it.

So let there be no doubt: Islam is a part of America. And I believe that America holds within her the truth that regardless of race, religion, or station in life, all of us share common aspirations—to live in peace and security; to get an education and to work with dignity; to love our families, our communities, and our God. These things we share. This is the hope of all humanity.

Of course, recognizing our common humanity is only the beginning of our task. Words alone cannot meet the needs of our people. These needs will be met only if we act boldly in the years ahead; and if we understand that the challenges we face are shared, and our failure to meet them will hurt us all.

For we have learned from recent experience that when a financial system weakens in one country, prosperity is hurt everywhere. When a new flu infects one human being, all are at risk. When one nation pursues a nuclear weapon, the risk of nuclear attack rises for all nations. When violent extremists operate in one stretch of mountains, people are endangered across an ocean. When innocents in Bosnia and Darfur are slaughtered, that is a stain on our collective conscience. That is what it means to share this world in the 21st century. That is the responsibility we have to one another as human beings.

And this is a difficult responsibility to embrace. For human history has often been a record of nations and tribes—and, yes, religions—subjugating one another in pursuit of their own interests. Yet in this new age, such attitudes are self-defeating. Given our interdependence, any world order that elevates one nation or group of people over another will inevitably fail. So whatever we think of the past, we must not be prisoners to it. Our problems must be dealt with through partnership; our progress must be shared.

Now, that does not mean we should ignore sources of tension. Indeed, it suggests the opposite: We must face these tensions squarely. And so in that spirit, let me speak as clearly and as plainly as I can about some specific issues that I believe we must finally confront together.
The first issue that we have to confront is violent extremism in all of its forms.

In Ankara, I made clear that America is not—and never will be—at war with Islam. We will, however, relentlessly confront violent extremists who pose a grave threat to our security—because we reject the same thing that people of all faiths reject: the killing of innocent men, women, and children. And it is my first duty as President to protect the American people.

The situation in Afghanistan demonstrates America's goals, and our need to work together. Over seven years ago, the United States pursued al Qaeda and the Taliban with broad international support. We did not go by choice; we went because of necessity. I'm aware that there's still some who would question or even justify the events of 9/11. But let us be clear: Al Qaeda killed nearly 3,000 people on that day. The victims were innocent men, women and children from America and many other nations who had done nothing to harm anybody. And yet al Qaeda chose to ruthlessly murder these people, claimed credit for the attack, and even now states their determination to kill on a massive scale. They have affiliates in many countries and are trying to expand their reach. These are not opinions to be debated; these are facts to be dealt with.

Now, make no mistake: We do not want to keep our troops in Afghanistan. We see no military—we seek no military bases there. It is agonizing for America to lose our young men and women. It is costly and politically difficult to continue this conflict. We would gladly bring every single one of our troops home if we could be confident that there were not violent extremists in Afghanistan and now Pakistan determined to kill as many Americans as they possibly can. But that is not yet the case.

And that's why we're partnering with a coalition of 46 countries. And despite the costs involved, America's commitment will not weaken. Indeed, none of us should tolerate these extremists. They have killed in many countries. They have killed people of different faiths—but more than any other, they have killed Muslims. Their actions are irreconcilable with the rights of human beings, the progress of nations, and with Islam. The Holy Koran teaches that whoever kills an innocent is as—it is as if he has killed all mankind. And the Holy Koran also says whoever saves a person, it is as if he has saved all mankind. The enduring faith of over a billion people is so much bigger than the narrow hatred of a few. Islam is not part of the problem in combating violent extremism—it is an important part of promoting peace.

Now, we also know that military power alone is not going to solve the problems in Afghanistan and Pakistan. That's why we plan to invest $1.5 billion each year over the next five years to partner with Pakistanis to build schools and hospitals, roads and businesses, and hundreds of millions to help those who've been displaced. That's why we are providing more than $2.8 billion to help Afghans develop their economy and deliver services that people depend on.

Let me also address the issue of Iraq. Unlike Afghanistan, Iraq was a war of choice that provoked strong differences in my country and around the world. Although I believe that the Iraqi people are ultimately better off without the tyranny of Saddam Hussein, I also believe that events in Iraq have reminded America of the need to use diplomacy and build international consensus to resolve our problems whenever possible.

Indeed, we can recall the words of Thomas Jefferson, who said: "I hope that our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us that the less we use our power the greater it will be."

Today, America has a dual responsibility: to help Iraq forge a better future—and to leave Iraq to Iraqis. And I have made it clear to the Iraqi people—I have made it clear to the Iraqi people that we pursue no bases, and no claim on their territory or resources. Iraq's sovereignty is its own.

And that's why I ordered the removal of our combat brigades by next August. That is why we will honor our agreement with Iraq's democratically elected government to remove combat troops from Iraqi cities by July, and to remove all of our troops from Iraq by 2012. We will help Iraq train its security forces and develop its economy. But we will support a secure and united Iraq as a partner, and never as a patron.
And finally, just as America can never tolerate violence by extremists, we must never alter or forget our principles. Nine-eleven was an enormous trauma to our country. The fear and anger that it provoked was understandable, but in some cases, it led us to act contrary to our traditions and our ideals. We are taking concrete actions to change course. I have unequivocally prohibited the use of torture by the United States, and I have ordered the prison at Guantanamo Bay closed by early next year.

So America will defend itself, respectful of the sovereignty of nations and the rule of law. And we will do so in partnership with Muslim communities which are also threatened. The sooner the extremists are isolated and unwelcome in Muslim communities, the sooner we will all be safer.
The second major source of tension that we need to discuss is the situation between Israelis, Palestinians and the Arab world.

America's strong bonds with Israel are well known. This bond is unbreakable. It is based upon cultural and historical ties, and the recognition that the aspiration for a Jewish homeland is rooted in a tragic history that cannot be denied.

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust.

Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed—more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, it is ignorant, and it is hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction—or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews—is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people—Muslims and Christians—have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than 60 years they've endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations—large and small—that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: The situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. And America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

For decades then, there has been a stalemate: two peoples with legitimate aspirations, each with a painful history that makes compromise elusive. It's easy to point fingers—for Palestinians to point to the displacement brought about by Israel's founding, and for Israelis to point to the constant hostility and attacks throughout its history from within its borders as well as beyond. But if we see this conflict only from one side or the other, then we will be blind to the truth: The only resolution is for the aspirations of both sides to be met through two states, where Israelis and Palestinians each live in peace and security.

That is in Israel's interest, Palestine's interest, America's interest, and the world's interest. And that is why I intend to personally pursue this outcome with all the patience and dedication that the task requires. The obligations—the obligations that the parties have agreed to under the road map are clear. For peace to come, it is time for them—and all of us—to live up to our responsibilities.

Palestinians must abandon violence. Resistance through violence and killing is wrong and it does not succeed. For centuries, black people in America suffered the lash of the whip as slaves and the humiliation of segregation. But it was not violence that won full and equal rights. It was a peaceful and determined insistence upon the ideals at the center of America's founding. This same story can be told by people from South Africa to South Asia; from Eastern Europe to Indonesia. It's a story with a simple truth: that violence is a dead end. It is a sign neither of courage nor power to shoot rockets at sleeping children, or to blow up old women on a bus. That's not how moral authority is claimed; that's how it is surrendered.

Now is the time for Palestinians to focus on what they can build. The Palestinian Authority must develop its capacity to govern, with institutions that serve the needs of its people. Hamas does have support among some Palestinians, but they also have to recognize they have responsibilities. To play a role in fulfilling Palestinian aspirations, to unify the Palestinian people, Hamas must put an end to violence, recognize past agreements, recognize Israel right to exist.

At the same time, Israelis must acknowledge that just as Israel's right to exist cannot be denied, neither can Palestine's. The United States does not accept the legitimacy of continued Israeli settlements. This construction violates previous agreements and undermines efforts to achieve peace. It is time for these settlements to stop.

And Israel must also live up to its obligation to ensure that Palestinians can live and work and develop their society. Just as it devastates Palestinian families, the continuing humanitarian crisis in Gaza does not serve Israel's security; neither does the continuing lack of opportunity in the West Bank. Progress in the daily lives of the Palestinian people must be a critical part of a road to peace, and Israel must take concrete steps to enable such progress.

And finally, the Arab states must recognize that the Arab Peace Initiative was an important beginning, but not the end of their responsibilities. The Arab-Israeli conflict should no longer be used to distract the people of Arab nations from other problems. Instead, it must be a cause for action to help the Palestinian people develop the institutions that will sustain their state, to recognize Israel's legitimacy, and to choose progress over a self-defeating focus on the past.

America will align our policies with those who pursue peace, and we will say in public what we say in private to Israelis and Palestinians and Arabs. We cannot impose peace. But privately, many Muslims recognize that Israel will not go away. Likewise, many Israelis recognize the need for a Palestinian state. It is time for us to act on what everyone knows to be true.

Too many tears have been shed. Too much blood has been shed. All of us have a responsibility to work for the day when the mothers of Israelis and Palestinians can see their children grow up without fear; when the Holy Land of the three great faiths is the place of peace that God intended it to be; when Jerusalem is a secure and lasting home for Jews and Christians and Muslims, and a place for all of the children of Abraham to mingle peacefully together as in the story of Isra—as in the story of Isra, when Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed, peace be upon them, joined in prayer.

The third source of tension is our shared interest in the rights and responsibilities of nations on nuclear weapons.

This issue has been a source of tension between the United States and the Islamic Republic of Iran. For many years, Iran has defined itself in part by its opposition to my country, and there is in fact a tumultuous history between us. In the middle of the Cold War, the United States played a role in the overthrow of a democratically elected Iranian government.

Since the Islamic Revolution, Iran has played a role in acts of hostage-taking and violence against U.S. troops and civilians. This history is well known. Rather than remain trapped in the past, I've made it clear to Iran's leaders and people that my country is prepared to move forward. The question now is not what Iran is against, but rather what future it wants to build.

I recognize it will be hard to overcome decades of mistrust, but we will proceed with courage, rectitude, and resolve. There will be many issues to discuss between our two countries, and we are willing to move forward without preconditions on the basis of mutual respect. But it is clear to all concerned that when it comes to nuclear weapons, we have reached a decisive point. This is not simply about America's interests. It's about preventing a nuclear arms race in the Middle East that could lead this region and the world down a hugely dangerous path.

I understand those who protest that some countries have weapons that others do not. No single nation should pick and choose which nation holds nuclear weapons. And that's why I strongly reaffirmed America's commitment to seek a world in which no nations hold nuclear weapons.

And any nation—including Iran—should have the right to access peaceful nuclear power if it complies with its responsibilities under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. That commitment is at the core of the treaty, and it must be kept for all who fully abide by it. And I'm hopeful that all countries in the region can share in this goal.

The fourth issue that I will address is democracy.

I know—I know there has been controversy about the promotion of democracy in recent years, and much of this controversy is connected to the war in Iraq. So let me be clear: No system of government can or should be imposed by one nation by any other.

That does not lessen my commitment, however, to governments that reflect the will of the people. Each nation gives life to this principle in its own way, grounded in the traditions of its own people. America does not presume to know what is best for everyone, just as we would not presume to pick the outcome of a peaceful election. But I do have an unyielding belief that all people yearn for certain things: the ability to speak your mind and have a say in how you are governed; confidence in the rule of law and the equal administration of justice; government that is transparent and doesn't steal from the people; the freedom to live as you choose. These are not just American ideas; they are human rights. And that is why we will support them everywhere.

Now, there is no straight line to realize this promise. But this much is clear: Governments that protect these rights are ultimately more stable, successful and secure. Suppressing ideas never succeeds in making them go away. America respects the right of all peaceful and law-abiding voices to be heard around the world, even if we disagree with them. And we will welcome all elected, peaceful governments—provided they govern with respect for all their people.

This last point is important because there are some who advocate for democracy only when they're out of power; once in power, they are ruthless in suppressing the rights of others. So no matter where it takes hold, government of the people and by the people sets a single standard for all who would hold power: You must maintain your power through consent, not coercion; you must respect the rights of minorities, and participate with a spirit of tolerance and compromise; you must place the interests of your people and the legitimate workings of the political process above your party. Without these ingredients, elections alone do not make true democracy.

AUDIENCE MEMBER: Barack Obama, we love you!

Thank you. The fifth issue that we must address together is religious freedom.

Islam has a proud tradition of tolerance. We see it in the history of Andalusia and Cordoba during the Inquisition. I saw it firsthand as a child in Indonesia, where devout Christians worshiped freely in an overwhelmingly Muslim country. That is the spirit we need today. People in every country should be free to choose and live their faith based upon the persuasion of the mind and the heart and the soul. This tolerance is essential for religion to thrive, but it's being challenged in many different ways.

Among some Muslims, there's a disturbing tendency to measure one's own faith by the rejection of somebody else's faith. The richness of religious diversity must be upheld—whether it is for Maronites in Lebanon or the Copts in Egypt. And if we are being honest, fault lines must be closed among Muslims, as well, as the divisions between Sunni and Shia have led to tragic violence, particularly in Iraq.

Freedom of religion is central to the ability of peoples to live together. We must always examine the ways in which we protect it. For instance, in the United States, rules on charitable giving have made it harder for Muslims to fulfill their religious obligation. That's why I'm committed to working with American Muslims to ensure that they can fulfill zakat.

Likewise, it is important for Western countries to avoid impeding Muslim citizens from practicing religion as they see fit— for instance, by dictating what clothes a Muslim woman should wear. We can't disguise hostility towards any religion behind the pretence of liberalism.

In fact, faith should bring us together. And that's why we're forging service projects in America to bring together Christians, Muslims, and Jews. That's why we welcome efforts like Saudi Arabian King Abdullah's interfaith dialogue and Turkey's leadership in the Alliance of Civilizations. Around the world, we can turn dialogue into interfaith service, so bridges between peoples lead to action—whether it is combating malaria in Africa, or providing relief after a natural disaster.

The sixth issue—the sixth issue that I want to address is women's rights. I know—I know—and you can tell from this audience, that there is a healthy debate about this issue. I reject the view of some in the West that a woman who chooses to cover her hair is somehow less equal, but I do believe that a woman who is denied an education is denied equality. And it is no coincidence that countries where women are well educated are far more likely to be prosperous.

Now, let me be clear: Issues of women's equality are by no means simply an issue for Islam. In Turkey, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, we've seen Muslim-majority countries elect a woman to lead. Meanwhile, the struggle for women's equality continues in many aspects of American life, and in countries around the world.

I am convinced that our daughters can contribute just as much to society as our sons. Our common prosperity will be advanced by allowing all humanity—men and women—to reach their full potential. I do not believe that women must make the same choices as men in order to be equal, and I respect those women who choose to live their lives in traditional roles. But it should be their choice. And that is why the United States will partner with any Muslim-majority country to support expanded literacy for girls, and to help young women pursue employment through micro-financing that helps people live their dreams.

Finally, I want to discuss economic development and opportunity.
I know that for many, the face of globalization is contradictory. The Internet and television can bring knowledge and information, but also offensive sexuality and mindless violence into the home. Trade can bring new wealth and opportunities, but also huge disruptions and change in communities. In all nations—including America—this change can bring fear. Fear that because of modernity we lose control over our economic choices, our politics, and most importantly our identities—those things we most cherish about our communities, our families, our traditions, and our faith.

But I also know that human progress cannot be denied. There need not be contradictions between development and tradition. Countries like Japan and South Korea grew their economies enormously while maintaining distinct cultures. The same is true for the astonishing progress within Muslim-majority countries from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai. In ancient times and in our times, Muslim communities have been at the forefront of innovation and education.

And this is important because no development strategy can be based only upon what comes out of the ground, nor can it be sustained while young people are out of work. Many Gulf states have enjoyed great wealth as a consequence of oil, and some are beginning to focus it on broader development. But all of us must recognize that education and innovation will be the currency of the 21st century and in too many Muslim communities, there remains underinvestment in these areas. I'm emphasizing such investment within my own country. And while America in the past has focused on oil and gas when it comes to this part of the world, we now seek a broader engagement.

On education, we will expand exchange programs, and increase scholarships, like the one that brought my father to America. At the same time, we will encourage more Americans to study in Muslim communities. And we will match promising Muslim students with internships in America; invest in online learning for teachers and children around the world; and create a new online network, so a young person in Kansas can communicate instantly with a young person in Cairo.

On economic development, we will create a new corps of business volunteers to partner with counterparts in Muslim-majority countries. And I will host a Summit on Entrepreneurship this year to identify how we can deepen ties between business leaders, foundations and social entrepreneurs in the United States and Muslim communities around the world.

On science and technology, we will launch a new fund to support technological development in Muslim-majority countries, and to help transfer ideas to the marketplace so they can create more jobs. We'll open centers of scientific excellence in Africa, the Middle East and Southeast Asia, and appoint new science envoys to collaborate on programs that develop new sources of energy, create green jobs, digitize records, clean water, grow new crops. Today I'm announcing a new global effort with the Organization of the Islamic Conference to eradicate polio. And we will also expand partnerships with Muslim communities to promote child and maternal health.

All these things must be done in partnership. Americans are ready to join with citizens and governments; community organizations, religious leaders, and businesses in Muslim communities around the world to help our people pursue a better life.

The issues that I have described will not be easy to address. But we have a responsibility to join together on behalf of the world that we seek—a world where extremists no longer threaten our people, and American troops have come home; a world where Israelis and Palestinians are each secure in a state of their own, and nuclear energy is used for peaceful purposes; a world where governments serve their citizens, and the rights of all God's children are respected. Those are mutual interests. That is the world we seek. But we can only achieve it together.

I know there are many—Muslim and non-Muslim—who question whether we can forge this new beginning. Some are eager to stoke the flames of division, and to stand in the way of progress. Some suggest that it isn't worth the effort—that we are fated to disagree, and civilizations are doomed to clash. Many more are simply skeptical that real change can occur. There's so much fear, so much mistrust that has built up over the years. But if we choose to be bound by the past, we will never move forward. And I want to particularly say this to young people of every faith, in every country—you, more than anyone, have the ability to reimagine the world, to remake this world.

All of us share this world for but a brief moment in time. The question is whether we spend that time focused on what pushes us apart, or whether we commit ourselves to an effort—a sustained effort—to find common ground, to focus on the future we seek for our children, and to respect the dignity of all human beings.

It's easier to start wars than to end them. It's easier to blame others than to look inward. It's easier to see what is different about someone than to find the things we share. But we should choose the right path, not just the easy path. There's one rule that lies at the heart of every religion—that we do unto others as we would have them do unto us. This truth transcends nations and peoples—a belief that isn't new; that isn't black or white or brown; that isn't Christian or Muslim or Jew. It's a belief that pulsed in the cradle of civilization, and that still beats in the hearts of billions around the world. It's a faith in other people, and it's what brought me here today.

We have the power to make the world we seek, but only if we have the courage to make a new beginning, keeping in mind what has been written.

The Holy Koran tells us: "O mankind! We have created you male and a female; and we have made you into nations and tribes so that you may know one another."

The Talmud tells us: "The whole of the Torah is for the purpose of promoting peace."

The Holy Bible tells us: "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God."

The people of the world can live together in peace. We know that is God's vision. Now that must be our work here on Earth.

Thank you. And may God's peace be upon you. Thank you very much. Thank you.

http://www.usnews.com/articles/news/...niversity.html
Reply

salafy_masry
06-05-2009, 08:59 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
I think that his speech was so impressive... :D
Salam alikum

إِنَّا أَرْسَلْنَاكَ بِالْحَقِّ بَشِيرًا وَنَذِيرًا ۖ وَلَا تُسْأَلُ عَنْ أَصْحَابِ الْجَحِيمِ (119)

وَلَنْ تَرْضَىٰ عَنْكَ الْيَهُودُ وَلَا النَّصَارَىٰ حَتَّىٰ تَتَّبِعَ مِلَّتَهُمْ ۗ قُلْ إِنَّ هُدَى اللَّهِ هُوَ الْهُدَىٰ ۗ وَلَئِنِ اتَّبَعْتَ أَهْوَاءَهُمْ بَعْدَ الَّذِي جَاءَكَ مِنَ الْعِلْمِ ۙ مَا لَكَ مِنَ اللَّهِ مِنْ وَلِيٍّ وَلَا نَصِيرٍ (120)

الَّذِينَ آتَيْنَاهُمُ الْكِتَابَ يَتْلُونَهُ حَقَّ تِلَاوَتِهِ أُولَٰئِكَ يُؤْمِنُونَ بِهِ ۗ وَمَنْ يَكْفُرْ بِهِ فَأُولَٰئِكَ هُمُ الْخَاسِرُونَ (121
Reply

Clover
06-05-2009, 09:16 AM
I hope people have a little more confidence for him, I mean, he isn't gonna get everything down in a couple months, but I think he can start making healthier relations with muslims, but if people lack confidence in him this much, then we'll, we can't really say anything about him not getting anywhere.
Reply

Tony
06-05-2009, 03:56 PM
Originally Posted by glo
How can somebody be 'too honest'?
What do you mean by that? :? Do you think he is insincere?
Because of Bush everyone thinks Americans are: dumb, fat and bigots who have an extreme dislike for Muslims


due to this statement
Reply

glo
06-05-2009, 06:18 PM
Originally Posted by TKTony
Because of Bush everyone thinks Americans are: dumb, fat and bigots who have an extreme dislike for Muslims
I guess firstly people should know better than judging an entire nation by the actions of one man (even if he is the President).

Secondly, here is another man taking a huge step to undo that stereotype and to reach out in friendship. I find that pretty impressive.

Obama certainly isn't fat, he doesn't sound like a dumb person, he declares himself to respect Muslims and he certainly seems too tolerant of the beliefs and opinions of others to be called a bigot. That's all of the above four concerns taken care of! :D

As Zafran said, time will tell whether Obama can live up to his words - but a first step has been taken in the right direction!

Peace
Reply

Clover
06-05-2009, 11:34 PM
Originally Posted by TKTony
Because of Bush everyone thinks Americans are: dumb, fat and bigots who have an extreme dislike for Muslims


due to this statement
Honestly, I wouldn't care, if they judge us by 1 man, then they are the dumb ones.
Reply

Zafran
06-05-2009, 11:43 PM
Originally Posted by Clover
Honestly, I wouldn't care, if they judge us by 1 man, then they are the dumb ones.
dont forget the majority of america voted for him...........twice so..........
Reply

Clover
06-06-2009, 12:35 AM
Originally Posted by Zafran
dont forget the majority of america voted for him...........twice so..........
And? that's not all of America. I didn't get to vote, and I can't vote for another 2 years, but I am gathered into the same group? :raging:
Reply

Eric H
06-06-2009, 01:00 AM
Greetings and peace be with you Zafran;
lets see how Obama lives up to his words.
It appears Obama needs a lot of support, there is a petition to sign to help the Palestinian people.

President Obama just made a remarkable speech in Egypt, committing personally to building peace in the Middle East. Unexpectedly, his first move is to directly challenge the new right-wing government of America's ally Israel -- pressing them to stop their self-destructive policy of settlements (illegal colonies set up on territory recognised by the US and the world as Palestinian).

This is a moment of rare crisis and opportunity. Obama’s bold strategy is facing powerful opposition, so he’s going to need help around the world in the coming days and weeks to strengthen his resolve. Let’s start right now -- by raising a massive global chorus behind Obama’s statement that the settlements in occupied territory must stop.

We’ll advertise the number of signatures in key newspapers in Israel, as well as in Washington DC (where some are trying to undermine Obama in the US Congress). Read Obama’s words now and add your signature to them at the link below, then forward this email to friends and family so they can do the same:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/obama_stop_settlements
In the spirit of praying for justice for all people

Eric
Reply

Zafran
06-06-2009, 01:08 AM
Originally Posted by Clover
And? that's not all of America. I didn't get to vote, and I can't vote for another 2 years, but I am gathered into the same group? :raging:
:D your also the country that voted for Obama so........It could be good

Eric - peace thanks i'll check it out.

In the spirit of praying for justice for all people
- Amen to that.
Reply

Hamayun
06-06-2009, 09:13 AM
Originally Posted by Zafran
salaam

I agree - you cant realy expect a lot from any president but Obama is going in the right direction.
Walaikum Salam :)

What he is trying to do is more than what any other American president has done.

Lets not forget he is under a lot of pressure from both sides so we can't expect any miracles.

He is moving in the right direction very slowly. If he shows too much support for Muslims he will lose the support of his people.
Balance is the key.

As a kid I heard a story... Slow and steady wins the race :)
Reply

Keltoi
06-06-2009, 10:34 AM
Originally Posted by Whatsthepoint
But the fact is that Isarel cannot do without you so if the US took a tougher stance on them, they'd eventually have to obey.
What would a "tougher" stance be? The only leverage is foreign aid to Israel, which the U.S. Congress would never vote to end.
Reply

Trumble
06-06-2009, 11:45 AM
Originally Posted by Zafran
dont forget the majority of america voted for him...........twice so..........
Even restricting the comment to those who voted, that isn't actually true. In the first case Al Gore actually got more votes than Bush, they just happened to be in the wrong place.
Reply

salafy_masry
06-06-2009, 12:09 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
Remarks of President Barack Obama
June 4, 2009
Cairo University


America's strong bonds with Israel are well known. This bond is unbreakable. It is based upon cultural and historical ties, and the recognition that the aspiration for a Jewish homeland is rooted in a tragic history that cannot be denied.

Palestinians must abandon violence. Resistance through violence and killing is wrong and it does not succeed. For centuries, black people in America suffered the lash of the whip as slaves and the humiliation of segregation. But it was not violence that won full and equal rights. It was a peaceful and determined insistence upon the ideals at the center of America's founding. This same story can be told by people from South Africa to South Asia; from Eastern Europe to Indonesia. It's a story with a simple truth: that violence is a dead end. It is a sign neither of courage nor power to shoot rockets at sleeping children, or to blow up old women on a bus. That's not how moral authority is claimed; that's how it is surrendered.
So muslims see a man that see's that an INVADER ( Israel ) has the right to OWN ( Palestine ) what they do NOT have the right to OWN is a good man ??

I am sure than any one in this forum who's country was invaded for 60 years would only see that freeing his country by any mean is legitimate.

And giving an example about what African Americans suffered is not valid by any means to be compared with Palestine .. Did the African American OWN the land and the white americans invade it ???
Reply

Whatsthepoint
06-06-2009, 12:32 PM
Originally Posted by Keltoi
What would a "tougher" stance be? The only leverage is foreign aid to Israel, which the U.S. Congress would never vote to end.
Well, you could start with less UN security counsil vetoes on resolutions about Israel. That would send a strong message.
Reply

Pygoscelis
06-06-2009, 05:22 PM
I don't hold out much hope for this, because I am not convinced that either Israel or Palestine want peace. You can't help to negotiate peace when neither side wants it, no matter how good a diplomat you may be. Leadership in both Israel and the muslim world depend on this conflict for their power.
Reply

Zafran
06-06-2009, 06:08 PM
Originally Posted by Trumble
Even restricting the comment to those who voted, that isn't actually true. In the first case Al Gore actually got more votes than Bush, they just happened to be in the wrong place.
lol I know that but Bush got in the second time or was that also a mistake....that seriously would explain alot.
Reply

Banu_Hashim
06-06-2009, 06:28 PM
Originally Posted by glo
I guess firstly people should know better than judging an entire nation by the actions of one man (even if he is the President).
True, I agree. One should know better than to judge a people by actions of leaders. But, as President of the United States he or she is basically acting on behalf of the USA as a country. So they have a huge responsibility on their shoulders. Presidents say "my country believes this or that...", so they have to be very smart is what they say and how they say it. More importantly they have to be diplomatic in their actions towards everyone equally... skills former President Bush clearly lacked.
Reply

Eric H
06-06-2009, 06:43 PM
Greetings and peace be with you salafy_masry;
And giving an example about what African Americans suffered is not valid by any means to be compared with Palestine .. Did the African American OWN the land and the white americans invade it ???
The British and American were possibly worse, they forced Africans out of their own country, and took them to America by force. Huge numbers died under horrible conditions in the slave ships that transported them to America.

So many people have suffered through the greed and stupidity of our fellow man, it seems we just keep compounding and adding to the mistakes and evils of history.

In the spirit of praying for justice for the poor and the oppressed, of all faiths and no faith.

Eric
Reply

north_malaysian
06-07-2009, 01:05 AM
Originally Posted by Eric H
The British and American were possibly worse, they forced Africans out of their own country, and took them to America by force. Huge numbers died under horrible conditions in the slave ships that transported them to America.
But we should blame the African warlords too... they fought each other and sold the weak tribes to the europeans... they sold their own African brothers...
Reply

north_malaysian
06-07-2009, 01:11 AM
Originally Posted by salafy_masry
salam alikum

إِنَّا أَرْسَلْنَاكَ بِالْحَقِّ بَشِيرًا وَنَذِيرًا ۖ وَلَا تُسْأَلُ عَنْ أَصْحَابِ الْجَحِيمِ (119)

وَلَنْ تَرْضَىٰ عَنْكَ الْيَهُودُ وَلَا النَّصَارَىٰ حَتَّىٰ تَتَّبِعَ مِلَّتَهُمْ ۗ قُلْ إِنَّ هُدَى اللَّهِ هُوَ الْهُدَىٰ ۗ وَلَئِنِ اتَّبَعْتَ أَهْوَاءَهُمْ بَعْدَ الَّذِي جَاءَكَ مِنَ الْعِلْمِ ۙ مَا لَكَ مِنَ اللَّهِ مِنْ وَلِيٍّ وَلَا نَصِيرٍ (120)

الَّذِينَ آتَيْنَاهُمُ الْكِتَابَ يَتْلُونَهُ حَقَّ تِلَاوَتِهِ أُولَٰئِكَ يُؤْمِنُونَ بِهِ ۗ وَمَنْ يَكْفُرْ بِهِ فَأُولَٰئِكَ هُمُ الْخَاسِرُونَ (121
هذه الآيات ما له علاقة لي ان خطابه كان ذلك رائعا؟
Reply

Trumble
06-07-2009, 08:16 AM
Originally Posted by Zafran
lol I know that but Bush got in the second time or was that also a mistake....that seriously would explain alot.
It wasn't a 'mistake'; it was the way the US electoral system works and to my knowledge always has.

Bush got elected the second time because of a 'mistake', though. A mistake that ever since it happened has been called '9-11'.
Reply

Clover
06-07-2009, 09:16 AM
Originally Posted by Trumble
It wasn't a 'mistake'; it was the way the US electoral system works and to my knowledge always has.

Bush got elected the second time because of a 'mistake', though. A mistake that ever since it happened has been called '9-11'.
I do not see how that is a mistake or a accident. It was a attack on America.
Reply

salafy_masry
06-07-2009, 10:24 PM
Originally Posted by Eric H
Greetings and peace be with you salafy_masry;


The British and American were possibly worse, they forced Africans out of their own country, and took them to America by force. Huge numbers died under horrible conditions in the slave ships that transported them to America.

So many people have suffered through the greed and stupidity of our fellow man, it seems we just keep compounding and adding to the mistakes and evils of history.

In the spirit of praying for justice for the poor and the oppressed, of all faiths and no faith.

Eric
The two cases are different .. Palestinians are defending their land from foreign occupation since 1948 to free it .. the African Americans wanted to have rights.
Reply

salafy_masry
06-07-2009, 10:26 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
هذه الآيات ما له علاقة لي ان خطابه كان ذلك رائعا؟

It is 100% related ... it explains the condition we are in exactly .. we want the US to be pleased with us as muslims and show that they care and understand islam more than we do ... etc.
Reply

ghengis
06-07-2009, 10:39 PM
dont fall into this guys sweet talk...

they probably want a break from attacking muslims cos they are gonna start a fight with the koreans... once they'v been nuked the war with islam will continue....

and what was that stuff about "its ok to let girls wear headscarfs but they need a right to an eductation"

rule 1:

islam study is education..... western schooling and indoctrination of western ideals is not helpful for any muslim .
Reply

salafy_masry
06-07-2009, 10:42 PM
Thats one good comment I read about him

" To call it by its right name, what the more perceptive elements in the US ruling class fear is world revolution. The effort to prevent such a social upheaval is what impelled them to install Obama in the White House and what set him on his pilgrimage to Cairo. "
Reply

ghengis
06-07-2009, 10:42 PM
.... they teach u rubbish in there so called education system!!

the greek gods.... the world war.... pearl harbour... totally (well not totally ) irrelevent.
muslims should get islamic education..... like the battle of badr, attributes of allah, etcetcetc...

a lesson on how the turkish ottoman empire was destroyed..
how umar ibn khattab was assassinated...
etcetcetc.

he wants everyone to have a so called western education.... which probably includes sex education at 5 yrs old just incase, to stop promiscuity in later years.
Reply

ghengis
06-07-2009, 10:47 PM
.... look at the west,.... how many so called ladies walk around with there power walk and business suits...lol

gender is soon gonna be eradicated in the west.... they are gonna be asexuals!!

blokes wearing make up reading fhm... (10 top ways to please your woman)
and women reading the financial times, making deals.
blokes dieting.... ladies going on weekend business trips..

lol


gender in the west is a joke. the family unit in the west is a joke.
dont let them indoctrinate beautiful islam with their failing ideology....

a whole western pop culture directed completely at kids.... wat a joke. may god save islamic family values.
Reply

ghengis
06-07-2009, 10:54 PM
muslims in the west

know more about the greek gods and how fantastic america saved the day in world war 2... just on time. wow.

muslim sisters in the middle east, believe me u donot want a western education. just be content with islam. please.... dont let there words get to you...

the feminin revolution is more of a "challenge to the male" , "women are just as good as men" "if a man can do it so can a woman" blah blah

we know u can do it sisters.... but u dont have to. we donot compete with each other in the ummah. we are one body.

compare the western ideology and doctrine "men are from venus and women are from mars"

with what allah says "a man is a garment to a woman and a woman is a garment to a man"

they base there education on a false premise.... to teach false destructive doctrines...
Reply

Clover
06-08-2009, 03:02 AM
Originally Posted by Eric H
Greetings and peace be with you salafy_masry;


The British and American were possibly worse, they forced Africans out of their own country, and took them to America by force. Huge numbers died under horrible conditions in the slave ships that transported them to America.

So many people have suffered through the greed and stupidity of our fellow man, it seems we just keep compounding and adding to the mistakes and evils of history.

In the spirit of praying for justice for the poor and the oppressed, of all faiths and no faith.

Eric
lol, I think your mis-interpreting some historical events. Most slavers in Africa, were African tribal leaders, who owned slaves already from wars with other tribes. Many of them slave ship sailors were from Portugal/Spain, but a good amount were Americans. Americans didn't just land and kill the africans, if they had, they'd be mass-murdered cause Africans were very brutal in warfare, many of them landed, and bought them from Portugal/Spain slavers, or from African slavers themselves.
Reply

Clover
06-08-2009, 03:03 AM
Originally Posted by ghengis
muslims in the west

know more about the greek gods and how fantastic america saved the day in world war 2... just on time. wow.

muslim sisters in the middle east, believe me u donot want a western education. just be content with islam. please.... dont let there words get to you...

the feminin revolution is more of a "challenge to the male" , "women are just as good as men" "if a man can do it so can a woman" blah blah

we know u can do it sisters.... but u dont have to. we donot compete with each other in the ummah. we are one body.

compare the western ideology and doctrine "men are from venus and women are from mars"

with what allah says "a man is a garment to a woman and a woman is a garment to a man"

they base there education on a false premise.... to teach false destructive doctrines...
Wow, thats completely not rude...
Reply

ghengis
06-08-2009, 03:30 AM
men are from mars and women are from venus....
--a very destructive doctrine--- destroying the bond of man and woman.

your only young once so have a good time..... a very destructive doctrine.... i'd get drunk and impregnate her with that mindset too. :)

life is for the taking....

survival of the fittest....

he who dares wins....

...very competetive culture..., destructively so...."kill or be killed" not good for society at large and the family unit of man woman and children either...

...can u see the family splitting up with these foundational belief system flaws???

yep.


no offense. just external observer//..
Reply

Clover
06-08-2009, 03:56 AM
Originally Posted by ghengis
men are from mars and women are from venus....
--a very destructive doctrine--- destroying the bond of man and woman.

your only young once so have a good time..... a very destructive doctrine.... i'd get drunk and impregnate her with that mindset too. :)

life is for the taking....

survival of the fittest....

he who dares wins....

...very competetive culture..., destructively so...."kill or be killed" not good for society at large and the family unit of man woman and children either...

...can u see the family splitting up with these foundational belief system flaws???

yep.


no offense. just external observer//..
Their is a big difference between observing and insulting, and I know the difference, even though I am young...
Reply

north_malaysian
06-08-2009, 06:15 AM
Originally Posted by salafy_masry
we want the US to be pleased with us as muslims
of course we are... plus not all Americans are Christians or Jews...

Originally Posted by salafy_masry
and show that they care and understand islam more than we do
it's more that they're learning to understand Islam and wanted to establish peaceful relationship between both worlds from mess done by Bush...
Reply

Clover
06-08-2009, 06:19 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
of course we are... plus not all Americans are Christians or Jews...
I concur
Reply

Lejla
06-10-2009, 08:46 PM
Hold Your Applause

By Chris Hedges


Did they play Barack Obama’s speech to the Muslim world in the prison corridors of Abu Ghraib, Bagram air base, Guantanamo or the dozens of secret sites where we hold thousands of Muslims around the world? Did it echo off the walls of the crowded morgues filled with the mutilated bodies of the Muslim dead in Baghdad or Kabul? Was it broadcast from the tops of minarets in the villages and towns decimated by U.S. iron fragmentation bombs? Was it heard in the squalid refugee camps of Gaza, where 1.5 million Palestinians live in the world’s largest ghetto?

What do words of peace and cooperation mean from us when we torture—yes, we still torture—only Muslims? What do these words mean when we sanction Israel’s brutal air assaults on Lebanon and Gaza, assaults that demolished thousands of homes and left hundreds dead and injured? How does it look for Obama to call for democracy and human rights from Egypt, where we lavishly fund and support the despotic regime of Hosni Mubarak, one of the longest-reigning dictators in the Middle East?

We may thrill to Obama’s rhetoric, but very few of the 1.3 billion Muslims in the world are as deluded. They grasp that nothing so far has changed for Muslims in the Middle East under the Obama administration. The wars of occupation go on or have been expanded. Israel continues to flout international law, gobbling up more Palestinian land and carrying out egregious war crimes in Gaza. Calcified, repressive regimes in countries such as Egypt and Saudi Arabia are feted in Washington as allies.

The speech at Cairo University, which usually has trucks filled with riot police outside the university gates and a heavy security presence on campus to control the student body, is an example of the facade. Student political groups, as everyone who joined in the standing ovation for the president knew, are prohibited. Faculty deans are chosen by the administration, rather than elected by professors, “as a way to combat Islamist influence on campus,” according to the U.S. State Department’s latest human rights report. And, as The Washington Post pointed out, students who use the Internet “as an outlet for their political or social views are on notice: One Cairo University student blogger was jailed for two months last summer for ‘public agitation,’ and another was kicked out of university housing for criticizing the government.”

The expanding imperial projects and tightening screws of repression lurch forward under Obama. We are not trying to end terror or promote democracy. We are ensuring that our corporate state has a steady supply of the cheap oil to which it is addicted. And the scarcer oil becomes, the more aggressive we become. This is the game playing out in the Muslim world.

The Bush White House openly tortured. The Obama White House tortures and pretends not to. Obama may have banned waterboarding, but as Luke Mitchell points out in next month’s issue of Harper’s magazine, torture, including isolation, sleep and sensory deprivation and force-feeding, continues to be used to break detainees. The president has promised to close Guantanamo, where only 1 percent of the prisoners held offshore by the United States are kept. And the Obama administration has sought to obscure the fate and condition of thousands of Muslims held in black holes around the globe. As Mitchell notes, the Obama White House “has sought to prevent detainees at Bagram prison in Afghanistan from gaining access to courts where they may reveal the circumstances of their imprisonment. It has sought to continue the practice of rendering prisoners to unknown and unknowable locations outside the United States, and sought to keep secret many (though not all) of the records regarding our treatment of those detainees.”

Muslim rage is stoked because we station tens of thousands of American troops on Muslim soil, occupy two Muslim nations, make possible the illegal Israeli occupation of Palestine, support repressive Arab regimes and torture thousands of Muslims in offshore penal colonies where prisoners are stripped of their rights. We now have 22 times as many military personnel in the Muslim world as were deployed during the crusades in the 12th century. The rage comes because we have constructed massive military bases, some the size of small cities, in Iraq, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Kuwait, and established basing rights in the Gulf states of Bahrain, Qatar, Oman and the United Arab Emirates. The rage comes because we have expanded our military empire into neighboring Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. It comes because we station troops and special forces in Egypt, Algeria and Yemen. And this vast network of bases and military outposts looks suspiciously permanent.

The Muslim world fears, correctly, that we intend to dominate Middle East oil supplies and any Caspian Sea oil infrastructure. And it is interested not in our protestations of good will but in the elemental right of justice and freedom from foreign occupation. We would react, should the situation be reversed, no differently.

The brutal reality of expanding foreign occupation and harsher and harsher forms of control are the tinder of Islamic fundamentalism, insurgences and terrorism. We can blame the violence on a clash of civilizations. We can naively tell ourselves we are envied for our freedoms. We can point to the Koran. But these are fantasies that divert us from facing the central dispute between us and the Muslim world, from facing our own responsibility for the virus of chaos and violence spreading throughout the Middle East. We can have peace when we shut down our bases, stay the hand of the Israelis to create a Palestinian state, and go home, or we can have long, costly and ultimately futile regional war. We cannot have both.

Obama, whose embrace of American imperialism is as naive and destructive as that of George W. Bush, is the newest brand used to peddle the poison of permanent war. We may not see it. But those who bury the dead do.

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/...your_applause/
Reply

Pygoscelis
06-11-2009, 09:08 PM
It is not in the interest of those in power, in either the US, Israel, OR the muslim world to have peace and understanding between islamic lands nad the west. They all use the conflict to bolster their power. So I hold no hope for it happening. It is sad because I truly believe that the individual citizens of ALL of these places would like peace and understanding.
Reply

salafy_masry
06-13-2009, 09:39 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
of course we are... plus not all Americans are Christians or Jews...



it's more that they're learning to understand Islam and wanted to establish peaceful relationship between both worlds from mess done by Bush...
So I guess he has started learning to understand Islam after this speech

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cOJNC2EuJw
Reply

aadil77
06-13-2009, 10:00 AM
Originally Posted by salafy_masry
So I guess he has started learning to understand Islam after this speech

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cOJNC2EuJw
Brother what does he say in that video, can you summerise it?

I suppose at an aipac meeting he'd have to please all the israeli's, but I'd like to know the other side of the coin.

JazakhAllah
Reply

Whatsthepoint
06-13-2009, 03:00 PM
Originally Posted by Pygoscelis
It is not in the interest of those in power, in either the US, Israel, OR the muslim world to have peace and understanding between islamic lands nad the west. They all use the conflict to bolster their power. So I hold no hope for it happening. It is sad because I truly believe that the individual citizens of ALL of these places would like peace and understanding.
The problem is there's extremists on both sides and none of them view themsleves as extremists. There's people on both sides who want all the land just for themselves.
and the problem is that poliical aprties cater both to extremists and moderate right wingers, such is teh case with Likud.
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-31-2010, 01:00 AM
  2. Replies: 39
    Last Post: 04-11-2009, 03:39 AM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-30-2008, 06:50 PM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-05-2007, 08:54 PM

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!