PDA

View Full Version : Is deodrant halal?



_PakistaN_
09-13-2009, 03:04 AM
I use a deoderant called old spice red zone. Ever since I found out perfume with alcohol wasn't allowed I also stopped using deoderant. I've been stinking a lot lately so I'm here to ask. Is deoderant halal?
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
Soulja Girl
09-13-2009, 12:41 PM
:sl:

^Of course it is... :><:

Check

:wa:
Reply

papa_smurf
09-13-2009, 01:09 PM
Those poor people that were around you..... toxic :skeleton:
Reply

blazingflames17
09-13-2009, 01:14 PM
Even if it is, you're just gonna have to wash really well like everyday and try to avoid activities that cause you to sweat a lot. I hope I didn't discourage you from anything though.
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
Snowflake
09-13-2009, 01:18 PM
:sl: - Deodrant may be halal technically, but most contain aluminium which has been linked to breast cancer. Men aren't immune to breast cancer. A better option is the mineral stick which is free from harmful chemicals. It won't stop you from sweating, but it will kill the bacteria on your skin which makes sweat smell. It's available in Boots in the UK and shouldn't be too hard to find in the U.S. in larger chemists.

If you still smell after showering everyday, you should consider eating more fruit and veg in your diet and avoiding junk foods. Also, drink more water so that bodily fluids aren't so concentrated.
Reply

جوري
09-13-2009, 01:27 PM
Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer: Questions and Answers

Key Points

  • There is no conclusive research linking the use of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer (see Question 1).
  • Research studies of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and breast cancer have been completed and provide conflicting results (see Question 3).



  1. Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? Articles in the press and on the Internet have warned that underarm antiperspirants (a preparation that reduces underarm sweat) or deodorants (a preparation that destroys or masks unpleasant odors) cause breast cancer (1). The reports have suggested that these products contain harmful substances, which can be absorbed through the skin or enter the body through nicks caused by shaving. Some scientists have also proposed that certain ingredients in underarm antiperspirants or deodorants may be related to breast cancer because they are applied frequently to an area next to the breast (2, 3).
    However, researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a part of the National Institutes of Health, are not aware of any conclusive evidence linking the use of underarm antiperspirants or deodorants and the subsequent development of breast cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates food, cosmetics, medicines, and medical devices, also does not have any evidence or research data that ingredients in underarm antiperspirants or deodorants cause cancer.
  2. What do scientists know about the ingredients in antiperspirants and deodorants? Aluminum-based compounds are used as the active ingredient in antiperspirants. These compounds form a temporary plug within the sweat duct that stops the flow of sweat to the skin's surface. Some research suggests that aluminum-based compounds, which are applied frequently and left on the skin near the breast, may be absorbed by the skin and cause estrogen-like (hormonal) effects (3). Because estrogen has the ability to promote the growth of breast cancer cells, some scientists have suggested that the aluminum-based compounds in antiperspirants may contribute to the development of breast cancer (3).
    Some research has focused on parabens, which are preservatives used in some deodorants and antiperspirants that have been shown to mimic the activity of estrogen in the body’s cells (4). Although parabens are used in many cosmetic, food, and pharmaceutical products, according to the FDA, most major brands of deodorants and antiperspirants in the United States do not currently contain parabens. Consumers can look at the ingredient label to determine if a deodorant or antiperspirant contains parabens. Parabens are usually easy to identify by name, such as methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, or benzylparaben. The National Library of Medicine’s Household Products Database also has information about the ingredients used in most major brands of deodorants and antiperspirants. This database is available at http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/index.htm on the Internet.
    The belief that parabens build up in breast tissue was supported by a 2004 study, which found parabens in 18 of 20 samples of tissue from human breast tumors (5). However, this study did not prove that parabens cause breast tumors (4). The authors of this study did not analyze healthy breast tissue or tissues from other areas of the body and did not demonstrate that parabens are found only in cancerous breast tissue (5). Furthermore, this research did not identify the source of the parabens and cannot establish that the buildup of parabens is due to the use of deodorants or antiperspirants.
    More research is needed to specifically examine whether the use of deodorants or antiperspirants can cause the buildup of parabens and aluminum-based compounds in breast tissue. Additional research is also necessary to determine whether these chemicals can either alter the DNA in some cells or cause other breast cell changes that may lead to the development of breast cancer.
  3. What have scientists learned about the relationship between antiperspirants or deodorants and breast cancer? In 2002, the results of a study looking for a relationship between breast cancer and underarm antiperspirants/deodorants were reported (6). This study did not show any increased risk for breast cancer in women who reported using an underarm antiperspirant or deodorant. The results also showed no increased breast cancer risk for women who reported using a blade (nonelectric) razor and an underarm antiperspirant or deodorant, or for women who reported using an underarm antiperspirant or deodorant within 1 hour of shaving with a blade razor. These conclusions were based on interviews with 813 women with breast cancer and 793 women with no history of breast cancer.
    Findings from a different study examining the frequency of underarm shaving and antiperspirant/deodorant use among 437 breast cancer survivors were released in 2003 (7). This study found that the age of breast cancer diagnosis was significantly earlier in women who used these products and shaved their underarms more frequently. Furthermore, women who began both of these underarm hygiene habits before 16 years of age were diagnosed with breast cancer at an earlier age than those who began these habits later. While these results suggest that underarm shaving with the use of antiperspirants/deodorants may be related to breast cancer, it does not demonstrate a conclusive link between these underarm hygiene habits and breast cancer.
    In 2006, researchers examined antiperspirant use and other factors among 54 women with breast cancer and 50 women without breast cancer. The study found no association between antiperspirant use and the risk of breast cancer; however, family history and the use of oral contraceptives were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (8).
    Because studies of antiperspirants and deodorants and breast cancer have provided conflicting results, additional research is needed to investigate this relationship and other factors that may be involved.
  4. Where can someone get more information on breast cancer risk? People who are concerned about their breast cancer risk are encouraged to talk with their doctor. More information about breast cancer risk can be found on the NCI's Cancer Risk: Understanding the Puzzle Web site. This interactive Web site, which includes information about how to reduce breast cancer risk, can be accessed at http://understandingrisk.cancer.gov on the Internet.
    U.S. residents may wish to contact the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) (see below) with any remaining questions or concerns about breast cancer. Inquirers who live outside the United States may wish to contact the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) for information about a resource in their country. The UICC Web site is located at http://www.uicc.org on the Internet. Also, some countries have organizations that offer services similar to those of the U.S. CIS. A list of international cancer information services can be found at http://www.icisg.org/meet_memberslist.htm#full on the Internet.


Selected References


  1. Jones J. Can rumors cause cancer? Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2000; 92(18):1469–1471.
  2. Darbre PD. Underarm cosmetics and breast cancer. Journal of Applied Toxicology 2003; 23(2):89–95.
  3. Darbre PD. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer. Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry 2005; 99(9):1912–1919.
  4. Harvey PW, Everett DJ. Significance of the detection of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) in human breast tumours. Journal of Applied Toxicology 2004; 24(1):1–4.
  5. Darbre PD, Aljarrah A, Miller WR, et al. Concentrations of parabens in human breast tumours. Journal of Applied Toxicology 2004; 24(1):5–13.
  6. Mirick DK, Davis S, Thomas DB. Antiperspirant use and the risk of breast cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 2002; 94(20):1578–1580.
  7. McGrath KG. An earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis related to more frequent use of antiperspirants/deodorants and underarm shaving. European Journal of Cancer 2003; 12(6):479–485.
  8. Fakri S, Al-Azzawi A, Al-Tawil N. Antiperspirant use as a risk factor for breast cancer in Iraq. Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal 2006; 12(3-4):478–482.

# # #
Related NCI materials and Web pages:



For more help, contact:

NCI's Cancer Information Service
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237)
TTY (toll-free): 1-800-332-8615
LiveHelp® online chat: https://cissecure.nci.nih.gov/livehelp/welcome.asp
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/f...et/risk/ap-deo
Reply

Rasema
09-13-2009, 01:30 PM
:sl:
Good question. I had this on my mind for a while.
Is it true that in some soups there are bones?
And this cancer stuff, the doctors offered my mother to go and check if she has it. I refused to take her.

What do you do in situations where male doctors would see you nude?!
Reply

جوري
09-13-2009, 01:39 PM
you have to go for your first mammogram at age 40 to get a baseline reading, or earlier if there is a family history.
You request a female physician and they will comply or refer you and if your mother finds the procedure uncomfortable you can request an anesthetic.. but you can't refuse her health care. Br. Cancer affects one in eight women!

and no one is immune from it, my uncle's wife just died last year of cancer, she was 43 and has three young kids!

:w:
Reply

Rasema
09-13-2009, 01:45 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
you have to go for your first mammogram at age 40 to get a baseline reading, or earlier if there is a family history.
You request a female physician and they will comply or refer you and if your mother finds the procedure uncomfortable you can request an anesthetic.. but you can't refuse her health care. Br. Cancer affects one in eight women!

and no one is immune from it, my uncle's wife just died last year of cancer, she was 43 and has three young kids!

:w:
:sl:

Thanks aunty.

There is no family history as far as I know. It isn't uncomfortable for her but I have to go and watch!!

I'm so tired of this!

Oh well ........
Age 40 is an old age so I'm not thinking about it now.
Reply

جوري
09-13-2009, 01:48 PM
Originally Posted by Rasema
:sl:

Thanks aunty.

There is no family history as far as I know. It isn't uncomfortable for her but I have to go and watch!!

I'm so tired of this!

Oh well ........
Age 40 is an old age so I'm not thinking about it now.
:sl:

lol I am an aunty already ;D
uncomfortable is a euphemism for painful, we just don't like to use the P word. And I don't see why you have to watch, that will probably indeed make her uncomfortable... Also, I thought this was about your mom not you? You don't have to think about it, but surely she needs to have herself checked, there are very few preventative things in medicine, and this is one of them.. if you don't like that, wait until you hit 50 and have to get a colonoscopy.

Health is a gift from Allah swt

:w:
Reply

Rabi'ya
09-13-2009, 01:51 PM
:sl:

With regards to Alcohol in deoderant. If you're concerened by it then it is possible to buy 100% alcohol FREE deoderants.

Its not the end of the worl, but we have no excuse for poor personal hygiene.
Reply

Rasema
09-13-2009, 01:53 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
:sl:

lol I am an aunty already ;D
uncomfortable is a euphemism for painful, we just don't like to use the P word. And I don't see why you have to watch, that will probably indeed make her uncomfortable... Also, I thought this was about your mom not you? You don't have to think about it, but surely she needs to have herself checked, there are very few preventative things in medicine, and this is one of them.. if you don't like that, wait until you hit 50 and have to get a colonoscopy.

Health is a gift from Allah swt

:w:
:sl:

Oh, what do yo want to be called?

Well, I have to translate for her. I don't know If I'll be needed in this occasion but there are others in which I have to be.
It is about my mom right now because she is 50. I meant that I don't need to worry about it because I'm young. And I don't care If I die:D

Thanks scientist.
Reply

جوري
09-13-2009, 01:58 PM
Originally Posted by Rasema
:sl:

Oh, what do yo want to be called?

Well, I have to translate for her. I don't know If I'll be needed in this occasion but there are others in which I have to be.
It is about my mom right now because she is 50. I meant that I don't need to worry about it because I'm young. And I don't care If I die:D

Thanks scientist.
You can call me whatever you like :D
If you are in the U.S I am certain that you can have a doctor who is from your country, also most hospitals provide a translator service so you can be free from that responsibility if it bothers you. If she is fifty, she will need more than one screening test as mentioned above a baseline colonoscopy is started at 50, a mammogram at 40 and if you have recently moved into the country in all likelihood a PPD as well ...

No one cares if they die, until they are on their death bed me thinkus :hmm:

I think I am going to try to sleep now and salvage some of my sanity, though we might have guests in a couple of hours insha'Allah

:w:
Reply

Rasema
09-13-2009, 02:09 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
You can call me whatever you like :D
If you are in the U.S I am certain that you can have a doctor who is from your country, also most hospitals provide a translator service so you can be free from that responsibility if it bothers you. If she is fifty, she will need more than one screening test as mentioned above a baseline colonoscopy is started at 50, a mammogram at 40 and if you have recently moved into the country in all likelihood a PPD as well ...

No one cares if they die, until they are on their death bed me thinkus :hmm:

I think I am going to try to sleep now and salvage some of my sanity, though we might have guests in a couple of hours insha'Allah

:w:
:sl:

Alright, but no. I have tried to get these interpretears but they only come if the doctor is willing to pay them. Only her psychiaytrist did but others refused to.
Reply

cat eyes
09-13-2009, 08:10 PM
Originally Posted by Scents of Jannah
:sl: - Deodrant may be halal technically, but most contain aluminium which has been linked to breast cancer. Men aren't immune to breast cancer. A better option is the mineral stick which is free from harmful chemicals. It won't stop you from sweating, but it will kill the bacteria on your skin which makes sweat smell. It's available in Boots in the UK and shouldn't be too hard to find in the U.S. in larger chemists.

If you still smell after showering everyday, you should consider eating more fruit and veg in your diet and avoiding junk foods. Also, drink more water so that bodily fluids aren't so concentrated.
i had stoped using deodrant also for alcohol and the cancer risk i take a full shower morning and night since stoped using. sis could you give me the name of that mineral stick? i go to boots but i cannot find anything that i can use instead everything has alcohol in it:raging: the staff tried to trick me to tell me ahh no its not that type of alcohol, its a different type if alcohol but alcohol is alcohol
Reply

Asad - HDP
09-13-2009, 08:27 PM
Originally Posted by _PakistaN_
I use a deoderant called old spice red zone. Ever since I found out perfume with alcohol wasn't allowed I also stopped using deoderant. I've been stinking a lot lately so I'm here to ask. Is deoderant halal?
Yes brother. You can buy Halal Deodrant. I bought it from Malaysia, it's called old spice.
We are from Halal Development Board, a forum initiated to develop the Halal industry in Pakistan and help Pakistani business & industry enter the world Halal market,.Inshallah.
Reply

Asad - HDP
09-13-2009, 09:38 PM
Originally Posted by Asad - HDP
Yes brother. You can buy Halal Deodrant. I bought it from Malaysia, it's called old spice.
We are from Halal Development Board, a forum initiated to develop the Halal industry in Pakistan and help Pakistani business & industry enter the world Halal market,.Inshallah.
my mesage was wrongly edited by the web administrator. What I said was that
"Yes brother. You can buy Halal Deodrant. I bought it from Malaysia.
We are from Halal Development Board, a forum initiated to develop the Halal industry in Pakistan and help Pakistani business & industry enter the world Halal market,.Inshallah.
Reply

_PakistaN_
09-14-2009, 07:06 PM
Originally Posted by Asad - HDP
Yes brother. You can buy Halal Deodrant. I bought it from Malaysia, it's called old spice.
We are from Halal Development Board, a forum initiated to develop the Halal industry in Pakistan and help Pakistani business & industry enter the world Halal market,.Inshallah.
I don't live in Pakistan though dude. I live in Toronto Canada.
Reply

Asad - HDP
09-14-2009, 07:56 PM
Monday, 14 September 2009 10:43
Canadian Make-up artist Layla Mandi introduces cosmetics, free from alcohol and animal residues. OnePure brand offers "halal" cosmetics, for Muslims, which have no ingredients that are banned under Islamic law.

Halal (which means Lawful) products are getting very popular, forbids pork and alcohol, and animals must be slaughtered according to Koranic procedures. Muslims around the world buy halal food, but halal cosmetics are still very new. They can be bought on the internet, but not usually over the counter.

Layla Mandi who converted to Islam, said "Muslims don't want to go around and pray five times a day having pork residues on their body. I came to the Middle East to learn about people's needs. Most were shocked when I said there were pork products in skincare items, they were very interested".

Moisturisers, shampoos, face masks and lipsticks, and other items often contain fatty acids and gelatins obtained from pigs, Mandi said.

Cosmetics is a highly competitive business, and OnePure is guaranteed pure, and is presented in glitzy wrappings, which it is hoped will help get them a start in the market.

A product of OnePure Halal Cosmetics. this was posted at the website of internationalsupermarketnews

from Asad - HDP
Reply

//-Asif-\\
09-14-2009, 07:59 PM
At first I thought this question was a no brainer. OF COURSE! But pondering a bit about it and just from my experiences and the people i've interacted with, it may not be that easy to answer.

This is a topic that I've always scratched my head on. I'm of Pakistani descent and a common stereotype synonomous with people of Pakistani/Indians etc is that we have horrible BO or don't wear deodorant thus being the "stinky race". The stereotype has carried over to the religion even. I've heard ignorant people say "You're Muslim right, how come ya'll people stink?" or things to the affect of "Is deodorant/bathing against your religion?" since a number of those that are Desi (Indo-Pak etc) smell like they don't use deodorant, though I believe this is usually tied to immigrants and such.

I've noticed this too with people not only people of my nationality but distant relatives and members of my family even. Some just can knock you out with their body odor. I've always wondered like "Hey we're Muslims! Cleaniness is tied to our faith in the Wudhu and whatnot. We should be the cleanest and most hygenic people around. We shouldn't be labeled the 'stinky people' of the world."

Sometimes at the Mosque during Jum'ah theres brothers that smell AWFUL with clear BO. Friends of the family who we treat like aunts I've noticed have BO worse than the males! And it's not like I'm running up on them and sniffing hard..it's the kind of odor where if they just pass by you and you get a massive gust of their flavor. +o( I know for women you're not supposed to wear perfume and whatnot for purposes of repelling attraction from males but does that mean you have to smell like, excuse my bluntness, crap?

Maybe it's just certain people that don't find it that important, maybe they are just not accustomed to maintaining hygiene or need some lessons but if its something religious based than I guess you gotta take the good with the bad, or in this case stinky.
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-22-2015, 09:37 AM
  2. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 02-25-2010, 10:27 PM
  3. Replies: 39
    Last Post: 09-26-2008, 09:47 AM
  4. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 11-19-2006, 01:52 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-28-2005, 02:21 PM

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!