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Proud.Hijaabi
01-24-2010, 10:05 PM
:sl:
Does anyone know the reasons for why wine became haraam later on rather than in the past? When was it made haraam? (During which Prophets time?) Was it always haraam or am I making the right assumption?
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The Ruler
01-24-2010, 10:17 PM
I can only answer to a part of your query, and so I shall. Drinking small amounts of alcohol often leads to addiction/high intake of alcohol, leading to poor judgement, coordination and lack of sense. To prevent us from falling into such situations, Allah made it unlawful for us.

I hope that helps.
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Darth Ultor
01-24-2010, 10:20 PM
I heard a theory that it was completely haraam, but also another theory. That it depends on the soul. If you pour wine into a cup of water, it will change colors. But if you pour wine into the sea, the water will remain the same color. But I 'm only repeating what I have heard people say.
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The Ruler
01-24-2010, 10:26 PM
^I'm unsure, but perhaps it was referring to the intake of alcoholic medication? In severe conditions, if there is a fear of death and the physician prescribes it, then the quantity that is necessary for living may be consumed.

I am unable to quote hadith or Qur'anic ayah due to my lack of sources. Perhaps another member will do better.
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Proud.Hijaabi
01-24-2010, 10:27 PM
Originally Posted by Boaz
I heard a theory that it was completely haraam, but also another theory. That it depends on the soul. If you pour wine into a cup of water, it will change colors. But if you pour wine into the sea, the water will remain the same color. But I 'm only repeating what I have heard people say.
:sl:
I don't understand the significance. Why does this matter?
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Darth Ultor
01-24-2010, 10:28 PM
It's supposed to represent the human soul.
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The Ruler
01-24-2010, 10:31 PM
Originally Posted by Boaz
It's supposed to represent the human soul.
So, you're saying that regardless of the quantity, as long as your soul is not affected (and where would you draw the line?) you may drink as you please?
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Darth Ultor
01-24-2010, 10:43 PM
There is having a drink, and then there's just being irresponsible. A little drink of wine occasionally (say a few months) does no harm. But there is a limit. You have to know how much your body can take, because we all know too much alcohol is harmful and it can lead people to do or say stupid things. And in no religion are you ever allowed to pray while drunk. Aside from that, I would not drink and drive, or drink when I'm feeling down, or when I need to be entirely focused.
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Darth Ultor
01-24-2010, 10:43 PM
Is the story of the sons of Aaron in the Quran?
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The Ruler
01-24-2010, 10:57 PM
Originally Posted by Boaz
There is having a drink, and then there's just being irresponsible. A little drink of wine occasionally (say a few months) does no harm. But there is a limit.
How do you know where your limit lies? Your body will get used to the levels of alcohol, causing you to exceed your 'limit' everytime. And addiction to alcohol is too widespread for you to claim that occasional drinking will not lead to addiction.

Aside from that, I would not drink and drive, or drink when I'm feeling down, or when I need to be entirely focused.
Islam requires one to be in a sound state of mind always (unless due to any natural calamity that becomes impossible).
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Ummu Sufyaan
01-25-2010, 02:31 AM
Originally Posted by Proud.Hijaabi
:sl:
Does anyone know the reasons for why wine became haraam later on rather than in the past? When was it made haraam? (During which Prophets time?) Was it always haraam or am I making the right assumption?
wa alaykum us-Salaam
intoxicants became banned in stages....
http://www.tafsir.com/default.asp?sid=5&tid=14567
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جوري
01-25-2010, 02:38 AM
I was just listening to a lecture by Al walaki the other day, and he spoke of how the prohibition didn't happen all of a sudden that a love of God and a desire to please him has to be established first in the hearts of the believers, and he contrasted that with the prohibition in the U.S which cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and sent many to prisons and then the ban was lifted anyway because it couldn't be upheld..
however when the prohibition was revealed in the Quran, it was said that Anas ibn maalik who was a bartender dropped the bottle and the sahaba refused to drink, and the streets of medina were red as if filled with blood, but it was all the wine voluntairly dumped into the streets by Muslims..

sobhan Allah..

I recommend that folks here, listen to his entire series-- everything makes so much sense when you have a scholar going over it with you..

and Allah swt knows best

:w:
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Darth Ultor
01-25-2010, 03:04 AM
Originally Posted by The Ruler
How do you know where your limit lies? Your body will get used to the levels of alcohol, causing you to exceed your 'limit' everytime. And addiction to alcohol is too widespread for you to claim that occasional drinking will not lead to addiction.
I know because I drink from time to time, and I have no urge to do so in between. I think I can abstain from alcohol entirely if need be.
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جوري
01-25-2010, 03:29 AM
Originally Posted by Boaz
I know because I drink from time to time, and I have no urge to do so in between. I think I can abstain from alcohol entirely if need be.
alcohol causes a host of problems and you don't need to be downing it in large amounts, in fact death can and has happened to some people from just one bout of drinking even through asphyxiation by vomit.. alcohol causes everything from fibrosis to Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis to ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, to ophthalmoplegia etc. too numerous for me to even list on one page..
in fact whatever research advocating 'alcohol in moderation' is misleading.. you can easily confer the same benefits if there are any at all by having red grape juice.


for us Muslims there need NOT be any health hazards or benefits, the fact that it is a divine prohibition is enough!

all the best
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waqas maqsood
01-25-2010, 05:11 AM
Originally Posted by Boaz
I know because I drink from time to time, and I have no urge to do so in between. I think I can abstain from alcohol entirely if need be.
U can.... but maybe others can...

Now we cannot make one rule for you and one for the rest of the people.

You may think that may be out of other for you as you can drink in moderate but others cant' and therefore Islam has prohibited.

For that, Allah used this as a test to see if we are able to follow His commands and if successful, we will have our wine/alcohol in Jannah, where it will be allowed.
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Darth Ultor
01-25-2010, 11:15 AM
Jannah is the World to Come isn't it? It sounds like the Hebrew word Gan (for Gan Eden). I'm looking on Wikipedia now, and your word for Hell in Jahannam. Similar to our Gehinom. Our languages are very similar, and there are not too many differences in our faiths either.
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- IqRa -
01-25-2010, 11:22 AM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
I was just listening to a lecture by Al walaki the other day, and he spoke of how the prohibition didn't happen all of a sudden that a love of God and a desire to please him has to be established first in the hearts of the believers, and he contrasted that with the prohibition in the U.S which cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and sent many to prisons and then the ban was lifted anyway because it couldn't be upheld..
however when the prohibition was revealed in the Quran, it was said that Anas ibn maalik who was a bartender dropped the bottle and the sahaba refused to drink, and the streets of medina were red as if filled with blood, but it was all the wine voluntairly dumped into the streets by Muslims..

sobhan Allah..

I recommend that folks here, listen to his entire series-- everything makes so much sense when you have a scholar going over it with you..

and Allah swt knows best

:w:
To thread starter:

I have the Awlaki Hereafter series. If you wish, I will go through them and let you know which one to listen to regarding alcohol prohibition.
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جوري
01-25-2010, 02:41 PM
Originally Posted by Confus1on
To thread starter:

I have the Awlaki Hereafter series. If you wish, I will go through them and let you know which one to listen to regarding alcohol prohibition.
Insha'Allah that would be great, can you upload the entire lectures on the media section? I listened to two lectures and they covered a good seven queries that were posted on the board recently ..

sob7an Allah

Jazaka Allah khyran

:w:
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ardianto
01-25-2010, 04:28 PM
What is "Bacl Then" ?.
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sur
01-25-2010, 04:47 PM
One reason I can come up with is that Alcohol is group-1 cancer causing agent...

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (Centre International de Recherche sur le Cancer) of the World Health Organization has classified alcohol as a Group 1 carcinogen.
Human genes are constanly getting damaged by many factors...
Our cells have automatic repair system that repairs damaged genes...
Over the ages, factors that cause damage to genes have increased many folds, genes have started to hold more damaged areas, while repair mechanism is same...

These cancer causing factors appear as a result of modern technological advancement, that started after advent of islam... starting with Al-Chemiya(Chemistry)... Foreseeing such side-effects of upcoming era, islamic texts completely forbade use of alcohol.


In pre-technological era, genetic damage caused by alcohol would have been easily repaired by cells themselves, now it's NOT... that's why so many cancers associated with alcohol.

I Quote:-
Alcohol, especially in combination with smoking, is a well-established risk factor for cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, and larynx, with 25% to 80% of these cancers being attributable to alcohol...liver cancer... cancers of the colorectum and female breast...
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Proud.Hijaabi
01-29-2010, 12:04 AM
Originally Posted by ardianto
What is "Bacl Then" ?.
Sorry, I wanted to edit but I couldn't. Haha it's actually "Back Then" accidently pressed "l"
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'Abd-al Latif
01-29-2010, 01:07 AM
Originally Posted by Proud.Hijaabi
:sl:
Does anyone know the reasons for why wine became haraam later on rather than in the past? When was it made haraam? (During which Prophets time?) Was it always haraam or am I making the right assumption?
:wasalamex

The Makki verses (i.e. verses revealed in Makkah) were mainly about tawheed in order to attach the peoples hearts to Allah and because the Muslims were very, very small in number. Once the Prophet :saws1: migrated to Madinah the verses of prohibition and law were revealed because the Muslims were not only large in number but able to practice their religion freely.
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GreyKode
01-29-2010, 03:05 PM
Originally Posted by Boaz
Jannah is the World to Come isn't it? It sounds like the Hebrew word Gan (for Gan Eden). I'm looking on Wikipedia now, and your word for Hell in Jahannam. Similar to our Gehinom. Our languages are very similar, and there are not too many differences in our faiths either.
Indeed they are very similar, during the Islamic reign of Spain/Andalusia I've read that the muslims helped the jews a great deal to understand strange hebrew words using the help of the arabic language.
I've heard that the Israelis speak yiddish which is not the same as the original hebrew, is that true?
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Darth Ultor
01-29-2010, 04:56 PM
Originally Posted by GreyKode
Indeed they are very similar, during the Islamic reign of Spain/Andalusia I've read that the muslims helped the jews a great deal to understand strange hebrew words using the help of the arabic language.
I've heard that the Israelis speak yiddish which is not the same as the original hebrew, is that true?
No, Israelis speak Hebrew. Yiddish is only spoken by the very religious or older Israelis who came from Europe. The Hebrew of the Torah is not like the spoken Hebrew of today. Today we mix it with Arabic and English. And yes, under the Islamic empire, Europe advanced in science and medicine faster than ever.
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