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جوري
07-24-2009, 09:31 PM
Evangelist Alamo Guilty of Sex Crimes


By JON GAMBRELL
, AP
posted: 2 HOURS 25 MINUTES AGO
comments: 518
filed under: Crime News, National News

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TEXARKANA, Ark. (July 24) - Tony Alamo, a one-time street preacher who built a multimillion-dollar ministry and became an outfitter of the stars, was convicted Friday of taking girls as young as 9 across state lines for sex.
Alamo stood silently as the verdict was read, a contrast to his occasional mutterings during testimony. His five victims sat looking forward in the gallery. One, a woman he "married" at age 8, wiped away a tear.
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Tony Alamo Convicted
Christian evangelist Tony Alamo was convicted Friday on ten counts of sex abuse. Jurors found him guilty on federal charges of transporting young girls across state lines for sexual purposes. This 2008 booking photo shows Alamo after his arrest on the charges in Arizona.
Coconino County Sheriff's Office / AP
Coconino County Sheriff's Office / AP

"I'm just another one of the prophets that went to jail for the Gospel," Alamo called to reporters afterward as he was escorted to a waiting U.S. marshal's vehicle.




Shouts of "Bye, bye, Bernie" — Alamo was born Bernie Lazar Hoffman — came from a crowd gathered on the Arkansas side of the courthouse, which straddles the Texas-Arkansas border.
Jurors were convinced Alamo had had sex with the girls when they were underage, but deliberated for more than a day to ensure that they considered everything, jury foreman Frank Oller of Texarkana said.
"That was the evidence. That was proven," Oller said. "We came up with a full decision that we are quite satisfied with."
Defense lawyer Don Ervin said the evidence against the 74-year-old preacher was insufficient and that the preacher would appeal. He also said Alamo's criminal history — he served four years in prison on tax charges in the 1990s — "will hurt him" at sentencing in six to eight weeks.
"We believe he will face the rest of his natural life in prison," said Assistant U.S. Attorney Kyra Jenner. The penalties on the 10 charges total 175 years in prison, she said, and violations of the century-old Mann Act also carry fines of up to $250,000 each.
The five women, now age 17 to 33, told jurors that Alamo "married" them in private ceremonies while they were minors, sometimes giving them wedding rings. Each detailed trips beyond Arkansas' borders for Alamo's sexual gratification.
Alamo never testified. Though he announced to reporters that he wanted to, his lawyers told him he should not directly challenge their testimony and the attorneys argued to jurors that the girls traveled for legitimate church business.
State and federal agents raided Alamo's compound last Sept. 20 after repeated reports of abuse. Defense lawyers said the government targeted Alamo because it doesn't like his apocalyptic brand of Christianity. Alamo has blamed the Vatican for his legal troubles, which include a four-year prison term for tax evasion in the 1990s.
With little physical evidence, prosecutors relied on the women's stories to paint an emotional portrait of a charismatic religious leader who controlled every aspect of his subjects' lives. No one obtained food, clothing or transportation without him knowing about it.
At times, men were ordered away from the compound and their wives kept as another Alamo bride. Minor offenses from either gender drew beatings or starvation fasts.
In the end, prosecutors convinced jurors in Arkansas' conservative Christian climate that Alamo's ministry offered him the opportunity to prey on the young girls of loyal followers who believed him to be a prophet who spoke directly to God. They described a ministry that ran on the fear of drawing the anger of "Papa Tony."
"You really appreciate the courage that they showed stepping up to face their demons," said Thomas Browne, the special agent in charge of the FBI office at Little Rock.
Alamo remained defiant during the trial. He openly referred to the Branch Davidian raid at Waco, Texas, muttered expletives during testimony and fell asleep at times — while alleged victims spoke from the witness stand and again as prosecutors urged his conviction.
He had built his multistate ministry on the backs of followers who worked in various businesses to support the church. In the 1980s, he designed and sold elaborately decorated denim jackets, hobnobbed with celebrities and owned a compound in western Arkansas that featured a heart-shaped swimming pool.
Federal agents seized a large portion of his assets in the 1990s to settle tax claims after courts declared his operations a business, not a church. Among items offered for auction were the plans for the studded jacket Michael Jackson wore on his "Bad" album.
The Southern Poverty Law Center considers his ministry a cult.
The woman considered to be Alamo's common-law wife, Sharon Alamo, and several other of his 100-200 followers missed the verdict, hustling up the courthouse stairs and entering an empty courtroom five minutes after court adjourned.

http://news.aol.com/article/alamo-gu...-crimes/566176
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Cabdullahi
07-24-2009, 11:04 PM
this is diiirtyy
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جوري
07-24-2009, 11:07 PM
indeed.. reaction formation at best..

many people go cloak themselves with something holy so others won't suspect them..

:w:
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Tony
07-24-2009, 11:25 PM
these ppl deserve instant release from custody, with a brand on their heads, they should be dropped in town centre and chained to a railing outside mothercare
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
07-24-2009, 11:44 PM
Disgusting. Audhubillah...:skeleton:
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جوري
07-25-2009, 02:38 PM
Originally Posted by Tony
these ppl deserve instant release from custody, with a brand on their heads, they should be dropped in town centre and chained to a railing outside mothercare

Actually, I really see alot of wisdom in the Islamic style execution and punishment.. I don't really believe the prison system works, save to drain private citizens of their hard earned money to put a roof over criminals heads and provide them with meals and health care which hard working people on minimum wages aren't even entitled to..

executions should be made public and for all to see, not simply to establish justice but as a reminder to all people.. it needs to be ingrained in their minds... and how much worst is it to cloak yourself in something holy to advance in sin undiscovered ... it is plain disgusting!
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Lost&Found
07-25-2009, 02:55 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
Actually, I really see alot of wisdom in the Islamic style execution and punishment.. I don't really believe the prison system works, save to drain private citizens of their hard earned money to put a roof over criminals heads and provide them with meals and health care which hard working people on minimum wages aren't even entitled to.
Capital punishment is more expensive than life imprisonment though.
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جوري
07-25-2009, 05:16 PM
Originally Posted by Lost&Found
Capital punishment is more expensive than life imprisonment though.
No, it isn't!
a single bullet is 19c-38c at best, potassium shot (for the humane style execution :rollseyes) is $8.99 and I'll throw in an extra $5.00 for the syringe. A noose and a stool doesn't cost more than $30.00 all together and a good sharp edged sword $355.. let's compare that to the exhaustive $100,000 to keep one hardened criminal in jail for one year and then sends them out into the communities un-rehabilitated .. please don't make up stories and pass them off as facts!

thanks,

all the best
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Lost&Found
07-25-2009, 06:29 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
No, it isn't!
a single bullet is 19c-38c at best, potassium shot (for the humane style execution :rollseyes) is $8.99 and I'll throw in an extra $5.00 for the syringe. A noose and a stool doesn't cost more than $30.00 all together and a good sharp edged sword $355.. let's compare that to the exhaustive $100,000 to keep one hardened criminal in jail for one year and then sends them out into the communities un-rehabilitated .. please don't make up stories and pass them off as facts!

thanks,

all the best
I didn't make it up. :/

http://www.economist.com/world/unite...TOKEN=98779690
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aadil77
07-25-2009, 07:23 PM
Originally Posted by Lost&Found
thats specific to americas way of spending thousands and wasting years to send them criminals to death

seems like theres too many legal barriers over there that are making it that expensive for the death penalty
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Clover
07-25-2009, 07:30 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
No, it isn't!
a single bullet is 19c-38c at best, potassium shot (for the humane style execution :rollseyes) is $8.99 and I'll throw in an extra $5.00 for the syringe. A noose and a stool doesn't cost more than $30.00 all together and a good sharp edged sword $355.. let's compare that to the exhaustive $100,000 to keep one hardened criminal in jail for one year and then sends them out into the communities un-rehabilitated .. please don't make up stories and pass them off as facts!

thanks,

all the best
Actually, I know a free way. I have a swamp, this swamp works like quick sand, you walk in it, your going down, and its really quick, and its really hard to get out of, I nearly got sucked in once cause I jumped and my left foot got caught in it, luckily, I was holding on to a strong tree and jerked it out, but I mean, you put somebody in a cage, lower it into that, I gurantee you, it's cheap and effective. Plus its scary to see the snakes that live in it.

People do bad things, even holy ones. Humans are humans, no matter how holy they try to make themselves.
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Lost&Found
07-25-2009, 07:49 PM
Originally Posted by aadil77
seems like theres too many legal barriers over there that are making it that expensive for the death penalty
True.
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جوري
07-25-2009, 08:06 PM
Originally Posted by Lost&Found

The problem whether spending $100,000 per prisoner with meals and health care per year or on the high costs of a simple execution, lies with the Justice system, not in the manner in which justice is to be carried out as seen above the actual methods of executions are actually quite cheap... Fostering the life of a hardened criminal in prison or giving a multiple chance for a hardened criminal to stay roofed and fed while he requests an appeal and re-appeals, only to have one dumb corrupt governor overturn the positions of the previous ones undoubtedly drains everyone involved or un-involved.. were it carried out in the swift manner with a just judicial system of learned judges not 12 idiots picked off the streets to begin with, then you wouldn't have such a massive problem:

Why Prisons Don't Work

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...0372-2,00.html






all the best
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جوري
07-25-2009, 08:09 PM
Originally Posted by Clover
Actually, I know a free way. I have a swamp, this swamp works like quick sand, you walk in it, your going down, and its really quick, and its really hard to get out of, I nearly got sucked in once cause I jumped and my left foot got caught in it, luckily, I was holding on to a strong tree and jerked it out, but I mean, you put somebody in a cage, lower it into that, I gurantee you, it's cheap and effective. Plus its scary to see the snakes that live in it.

People do bad things, even holy ones. Humans are humans, no matter how holy they try to make themselves.

You must understand that I get no pleasure and wouldn't get any pleasure in seeing someone out to death... It has become such a phenomenon to feel for the criminals and not even acknowledge the victims.. I believe that justice should be quick, swift and always a reminder for others at large.. it isn't a matter of gloating or feeling better that such folks don't exist in our midst. But simply knowing that there is justice in the world and that crime has a consequence so folks think twice about committing a crime -- that is if criminals do any thinking to begin with..:hmm:

peace
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Clover
07-25-2009, 08:10 PM
Originally Posted by aadil77
thats specific to americas way of spending thousands and wasting years to send them criminals to death

seems like theres too many legal barriers over there that are making it that expensive for the death penalty
I wouldn't call it legal barriers as much as rich barriers. Over here, if your rich you can afford a real lawyer, if your poor (like me) you can get a law student, who completed 40 hours of actual class time. While the lawyer has probably had over 50 cases, spent 100's of hours reading law, and such, you can get the law student, who read probably Law for Dummies.

Example: A kid whiplashes me, I don't sue, I simply make a case for his insurance to pay for my medical bills. He refuses and counter sues, for me being in the road only doing 45, even though the speed limit is 55. He was doing 80. If he gets a good enough lawyer, he can win. Even though the law is on my side.
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Lost&Found
07-25-2009, 08:16 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
The problem whether spending $100,000 per prisoner with meals and health care per year or on the high costs of a simple execution, lies with the Justice system, not in the manner in which justice is to be carried out as seen above the actual methods of executions are actually quite cheap... Fostering the life of a hardened criminal in prison or giving a multiple chance for a hardened criminal to stay roofed and fed while he requests an appeal and re-appeals, only to have one dumb corrupt governor overturn the positions of the previous ones undoubtedly drains everyone involved or un-involved.. were it carried out in the swift manner with a just judicial system of learned judges not 12 idiots picked off the streets to begin with, then you wouldn't have such a massive problem:
Yes, the actual 'execution' does not cost much at all:

At first glance, the costs involved in the execution of an inmate appear simple and minuscule. As of 2003, the state of Florida paid $150 to the executioner, $20 for the last meal, $150 for a new suit for the inmate's burial, and $525 for the undertaker's services and a coffin. In Florida, the cost of an execution is less than $1,000.
http://law.jrank.org/pages/5002/Capi...UNISHMENT.html

It's the 'legal barriers' as aadil77 stated that make it cost a great deal of money.
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