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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 12:05 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh

Divine - Linguistic Miracle of Qur'an Gems!

Many people talk about it, but most of us don't know any of the Qur'ans linguistic miracles.

We'll gather Linguistic Miracle Gems from the Qur'an here inshaa' Allah. Maybe Allah will increase us in emaan through by reflecting on them.
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:37 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah wabarakatuh


Your Life Summarised in 1 Aayah/verse!



اعْلَمُوا أَنَّمَا الْحَيَاةُ الدُّنْيَا لَعِبٌ وَلَهْوٌوَزِينَةٌ وَتَفَاخُرٌ بَيْنَكُمْ وَتَكَاثُرٌ فِي الْأَمْوَالِ وَالْأَوْلَادِ ۖكَمَثَلِ غَيْثٍ أَعْجَبَ الْكُفَّارَ نَبَاتُهُ ثُمَّ يَهِيجُ فَتَرَاهُ مُصْفَرًّا ثُمَّ يَكُونُ حُطَامًا ۖ وَفِي الْآخِرَةِ عَذَابٌ شَدِيدٌ وَمَغْفِرَةٌ مِّنَ اللَّهِ وَرِضْوَانٌ ۚ وَمَا الْحَيَاةُ الدُّنْيَا إِلَّا مَتَاعُ الْغُرُورِ
Know that the life of this world is only play and amusement, pomp and mutual boasting among you, and rivalry in respect of wealth and children.

(It is) as the likeness of vegetation after rain, thereof the growth is pleasing to the tillers; afterwards it dries up and you see it turning yellow; then it becomes straw.

But in the Hereafter (there is) a severe torment (for the disbelievers – evildoers), and (there is) forgiveness from Allâh and (His) Good Pleasure (for the believers – good-doers). And the life of this world is only a deceiving enjoyment.
[Quran Surah Hadeed 57:20]



This one verse concisely summarizes and sums up our entire lives. And it’s not a pretty picture. Consider our lives:

1) We start as toddlers. This verse starts with play (la`ibun), which is what toddlers are engrossed in, it’s most important to them.

2) Then when we get a little older we need entertainment to keep us busy – amusement (lahwun).

3) A little later in our teens we are obsessed with pomp, or appearance and how things look (zeenatun).

4) Then as we get independent and make money we deal with urges to show off (boasting – tafaakhur).

5) Then we get married and have kids (rivalry in wealth and children – takaathur fi al-amwaal wa al-aulaad).

In just a few words, Allah (SWT) has compressed our entire thought process throughout our lives!



Then He (SWT) makes an analogy of it in the same verse.
- Heavy rain impresses the farmer as he is burying seeds, green shoots make him happy and make him feel like he’s close to achieving something big, and then the crop matures.

But why doesn’t the farmer cut it and harvest it? Why does he watch it turn yellow? It’s because we humans run after a lot of things, but when we get them we immediately lose interest most of the time and newer shinier things take our attention. Then those crops turn into straw and crust and eventually become worthless.

And so this is Allah SWT telling us that nothing in this life will make us content and that only Allah can give us true contentment (ridwaan).

And the verse finishes – And what is this life except a deceptive enjoyment?


Subhanallah … one verse!
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:54 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


This verse shows the power of Du'a [calling upon Allah for your requests]
.



How?


Prophet Ibrahim [Abraham] and Isma'il [Ishmail] prayed to Allah that through their offspring comes a Messenger;

{ "Our Lord! Send amongst them a Messenger of their own, who shall recite unto them Your Verses and instruct them in the Book (this Quran) and Al-Hikmah (full knowledge of the Islamic laws and jurisprudence or wisdom or Prophethood, etc.), and sanctify them. Verily! You are the All-Mighty, the All-Wise."} [al Baqara 2:129]

Prophet Muhammad was sent to us - due to Allah's response of the du'a of Ibrahim and Isma'il!


So ask from Allah, and He will give!
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:54 PM
Why is Walidayn used instead of Abu & Um? [Surah Israa' 17:23]


وَقَضَىٰ رَبُّكَ أَلَّا تَعْبُدُوا إِلَّا إِيَّاهُ وَبِالْوَالِدَيْنِ إِحْسَانًا ۚ إِمَّا يَبْلُغَنَّ عِندَكَ الْكِبَرَ أَحَدُهُمَا أَوْ كِلَاهُمَا فَلَا تَقُل لَّهُمَا أُفٍّ وَلَا تَنْهَرْهُمَا وَقُل لَّهُمَا قَوْلًا كَرِيمًا
And your Lord has decreed that you not worship except Him, and to parents, good treatment. Whether one or both of them reach old age [while] with you, say not to them [so much as], "uff," and do not repel them but speak to them a noble word.

[Israa' 17:23]

The word 'walidayn' is used in that ayah/verse, which refers to both your parents.

The word 'lid' = to produce something.

The ' wa' as a prefix = to make the following word/verb occur.


In this case, the walid = the one who produced and made - the child - existant.


Walid [m] = the man who fathered you [i.e. biological father].

Walida [f] = the woman who gave birth to you.


Walidayn as a suffix signifies 'two' i.e. Both parents; Mum and Dad.
In arabic, Um and Abu is also used for Mother and Father.

So why is Walid, and Walida [=Walidayn] used in the aayah/verse instead of Abu and Um?



In arabic, the Walid is the one fathered you.

However, the Abu is the one who fathered you, and he also lookaftered you, provided for you and gave you an upbringing.


This means that the Abu [Providing father] is of a higher rank than a Walid [biological father].

However, Allah is ordering the Muslim son/daughter to honour their parents, even if they just gave birth to them! Because without them, we would never be born.


So when we see people disrespecting their biological father and saying that "you weren't there for me!", they still need to realise that he is their Walid, and they are still required to respect their parents [walidayn].



The Pregnant Um

The mother is honored more than a walid [biological father]. Yet we should honor both.


How is this?



Allah tells us in Surah Luqman [31:14];
وَوَصَّيْنَا الْإِنسَانَ بِوَالِدَيْهِ حَمَلَتْهُ أُمُّهُ وَهْنًا عَلَىٰ وَهْنٍ وَفِصَالُهُ فِي عَامَيْنِ أَنِ اشْكُرْ لِي وَلِوَالِدَيْكَ إِلَيَّ الْمَصِيرُ

And We have enjoined on man (to be dutiful and good) to his parents. His mother [Um] bore him in weakness and hardship upon weakness and hardship, and his weaning is in two years give thanks to Me and to your parents, unto Me is the final destination.}[31:14]
Allah is telling us that your mother [walida], has already got the honorable title of Um [caring mother] - by being pregnant and giving birth to you. This is why she has more rights over you from the start.

However, for the father to get the title of Abu [the providing father], he will have to provide for you and give you an upbringing, otherwise his status will remain as a Walid [the one who you are born from (biologically)]. (even though you still respect your Walid).
حدثنا ‏ ‏قتيبة بن سعيد بن جميل بن طريف الثقفي ‏ ‏وزهير بن حرب ‏ ‏قالا حدثنا ‏ ‏جرير ‏ ‏عن ‏ ‏عمارة بن القعقاع ‏ ‏عن ‏ ‏أبي زرعة ‏ ‏عن ‏ ‏أبي هريرة ‏ ‏قال ‏
‏جاء ‏ ‏رجل ‏ ‏إلى رسول الله ‏ ‏صلى الله عليه وسلم ‏ ‏فقال من أحق الناس بحسن صحابتي قال ‏ ‏أمك قال ثم من قال ثم أمك قال ثم من قال ثم أمك قال ثم من قال ثم أبوك ‏
‏وفي حديث ‏ ‏قتيبة ‏ ‏من أحق بحسن صحابتي ولم يذكر الناس ‏

Abu Hurairah, may Allah be pleased with him, reported:

A person came to Allah's Messenger (may peace be upon him) and said: Who among the people is most deserving my companionship (of a kind treatment from me?)

He said: Your mother. He, again, said: Then who (is the next one)? He said: It is your mother [Um] (who deserves the best treatment from you). He said: Then who (is the next one)? He (the Holy Prophet) said: It is your mother.

He (again) said: Then who? Thereupon he (The Prophet (peace be upon him)) said: It is your father [Abu].

[Sahih Muslim The Book of Virtue, Good Manners and Joining of the Ties of Relationship (Kitab Al-Birr was-Salat-I-wal-Adab )]
This is part of the Linguistic Miracle of the Qur'an.




Also see;

Baby Arabic Lessons;

http://forums.almaghrib.org/showthread.php?t=26239
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:55 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


Tranquility, Passion, and Mercy...


وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ أَنْ خَلَقَ لَكُم مِّنْ أَنفُسِكُمْ أَزْوَاجًا لِّتَسْكُنُوا إِلَيْهَا وَجَعَلَ بَيْنَكُم مَّوَدَّةً وَرَحْمَةً ۚإِنَّ فِي ذَٰلِكَ لَآيَاتٍ لِّقَوْمٍ يَتَفَكَّرُونَ

And among His Signs is this, that He created for you wives from among yourselves, that you may find repose in them, and He has put between you affection and mercy. Verily, in that are indeed signs for a people who reflect.

[Quran ar-Rum 30:21]


"that you may find repose [taskoonoo] in them".

The word in arabic for Repose is; Sakoon.
Sakoon = Tranquility/calmness. Anyone who has been in love has felt this strongly when they are with their lover. This is one of the strongest feelings that person will feel when they are with their lover.

This feeling of joy, contenment and tranquility makes the person have extreme love for that person. So Allah after explaining the first attribute of Tranquility says describes the next stage;



"..and he has put between you affection (Mawaddah).."

Mawaddah is love with a passion, an extreme liking to something.

So the lover;

1) Feels at ease [feels calmness] with the person.
2) Has an extreme passionate liking to them.


This Mawaddah stage usually lasts for around 2 years.

As the couple continue living together, the passion gradually lessens. Both partners mature abit more and the fantasies die out abit more.

So many obstacles come within their way because they are living with each other. Before they were both blinded by passion, but now they see each others mistakes and errors.



So Allah tells us;

"and He has put between you affection and MERCY (rahmah).."

So now that the passions have slightly died out, and the calmness isn't always there in the relationship (arguments do happen in marriage) - Allah tells us that He has placed between the lovers Mercy.

So even though they might argue with each other, they have mercy on each other and forgive. This mercy keeps your relationship going, because deep down inside you still care that your partner doesn't get hurt.


"..Verily, in that are signs for people who reflect."
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:55 PM
And he whom We grant long life, We reverse him in creation." [Yasin 36:38]

wwwislamicboardcom -
http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/h...ed2kx/3638.png
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:56 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


Why is Yathrib used instead of Madinah?



وَإِذْ قَالَت طَّائِفَةٌ مِّنْهُمْ يَا أَهْلَ يَثْرِبَ لَا مُقَامَ لَكُمْ فَارْجِعُوا ۚ وَيَسْتَأْذِنُ فَرِيقٌ مِّنْهُمُ النَّبِيَّ يَقُولُونَ إِنَّ بُيُوتَنَا عَوْرَةٌ وَمَا هِيَ بِعَوْرَةٍ ۖ إِن يُرِيدُونَ إِلَّا فِرَارًا

And when a party of them said: "O people of Yathrib! There is no stand (possible) for you (against the enemy attack!) Therefore go back!" And a band of them ask for permission of the Prophet ( SAW) saying: "Truly, our homes lie open (to the enemy)." And they lay not open. They but wished to flee.

[Ahzab 33:13]
Why is the word “Yathrib” used at [Ahzab 33:13] whereas in other places it’s always “Madinah” (e.g. Munafiqoon 63:8)?

Even more intriguingly, this surah is Madinan (revealed in Madinah), and the word Madinah is used later on in the same surah at verse 60 [Ahzab 33:60]!


One of the wisdoms for doing so (and Allah knows best) is that Madinah is a nickname (short for Madinat-un-Nabi – The City of the Prophet) given after Hijrah [emigration of the Prophet], and so the use of the the term “Madinah” by people signifies allegiance to the Prophet (sal Allah alaihi wasalam).

Now if we look closely at Ahzab 33:13, we see that it captures a part of the saying of the munafiqoon [hypocrites] at the time – they’re exposing their hypocrisy in the battle of/ Khandaq/Ahzab by calling on the people of Yathrib (not Madinah!) to give up and go home!

These were those who had lost their claim to power in the city as a result of Hijrah [emigration of Prophet Muhammad & his companions), and are using old associations to rouse the people, thereby making their nifaaq [hypocrisy] clear.

So the use of Yathrib is not a mistake or slip-up as people might assume, it’s actually perfectly positioned to suit the context of the situation.
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:56 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh.

Miracle Story Timeline - of Surah Yusuf


This is the layout of the plot of Surah Yusuf
:

1 – Yusuf (alayhis-Salam) has a dream.
2 – His brothers plot against him
3 – His owner’s wife attempts to seduce him
4 – Her friends attempt to seduce him
5 – He (as) is imprisoned

6 – The king has a dream
6 – The king’s dream is interpreted
5 – Yusuf (as) is released from prison
4 – The ladies confess
3 – His former owner’s wife confesses
2 – His brothers learn their lesson
1 – Yusuf (as)’s dream is interpreted and realized.

This is spread out in exactly this order over 100 ayaat. Problems are introduced and solved in reverse symmetric order. Remember, these are verses of speech. Qur’an wasn’t revealed as a book. It was revealed in parts over 23 years! The thing is, humans just don’t think like this! You need a stack to process a story and say it like this.


To have this kind of consistency in speech over 23 years, forming what would later be compiled as a book and analyzed as a book is beyond human capacity. Armies of the best authors couldn’t do it, even with the luxury of being able to make mistakes the first few times and correct them.
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:57 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


Miracle Qur'an Challenge: Write a Palindrome Phrase - read the same backward as forward.



Palindrome Miracle
:

وربك ف ك بر
[wa Rabaka Fa Kabir]
(focus on the consonants only in the arabic language)

And your Lord (Allah) magnify! [so magnify your Lord]

[Quran Surah Mudatthir 74:3]
What is a Palindrome?

A word or phrase that reads the same backward as forward.



A challenge to those who reject the linguistic miracle of Qur'an
:

Can you provide a meaningful sentence - in any language - which can be written in a Palindrome form? The above aayah/verse has 4 words in a Palindrome form, so the challenge for them is to beat that.
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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:57 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh

Miracle Sounds [Onomatopoeia] in al-Qur'an.


The use of delicate sounds.. exhibits the Qur’an’s ability to express meaning and images via the sound of its text:



The Still Night..

وَاللَّيْلِ إِذَا سَجَىٰ

wallayli izaa sajaa..


“And by the Night when it is still..” [Qur'an 93: 2]
The way the Qur’an uses the word ‘when it is still’ produces a tranquil tone and a smooth sound. This indicates the peace, stillness and serenity that night time provides.




The Striking of Rocks to Produce Sparks:



The Qur’an also uses sound to build intense images, for example,

فَالْمُورِيَاتِ قَدْحًا

Faalmooriyaati Qad-han

“And the producers of sparks striking” [Qur'an 100: 2] (really referring to war horses galloping and their hooves striking rocks to produce sparks [refer to the tafseers on this verse])
The word for sparks striking, ‘Qad-han’, that is used here emits a sound that develops the sense of this image, the proximity of the Arabic letters Qa - striking the ‘daal’ and rebounding the ‘ha’ is responsible for this sound.




Splattering and Scattering..

In another example,:

وَأَنزَلْنَا مِنَ الْمُعْصِرَاتِ مَاءً ثَجَّاجًا

Waanzalna mina almu'siraati maa'an thajjaja

And sent down, from the rain clouds, pouring water.[Naba' 78:14]


The use of the word 'thajjaja' in this verse, with its series of vowels emits a sound of splattering and scattering, which expresses the image of the drama.




For example in the verse below the Qur’an uses words that imitate the sound they denote. This rhetorical device called Onomatopoeia is widely used throughout the Qur’anic discourse.



Saaaakhah.. the loud deafening noise.
فَإِذَا جَاءَتِ الصَّاخَّةُ

Fa-itha jaa'ati-ssaaakhah

But when there comes the Deafening Blast. [Abasa 80:33]

The word for ‘deafening noise’, ‘alssaakhah,’ chosen here produces a sound eluding to its meaning.

The Arabic letters ‘kha’ connected with a 'ta’ [marboota = a 'ha' sound] emanate harsh sounds which conform to the meaning of the text.





The Waswasa Whispering..
فَوَسْوَسَ إِلَيْهِ الشَّيْطَانُ

Fa Wasswassa ilayhi-shaytaan.. [Ta-Ha 20:120]

So Satan whispered to him [Adam]...

The word Wasswassa = Repeated Whispering which is targetted at someone, paused, and then comes back again.


The word is repeated twice [Wass-Wassa] because satan's whispering is targetted at a person - to make them doubt/fear/get confused etc. then he will go away and come back again to whisper again another time...

[Also See Surah al-Naas 114.]


The utilisation of sounds in the Qur’an also play a rhetorical role.

Sounds in the Qur’an are employed to increase the effect of its message. The Arabic language has many words for a single meaning, but yet the Qur’an selects and arranges the words to portray the intended meaning in addition to create sounds to conform to the image, scene and message the book conveys. This is not only done by selecting the right words but also arranging them in a specific way to develop sounds and rhythms. Just by touching upon a few simple examples it can be seen why Pickthall was lead to believe that the Qur’an had an “inimitable symphony”.



A famous Orientalist Arberry comments on his personal experience with the rhythm of the Qur’an:

“Whenever I hear the Quran chanted, it is as though I am listening to Music, underneath the flowing melody there is sounding… insistent beat of a drum, it is like the beating of my heart.”

Arthur J. Arberry. 1964.The Koran Interpreted. Oxford University Press
Refer to this link for more Comments of non-muslim Orientalists on the Qur'an's miraculousness;
http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...cle-hamza.html



Refer to the following Aayaat/verses for more Onomatopoeias' in the Qur'an.

[al Waqi'ah 56:4], [Nazi'at 79:6-7], [Ta-Ha 20:120], [Zalzala 99:1].



There are more, and I will add them inshaa' Allah if I am able to find them. Maybe you can find some?


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- Qatada -
03-30-2010, 01:58 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh


You can find other linguistic miracles from selected verses, or selected suwar/surahs/chapters from the Qur'an here;

http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.com/
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- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:31 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


Why is the term 'Surah' used?

A surah is different from a chapter for linguistic reasons. The word surah comes from “the outer walls of a city.” If you can visualize: in the old days, they didn’t have borders and signs saying

“Welcome to such-and-such city.” Rather, there were outer walls that you had to go through; it was a security measure. Inside of the city, there are a bunch of things happening – commerce, residences, markets, etc – but it is all connected. That is kind of what is going on in a surah – there’s a lot going on, but it’s all connected somehow.


- Nouman Ali Khan [in his Bayyinah tafseer discussion on Surah Naba']
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- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:34 PM
Rhyming Scheme in Surah Maryam.


In Surah Maryam the rhyming pattern is very distinct and consistent throughout the beginning of the Surah all the way up until the point that it begins to address Isa (alayhis Salam).

Listen to [or read] Surah Maryam [surah/chapter 19], starting from verse [19:]2, all the way to verse 33. This is a narrative of the story of Prophet Zakariyyah, and Maryam/Mary (peace be upon them.) Then it begins briefly on the birth of Prophet 'Eesa/Jesus.

So at the end of every aayah/verse, there is an "iyya" sound at the end. I.e. زَكَرِيَّا [Zakariyyah] (in the 2nd verse), with شَقِيًّا [Shakkiyya] (on the 32nd verse), حَيًّاHayya [meaning 'Life'] (on the 33rd verse). With the 33rd verse referring to Jesus talking whilst being a baby.




Suddenly, a Drastic change takes place - the Rhyming Scheme changes totally:


ذَٰلِكَ عِيسَى ابْنُ مَرْيَمَ ۚ قَوْلَ الْحَقِّ الَّذِي فِيهِ يَمْتَرُونَ
That is Jesus, the son of Mary - the word of truth about which they are in dispute. [Maryam 19:34]

The last word now is 'yamtaroon'.




Why is this rhyming scheme changed?


Part of the characteristics of the Quran is that it is something meant to be recited and heard by the people. When someone is listening to this, and they notice an abrupt change they will automatically pay more attention. The rhyme scheme is not beautification only, but it serves a very real purpose in drawing attention to a very important point in the Surah.


This important point in the Surah is clearing the doubts on the character Jesus son of Mary, about whom they are in dispute. This abrupt change makes you notice a difference in rhythm and tune, it must be really big news for the tune/rhythm/theme to change totally after so long.. It gives focus, and clears the doubts of the sincere listener.



Rhythm continues...


After that part is finished, Allah starts talking about Ibrahim/Abraham (alayhis Salam) and his story [from Surah Maryam 19:34 onwards], it returns back to the original pattern (with 'Iyya' at the end of the verses again).. To continue the flow of what was being mentioned previously of the narratives of the righteous.




http://muslimmatters.org/2007/05/25/...acles-respond/
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- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:37 PM
Similarities between beginnings of Surah Israa' & al-Kahf

Surah Isra and Surah Kahf are the 17th and 18th Surahs in the Quran. Isra has 111 ayaat, and Kahf has 110 ayaat.


Surah Isra begins with:
سبحان الذي أسرى بعبده


Glory to (Allah) Who did take His servant for a Journey by night from the Sacred Mosque to the farthest Mosque...


And Surah Kahf begins with:
الحمد لله الذي أنزل على عبده
Praise be to Allah, Who has sent to His Servant the Book...



Notice the similarities and differences here? Both are glorifying and praising Allah, and both are discussing revelation.

In Surah Isra, the Prophet (sal-Allahu alayhi was-Sallam) is ascending up to receive the revelation, and in Surah Kahf the revelation is being sent down.


Both of them have the word ‘abdihi [His slave].
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Insaanah
04-01-2010, 09:40 PM
:sl:

What a brilliant thread, maashaAllah! This is all just amazing.

As I was reading I was wondering if there was a link where I could read more, then I saw you posted it.

Jazaakallah khair for sharing this with us. May Allah reward you abundantly. Ameen.

:sl:
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CosmicPathos
04-01-2010, 09:40 PM
beautiful beautiful beautiful. I am humbled just by the very first post. Ya Rub.
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- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:44 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh



The Story of Iblis (in Surah Israa' & al Kahf)

In the middle of both surah’s [Israa' & Kahf] is an ayah/verse talking about the story of Iblis [satan] refusing to prostrate to Adam (alayhis Salam).


In Surah Isra [17:61] the ayah is as follows:
And (remember) when We said to the angels: “Prostrate unto Adam.” They prostrated except Iblis (Satan). He said: “Shall I prostrate to one whom You created from clay?”



In Surah Kahf [18:50]
it reads:
And (remember) when We said to the angels; “Prostrate to Adam.” So they prostrated except Iblis (Satan). He was one of the jinns; he disobeyed the Command of his Lord.


This is an example of something that some Non-Muslims may claim is an incoherency. Why is the same story split up into different places with different details? Good question.

Let’s take a quick step back. We know that Surah Isra is also sometimes called Surah Bani Israa’eel [children of Israel/the Jews]. It also contains a series of ayaat that Ibn Abbas(ra) mentioned were similar to the 10 commandments given to Musa (alayhis Salam). So this surah is primarily addressing Bani Isra’eel, who had knowledge but became arrogant.

Surah Kahf is addressing the Christians. We can see this from ayah 18:4, “And to warn those who say, ‘Allah has begotten a son (or offspring or children).’” The Christians disobeyed their Lord.



So when the surah is addressing those who were afflicted with arrogance (i.e. the Jews), the part of the story mentioned is the one pertaining to them [i.e. Iblis did not prostrate to someone Allah ordered him to prostrate to, out of thinking that he is superior. Similarly, the Jews rejected Prophet Muhammad while thinking thinking they are superior].



When the surah is addressing a different audience (i.e. Christians), it uses the part of the story most pertinent to them [i.e. Iblis disobeyed the Command of his Lord, and many Christians disobey their Lord while still thinking their on the right path].

Furthermore, Allah tells us in Surah al Kahf that Iblis was of the Jinn. This clears the doubts of Christians who say that Iblis was a 'fallen angel'.


SubhanAllah!!


Quranic Incoherence? 2 Miracles Respond | MuslimMatters.org
Reply

- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:49 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


The Secret Happiness


So important is the concept of ‘happiness’ in our lives that many people – even dating back to the days of the Greek philosophers – considered its pursuit to be the very purpose of existence.


Indeed, the Qur’an itself speaks of happiness as being one of the rewards of those whom Allah chooses to admit to Paradise. He says of the martyrs in Aal-’Imraan, verse 170,




فَرِحِينَ بِمَا آَتَاهُمُ اللَّهُ مِنْ فَضْلِهِ
They rejoice in what Allah has bestowed upon them of His Bounty




And of the reward of the pious believers [al-Insaan, verse 11],


فَوَقَاهُمُ اللَّهُ شَرَّ ذَلِكَ الْيَوْمِ وَلَقَّاهُمْ نَضْرَةً وَسُرُورًا
So, Allah saved them from the evil of that Day and gave them a light of beauty and joy.




What becomes immediately apparent upon reading the Arabic text (but once again obscured in the translation) is that two very different words have been used to convey the idea of happiness: فَرِحِينَ fariheena, which is conjugated from the noun فَرَح farah, and سُرُور suroor, and this is prevalent throughout the Qur’an. This is because there are two very different types of happiness being referred to.


فَرَح farah generally refers to transitory delights or pleasures, as is the case in bodily or worldly pleasure. For this reason, most times that فَرَح farah appears in the Qur’an, it is being censured, as in the story of Qarun [al-Qasas, verse 76],


إِنَّ اللهَ لا يُحِبُّ الَفِرحِينَ
Indeed, Allaah does not like the fariheen


But when the source of the farah is specified in the Qur’an, as in the verse from Aal-’Imraan mentioned above, the meaning becomes restricted (muqayyad) and it is no longer censured.


But perhaps a greater distinction between the two lies in the manifestation of the happiness. Whereas the expression of farah is external and with clear outward signs, suroor refers to the expansion of one’s heart with delight or pleasure wherein is quiet or tranquility, and as such it has no external sign. This is indicated by the root from which the word stems – س ر seen raa’ – the same root as the word سرّ sirr, or secret. So suroor is a secret happiness, known to one’s heart but not always seen by others, as Ibn ‘Abbas said in reference to the above verse from al-Insaan, “The نضرة nadrah is on their faces, and the سرور suroor is in their hearts.”


Such distinctions exemplify yet another example in which the translation fails and the original prevails.




http://arabicgems.wordpress.com/2008...-of-happiness/
Reply

- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:50 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh


The Secret Happiness


So important is the concept of ‘happiness’ in our lives that many people – even dating back to the days of the Greek philosophers – considered its pursuit to be the very purpose of existence.


Indeed, the Qur’an itself speaks of happiness as being one of the rewards of those whom Allah chooses to admit to Paradise. He says of the martyrs in Aal-’Imraan, verse 170,




فَرِحِينَ بِمَا آَتَاهُمُ اللَّهُ مِنْ فَضْلِهِ
They rejoice in what Allah has bestowed upon them of His Bounty




And of the reward of the pious believers [al-Insaan, verse 11],


فَوَقَاهُمُ اللَّهُ شَرَّ ذَلِكَ الْيَوْمِ وَلَقَّاهُمْ نَضْرَةً وَسُرُورًا
So, Allah saved them from the evil of that Day and gave them a light of beauty and joy.




What becomes immediately apparent upon reading the Arabic text (but once again obscured in the translation) is that two very different words have been used to convey the idea of happiness: فَرِحِينَ fariheena, which is conjugated from the noun فَرَح farah, and سُرُور suroor, and this is prevalent throughout the Qur’an. This is because there are two very different types of happiness being referred to.


فَرَح farah generally refers to transitory delights or pleasures, as is the case in bodily or worldly pleasure. For this reason, most times that فَرَح farah appears in the Qur’an, it is being censured, as in the story of Qarun [al-Qasas, verse 76],


إِنَّ اللهَ لا يُحِبُّ الَفِرحِينَ
Indeed, Allaah does not like the fariheen


But when the source of the farah is specified in the Qur’an, as in the verse from Aal-’Imraan mentioned above, the meaning becomes restricted (muqayyad) and it is no longer censured.


But perhaps a greater distinction between the two lies in the manifestation of the happiness. Whereas the expression of farah is external and with clear outward signs, suroor refers to the expansion of one’s heart with delight or pleasure wherein is quiet or tranquility, and as such it has no external sign. This is indicated by the root from which the word stems – س ر seen raa’ – the same root as the word سرّ sirr, or secret. So suroor is a secret happiness, known to one’s heart but not always seen by others, as Ibn ‘Abbas said in reference to the above verse from al-Insaan, “The نضرة nadrah is on their faces, and the سرور suroor is in their hearts.”


Such distinctions exemplify yet another example in which the translation fails and the original prevails.




http://arabicgems.wordpress.com/2008...-of-happiness/
Reply

- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:54 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah wabarakatuh

"The heart lied not in what he saw..." (Surah Najm 53:11)


مَا كَذَبَ الْفُؤَادُ مَا رَأَىٰ

“The (Prophet’s) heart lied not in what he saw.” (Surah Najm 53:11)

The fu’aad is the heart, and this means that the what the Prophet (sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam) saw with his eyes during the night journey and ascension, he also saw with certainty in his heart.

It could be that the eye sees something but the heart does not confirm it, and it could be the that heart sees something that the eye does not confirm. As for what the Prophet (sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam) saw during the night of Mi’raaj, it is the truth – in both his sight and in his insight, and that is why Allah ta’ala says: “The heart lied not in what he saw.” (Surah Najm 53:11)


http://muslimmatters.org/2010/03/31/...ibn-uthaymeen/
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
04-01-2010, 09:57 PM
Originally Posted by - Qatada -
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh
A challenge to those who reject the linguistic miracle of Qur'an:

Can you provide a meaningful sentence - in any language - which can be written in a Palindrome form? The above aayah/verse has 4 words in a Palindrome form, so the challenge for them is to beat that.
:wasalamex

Some points to add to this that were mentioned in the seminar:

1) It was spoken and the one who spoke it was illiterate. It's pretty darn hard to come up with a palindrome when you sit down and work it out, yet it might be possible, but to speak it out of the blue -> you only get one shot at getting it right because what is being is said is memorized instantly and written down. You can't go back and modify it. Plus the speaker himself, the Messenger (saw), is illiterate so it's not like he could have sat down before hand and worked through it, he doesn't even know the letters!
2) It was recited together with the verses before and after it. I.e. it's right in the middle of a passage and the fact that the verse being a palindrome fits so well in the context of what's being said and doesn't take anything away from the coherency and meaning.
3) It was unknown at the time but discovered later by linguistic scholars who spent their time looking through the Qur'an for such aspects of linguistic excellence. It's not like the Prophet (saw) went around and said look, this verse has a palindrome nor did anyone else. It's just there.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 09:57 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh

“The sight turned not aside, nor it transgressed beyond the limit.” (Surah Najm 53:17)



مَا زَاغَ الْبَصَرُ وَمَا طَغَىٰ


“The sight turned not aside, nor it transgressed beyond the limit.” (Surah Najm 53:17)

This ayah is referring to the sight of the Prophet (sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam) during the ascension to the heavens, and the scholars say ”zaagha” means turning to the left and right. As for “wa ma taghaa“; this means he did look past what was in front of him.

The Messenger (sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam) had the best of manners in this high standing; he did not turn his eyes to the left or right, and he did not look to what was not permitted for him to look at and this is from the perfection of the character of the Prophet (sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam).

Normally, you will find people looking around to their right and to their left when they enter a place that is strange to them, especially if this place is a great change from what they are used, such as in this regard (i.e., ascension into the heavens). A person will not be able to keep themselves from looking around to see what is happening but because of the perfection of the Prophet’s (sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam) character, manners, his calmness and self-control, he did not turn aside or transgress the limits.


http://muslimmatters.org/2010/03/31/tafseer-gems-from-shaykh-ibn-uthaymeen/
Reply

czgibson
04-01-2010, 10:38 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by - Qatada -

A challenge to those who reject the linguistic miracle of Qur'an
:

Can you provide a meaningful sentence - in any language - which can be written in a Palindrome form? The above aayah/verse has 4 words in a Palindrome form, so the challenge for them is to beat that.
How about these?


Some men interpret nine memos.

Delia sailed as sad Elias ailed.

Now do I repay a period won.

Satan, oscillate my metallic sonatas.

No, it is open on one position.

Live not on evil's deeds, live not on evil.

Now, sir, a war is won!


All of those are meaningful palindromic sentences which follow the conventions of standard English usage. There are many other possible examples. Are they miraculous? Of course not.

Peace
Reply

جوري
04-01-2010, 11:04 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


How about these?


Some men interpret nine memos.

Delia sailed as sad Elias ailed.

Now do I repay a period won.

Satan, oscillate my metallic sonatas.

No, it is open on one position.

Live not on evil's deeds, live not on evil.

Now, sir, a war is won!


All of those are meaningful palindromic sentences which follow the conventions of standard English usage. There are many other possible examples. Are they miraculous? Of course not.

Peace
There should be more to words than rhyme no?
Reply

czgibson
04-01-2010, 11:11 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
There should be more to words than rhyme no?
What does rhyme have to do with this?

Peace
Reply

جوري
04-01-2010, 11:20 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


What does rhyme have to do with this?

Peace
what does your ' palindromic sentence' have to do with the linguistic miracles of the Quran?
Reply

- Qatada -
04-01-2010, 11:22 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson

All of those are meaningful palindromic sentences which follow the conventions of standard English usage. There are many other possible examples. Are they miraculous? Of course not.

Peace
http://www.islamicboard.com/quran/13...ml#post1312448


Besides that, there's much more in the thread to support its miraculousness further. Especially when we consider that the one who gave us the Qur'an was an unlettered man who had no former experience in such a field.
Reply

czgibson
04-01-2010, 11:25 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by - Qatada -
http://www.islamicboard.com/quran/13...ml#post1312448


Besides that, there's much more in the thread to support its miraculousness further. Especially when we consider that the one who gave us the Qur'an was an unlettered man who had no former experience in such a field.
You've issued a challenge and I've answered it. If you'd like to respond to my answer, go ahead.

Peace
Reply

جوري
04-01-2010, 11:30 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


You've issued a challenge and I've answered it. If you'd like to respond to my answer, go ahead.

Peace
a palindrome isn't an answer to the divine linguistic miracle of the Quran!
but I'll give you that, you are funny!

all the best
Reply

czgibson
04-01-2010, 11:36 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
a palindrome isn't an answer to the divine linguistic miracle of the Quran!
but I'll give you that, you are funny!

all the best
Why, thank you.

It was an answer to the challenge given by Qatada here:

Originally Posted by Qatada
A challenge to those who reject the linguistic miracle of Qur'an:

Can you provide a meaningful sentence - in any language - which can be written in a Palindrome form? The above aayah/verse has 4 words in a Palindrome form, so the challenge for them is to beat that.
The fact that I quoted this in my post may have been a clue.

Judging from the content of the thread, the standard for a "linguistic miracle" seems very low.

Peace
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
04-01-2010, 11:41 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,

Judging from the content of the thread, the standard for a "linguistic miracle" seems very low.

Peace
Says one who is completely ignorant of the language the miracle is in! Forgive me if I don't take you seriously. In any case, you might want to refer to my previous post in this thread.
Reply

Alpha Dude
04-01-2010, 11:43 PM
czgibson, how about if you take this into consideration too?
1) It was spoken and the one who spoke it was illiterate. It's pretty darn hard to come up with a palindrome when you sit down and work it out, yet it might be possible, but to speak it out of the blue -> you only get one shot at getting it right because what is being is said is memorized instantly and written down. You can't go back and modify it. Plus the speaker himself, the Messenger (saw), is illiterate so it's not like he could have sat down before hand and worked through it, he doesn't even know the letters!

2) It was recited together with the verses before and after it. I.e. it's right in the middle of a passage and the fact that the verse being a palindrome fits so well in the context of what's being said and doesn't take anything away from the coherency and meaning.

3)
It was unknown at the time but discovered later by linguistic scholars who spent their time looking through the Qur'an for such aspects of linguistic excellence. It's not like the Prophet (saw) went around and said look, this verse has a palindrome nor did anyone else. It's just there.
Reply

جوري
04-01-2010, 11:52 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


Why, thank you.

It was an answer to the challenge given by Qatada here:



The fact that I quoted this in my post may have been a clue.

Judging from the content of the thread, the standard for a "linguistic miracle" seems very low.

Peace
The 'challenge' that Br. Qatada asked for isn't the conventional challenge of the Quran, nonetheless what you have provided makes no sense under any circumstance as there is more to the challenge than merely putting words together in a grammatical shift of mere rhetoric. It needs to be meaningful.. where is the pictorial element? the word choice of precision and subtlety, where is the humor, satire and irony? where is the word play and ambiguity, where is the narrative, the dramatic dialogue, the characterization, where is the transcendence and the engagement and constant relation to the reader? most importantly where is the the inimitability?

the standards are low because you like to bring things down to a low common denominator as it is easier for both your psyche and I imagine lifestyle.

all the best
Reply

czgibson
04-01-2010, 11:53 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Muraad
Says one who is completely ignorant of the language the miracle is in! Forgive me if I don't take you seriously.
Right on time - the last line of defence arrives.

The Qur'an has a long passage of rhyming; it contains a palindrome. Why would anyone consider these things to be miracles? They can and have been done in many languages.

In any case, you might want to refer to my previous post in this thread.
I already have, and Alpha Dude has quoted you as well. I don't see how any of it is relevant to Qatada's challenge to produce a palindrome of more than four words in any language.

Peace
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
04-01-2010, 11:56 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


Right on time - the last line of defence arrives.
Be it what it is, it still stands true. To pass judgment (arrogantly) on something you don't know just begs such a response. Just as I wouldn't take a medical opinion from other than a medical doctor, I really don't see why I should take your opinion on a subject when I know you don't know what you're talking about?

The Qur'an has a long passage of rhyming; it contains a palindrome. Why would anyone consider these things to be miracles? They can and have been done in many languages.
I doubt that considering the historical context given in my post.

I already have, and Alpha Dude has quoted you as well. I don't see how any of it is relevant to Qatada's challenge to produce a palindrome of more than four words in any language.

Peace
It's called historical context?
Reply

czgibson
04-01-2010, 11:58 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Muraad
It's called historical context?
Did Qatada specify that these contextual matters must apply to anyone answering his challenge?

Peace
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
04-02-2010, 12:00 AM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


Did Qatada specify that these contextual matters must apply to anyone answering his challenge?

Peace
I would assume anyone can understand what's being said? If the pretense is regarding something historical, then it only follows the context remains the same!

Now that you know the historical context, how about you respond to it and make my time responding to you worthwhile? :)
Reply

czgibson
04-02-2010, 12:08 AM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Muraad
I would assume anyone can understand what's being said? If the pretense is regarding something historical, then it only follows the context remains the same!
I don't understand what you mean here.

Now that you know the historical context, how about you respond to it and make my time responding to you worthwhile? :)
Your time is yours to spend as you please.

None of what you've mentioned (all of which I was aware of before reading your post) is relevant to Qatada's challenge. I don't see why you think changing the goalposts at this stage is of any benefit to anyone.

Peace
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
04-02-2010, 12:14 AM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,

None of what you've mentioned (all of which I was aware of before reading your post) is relevant to Qatada's challenge. I don't see why you think changing the goalposts at this stage is of any benefit to anyone.

Peace
So I'm to understand I won't be getting a response from you for that particular example? No surprise there.

Btw, there are 15 other examples provided by Qatada. I suggest you busy yourself with them, at the very least to dissect them from a linguistic perspective and show us exactly why as you said:

Originally Posted by czgibson
Judging from the content of the thread, the standard for a "linguistic miracle" seems very low.
Until then we'll be waiting. Good luck.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-02-2010, 09:49 AM
czgibson, I admit my challenge wasn't set out specifically, so I can figure where you're coming from. However, even if one was to answer it, it still wouldn't defeat the original challenge set in the Qur'an of bringing one Surah [roughly translated as chapter] like it.


For example, listen to this recitation of this along with the meaning, and try to come up with something similar to it.

Surah Naba' [About what are they asking...?]



Remember, anything similar to it covers a wide array of subjects:

Literary structures are composed of many elements that are too numerous to be discussed in detail in this article. They include diction, phonology, rhetoric, composition, morphology, syntax, architecture, rhythm, and style, in addition to matters related to tone, voice, orality, imagery, symbolism, allegory, genre, point of view, intertexuality, intratextual resonance, and other literary aspects – all of which are set within a historical, cultural, intellectual, and psychological context. These elements combine with each other in the Qur’an in myriad ways that produce the Qur’an’s unique character.

http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...cle-hamza.html
Reply

czgibson
04-02-2010, 04:13 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Muraad
So I'm to understand I won't be getting a response from you for that particular example? No surprise there.
1) It was spoken and the one who spoke it was illiterate. It's pretty darn hard to come up with a palindrome when you sit down and work it out, yet it might be possible, but to speak it out of the blue -> you only get one shot at getting it right because what is being is said is memorized instantly and written down. You can't go back and modify it. Plus the speaker himself, the Messenger (saw), is illiterate so it's not like he could have sat down before hand and worked through it, he doesn't even know the letters!
There doesn't seem to be much point in responding to this. You believe that divine guidance was delivered to an illiterate man; I don't. We're not really going to get much further with that one, are we?

2) It was recited together with the verses before and after it. I.e. it's right in the middle of a passage and the fact that the verse being a palindrome fits so well in the context of what's being said and doesn't take anything away from the coherency and meaning.
The substance of this seems simply to be that a palindrome occurs in the middle of a text. Is this considered noteworthy or impressive in some way?

3) It was unknown at the time but discovered later by linguistic scholars who spent their time looking through the Qur'an for such aspects of linguistic excellence. It's not like the Prophet (saw) went around and said look, this verse has a palindrome nor did anyone else. It's just there.
A literary device was discovered after a text's composition. Again, is this considered noteworthy or impressive in some way? If so, why?

Btw, there are 15 other examples provided by Qatada. I suggest you busy yourself with them, at the very least to dissect them from a linguistic perspective and show us exactly why as you said:

Originally Posted by czgibson
Judging from the content of the thread, the standard for a "linguistic miracle" seems very low.
Until then we'll be waiting. Good luck.
OK then. I'll try to take them one at a time.

First of all, let's take a look at the meaning of the word 'miracle'. Its primary meaning is given by most dictionaries along these lines:

Originally Posted by dictionary.com
an effect or extraordinary event in the physical world that surpasses all known human or natural powers and is ascribed to a supernatural cause.
I hope I can safely assume that people do not refer to the linguistic features of the Qur'an as 'miracles' in the much weaker sense that ordinary events that are perceived to be wonderful (such as childbirth) are sometimes described as 'miracles'.

Considering the word in its primary definition, I tend to agree with Cicero:

Originally Posted by Marcus Tullius Cicero
There are no miracles. What was incapable of happening never happened, and what was capable of happening is not a miracle.
With that said, let's have a look at the supposed 'linguistic miracles' of the Qur'an.

#1

Originally Posted by Qatada
Your Life Summarised in 1 Aayah/verse!


اعْلَمُوا أَنَّمَا الْحَيَاةُ الدُّنْيَا لَعِبٌ وَلَهْوٌوَزِينَةٌ وَتَفَاخُرٌ بَيْنَكُمْ وَتَكَاثُرٌ فِي الْأَمْوَالِ وَالْأَوْلَادِ ۖكَمَثَلِ غَيْثٍ أَعْجَبَ الْكُفَّارَ نَبَاتُهُ ثُمَّ يَهِيجُ فَتَرَاهُ مُصْفَرًّا ثُمَّ يَكُونُ حُطَامًا ۖ وَفِي الْآخِرَةِ عَذَابٌ شَدِيدٌ وَمَغْفِرَةٌ مِّنَ اللَّهِ وَرِضْوَانٌ ۚ وَمَا الْحَيَاةُ الدُّنْيَا إِلَّا مَتَاعُ الْغُرُورِ

Know that the life of this world is only play and amusement, pomp and mutual boasting among you, and rivalry in respect of wealth and children.

(It is) as the likeness of vegetation after rain, thereof the growth is pleasing to the tillers; afterwards it dries up and you see it turning yellow; then it becomes straw.

But in the Hereafter (there is) a severe torment (for the disbelievers – evildoers), and (there is) forgiveness from Allâh and (His) Good Pleasure (for the believers – good-doers). And the life of this world is only a deceiving enjoyment.
[Quran Surah Hadeed 57:20]
First of all, I don't think this summarises my life at all. Also, the assumption that disbelievers always do evil and believers always do good is hideously naive (I assume those portions are a human insertion to the text). However, neither of these things is relevant to the question of whether what we see in this verse is a miracle.

Suppose that I did feel this verse summarised my life well - would that make it a miracle? If it did, that make many other texts miraculous as well. For example, here is Jaques' famous 'Seven Ages of Man' speech from Shakespeare's As You Like It, which attempts the same thing:

Originally Posted by William Shakespeare
All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms;
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lin'd,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well sav'd, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
That's a good piece of writing; it's not a miracle.

#2

Originally Posted by Qatada
Prophet Ibrahim [Abraham] and Isma'il [Ishmail] prayed to Allah that through their offspring comes a Messenger;

{ "Our Lord! Send amongst them a Messenger of their own, who shall recite unto them Your Verses and instruct them in the Book (this Quran) and Al-Hikmah (full knowledge of the Islamic laws and jurisprudence or wisdom or Prophethood, etc.), and sanctify them. Verily! You are the All-Mighty, the All-Wise."} [al Baqara 2:129]


Prophet Muhammad was sent to us - due to Allah's response of the du'a of Ibrahim and Isma'il!
I'm not even sure what the claim is supposed to be here. Is there anything miraculous about reporting an alleged foretelling of yourself?

#3

Originally Posted by Qatada
Why is Walidayn used instead of Abu & Um? [Surah Israa' 17:23]


وَقَضَىٰ رَبُّكَ أَلَّا تَعْبُدُوا إِلَّا إِيَّاهُ وَبِالْوَالِدَيْنِ إِحْسَانًا ۚ إِمَّا يَبْلُغَنَّ عِندَكَ الْكِبَرَ أَحَدُهُمَا أَوْ كِلَاهُمَا فَلَا تَقُل لَّهُمَا أُفٍّ وَلَا تَنْهَرْهُمَا وَقُل لَّهُمَا قَوْلًا كَرِيمًا

And your Lord has decreed that you not worship except Him, and to parents, good treatment. Whether one or both of them reach old age [while] with you, say not to them [so much as], "uff," and do not repel them but speak to them a noble word.

[Israa' 17:23]
There doesn't seem to be any miracle claim in this post either. This is apparently a simple explanation of the text and nothing more.

#4


Originally Posted by Qatada
وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ أَنْ خَلَقَ لَكُم مِّنْ أَنفُسِكُمْ أَزْوَاجًا لِّتَسْكُنُوا إِلَيْهَا وَجَعَلَ بَيْنَكُم مَّوَدَّةً وَرَحْمَةً ۚإِنَّ فِي ذَٰلِكَ لَآيَاتٍ لِّقَوْمٍ يَتَفَكَّرُونَ

And among His Signs is this, that He created for you wives from among yourselves, that you may find repose in them, and He has put between you affection and mercy. Verily, in that are indeed signs for a people who reflect.

[Quran ar-Rum 30:21]
This post is more of the same. The Qur'an describes loving relationships in a way that is perfectly ordinary, and again I can see no claim that this is a miracle.

#5

And he whom We grant long life, We reverse him in creation." [Yasin 36:38]
This is rather a clever use of figurative language, of the kind that can be seen in many works of poetry and fiction. Like the passage from Shakespeare above, it's a good piece of writing, but it's hardly a contravention of the laws of nature.

#6

Originally Posted by Qatada
Why is Yathrib used instead of Madinah?
In a similar way to the last three posts, this is merely an explanation of the text (in this case a textual puzzle), and nowhere are we asked to believe that this is somehow a miracle.

#7

Originally Posted by Qatada
Miracle Story Timeline - of Surah Yusuf


This is the layout of the plot of Surah Yusuf:

1 – Yusuf (alayhis-Salam) has a dream.
2 – His brothers plot against him
3 – His owner’s wife attempts to seduce him
4 – Her friends attempt to seduce him
5 – He (as) is imprisoned

6 – The king has a dream
6 – The king’s dream is interpreted
5 – Yusuf (as) is released from prison
4 – The ladies confess
3 – His former owner’s wife confesses
2 – His brothers learn their lesson
1 – Yusuf (as)’s dream is interpreted and realized.


This is spread out in exactly this order over 100 ayaat. Problems are introduced and solved in reverse symmetric order. Remember, these are verses of speech. Qur’an wasn’t revealed as a book. It was revealed in parts over 23 years! The thing is, humans just don’t think like this! You need a stack to process a story and say it like this.


To have this kind of consistency in speech over 23 years, forming what would later be compiled as a book and analyzed as a book is beyond human capacity. Armies of the best authors couldn’t do it, even with the luxury of being able to make mistakes the first few times and correct them.
This is strange. According to Yasir Qadhi in this video at 2:05, Surah Yusuf was revealed all in one go, not over 23 years. If Yasir Qadhi is right, this would undermine Qatada's claim here.

#8

This is the palindrome, which I have already answered.

#9
Originally Posted by Qatada
Miracle Sounds [Onomatopoeia] in al-Qur'an.
This is a good example of what I mean by the low standards needed for something to be perceived as a miracle in the Qur'an. The way the text I've quoted appears, it almost looks like 'Miracle Sounds' is being set up as a definition for 'onomatopoeia', which is of course not true at all.

Onomatopoeia is one of the most commonly used devices in literature the world over, and to say that using it amounts to a miracle is nothing short of preposterous.

#10

Originally Posted by Qatada
Why is the term 'Surah' used?
This is another post directed towards explanation, and again no miracle claim is made.

#11

Originally Posted by Qatada
Rhyming Scheme in Surah Maryam.
The feature highlighted this time is a rhyme that occurs at the end of 31 verses, and which is then followed by an abrupt change in the rhyme scheme. The monorhyme technique is well-known and is common in Latin, Arabic and Welsh poetry, and the abrupt change in the rhyme scheme is one of many devices that poets have often used to signal important moments. Again, we are not asked in the post itself to believe that this is a miracle.

#12

Originally Posted by Qatada
Similarities between beginnings of Surah Israa' & al-Kahf
The recurrence of similar phrases does not show that the Qur'an is miraculous; it shows that the Qur'an is repetitive.

#13
The Story of Iblis (in Surah Israa' & al Kahf)
This is another example of textual explanation; again, no miracle appears to be claimed here.

#14

The Secret Happiness
This post explains how two different words have been used in the Qur'an to describe two different types of happiness. Is there anything miraculous in this?

#15 & #16

"The heart lied not in what he saw..." (Surah Najm 53:11)
“The sight turned not aside, nor it transgressed beyond the limit.” (Surah Najm 53:17)
More textual explanation. Even if you do believe that these are good pieces of writing, that clearly does not make them miraculous.


In most of these posts, the miracle claim is so weak that it is not even mentioned. It is as if any feature of the text at all is welcome in the thread. There is nothing here to persuade anyone who isn't already convinced that there is anything miraculous in the Qur'an use of language.

Peace
Reply

- Qatada -
04-02-2010, 04:50 PM
czgibson, i'm really surprised at your answers, especially when you're a teacher in the field of literature.

When a piece of literature is written, a masterpiece - ALL of it is taken into consideration. Then, selections are chosen from that to show some signs of its amazing literary skills.



Many Orientalists who are non Muslims have testified to the miraculousness of the Qur'an;
Armstrong states:

“From the above evidence the Quran is acknowledged to be written with the utmost beauty and purety of Language. It is incontestably the standard of the Arabic tongue, inimitable by any human pen, and because it still exists today, therefore insisted on as a permanent miracle sufficient to convince the world of its divine origin. If the Quran was written by Muhammad, why were not Arab scholars and linguists able to rival the Quran?”

K. Armstrong. 1993. A History of God: the 4,000 Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Ballantine Books

http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...cle-hamza.html


Someone who is an unlettered man cannot bring about a piece of literature which has been so effective at such a large scale, throughout history, yet even intellectuals have been unable to come up with something similar to it.

It then becomes miraculous because history has proven that it is unmatched (for over 1,400 years), even though the competitors have the exact same tools as Prophet Muhammad; the letters of the Arabic language, they have the opportunity for support from all the linguists [this is something the unlettered Messenger never had], and even the style of the Qur'an to relate to [the Qur'an was a unique style, so him being unlettered - he never had a foundation style to work from either].
Reply

جوري
04-02-2010, 04:55 PM
He hasn't addressed any point from my post.. gibson always seems to be looking for a school-yard fight while bullying people into his sophomoric understanding of things as it seems the best he can do!
Reply

czgibson
04-02-2010, 05:12 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by - Qatada -
czgibson, i'm really surprised at your answers, especially when you're a teacher in the field of literature.
I'm surprised you think the examples you gave qualify as miracles.

When a piece of literature is written, a masterpiece - ALL of it is taken into consideration.
As an update to my previous comments on this in years gone by, I have now read the Qur'an from start to finish.

Then, selections are chosen from that to show some signs of its amazing literary skills.
Do you think literature is some kind of competition, with writers creating work solely for the purpose of showing off? This is what your comments suggest.

Many Orientalists who are non Muslims have testified to the miraculousness of the Qur'an;
Armstrong states:

“From the above evidence the Quran is acknowledged to be written with the utmost beauty and purety of Language. It is incontestably the standard of the Arabic tongue, inimitable by any human pen, and because it still exists today, therefore insisted on as a permanent miracle sufficient to convince the world of its divine origin. If the Quran was written by Muhammad, why were not Arab scholars and linguists able to rival the Quran?”

K. Armstrong. 1993. A History of God: the 4,000 Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Ballantine Books

http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...cle-hamza.html
Read the quote again, and you'll see that Karen Armstrong is not actually claiming that she believes the Qur'an to be a miracle. If she did, she would be a Muslim. She says 'insisted on' in the passive voice, meaning that the agent of the sentence is either unknown, unimportant or obvious. In this case, those who insist on the miraculousness of the Qur'an are obviously Muslims.

Someone who is an unlettered man cannot bring about a piece of literature which has been so effective at such a large scale, throughout history, yet even intellectuals have been unable to come up with something similar to it.

It then becomes miraculous because history has proven that it is unmatched (for over 1,400 years), even though the competitors have the exact same tools as Prophet Muhammad; the letters of the Arabic language, they have the opportunity for support from all the linguists, and even the style of the Qur'an to relate to.
The Qur'anic challenge to produce a surah like it is transparently absurd for several reasons.

For one thing, it shows a naive understanding of literary merit, as if you can stack up works of literature against each other and definitively say "this one is better than that one", or "this one is exactly as good as that one".

Similarly, it would be ridiculous for me to make a comparable challenge to produce a text that matches Madame Bovary, Moby Dick or Ulysses. Who would be the judge? Would there ever be agreement? What would be the point in such a childish exercise?

Also, Muslims are absolutely forbidden from granting that the challenge has been met, since it would contradict their own faith. It is therefore an impossible challenge by definition, so it isn't surprising in the least that no-one has been judged to have satisfied it.

Peace
Reply

جوري
04-02-2010, 05:23 PM
if you have something to say CZ don't leave it in my CP like a coward.. it is a child that mumbles and a man that speaks his mind and I already know you not to be the latter for when challenged by 13 year olds all you can do is resort to dismissive comments and your un-ending tirade to draw satisfaction out of overly simplistic conclusions and inane definitions where you force others to conform to your standards or standards by proxy as it seems you can't come up with an intelligible definition on your own!

all the best
Reply

czgibson
04-02-2010, 05:29 PM
Greetings,
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
if you have something to say CZ don't leave it in my CP like a coward.. it is a child that mumbles and a man that speaks his mind and I already know you not to be the latter for when challenged by 13 year olds all you can do is resort to dismissive comments and your un-ending tirade to draw satisfaction out of overly simplistic conclusions and inane definitions where you force others to conform to your standards or standards by proxy as it seems you can't come up with an intelligible definition on your own!

all the best
Is this the new topic of the thread?

Peace
Reply

جوري
04-02-2010, 05:35 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,


Is this the new topic of the thread?

Peace
Nothing with you is new and judging from your incessant pedantry I doubt the thread will go to its intended place!

all the best
Reply

- Qatada -
04-02-2010, 07:17 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
He hasn't addressed any point from my post.. gibson always seems to be looking for a school-yard fight while bullying people into his sophomoric understanding of things as it seems the best he can do!

:salamext:


He hasn't answered this post of mine either;

Originally Posted by - Qatada -
czgibson, I admit my challenge wasn't set out specifically, so I can figure where you're coming from. However, even if one was to answer it, it still wouldn't defeat the original challenge set in the Qur'an of bringing one Surah [roughly translated as chapter] like it.


For example, listen to this recitation of this along with the meaning, and try to come up with something similar to it.

Surah Naba' [About what are they asking...?]



Remember, anything similar to it covers a wide array of subjects:

Literary structures are composed of many elements that are too numerous to be discussed in detail in this article. They include diction, phonology, rhetoric, composition, morphology, syntax, architecture, rhythm, and style, in addition to matters related to tone, voice, orality, imagery, symbolism, allegory, genre, point of view, intertexuality, intratextual resonance, and other literary aspects – all of which are set within a historical, cultural, intellectual, and psychological context. These elements combine with each other in the Qur’an in myriad ways that produce the Qur’an’s unique character.

http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...cle-hamza.html
Reply

جوري
04-02-2010, 07:31 PM
Originally Posted by - Qatada -
:salamext:


He hasn't answered this post of mine either;
Pickthal 8:22] Lo! the worst of beasts in Allah's sight are the deaf, the dumb, who have no sense.

[Pickthal 8:23] Had Allah known of any good in them He would have made them hear, but had He made them hear they would have turned away, averse


:w:
Reply

Ibn Abi Ahmed
04-02-2010, 09:22 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
There doesn't seem to be much point in responding to this. You believe that divine guidance was delivered to an illiterate man; I don't. We're not really going to get much further with that one, are we?
Guess not.

The substance of this seems simply to be that a palindrome occurs in the middle of a text. Is this considered noteworthy or impressive in some way?
Perhaps you can stand up and speak and in the middle of your speech, you will say a sentence that will read the same back and forth without the statement taking anything away from the coherence of your speech. What are the chances of that?

A literary device was discovered after a text's composition. Again, is this considered noteworthy or impressive in some way? If so, why?
Because it shows two things,

1) That it's not the main focus of the Book and as such is something complementary. The palindrome is not the reason the Qur'an is literary miracle, that has to do with other things as mentioned in an earlier post by Qatada.
2) That it shows that Messenger was illiterate. He didn't know that it just so happened that there was a palindrome in one of the verses he spoke.

OK then. I'll try to take them one at a time.
This should be interesting.

First of all, let's take a look at the meaning of the word 'miracle'. Its primary meaning is given by most dictionaries along these lines:

I hope I can safely assume that people do not refer to the linguistic features of the Qur'an as 'miracles' in the much weaker sense that ordinary events that are perceived to be wonderful (such as childbirth) are sometimes described as 'miracles'.
And let's make it clear that what are being highlighted here are only isolated examples from the Qur'an. They appear constantly and flawlessly through 114 chapters, 6000+ verses without a break. We have yet to find someone who can come up with a single chapter that meets same literary magnificience of the Qur'an.

Also let's keep in mind a maxim amongst the Arabs:
خَيْرُ الكلامِ ما قَلَّ ودَلَّ
The best of speech is that which has the fewest words while retaining the desired meaning
#1

First of all, I don't think this summarises my life at all.

Suppose that I did feel this verse summarised my life well - would that make it a miracle? If it did, that make many other texts miraculous as well. For example, here is Jaques' famous 'Seven Ages of Man' speech from Shakespeare's As You Like It, which attempts the same thing:
And this exactly shows why you should not be commenting on something you don't understand in the original language. The miracle here is not just that a verse gives the life story, rather it's the language used to portray that message. Why was the word لَعِبٌ used, why was لَهْوٌ used? Secondly, why the particular word order and not the other way around? Thirdly, why was the placement of the verse in that particular place and not two verses before or after?

The challenge here is if you think this is unimpressive in the Arabic language then show me in the Arabic language how a different word choice can give the same eloquence and retain the exact same depth of meaning. In other words, the precision of word choices such that any other word would not fit in the place of another.

Therefore, you haven't even begun to show why this is not a linguistic miracle. Remember, we're speaking about the Arabic language here and the miracle exists only there because the Qur'an is only in Arabic. Until you can show via the language using its morphology, syntax and grammar why the sentence is flawed or why it can be imitated, until then you have no argument and this applies here and to all other examples as I'll demonstrate.


#2



I'm not even sure what the claim is supposed to be here. Is there anything miraculous about reporting an alleged foretelling of yourself?
Again, back to the basics. It's the word choice and sentence structure.

#3

There doesn't seem to be any miracle claim in this post either. This is apparently a simple explanation of the text and nothing more.
Word choice my friend. In Arabic one can use either وَالِدَيْنِ or اب و ام translated they both mean the same, which obviously is why you fail to see the difference. But in Arabic when you use one and not the other the language provides a different depth of meaning. The linguistic understanding one gets from hearing وَالِدَيْنِ is different from اب و ام and in the verse mentioned اب و ام would not give the intended meaning and depth that وَالِدَيْنِ provides. See the end of this post for why this is important in terms of the language.

#4


This post is more of the same. The Qur'an describes loving relationships in a way that is perfectly ordinary, and again I can see no claim that this is a miracle.
According the scholars of the Arabic language, the language has over 60 different words for love each with a slightly different meaning and connotation. The word used in this verse for love is مَّوَدَّةً, perhaps you can show why this word, مَّوَدَّةً, is not the best word choice for this sentence? Why would any of the other 59 words not be a better fit? Why not محبّة ? Why not any of the following?

[حب ‘Hubb’ is love
[عشق] ‘ishq’ is love that entwines two people together
[شغف] ‘shaghaf’ is love that nests in the chambers of the heart
[هيام] ‘hayam’ is love that wanders the earth
[تيه] ‘teeh’ is love in which you lose yourself
[ولع] ‘walah’ is love that carries sorrow with it
[صبابة] ‘sababah’ is love that exudes from your pores
[هوى] ‘hawa’ is love that shares its name with ‘air’ and ‘falling’
[غرم] ‘gharam’ is love that is willing to pay the price

#5

This is rather a clever use of figurative language, of the kind that can be seen in many works of poetry and fiction. Like the passage from Shakespeare above, it's a good piece of writing, but it's hardly a contravention of the laws of nature.
Refer to the maxim mentioned previously. Perhaps you can bring me something in the language better structured or better worded that gives the same meaning whilst maintaining the same length?

#6

In a similar way to the last three posts, this is merely an explanation of the text (in this case a textual puzzle), and nowhere are we asked to believe that this is somehow a miracle.
In a similar way to the attempted explanations you've been trying to give, you're once again wrong. An explanation is necessary to highlight the spectacular word precision to a non-Arabic speaking forum.

The word Madinah appears in the Qur'an five times but only once do we see Yathrib. Both are a reference to the same city so why use one over the other? Let's see.

Yathrib is the original name of the city, i.e. pre-Islamic name. Madinah is the title of the city after the Prophet (saw) migrated there. The complete title is Madinatun Nabi, i.e. City of the Prophet.

The hypocrites were a problem in the Madinan period. They were fused within the ranks of the Muslims and they were very good at blending in. The only times they would show their true face was during the times of hardship such as when they defected at the time of Uhud. They used to call the city 'Madinah' often as the Muslims used to call it because it showed allegiance to the Prophet (saw). However, like we mentioned before during hardship they exposed themselves. The incident here is during the time of the Battle of al-Ahzab (Battle of the Trench) where the city was surrounded and the Muslims and Madinah was being seiged. Again, as before the hypocrites tried to defect and made their call to the people of Yathrib - thus showing his true allegiance.

A simple usage of 'Yathrib' versus usage of 'Madinah' denotes all this meaning.


#7

This is strange. According to Yasir Qadhi in this video at 2:05, Surah Yusuf was revealed all in one go, not over 23 years. If Yasir Qadhi is right, this would undermine Qatada's claim here.
I'm pretty sure he was referring to the entire Qur'an when he said 23 years, not specifically Surah Yusuf. Notice he said:

Qur’an wasn’t revealed as a book. It was revealed in parts over 23 years!
'It' in the second sentence refers to 'Qur'an' in the first sentence.

#8

This is the palindrome, which I have already answered.
I haven't seen a sufficient response.

#9


This is a good example of what I mean by the low standards needed for something to be perceived as a miracle in the Qur'an. The way the text I've quoted appears, it almost looks like 'Miracle Sounds' is being set up as a definition for 'onomatopoeia', which is of course not true at all.

Onomatopoeia is one of the most commonly used devices in literature the world over, and to say that using it amounts to a miracle is nothing short of preposterous.
I'll give you that perhaps the way the post was constructed was incorrect. Yet, the examples still remain of the Qur'an does this flawlessly across 6000+ verses.


#10

This is another post directed towards explanation, and again no miracle claim is made.
Have you ever actually listened to the Qur'an? I doubt that because what's being illustrated here is that the rhyme scheme across the Qur'an follows the same methodology. Qatada explains it here:
Part of the characteristics of the Quran is that it is something meant to be recited and heard by the people. When someone is listening to this, and they notice an abrupt change they will automatically pay more attention. The rhyme scheme is not beautification only, but it serves a very real purpose in drawing attention to a very important point in the Surah.
As with everything else, these nuances of the language were known to the people - poets used them but when the Qur'an was recited to them they saw it used in a way that left them astounded. The statements of the reigning Arab poets of the time about the Qur'an are well known and considering the fact that they were authorities in knowledge of the language their testament and in addition their own inability to create something like the Qur'an is enough of a proof that it can't be done.


#11


The feature highlighted this time is a rhyme that occurs at the end of 31 verses, and which is then followed by an abrupt change in the rhyme scheme. The monorhyme technique is well-known and is common in Latin, Arabic and Welsh poetry, and the abrupt change in the rhyme scheme is one of many devices that poets have often used to signal important moments. Again, we are not asked in the post itself to believe that this is a miracle.
See above.


#12

The recurrence of similar phrases does not show that the Qur'an is miraculous; it shows that the Qur'an is repetitive.
The funny thing is when you sit down and start looking at these repetitions from the linguistic perspective you'll find that the Qur'an hardly has any repetition.

Let's examine one aspect from these two chapters.

In the middle of the chapters we see a repitition of the same story of Adam and how the angels were commanded to prostrate to him and how Satan refused. Quite repetitive right? Let's look at the context. The primary audience of al-Israa' are the Jews and the primary audience of al-Kahf are the Christians. We know this because the first verses of al-Israa speak to the Jews and the first verses of al-Kahf speak to the Christians.

Both groups believe in Adam but both have different mistakes in their beliefs.

In al-Israa' : أَأَسْجُدُ لِمَنْ خَلَقْتَ طِينًا

Satan says: 'Should I prostrate to one made from clay?'

The Jews didn't believe in the Prophet for what reason? He was not from them.

In al-Kahf: إِلَّا إِبْلِيسَ كَانَ مِنَ الْجِنِّ فَفَسَقَ عَنْ أَمْرِ رَبِّهِ

It says: 'Satan was from al-Jinn who rebelled against the command of his Lord'

The Christians disbelieve for what reason? They believe Jesus is god, they believe Satan is a fallen angel, and they disobeyed the law.

The appropriate lesson from the same story is highlighted to appropriate group of people to teach them the lesson that is relevant to them. This precision is constant through out both chapters down to even word choice. See what I meant when I said the Qur'an is not as repetitive as it may seem?

#13


This is another example of textual explanation; again, no miracle appears to be claimed here.
Explained above. It's funny how every other you're passing of as textual explanation when it's required when the message is being explained to a non-Arabic speaking audience. Just because it's being explained does not take away from the miracle.

Secondly, as Ive said before these are just examples from different places in the Qur'an of it's literary superiority.
Literary structures are composed of many elements that are too numerous to be discussed in detail in this article. They include diction, phonology, rhetoric, composition, morphology, syntax, architecture, rhythm, and style, in addition to matters related to tone, voice, orality, imagery, symbolism, allegory, genre, point of view, intertexuality, intratextual resonance, and other literary aspects – all of which are set within a historical, cultural, intellectual, and psychological context. These elements combine with each other in the Qur’an in myriad ways that produce the Qur’an’s unique character.
#14

This post explains how two different words have been used in the Qur'an to describe two different types of happiness. Is there anything miraculous in this?
Yes. Precision of word choice. Your problem is that you're looking at them as isolated instances whereas this is something that occurs constantly in the Qur'an. The miracle is how it's been done flawlessly in a text that has over 6000 verses!

#15 & #16

More textual explanation. Even if you do believe that these are good pieces of writing, that clearly does not make them miraculous.
The word used in the verse is فؤاد which is translated as heart. Another word which is translated the same is قلب . See the problem? Both when translated are the same thing but are completely different in the Arabic language. There is so much lost in translation.

I'll leave you something to ponder over:

Chapter 28, verse 10:

وأصبح فؤاد أم موسى فارغا إن كادت لتبدي به لولا أن ربطنا على قلبها لتكون من المؤمنين

[And the heart of Moses' mother became empty [of all else]. She was about to disclose [the matter concerning] him had We not bound fast her heart that she would be of the believers.]

The underline portioned of the verse in Arabic and it's translation correspond to each other. Yet the words are different and translated the same. Perhaps you can explain to me the difference?

Do you see the handicap that you have when trying to even understand this in a language other than that of Arabic?

In most of these posts, the miracle claim is so weak that it is not even mentioned. It is as if any feature of the text at all is welcome in the thread. There is nothing here to persuade anyone who isn't already convinced that there is anything miraculous in the Qur'an use of language.

Peace
It's really interesting to see how someone who is ignorant of the Arabic language tries to pass judgment on something he knows nothing about. At the very least, the humble thing to do would be to admit the evident ignorance and go and attempt to learn the language even at a very basic level and then attempt to reexamine the subject after having the necessary prerequisites.

The Arabic language is so rich in it's vocabulary and its rhetorical devices to the extent that for one to come up with something as large as the Qur'an whilst maintaining all the nuances of the language, perfect word precision, perfect usage of grammar, morhpology and syntax is impossible for the human to do. How many times does an author write a chapter only to go back to it and edit? Then once he completes writing a book, how much of an editorial process does it have to go to before it becomes publish-worthy? Even then, there are mistakes and problems and that too in a language as simple as English. Yet the Messenger had only one chance to get it right because the Qur'an was spoken. When you speak you can't take back what you just said nor can you edit it later on. When the Messenger spoke the Qur'an that was it, it was a done deal and that itself is a testament to it's divine nature.

One can never do justice to the Arabic language except in Arabic. Anyway, I don't believe czgibson will get much of the response and that is expected from someone who doesn't understand the language and continue to be adamant in repeating the same [mis]understandings he has. Either way I want to leave whoever is reading this post with a small illustration of the depth of the language by itself:

Ibn Khalawayh said that the Arabs have five hundred names for the lion, and two hundred names for the snake. Whether these names (and others like them) are absolute synonyms is a point of contention among the linguists, but I believe the strongest opinion among them is that there are shades of differences among the meanings of each one and no two mean exactly the same thing.

Some examples of this precision in vocabulary:

A bare dinner table is called a khiwaan خِوان. When it is laden with food it becomes a maa'idah مائدة.

An empty drinking glass is called a koob كوب or a qadah قدح . When it has liquid in it, it becomes a ka's كأس.

The wind that blows between two winds is called a nakbaa' نكباء.

The wind that is so soft it does not shake the trees is called a naseem نسيم.

The verb that describes eating all that is on the dinner table is iqtamma اِقتمّ.

The verb that describes drinking all that is in a vessel is ishtaffa اشتفّ.

The verb that describes an infant drinking all its mother's milk is imtakka امتكّ.

The verb that describes milking a camel of all that is in its udders is nahaka نهك.

The verb that describes taking all the water out of a well is nazafa نزف.

It is no wonder then that some of the jurists said,

كلام العرب لا يحيط به إلا نبيّ

"No one can have full knowledge of the language of the Arabs other than a Prophet."

http://arabicgems.wordpress.com/2006/03/01/precision/
It is especially important to be aware of these subtleties when their words appear in the Qur'an, for only then can one understand the true nature of the message. In this regard, I present the degrees of sleep in Arabic:

1. al-nu'aas النُّعاس - this is when a person's eyes becomes tired or drowsy and feels the need for sleep. This word was used by Allaah when he gave the Muslims at the Battle of Badr a break before the fighting began to strengthen them, as mentioned in al-Anfal, verse 11,

إِذْ يُغَشِّيكُمُ النُّعَاسَ أَمَنَةً مِّنْهُ وَيُنَزِّلُ عَلَيْكُم مِّن السَّمَاء مَاء لِّيُطَهِّرَكُم بِهِ وَيُذْهِبَ عَنكُمْ رِجْزَ الشَّيْطَانِ وَلِيَرْبِطَ عَلَى قُلُوبِكُمْ وَيُثَبِّتَ بِهِ الأَقْدَامَ

[Remember] when He covered you with a slumber as a security from Him, and He caused rain to descend on you from the sky, to clean you thereby and to remove from you the whisperings of Satan, and to strengthen your hearts, and make your feet firm thereby.

It is interesting to note that al-nu'aas was sent to them as opposed to al-wasan, perhaps indicating that while their eyes were given the chance to sleep and rest, their minds remained fit and alert. And Allaah knows best.

2. al-wasan الوَسَن - this is when the tiredness intensifies in the head, and it becomes heavy with its need for sleep. Some linguists said the distinction between al-wasan and al-nu'aas is extremely slight in degree, and they only differ in their place (al-nu'aas in the eyes, and al-wasan in the head). The verbal noun is sinah سِنَة as in al-Baqarah, verse 255,

اللّهُ لاَ إِلَـهَ إِلاَّ هُوَ الْحَيُّ الْقَيُّومُ لاَ تَأْخُذُهُ سِنَةٌ وَلاَ نَوْمٌ

Allah! none has the right to be worshipped but He, the Ever Living, the One Who sustains and protects all that exists. Neither tiredness (sinah), nor sleep overtake Him.

3. al-tarneeq الترنيق which is when sleep pervades a person, without him actually sleeping.

4. al-ghumd الغُمض which is a state between sleep and wakefulness.

5. al-taghfeeq التَّغْفيق which is a state of sleep in which one still able to hear what others say.

6. al-ighfaa' الإغْفاء which is a very light sleep.

7. al-tahweem التهويم or al-ghiraar الغِرار or al-tihjaa' التهجاع all of which refer to a sleep of short duration.

8. al-ruqaad الرُّقاد which refers to a very long sleep, as in al-Kahf, verse 18,

وَتَحْسَبُهُمْ أَيْقَاظاً وَهُمْ رُقُودٌ

And you would have thought them awake, while they were asleep

and Yaseen, verse 52, [1]

قَالُوا يَا وَيْلَنَا مَن بَعَثَنَا مِن مَّرْقَدِنَا هَذَا مَا وَعَدَ الرَّحْمَنُ وَصَدَقَ الْمُرْسَلُونَ

They will say: "Woe to us! Who has raised us up from our place of sleep." (It will be said to them): "This is what the Most Beneficent (Allah) had promised, and the Messengers spoke truth!"

9. al-hujood الهُجود or al-hujoo' الهجوع or al-huboo' الهبوع which refer to a very deep sleep.

10. al-tasbeekh التسبيخ which refers to the strongest, deepest type of sleep.

11. al-subaat السبات which refers to a coma. [2]

[1] The marqad مرقد is the noun of place from the same root ر ق د.

[2] al-tasbeekh comes from the root س ب خ. In light of the previous post on ishtiqaaq note the relationship between the meaning of the word tasbeekh from this root, and the word subaat from the root س ب ت.
http://arabicgems.wordpress.com/2006...p-sleep-sleep/

Anyway, my intent with this post was to illustrate how ridiculous an attempt looks when it is to aimed to try and refute something in a language other than the language one knows, especially when the matter is about the intricacies of the other language itself. It's a waste of time for everyone and doesn't do justice to the matter being discussed.
Reply

Insaanah
04-02-2010, 09:32 PM
:sl:

To be honest, the primary concern of non-Muslims should not be with the linguistic miracle of the Qur'an, which they cannot fully appreciate or understand without having learnt some knowledge of the Arabic language. So they are in no position to discuss or dismiss it, and neither should we bother trying to discuss, explain, or convince them of it. It is a waste of everyone's time. The opinion of someone not qualified to discuss a subject does not hold much weight.

A non-Muslim's primary concern should be with reading the Qur'an to gain guidance. And our primary purpose should be conveying and explaining that guidance. We have all been given free will, and if she/he does not gain guidance, we can and should try to explain and discuss if they have a sincere desire to learn rather than them passing judgement on things they have no knowledge of. If we did explain, or if they did read the translation of the Qur'an, then at least they received the message, for which they will be held accountable.

As such, I suggest we Muslims continue to discuss the miracle of the linguistics of the Qur'an in this thread, and not get diverted. Anyone with a sincere desire to learn, should occupy themselves first with the message of the Qur'an and the guidance contained within it; the linguistics can come later.

"...... and when the ignorant address them, they say: "Peace." (Al-Qur'an, 25: end of 63)

:sl:

Peace, to the non-Muslims.
Reply

جوري
04-02-2010, 10:28 PM
Originally Posted by Insane Insaan
:sl:

To be honest, the primary concern of non-Muslims should not be with the linguistic miracle of the Qur'an, which they cannot fully appreciate or understand without having learnt some knowledge of the Arabic language. So they are in no position to discuss or dismiss it, and neither should we bother trying to discuss, explain, or convince them of it. It is a waste of everyone's time. The opinion of someone not qualified to discuss a subject does not hold much weight.

A non-Muslim's primary concern should be with reading the Qur'an to gain guidance. And our primary purpose should be conveying and explaining that guidance. We have all been given free will, and if she/he does not gain guidance, we can and should try to explain and discuss if they have a sincere desire to learn rather than them passing judgement on things they have no knowledge of. If we did explain, or if they did read the translation of the Qur'an, then at least they received the message, for which they will be held accountable.

As such, I suggest we Muslims continue to discuss the miracle of the linguistics of the Qur'an in this thread, and not get diverted. Anyone with a sincere desire to learn, should occupy themselves first with the message of the Qur'an and the guidance contained within it; the linguistics can come later.

"The slaves of the Most Gracious are they who walk upon the earth modestly, and when the ignorant address them, they answer: "Peace." (Al-Qur'an, 25:63)

:sl:

Peace, to the non-Muslims.
:sl:

I agree, except that this thread wasn't meant with Non-Muslims in mind given that it is placed here in the Quran section which is clearly not open for discussion or 'critique' as hilarious as it. This is meant for learning purposes only!.. MR. CZ always sees fit to dispense with his one talent and 'expertise' of the English language and I am very generous in acknowledging it as a talent at all to compass a wide range of languages so that even the best poets of the time like ka'ab ibn zuhair whose poem eludes Arabs to modern day and to whom the Quran as to many others was nothing short of divine should pale to the opinion and definitions of this unlearned man who enjoys dispensing his pearls where it is neither needed nor fit..

One time we were discussing the female gender of the bee as per Quran and he thought fit to without hesitation state that it isn't addressed in the feminine having looked at a translation which obviously can't engender based on limitations of the English language. What can we say except that there is nothing perhaps worse than ignorance save for little knowledge dispensed at the wrong time and in this case the wrong subject!

:w:
Reply

Chuck
04-03-2010, 06:11 PM
Originally Posted by Gossamer skye
One time we were discussing the female gender of the bee as per Quran and he thought fit to without hesitation state that it isn't addressed in the feminine having looked at a translation which obviously can't engender based on limitations of the English language. What can we say except that there is nothing perhaps worse than ignorance save for little knowledge dispensed at the wrong time and in this case the wrong subject!
Well said!




................
Reply

czgibson
04-04-2010, 02:53 PM
Greetings,

As is often the case in discussions here, pretty much all the points I've made have been missed completely.

Originally Posted by Muraad
Perhaps you can stand up and speak and in the middle of your speech, you will say a sentence that will read the same back and forth without the statement taking anything away from the coherence of your speech. What are the chances of that?
Not huge, but if somebody did it would it really constitute a violation of the laws of nature?

Because it shows two things,

1) That it's not the main focus of the Book and as such is something complementary. The palindrome is not the reason the Qur'an is literary miracle, that has to do with other things as mentioned in an earlier post by Qatada.
2) That it shows that Messenger was illiterate. He didn't know that it just so happened that there was a palindrome in one of the verses he spoke.
These are side issues that are not logically connected to the fact that a literary device was discovered after the text's composition.

And let's make it clear that what are being highlighted here are only isolated examples from the Qur'an. They appear constantly and flawlessly through 114 chapters, 6000+ verses without a break. We have yet to find someone who can come up with a single chapter that meets same literary magnificience of the Qur'an.
This shows the same naive understanding of how literature works that I've mentioned earlier.

And this exactly shows why you should not be commenting on something you don't understand in the original language. The miracle here is not just that a verse gives the life story, rather it's the language used to portray that message. Why was the word لَعِبٌ used, why was لَهْوٌ used? Secondly, why the particular word order and not the other way around? Thirdly, why was the placement of the verse in that particular place and not two verses before or after?
As in much of your post, your argument here essentially boils down to "You can't read Arabic. Naa na na naa na!" Why didn't you just write that, in accordance with the Arabic proverb you gave?

The point you're missing is this: The Qur'an may or may not be a particularly good piece of writing. We might disagree on this, but as you rightly say, I'm not properly qualified to judge, given that I'm not fluent in Arabic. But simply being a good piece of writing does not qualify something as being a miracle - a violation of the laws of nature. Many writers construct sentences beautifully, making word choices with astonishing precision - that is in a sense their job - but we don't assume that the laws of nature have been broken every time they produce a good piece of writing.

The challenge here is if you think this is unimpressive in the Arabic language then show me in the Arabic language how a different word choice can give the same eloquence and retain the exact same depth of meaning. In other words, the precision of word choices such that any other word would not fit in the place of another.
How can we measure eloquence? Again, you show no real understanding of how literature works.

Therefore, you haven't even begun to show why this is not a linguistic miracle. Remember, we're speaking about the Arabic language here and the miracle exists only there because the Qur'an is only in Arabic. Until you can show via the language using its morphology, syntax and grammar why the sentence is flawed or why it can be imitated, until then you have no argument and this applies here and to all other examples as I'll demonstrate.
The idea that the Qur'an can only exist in Arabic is the biggest red herring in this discussion. Why is it that Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Cervantes, Rabelais, Shakespeare, Pascal, Dostoyevsky and countless others can have their works translated and still retain their power, but the Almighty cannot?

Word choice my friend. In Arabic one can use either وَالِدَيْنِ or اب و ام translated they both mean the same, which obviously is why you fail to see the difference. But in Arabic when you use one and not the other the language provides a different depth of meaning. The linguistic understanding one gets from hearing وَالِدَيْنِ is different from اب و ام and in the verse mentioned اب و ام would not give the intended meaning and depth that وَالِدَيْنِ provides. See the end of this post for why this is important in terms of the language.
Again, you're probably right when you say this is a good choice of words, but why does that make it miraculous?

Perhaps you can bring me something in the language better structured or better worded that gives the same meaning whilst maintaining the same length?
There is no objective standard for judging sentence structure and phrasing, so the challenge is meaningless.

In a similar way to the attempted explanations you've been trying to give, you're once again wrong. An explanation is necessary to highlight the spectacular word precision to a non-Arabic speaking forum.
Fair enough, but this is the same point again: it may be a good word choice, but why does that make it a miracle?

I'm pretty sure he was referring to the entire Qur'an when he said 23 years, not specifically Surah Yusuf. Notice he said:

'It' in the second sentence refers to 'Qur'an' in the first sentence.
Yes: but why mention it in a post describing the supposedly amazing composition of the text of Surah Yusuf? Unless you interpret the whole post as I have, the information concerning '23 years' is irrelevant.

I haven't seen a sufficient response.
All of the palindromes I gave were meaningful and contained more than four words. How did they not satisfactorily answer Qatada's challenge?

I'll give you that perhaps the way the post was constructed was incorrect.
It's symptomatic of the uncritical way that Muslims are taught to read the Qur'an, automatically accepting claims that are wildly over the top.

Have you ever actually listened to the Qur'an? I doubt that because what's being illustrated here is that the rhyme scheme across the Qur'an follows the same methodology.
I have listened to the Qur'an several times. You didn't think I would spend five years on a forum learning about Islam and miss that particular experience, did you?

As with everything else, these nuances of the language were known to the people - poets used them but when the Qur'an was recited to them they saw it used in a way that left them astounded. The statements of the reigning Arab poets of the time about the Qur'an are well known and considering the fact that they were authorities in knowledge of the language their testament and in addition their own inability to create something like the Qur'an is enough of a proof that it can't be done.
On the point about the rhyme scheme: yes, it is a well-known technique, and I'm happy to believe the Arabic poets when they say it has been used extremely well, but why does that make it miraculous?

On the inability to create something like the Qur'an: as I've already said, such a challenge is as meaningless as asking someone to come up with a text similar to any major work of literature.

The funny thing is when you sit down and start looking at these repetitions from the linguistic perspective you'll find that the Qur'an hardly has any repetition.

...

See what I meant when I said the Qur'an is not as repetitive as it may seem?
Now you've lost me. I've read the book; I know how repetitive it is.

Secondly, as Ive said before these are just examples from different places in the Qur'an of it's literary superiority.
Again, there is no objective measure of this, so the claim is meaningless.

Literary structures are composed of many elements that are too numerous to be discussed in detail in this article. They include diction, phonology, rhetoric, composition, morphology, syntax, architecture, rhythm, and style, in addition to matters related to tone, voice, orality, imagery, symbolism, allegory, genre, point of view, intertexuality, intratextual resonance, and other literary aspects – all of which are set within a historical, cultural, intellectual, and psychological context. These elements combine with each other in the Qur’an in myriad ways that produce the Qur’an’s unique character.
This is a weak attempt to blind readers' judgments with some fancy terms. If you were aware of what even half of these terms mean you would know that they are present in almost any fictional text. Substitute Don Quixote, Hamlet or even Harry Potter for 'the Qur'an' and the paragraph remains just as meaningful.


Yes. Precision of word choice. Your problem is that you're looking at them as isolated instances whereas this is something that occurs constantly in the Qur'an. The miracle is how it's been done flawlessly in a text that has over 6000 verses!
I'm willing to believe you for the sake of argument, but many other texts behave in similar ways and we would never think of them as being miraculous. If you truly believed what you are saying here, you would logically have to regard many other texts as miraculous too. Take James Joyce's Ulysses for example. It contains every literary device you've mentioned so far, plus many, many more. It is longer than the Qur'an (732 pages in its first edition), and contains one of the largest vocabularies of any text in any language. It is an extraordinary achievement by any standard. But is it miraculous? Of course not.

The word used in the verse is فؤاد which is translated as heart. Another word which is translated the same is قلب . See the problem? Both when translated are the same thing but are completely different in the Arabic language. There is so much lost in translation.
I'm sure you're right, but how does precision with word choice qualify as a miracle?

The Arabic language is so rich in it's vocabulary and its rhetorical devices to the extent that for one to come up with something as large as the Qur'an whilst maintaining all the nuances of the language, perfect word precision, perfect usage of grammar, morhpology and syntax is impossible for the human to do.
Your argument now seems to be: "It is so difficult to write well in Arabic, that when it happens over the course of a lengthy text, it must be a miracle." Is that fair?

How many times does an author write a chapter only to go back to it and edit? Then once he completes writing a book, how much of an editorial process does it have to go to before it becomes publish-worthy? Even then, there are mistakes and problems and that too in a language as simple as English. Yet the Messenger had only one chance to get it right because the Qur'an was spoken. When you speak you can't take back what you just said nor can you edit it later on. When the Messenger spoke the Qur'an that was it, it was a done deal and that itself is a testament to it's divine nature.
This is a matter of belief.

One can never do justice to the Arabic language except in Arabic. Anyway, I don't believe czgibson will get much of the response and that is expected from someone who doesn't understand the language and continue to be adamant in repeating the same [mis]understandings he has.
Oh, I'm still here! I'm very interested in discussing this with you. Thank you for not getting too emotional about it thus far.

Anyway, my intent with this post was to illustrate how ridiculous an attempt looks when it is to aimed to try and refute something in a language other than the language one knows, especially when the matter is about the intricacies of the other language itself. It's a waste of time for everyone and doesn't do justice to the matter being discussed.
It's the appellation of the word 'miracle' that I'm most concerned with here, and that is a claim that can be expressed in any language. As for it being a waste of time: you were the one who asked for this discussion. If you've grown bored of it, then you are free to leave it any time you like.

Btw, Qatada: I answered your post in the last four paragraphs found here.

Btw, Skye: you were of course quite right about the bee. I'm always happy to be proved wrong - thanks.

Peace
Reply

CosmicPathos
04-04-2010, 03:12 PM
Originally Posted by czgibson
Greetings,

As is often the case in discussions here, pretty much all the points I've made have been missed completely.



Not huge, but if somebody did it would it really constitute a violation of the laws of nature?



These are side issues that are not logically connected to the fact that a literary device was discovered after the text's composition.



This shows the same naive understanding of how literature works that I've mentioned earlier.



As in much of your post, your argument here essentially boils down to "You can't read Arabic. Naa na na naa na!" Why didn't you just write that, in accordance with the Arabic proverb you gave?

The point you're missing is this: The Qur'an may or may not be a particularly good piece of writing. We might disagree on this, but as you rightly say, I'm not properly qualified to judge, given that I'm not fluent in Arabic. But simply being a good piece of writing does not qualify something as being a miracle - a violation of the laws of nature. Many writers construct sentences beautifully, making word choices with astonishing precision - that is in a sense their job - but we don't assume that the laws of nature have been broken every time they produce a good piece of writing.



How can we measure eloquence? Again, you show no real understanding of how literature works.



The idea that the Qur'an can only exist in Arabic is the biggest red herring in this discussion. Why is it that Homer, Plato, Dante, Chaucer, Cervantes, Rabelais, Shakespeare, Pascal, Dostoyevsky and countless others can have their works translated and still retain their power, but the Almighty cannot?



Again, you're probably right when you say this is a good choice of words, but why does that make it miraculous?



There is no objective standard for judging sentence structure and phrasing, so the challenge is meaningless.



Fair enough, but this is the same point again: it may be a good word choice, but why does that make it a miracle?



Yes: but why mention it in a post describing the supposedly amazing composition of the text of Surah Yusuf? Unless you interpret the whole post as I have, the information concerning '23 years' is irrelevant.



All of the palindromes I gave were meaningful and contained more than four words. How did they not satisfactorily answer Qatada's challenge?



It's symptomatic of the uncritical way that Muslims are taught to read the Qur'an, automatically accepting claims that are wildly over the top.



I have listened to the Qur'an several times. You didn't think I would spend five years on a forum learning about Islam and miss that particular experience, did you?



On the point about the rhyme scheme: yes, it is a well-known technique, and I'm happy to believe the Arabic poets when they say it has been used extremely well, but why does that make it miraculous?

On the inability to create something like the Qur'an: as I've already said, such a challenge is as meaningless as asking someone to come up with a text similar to any major work of literature.



Now you've lost me. I've read the book; I know how repetitive it is.



Again, there is no objective measure of this, so the claim is meaningless.



This is a weak attempt to blind readers' judgments with some fancy terms. If you were aware of what even half of these terms mean you would know that they are present in almost any fictional text. Substitute Don Quixote, Hamlet or even Harry Potter for 'the Qur'an' and the paragraph remains just as meaningful.




I'm willing to believe you for the sake of argument, but many other texts behave in similar ways and we would never think of them as being miraculous. If you truly believed what you are saying here, you would logically have to regard many other texts as miraculous too. Take James Joyce's Ulysses for example. It contains every literary device you've mentioned so far, plus many, many more. It is longer than the Qur'an (732 pages in its first edition), and contains one of the largest vocabularies of any text in any language. It is an extraordinary achievement by any standard. But is it miraculous? Of course not.



I'm sure you're right, but how does precision with word choice qualify as a miracle?



Your argument now seems to be: "It is so difficult to write well in Arabic, that when it happens over the course of a lengthy text, it must be a miracle." Is that fair?



This is a matter of belief.



Oh, I'm still here! I'm very interested in discussing this with you. Thank you for not getting too emotional about it thus far.



It's the appellation of the word 'miracle' that I'm most concerned with here, and that is a claim that can be expressed in any language. As for it being a waste of time: you were the one who asked for this discussion. If you've grown bored of it, then you are free to leave it any time you like.

Btw, Qatada: I answered your post in the last four paragraphs found here.

Btw, Skye: you were of course quite right about the bee. I'm always happy to be proved wrong - thanks.

Peace

Seems you have the missed the whole point. Many authors can do crazy stuff when they isolate themselves to their basement libraries cut off from families. Editing and re-editing theirs works and experimenting with their words. I fail to see when Muhammad (pbuh) had similar opportunities. To compare Muhammad's "Authorship" with those of others such as "Ulysses" is naive if not irrational.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-11-2010, 01:06 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh.
لِّيَجْزِيَ اللَّهُ الصَّادِقِينَ بِصِدْقِهِمْ وَيُعَذِّبَ الْمُنَافِقِينَ إِن شَاءَ أَوْ يَتُوبَ عَلَيْهِمْ ۚ إِنَّ اللَّهَ كَانَ غَفُورًا رَّحِيمًا

(Ahzaab 33:24)

That Allah may reward the truthful for their truth and punish the hypocrites if He wills or accept their repentance. Indeed, Allah is ever Forgiving and Merciful.

Point
#1:

See how; Allah mentions His Name near the Saadiqeen [truthful], yet He does not mention His Name near the hypocrites.

This is done because Allah is close to the Saadiqeen [truthful to themselves and truthful to Allah] - so He mentions His closeness to them by mentioning His Name next to them, and is angry with the hypocrites, so He does not mention His Name near the hypocrites [i.e. He is distant from them].


Point
#2:

But to give hope to those who have hypocrisy in their hearts, He mentions that the hypocrite can still reach that closeness to Allah, and that can only be reached by approaching His Forgiveness and Mercy.

He pictures this by placing His Names of Mercy (Ghafoor & Raheem) next to the Name; Allah, so the hypocrite will only get closer to Allah by approaching His Forgiveness & Mercy.


Point #1 is used many times in the Qur'an, sometimes in selected aayaat/verses [like above], sometimes in whole Surahs i.e. in Surah Tariq, Allah does not even mention His Name once, due to His Anger against the rejectors/disbelievers.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-11-2010, 06:45 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh

Think About These Words From Different Angles
Shaykh Ibn al-Uthaymeen


Think about these words from different angles [my comments in (Italics)]:


[وَقَالَ الَّذِينَ فِى النَّارِ لِخَزَنَةِ جَهَنَّمَ ادْعُواْ رَبَّكُمْ يُخَفِّفْ عَنَّا يَوْماً مِّنَ الْعَذَابِ
(And those in the Fire will say to the keepers (angels) of Hell: “Call upon your Lord to lighten for us the torment for a day!”) [Ghafir:49]

1. They didnt ask Allah Subhanahu wa Ta’ala, they asked the keepers of Jahannam [hell] to make dua for them, Because Allah had told them,
[اخْسَئُواْ فِيهَا وَلاَ تُكَلِّمُونِ]

(Remain you in it with ignominy! And speak you not to Me!)

So they saw themselves that they are not worthy of asking Allah and supplicate to Him rather they invoke to Him via intermediate (didn't the idolators used to invoke intermediaries in this life to 'get their prayers answered'?).


2. They said ”Call upon your Lord”, and didnt say Call upon our Lord because their faces and hearts cannot comprehend or say ”Our Lord”, they are in the state of shame and humility that they see themselves unworthy of claiming the Lordship of Allah to them rather they said ”Your Lord”.


3. They didnt say remove from us the punishment but they said (Lighten) because they are (Allah’s refuge is sought) despair from the Mercy of Allah (didn't the idolators used to despair of Allah's Mercy [by saying things like; "I am too sinful to repent"], and that's why they were unrepentant in this worldly life?).



4. They didnt say lighten the punishment for us forever rather they said ”For a Day”, only one day.


From this it is clear that they are in state of severe punishment, shame and humiliation,
وَتَرَاهُمْ يُعْرَضُونَ عَلَيْهَا خَـشِعِينَ مِنَ الذُّلِّ يَنظُرُونَ مِن طَرْفٍ خَفِىٍّ وَقَالَ الَّذِينَ ءَامَنُواْ إِنَّ الْخَـسِرِينَ الَّذِينَ خَسِرُواْ أَنفُسَهُمْ وَأَهْلِيهِمْ يَوْمَ الْقِيَـمَةِ أَلاَ إِنَّ الظَّـلِمِينَ فِى عَذَابٍ مُّقِيمٍ
”And you will see them brought forward to it (Hell) made humble by disgrace, (and) looking with stealthy glance. [ash-Shura:45] And those who believe will say: “Verily, the losers are they who lose themselves and their families on the Day of Resurrection.” [Zumar 39:15] Verily, the wrongdoers will be in a lasting torment.”


Sheikh Saalih ibn ‘Uthaymeen – Liqaa al Maftooh – No. 11 side A
Reply

- Qatada -
04-11-2010, 06:47 PM
Asalam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh


Alot of the stuff is from Nouman Ali Khan who gives talks on the Qur'an with easy to understand tafseer, while explaining the depth of each word in the Surahs context.


It's kool cuz you get a new & deeper understanding of each surah in a fresh perspective. Check out his talks;

http://bayyinah.com/dreams/podcast


Or check some notes for Surah Zalzala, or Surah Tariq, or Surah Naba.
Reply

Beardo
04-11-2010, 06:49 PM
^ I love Shaykh Abdul Nasir Jangda from Bayyinah. I attended that Meaningful Prayer course they were offering. I haven't heard Shaykh Noman Ali Khan yet thogh.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-12-2010, 08:20 PM
Originally Posted by Rashad
^ I love Shaykh Abdul Nasir Jangda from Bayyinah. I attended that Meaningful Prayer course they were offering. I haven't heard Shaykh Noman Ali Khan yet thogh.
:salamext:


you'll love him, they're all a kool team mashaa' Allah :)
Reply

- Qatada -
04-12-2010, 08:42 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


The Qur'an was Nazala, and the Torah & Gospel were Anzala.

What's the Difference?


In Surah Aal 'Imraan, verse 3,
نَزَّلَ عَلَيْكَ الْكِتَابَ بِالْحَقِّ مُصَدِّقاً لِّمَا بَيْنَ يَدَيْهِ وَأَنزَلَ التَّوْرَاةَ وَالإِنجِيلَ
It is He Who has sent down the Book (the Quran) to you (Muhammad SAW) with truth, confirming what came before it. And he sent down the Torah and the Gospel.

Although the English translation reflects no difference in the original words that were used to convey the meaning of 'sent down', a look at the Arabic will show us that the form nazzala نزَّلَwas used in reference to the Qur'an while the form anzala أَنْزَلَwas used in reference to the Torah and the Gospel.

The reason for this goes back to the manner of revelation – the Qur'an was gradually revealed in a number of stages that spanned the 23 years of the Prophet Muhammad's (sallaa Allaahu 'alayhi wa sallam) Prophethood, as is reflected by the form nazzalawhich indicates repetition and graduality, while the Torah and the Gospel were revealed to the Prophets Musa (Moses) and 'Eesa (Jesus) at one time, as reflected by the form anzala.




This difference is more beautifully sealed when we look at the first verse of Surah al-Qadr,

إِنَّا أَنزَلْنَاهُ فِي لَيْلَةِ الْقَدْرِ
Verily! We have sent it (this Quran) down in the night of Al-Qadr (Decree)
In this verse, Allaah has used the verb anzala – which does not reflect graduality – to describe the revelation of the Qur'an, although He previously used nazzala! The reason for this is clear when the word is considered in it's context, as is explained by Ibn 'Abbas and others,
"Allah sent the Qur'an down all at one time from the Preserved Tablet to the House of Might (Bayt al-'Izzah), which is in the heaven of this world. Then it came down in parts to the Messenger of Allah based upon the incidents that occurred over a period of twenty-three years.''
Thus, it is clear that this verse is referring to Allaah sending the Qur'an down at one time to Bayt al-'Izzah on Laylat al-Qadr, and not to its gradual revelation to the Prophet; a concept so precisely and beautifully conveyed just through knowing the meaning of the forms used in the original Arabic.

Reply

- Qatada -
04-13-2010, 01:48 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


The Angels Write down What you Do
[Taf'aloon].
وَإِنَّ عَلَيْكُمْ لَحَافِظِينَ
And indeed, [appointed] over you are keepers,


كِرَامًا كَاتِبِين
Noble and recording;

يَعْلَمُونَ مَا تَفْعَلُونَ
They know whatever you do.


(Infitar 82: 10-12)

Two words could be used to describe the angels writing the actions that you do:

'Aml or Fi'l.

Both words loosely translated would mean; To do an action. So why do the angels write down what you Taf'aloon?



The definitions
:

'Aml عمل : To do an action based on Intent. An action you do with intent/with conscience. Ie. Your intended actions/deeds; Eating, Watching with focused intent, hearing with focused intent, reading etc.

or

Fi'l فعل : To do any action. an action you do, even without thinking about it. Ie. Breathing. Seeing, hearing, blinking etc.


The Angels witness and write down what you Taf'aloon; anything you do - they write it down without exception.

They don't know your intentions, so they don't write down any of your intentions.


Allah will judge people on Judgment Day, and some people will have mountains of good actions recorded for them by the angels. However, they will not be rewarded for them - because they had no sincerety to Allah in their actions.



So we should strive to do good 'Aml, not just good Fi'l.




Reply

- Qatada -
04-13-2010, 03:51 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.

وَأَمَّا السَّائِلَ فَلَا تَنْهَرْ

Waamma assaa-ila fala tanhar.

And as for the beggar, do not repel [him]. [Duha 93:10]

The word used in that verse is Nahr, and Nahr means River.


Sometimes, when beggars come to people and ask them for something - people push them aside and ignore them or maybe give abit of money.


However, there are another type of people - these people actually stop at the beggar and start pressurising them. They start ridiculing them, abusing them, and flooding them with insults. The beggar can't do nothing except stand there, whilst a gushing flow of humiliation is being poured upon him.

You can imagine this beggar standing in the middle of a fast flowing River (nahr), being pushed and flooded with the waves of Insults being poured at them.


..and as for the beggar, do not drive [him] away, [do not] repel him on account of his poverty.. (Tafseer Jalalayn [Duha 93:10])
Reply

جوري
04-13-2010, 09:29 PM
^^ sob7an Allah, I have never looked at it that way before.. that is interesting indeed the etymology of the word itself.. btw I enjoy and have enjoyed your monumental effort here, especially with your last thread on zainab and gamal abdul'naser.. I also like the style of delivery I think small doses which are steady are the greatest foundation to mastering just about anything..

Jazaka Allah for this tremendous effort..

:w:
Reply

Rabi Mansur
04-14-2010, 01:42 AM
:sl:

I've been reading "God'ed" which is a really good read. The book is very well put together and extremely interesting. I highly recommend it.

One of the points made in the book, is that one of the miracles of the Qur'an is that like other ancient books, such as the Torah, it is written without diacritical marks and therefore, one word can therefore have multiple meanings. But with the Qur'an, unlike the Torah or other ancient books, all of the possible meanings with all of the words make sense.

Is that true? Can someone who knows Arabic well give me some examples of this?

:wa:
Reply

جوري
04-14-2010, 02:10 AM
absolutely.. this can be demonstrated in suret an'na7l.. it was discussed here extensively I am going to try to find the thread for you insha'Allah

:w:
Reply

Rabi Mansur
04-14-2010, 02:33 AM
شكرا جزيلا

Barraka Allahu Fik

Thanks a lot and God bless you.
Reply

Uthman
04-14-2010, 04:26 PM
This is amazing stuff Br. Qatada! BarakAllaahu feek.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-14-2010, 04:45 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


عَبَسَ وَتَوَلَّىٰ

Abasa watawal-laa
(The Prophet) frowned and turned away


أَن جَاءَهُ الْأَعْمَىٰ

An jaa'ahu al-a'maa
Because there came to him the blind man, [interrupting].


(Surah Abasa 80: 1-2)


What context was this aayah/verse revealed in?


One day the Messenger of Allah was addressing one of the great leaders of the Quraysh while hoping that he would accept Islam. While he was speaking in direct conversation with him, Ibn Umm Maktum [the blind man] came to him, and he was of those who had accepted Islam in its earliest days.

He (Ibn Umm Maktum) then began asking the Messenger of Allah about something, urgently beseeching him [repeatedly]. The Prophet hoped that the [rich noble Qurayshi] man would be guided, so he asked Ibn Umm Maktum to wait for a moment so he could complete his conversation...

Tafsir Ibn Katheer - Surah Abasa:

http://tafsir.com/default.asp?sid=80&tid=57084


However, the blind man kept repeating his question to the Messenger of Allah and - unintentionally - disturbing the conversation of Allah's Messenger. So he asked Ibn Umm Maktum to wait for a moment so he could complete his conversation with the other man.

Due to the persistence of the blind mans demands; He frowned in the face of the blind man and turned away from him in order to continue his discussion with the other man.


So Allah revealed these aayaat/verses:
(He frowned and turned away. Because there came to him the blind man. And how can you know that he might become pure) (Or he might receive admonition, and the admonition might profit him.) (As for him who thinks himself self-sufficient. To him you attend... ) [Surah Abasa 80: 1-5]


Now looking at the situation in context, we see that none of this is can really be blamed on Allah's Messenger.

Why? Let's see;

1) The blind man interrupted the conversation of Allah's Messenger and persisted in that. So really, it would be his error.

2) Allah's Messenger wanted to give dawah [invitation to Islam] to a noble from the Quraysh [elite] because they would hardly listen to his call beforehand, and now that someone's listening - they might accept Islam and influence many others to Islam too (since when an elite member of society accepts a truth, the masses look into that truth and more willingly accept it.)

3) The blind man persisted in asking when he had other times to ask too, which causes the listener - who is involved in an important project - to become annoyed when they're in a chance for huge success.

4) This leads to the 'frown' and turning away, which really - a blind person can't even notice. So is this really an insult to them?

5) Yet Allah would reveal aayaat/verses - which would be recited for many centuries by all people - about this scenario, to show the high level of expectations He has for His Messenger, and his followers. So that he should not even frown and turn away from a blind man (since Allah is still watching us), and that he should call the rich aswell as poor to Islam equally without biased precedence.

Now there are many words in Arabic to describe an angry face in the Arabic language. These are as follows:


Uboos عبوس [noun] - Abasa عبس [verb]. (Frown: Bulging of forehead only due to annoyance.)

Qalaha قله - Grinding Teeth due to anger.

Basar بسر - When the face becomes ugly due to Anger. [also see Surah Muddathir 74:22]

Basal بسل - The face made during extreme anger in war and fighting.


We see that the least minimum of just a frown [uboos] of slight frustration was just shown on the face of Allah's Messenger, yet Allah revealed aayaat/verses about it to forbid it and to raise the - already great - character of His Messenger to the next level.


Afterwards, whenever he [the blind man Ibn Um Maktum] came to him, the Prophet would say to him, ( مرحبا بمن عاتبني فيه ربي ) ‘Greetings to him on whose account God reproached me!’, and would lay down his cloak for him. (Tafseer Jalalayn 80:2)



So we learn from this aayah/verse that Allah is watching even the smallest of things that we do, He is aware of the subtleties in our actions. And He will take us to account for them.





Reply

- Qatada -
04-14-2010, 05:00 PM
The Strangeness of Judgment Day...


Running away from those you Love:


In life, when you're scared of something - you run to your family for security and help. However, on this Day - the total opposite happens;


فَإِذَا جَاءَتِ الصَّاخَّةُ

يَوْمَ يَفِرُّ الْمَرْءُ مِنْ أَخِيهِ

وَأُمِّهِ وَأَبِيهِ

وَصَاحِبَتِهِ وَبَنِيهِ

لِكُلِّ امْرِئٍ مِّنْهُمْ يَوْمَئِذٍ شَأْنٌ يُغْنِيهِ


But when there comes the Deafening Blast. That Day shall a man flee from his brother, And his mother and his father. And his wife and his children, Everyman, that Day, will have enough to make him careless of others.

[Abasa 80: 33-37]
So the ones you ran to in this life for help - you will run away from, because they have caused the most harm or benefit to you, since you interacted with them the most in this life [the ones with the favours wanting their good back, and the ones you did evil to wanting to blame you].

So running away from them in that situation seems most suitable.



Uniting the ones who Hate:


However, the ones who ran away from each other in this life - they will be united and gathered together - whether they like it or not.

وَإِذَا الْوُحُوشُ حُشِرَتْ

And when the wild beasts are gathered

[al-Takweer 81:5]

ungu buffalo lion -

So when you see that lion chasing after that buffalo, then this Lion will be gathered together with the Buffalo on this Day, even though they were running away from each other in this worldly life.



What a Strange Da
y. The ones who are close to each other in this life will be running away from each other, and the ones who are distant and hate each other will be united. Each group will then be gathered for Justice in the Court of Allah.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-14-2010, 05:15 PM
Originally Posted by rabimansur
:sl:

I've been reading "God'ed" which is a really good read. The book is very well put together and extremely interesting. I highly recommend it.

One of the points made in the book, is that one of the miracles of the Qur'an is that like other ancient books, such as the Torah, it is written without diacritical marks and therefore, one word can therefore have multiple meanings. But with the Qur'an, unlike the Torah or other ancient books, all of the possible meanings with all of the words make sense.

Is that true? Can someone who knows Arabic well give me some examples of this?

:wa:
An example is given here;

Allāh سبحانه و تعالى tells us,
وَاتَّبَعُوا مَا تَتْلُو الشَّيَاطِينُ عَلَىٰ مُلْكِ سُلَيْمَانَ ۖ وَمَا كَفَرَ سُلَيْمَانُ وَلَـٰكِنَّ الشَّيَاطِينَ كَفَرُوا يُعَلِّمُونَ النَّاسَ السِّحْرَ وَمَا أُنزِلَ عَلَى الْمَلَكَيْنِ بِبَابِلَ هَارُوتَ وَمَارُوتَ ۚ وَمَا يُعَلِّمَانِ مِنْ أَحَدٍ حَتَّىٰ يَقُولَا إِنَّمَا نَحْنُ فِتْنَةٌ فَلَا تَكْفُرْ ۖ فَيَتَعَلَّمُونَ مِنْهُمَا مَا يُفَرِّقُونَ بِهِ بَيْنَ الْمَرْءِ وَزَوْجِهِ ۚ وَمَا هُم بِضَارِّينَ بِهِ مِنْ أَحَدٍ إِلَّا بِإِذْنِ اللَّهِ ۚ

“They followed what the Shayāṭīn (devils) gave out (falsely of the magic) in the lifetime of Sulaymān (Solomon). Sulaymān did not disbelieve, but the Shayāṭīn (devils) disbelieved, teaching men magic and such things that came down at Babylon to the two angels, Hārūt and Mārūt, but neither of these two (angels) taught anyone (such things) till they had said, “We are only for trial, so disbelieve not (by learning this magic from us).” And from these (angels) people learn that by which they cause separation between man and his wife, but they could not thus harm anyone except by Allāh’s Leave…”


The word Allāh سبحانه و تعالى has used to mention about the Hārūt and Mārūt is الْمَلَكَيْنِ. The root of this word is مَلَكَ which means an Angel [malikayn in the verse is 'two angels']. But, Imām al-Baghawī رحمه الله mentions in his tafsīr that Abdullāh bin Abbās رضي الله عنهما, Al-Ḥasan رحمه الله and Imām Fakhrud-Dīn ar-Rāzī رحمه الله mentions that aḍ-Ḍaḥḥāk رحمه الله used to recite the word as الْمَلِكَيْنِ [2]whose root is مَلِكَ [which means king, and malikayn = two kings] with a kasraħ on lām rather than fatḥaħ. This fact is also mentioned in Tafsīr al-Kashshāf by Imām az-Zamakhsharī


[1] Sūraħ al-Baqaraħ, 2:102 [2] M'ālim at-Tanzīl


click to continue reading;
http://tafseerulquran.wordpress.com/...c-recitations/


All the reciting styles - even without diacritical marks - are all revealed to Allah's Messenger from Allah who spoke them Himself. So we can't compose our own. It has to be authentically established from authentic sources i.e. Allah spoke them, which was revealed to Angel Gabriel [Jibril], revealed to Prophet Muhammad, who recited them to his companions, who compiled them in the Masaahif [compilations] of companion Uthman - which are still preserved today [i.e. in the Topkapi museum of Turkey etc].
Reply

- Qatada -
04-15-2010, 01:04 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.

‘the waaw (و)(in Surah al Faatir [35:32]) has a right to be written with teardrops.’


Shaykh Muhammad al-Ameen al-Shanqeeti mentioned in his book Adhwaa’ al-Bayaan that from amongst the verses that give the most hope to a believer is:

ثُمَّ أَوْرَثْنَا الْكِتَابَ الَّذِينَ اصْطَفَيْنَا مِنْ عِبَادِنَا ۖ فَمِنْهُمْ ظَالِمٌ لِّنَفْسِهِ وَمِنْهُم مُّقْتَصِدٌ وَمِنْهُمْ سَابِقٌ بِالْخَيْرَاتِ بِإِذْنِ اللَّهِ ۚ ذَٰلِكَ هُوَ الْفَضْلُ الْكَبِيرُ

"“Then We gave the Book (the Quran) for inheritance to such of Our slaves whom We chose. Then of them are some who wrong their ownselves, and of them are some who follow a middle course, and of them are some who are, by Allah’s Leave, foremost in good deeds. That (inheritance of the Quran), that is indeed a great grace.”

[al-Faatir 35: 32]"



Point 1:


Allaah `azza wa jall makes it clear in this verse that the Ummah’s inheritance of the Book of Allaah is an indication that He subhaanahu wa ta’aala has chosen it above others, “Then We gave the Book (the Quran) for inheritance to such of Our slaves whom We chose”


Then He clarified that they were of three groups:

First: The dhaalim li-nafsihi - the one who oppresses and wrongs himself, he obeys Allaah and disobeys Him at times. About such a person, Allaah `azza wa jall has said;

وَآخَرُونَ اعْتَرَفُوا بِذُنُوبِهِمْ خَلَطُوا عَمَلًا صَالِحًا وَآخَرَ سَيِّئًا عَسَى اللَّهُ أَن يَتُوبَ عَلَيْهِمْ ۚ إِنَّ اللَّهَ غَفُورٌ رَّحِيمٌ

And [there are] others who have acknowledged their sins. They had mixed a righteous deed with another that was bad. Perhaps Allah will turn to them in forgiveness. Indeed, Allah is Forgiving and Merciful.

Second
:
The muqtasid - the one who takes a middle path. He is the one that obeys Allaah and does not disobey Him, but yet he doesn’t draw closer to Him by the nawaafil (supererogatory deeds).


Third: The saabiq bil-khayraat - the one who races to do righteous deeds and he is the one that performs the obligatory and avoids the muharramaat (forbidden acts) and he draws closer to Allaah with acts of obedience that are otherwise not mandatory.

And this is the most correct interpretation regarding the 3 types of people in this verse.


Then Allaah subhaanahu wa ta’aala promised all three of them everlasting Paradise as the next verse says:

جَنَّاتُ عَدْنٍ يَدْخُلُونَهَا يُحَلَّوْنَ فِيهَا مِنْ أَسَاوِرَ مِن ذَهَبٍ وَلُؤْلُؤًا ۖ وَلِبَاسُهُمْ فِيهَا حَرِيرٌ


“‘And (Eden) Paradise will theyenter, therein will they be adorned with bracelets of gold and pearls, and their garments there will be of silk…” [al-Faatir 35: 33]


Point #2
:


The Importance of the Waaw
(و)in Proving all 3 types of people will enter Paradise

This is where the importance of grammer comes in because the only way it is understood that all 3 types of the above people in this Ummah will enter Paradise is due to the letter waaw (و) in the word يدخلونها. This is called the waaw al-jam’ [collective waaw] and it represents the action of 3 or more people, e.g:


يدخل - He enters [singular]
يدخلان - They (2 people only) enter [dual]
يدخلون - They (plural. 3 or more) enter [plural]

This is why some people say regarding the waaw in the above ayah: “حق لهذه الواو أن تكتب بماء العينين” - i.e. ‘this waaw (و) has a right to be written with teardrops.’

And the fact that the first of the 3 types to be mentioned is the one who wrongs himself, brings the most hope to such a person in this Ummah.




Point #3:

The people of knowledge differed as to why the dhaalim li-nafsihi (the one who wrongs himself) was mentioned prior to the the muqtasid (one taking a middle path) and the saabiq (one racing in good). Some of them said that the dhaalim was mentioned first so that he doesn’t despair and the saabiq was mentioned last so that he doesn’t become amazed at his deeds, rendering them vain.

Others said that the dhaalim was preceded first because most of the people in Jannah are those who have wronged themselves and the ones who do not fall into disobedience are very few as is stated in the ayah:

الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا وَعَمِلُوا الصَّالِحَاتِ وَقَلِيلٌ مَّا هُمْ ۗ

...those who believe and do righteous deeds - and few are they.. [Saad 38:24]




References:


Info from: (Adhwaa’ al-Bayaan) أضواء البيان في إيضاح القرآن بالقرآن - by Shaykh Muhammad al-Ameen al-Shanqeeti.

SOURCE: http://fajr.wordpress.com/2007/09/03...ith-teardrops/
Reply

- Qatada -
04-15-2010, 07:42 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh.


وَإِذَا مَرِضْتُ فَهُوَ يَشْفِينِ


..and when I fall ill, He is the One who restores me to health.

(ash-Shu'ara 26:80)


مَرِضْتُ

I fall ill, There is a very delicate point here; the respect and care that the Prophets'/Messengers' of Allah pay towards Allah (swt.)


Abraham/Ibraheem (peace be upon him) does not say "when Allah makes me ill" rather he says "when I fall ill", therefore not directly attributing his illness to Allah swt. Though he knows well that both health and illness is from Allah (swt). However because we all look at illness as a test, a trial, something difficult, so from the amount of respect he has for Allah (swt), he does not say when Allah makes me sick, but rather he acknowledges his illness as his fault.



فَهُوَ يَشْفِينِ

Then he continues, to say that Allah (swt) is the one who restores his health (i.e. attributing the good to Allah). Giving Allah (swt) the prestige, and position of goodness. يَشْفِينِ this is in a tense that demonstrate that it will happen more than once. So on the one hand Abraham/Ibraheem says when I fall ill, meaning he knows he will, then he acknowledges that Allah (swt) will give him shifa [cure] more than once.

It is due to the goodness of his heart and the goodness that he exhibited in his character, that Allah (swt) chose him - Abraham/Ibrahim - as His khaleel [close friend].




All these mannerisms of Prophet Ibrahim/Abraham towards Allah are described in just 5 words!
Reply

- Qatada -
04-16-2010, 11:47 AM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


Allah (swt) says:


وَاللَّهُ خَلَقَكُمْ وَمَا تَعْمَلُونَ

"While Allah has created you and what you make!"

(as-Saffaat 37: 96)


In Arabic, the word "maa " (in green) has many meanings and can be used in many ways:

It could be used as an ism al-Istifhaam (interrogative particle) such as in the sentence: Maa haadhaa? - What is this?

It could also be a harf al-Nafi (negation) as in: Maa katabtuhu - I did not write it.

Another way it could be used is as an ism al-Isharah (demonstrative pronoun) for example: I'maloo maa shi'tum - Do that which you want to do.

It could also be used as a maa masdariyyah which is something I don't think is found in English.

[The word maausually always implies a negation, i.e. What? i don't.. etc.]

Now the amazing thing here is that all the above ways of using the word "maa" can be accommodated in this one ayah. It is possible that the maa in the ayah could be a maa masdariyyah, an ism al-Isharah, a nafi and an istifhaam.

So if it is taken as a maa masdariyyah then the meaning would be as it is the translation above."While Allah has created you and what you make!"

If it is an Istifhaam then it would be translated as: "But Allah has created you and what have you done?"

If it is an ism al-Isharah then the ayah is: "But Allah has created you and that which you do." It is similar in meaning to the first one, but there is a subtle difference grammatically.

And finally, if it is a nafi then it would be: "But Allah has created you and you have not done (that which you claim)."


So in this one small ayah all these various interpretations are possible and the differences stem from just one word: maa (مَا.)

Also see [Tafsir al Qurtubi. as-Saffaat 37:96]
;
http://quran.al-islam.com/Tafseer/Di...ora=37&nAya=96
Reply

- Qatada -
04-16-2010, 12:59 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


إِيَّاكَ نَعْبُدُ وَإِيَّاكَ نَسْتَعِينُ

Thee (alone) we worship; and Thee (alone) we ask for help. (al-Fatiha 1: 5)

The most fundamental aspect of Islam is that of Tauhid - the oneness of Allah (swt). Nothing else is as important as this one concept. It thus the main theme of the Quran and this ayah makes an indirect reference to it.



A normal Arabic sentence might be: "Kataba Muhammad al-Darsa" - Muhammad wrote the lesson.

In this sentence the first word is the verb (to write) the second one is the doer (Muhammad) and the last word is the object (the lesson). So in normal Arabic sentence structure the verb comes first and then the object.



But in the ayah above the positions of the two are reversed: the object (Iyyaaka - You) is mentioned first and then the verb (Na'budu - we worship) second. And there is profound wisdom in this subtle difference.

In the normal sentence structure; it is possible to add on more objects after the first. For example one could say: 'We worship the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost.' [notice that these objects came after the words; 'We Worship...']

But when the Object is placed firstbefore the action/verb, all attention is payed to that alone and nothing else. That is why the translation is given as "Thee (alone) do we worship" even though the word "alone" is nowhere mentioned in the Arabic of the ayah/verse.



So even the phrasing of the sentence has an effect on the meaning and it is here an allusion to the supreme Oneness of Allah, and the worship of Him alone.




Reply

- Qatada -
04-17-2010, 11:20 AM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.



Allaah `azza wa jall, says in Soorah al-Nisaa:

مَّن يَشْفَعْ شَفَاعَةً حَسَنَةً يَكُن لَّهُ نَصِيبٌ مِّنْهَا ۖ وَمَن يَشْفَعْ شَفَاعَةً سَيِّئَةً يَكُن لَّهُ كِفْلٌ مِّنْهَا ۗ وَكَانَ اللَّهُ عَلَىٰ كُلِّ شَيْءٍ مُّقِيتًا
“Whosoever intercedes for a good cause will have a ‘naseeb’ thereof, and whosoever intercedes for an evil cause will have a ‘kifl’ of it. And Allah is Ever All-Able to do everything.”

[al-Nisaa 4: 85]


Let’s have a look at these 2 separate words (in bold):

نصيبٌ

كِفْلٌ

They both mean the same thing – they both meanportion or ‘a part of something’.

Allaah (`azza wa jall) is informing us that the one who intercedes for a good or a bad cause will receive a portion of that deed written down for him.



But why the 2 different words if they both mean the same thing? Well, do they mean exactly the same thing? Let’s take a look.



Kifl:
The word ‘kifl’ is very ‘muhaddad’ – restricted and bounded. In language it means: a portion that is equal in all spheres, as they say النصيب المساوي – an equal portion, no shortcoming thereinnor any ‘ziyaada’ – increase.

Allaah `azza wa jall used this word here to inform us that the one who does intercede for an evil cause will only receive an equal portion thereof – there is no injustice. As He says in Soorah al-Ghaafir:

مَنْ عَمِلَ سَيِّئَةً فَلَا يُجْزَىٰ إِلَّا مِثْلَهَا ۖ وَمَنْ عَمِلَ صَالِحًا مِّن ذَكَرٍ أَوْ أُنثَىٰ وَهُوَ مُؤْمِنٌ فَأُولَٰئِكَ يَدْخُلُونَ الْجَنَّةَ يُرْزَقُونَ فِيهَا بِغَيْرِ حِسَابٍ

“Whosoever does an evil deed, will not be requited except the like thereof…” [al-Ghaafir: 40]

Naseeb:


As for the word ‘naseeb’ then again it also means ‘ portion’ but amazingly it has an added meaning of ziyaada’ (increase) and that the portion can be multiplied. It is for this reason that when speaking of the reward/portion of the one who intercedes for a good cause, Allaah subhaanahu wa ta’aala uses the word ‘naseeb’. As is known, out the mercy, favour and generosity of Allaah, the reward for good deeds are multiplied by ten times and more (up to 700 times)whereas the evil deed is only written down once and this is highlighted ever so subtly and yet so profoundly in the simple ayah above:

“Whosoever intercedes for a good cause will have a ‘naseeb’ thereof, and whosoever intercedes for an evil cause will have a ‘kifl’ of it. And Allah is Ever All-Able to do everything.” [al-Nisaa: 85]

It is for this reason that the above ayah in Soorah al-Ghaafir ends with…

“Whosoever does an evil deed, will not be requited except the like thereof, and whosoever does a righteous deed, whether male or female and is a true believer, such will enter Paradise, where they will be provided therein without limit.” [al-Ghaafir: 40]


http://fajr.wordpress.com/2007/06/05/only-a-portion/
Reply

- Qatada -
04-17-2010, 04:41 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


وَإِذْ تَأَذَّنَ رَبُّكُمْ لَئِن شَكَرْتُمْ لَأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ ۖ وَلَئِن كَفَرْتُمْ إِنَّ عَذَابِي لَشَدِيدٌ

And when your Lord proclaimed: "If you give thanks , I will give you more, but if you are thankless , verily! My Punishment is indeed severe." [Surah Ibrahim 14:7]



The Secret to Happiness:

لَئِن شَكَرْتُمْ لأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ
If you give thanks, I will give you more


This verse contains one of the secrets to happiness, success and contentment, and it is as though Allaah is saying to us, “I shall impart this simple secret to you if you are wise enough to take heed.”

The secret? “All you have to do is be thankful to Me for what I have given you, and oh-so-much-more will come your way. All you have to do is to thank Me, and your rizq [provisions] will come; you need not worry about overburdening yourself and spending sunrise to sunset seeking your rizq [provisions] (although of course you should work),just give Me thanks and praise Me for what you already have and I will give you more!”

How is He saying all of this through just 3 words? By emphasizing the concept, then emphasizing it more, then emphasizing it once again, and even emphasizing it a fourth time, so that there is no doubt in our minds about it.

In just these three short words, there are four emphases; or to be even more accurate there are only two words that make up this clause for the third is entirely for emphasis.



Be Grateful, Allah will give you more:


لَئِن شَكَرْتُمْ لأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ
If you give thanks, I will give you more


The first two emphasis are the initial laam al-qasm followed by the particle إِنْ in لَئِن; the third is another laam al-Qasm in لأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ and the fourth is the letter noon of emphasis in the same word. Four different instances of emphases for one concept – that if we thank Allaah for what He has already given us, He will provide us with more.

[This is because the La لَ is used as an emphasis [to strengthen the certainty of the statement], and the the 'In إِنْ means 'without doubt'.]


Look back now to the English translation, If you give thanks, I will give you more. Diyaa’i mentioned in his article Dalaalat al-Tawkeed fee al-Jumlah al-‘Arabiyyah, one of the aims of using emphasis in Arabic is to remove all doubts from the mind of the addressee about a concept which would otherwise contain doubts.

The greater the doubts, or the more important the concept, the greater the number of emphases used. So when you have a concept which has been emphasized four times, this should tell us how important this concept is to us.



..But if you're ungrateful:

And just as this part of the verse has been emphasized four times, so too has the second part of the verse warning us of the consequences of being ungrateful; a warning from which we seemingly prefer to turn our ears by not granting ourselves access to it;


وَلَئِن كَفَرْتُمْ إِنَّ عَذَابِي لَشَدِيدٌ
..but if you are thankless, verily! My Punishment is indeed severe.



Something to think about next time we complain.



Reply

- Qatada -
04-17-2010, 04:56 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


A runaway slave


The Story of Prophet Yunus (as) in the Qur’an is told only briefly in Surah al-Anbiya and Surah Saffat, although he is referred to elsewhere, such as al-Qalam. In brief, he was sent to a people whose unresponsiveness to him and his message led to him leaving them in frustration. In Saffat (37:139-140), the most high describes his departure by saying:

و إن يونس لمن المرسلين. إذ أبق إلى الفلك المشحون

“And Yunus was one of the Messengers; when he ran to the laden ship.”

In explaining the word ( أبق ), some exegetes gloss it as ( تباعد ) ‘to move away’; ( فزع ) ‘to flee’; or most commonly, ( هرب ) ‘to run away’. In my translation above, I rendered it simply as “ran”.

But the words given as estimates for ( أبق ) are simply that: an estimation of the approximate meaning. They do not allow us an understanding of the intricacy of this instance of word choice and usage in the Qur’an. ( أبق ) is not merely to flee; it is used for the ( آبق ), a slave who escapes and runs away from his master.

But as we know, Yunus (as) is not technically a slave, not through birth nor through any other means. So why the usage of the specific term ( أبق )? It is, incidentally, used only this once in the entire book!

The application of the term with respect to him is justified, some exegetes say, because of his fleeing away from his people without the permission of his Lord. In this manner, his fleeing from his responsibility and the people he had been entrusted with is being compared to the slave who, instead of fulfilling his duties, runs away from his master.

Some say that the term ( أبق ) refers not only to a slave who runs away, but one who does so without the type of reason that might justify his departure, such as persecution or extremely difficult conditions. If this is correct, it adds a further nuance to the choice of the word ( أبق ), in describing the condition of the Prophet Yunus (as) as one not warranting his flight.

The metaphoric usage of ( أبق ) thus demonstrates the relationship Yunus (as) had with his master, and serves as a strict reminder to us as well. We, like Yunus (as), are servants of Allah and cannot flee from him nor his command.

This added insight into the hapax legomenon ( أبق ) demonstrates yet again the absolute brilliance of the language of the Qur’an; it manages to convey deep meaning and lessons to us even with the placing of a single word.

---------------------------

Source: http://arabicgems.wordpress.com/2008...lave/#comments
Reply

footy_craze
04-19-2010, 12:36 AM
amazing stuff man keep it coming
Reply

- Qatada -
04-21-2010, 06:48 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


By the (steeds) that run, with panting (breath) [al-'Aadiyaat 100: 1-7]


In the Qur’an, there is a relationship between oaths and what follows the oaths. When Allah ta’ala swears by something, it shows the importance of the object He is swearing by and that object will be elevated. Furthermore, whatever comes after the oath is very important as well. There are many examples in the Qur’an.


Allah ta’ala says in Suratul ‘Aadiyaat,


وَالْعَادِيَاتِ ضَبْحًا
فَالْمُورِيَاتِ قَدْحًا
فَالْمُغِيرَاتِ صُبْحًا
فَأَثَرْنَ بِهِ نَقْعًا
فَوَسَطْنَ بِهِ جَمْعًا


By the (steeds) that run, with panting (breath),
Striking sparks of fire (by their hooves),
And scouring to the raid at dawn
And raise the dust in clouds the while,
Penetrating forthwith as one into the midst (of the enemy).

(Surat ul ‘Aadiyaat 100:1-5)

Makki/Makkan surahs have amazing imagery, and these first five verses are dedicated to horses in battle.

1400years ago, when there was no TV, movies, picture books, all that was available was one’s imagination, especially when the audience of the Qur’an were people from a desert with nothing to look at. Allah (azza wa jal) is painting a magnificient scene in the mind of the Quraysh:


The horses being described here are feminine (الْعَادِيَاتِ), why? The Arabs preferred the female horses in battle because they were faster. Allah (azza wa jal) is describing the horses in the morning time, when there is still moisture in the air and instead of the dust rising as it does in a desert, the moisture causes the dust to settle.

Imagine: these horses who are fast by nature, running so fast that they are causing the dust to rise up–even with the moisture, sparks are flying - when their hooves strike the rocks - even though there is moisture on the rocks, and they don’t see infront of them because of the dust in the air–not knowing if there is an enemy or spear waiting on the other side.


Think of the amazement of the non Muslims listening to the Prophet alayhi salaatu wa salaam recite these verses…Anyone amongst them who has a horse realized how loyal their horse is to them; how it will even die for its owner just out of submission to the master.


Then right after these amazing images, Allah ta’ala says:

إِنَّ الْإِنْسَانَ لِرَبِّهِ لَكَنُودٌ

Indeed man is not loyal to his Rabb! (100:6)
Just as this horse submits to its master, going into the enemy range without even knowing what is there, completely loyal to the Master…Allah ta’ala reminds them: man is not loyal to his Rabb [Master].


Not only that he’s not loyal but also:

وَإِنَّهُ عَلَىٰ ذَ*ٰلِكَ لَشَهِيدٌ

And to that fact he bears witness (100:7)
Man bears witness to the fact that he is not loyal! He knows! How? Allah azza wa jal just reminded them of the loyalty of the steeds/horses to their owner in the previous verses; if your horse submits to you, then why do you not submit to your Owner?


SubhanAllah!
Reply

- Qatada -
04-21-2010, 06:56 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


Two Hearts in One Man


Bismillah walhamdulillah.


Quick gem from suratul Ahzaab, Allah azza wa jal says:

رَجُلٍ مِنْ مَا جَعَلَ اللَّهُ لِ قَلْبَيْنِ فِي جَوْفِهِ

Allah has not put for any man two hearts inside his body. (Ahzab 33:4)


Why didn’t Allah mention women?
Think about it: a woman has the ability to get pregnant and therefore may have two, or even three or four or more hearts in her body!!

SubhanAllah the Qur’an is so precise even in this minute detail!




May Allah ta’ala grant us understanding of His Book, Ameen.
Reply

جوري
04-21-2010, 07:00 PM
I have always felt that suret al-adyat albeit one of the shortest is one of the most difficult and evocative .. it gives me goose pimples whenever I read it.. not just the words and meaning and the vision of the scene but the crescendo with which is increases and the psychological note with which it ends..



:w:
Reply

- Qatada -
04-21-2010, 07:08 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.



Whoever pardons and makes reconciliation - his reward is [due] from Allah.. (ash-Shura 42:20)



Surat Al-Shuraa (42:40):

وَجَزَاء سَيِّئَةٍ سَيِّئَةٌ مِّثْلُهَا فَمَنْ عَفَا وَأَصْلَحَ فَأَجْرُهُ عَلَى اللَّهِ إِنَّهُ لَا يُحِبُّ الظَّالِمِينَ (


And the retribution for an evil act is an evil one like it, but whoever pardons and makes reconciliation - his reward is [due] from Allah. Indeed, He does not like wrongdoers.

What does this mean; that his ajr/reward rests with Allah?

It means; "The pages of the Quran are unable to hold this ajr/reward that is mentioned. That, also the dunya/world and everything within it could not carry this ajr so that it can be mentioned. So Allah (swt) preserved it in Ilm AL-Ghayb [the knowledge of the Unseen] so that he can reward those who forgive/pardon others and make peace with them with an unimaginable reward!

http://forums.almaghrib.org/showpost...&postcount=110
Reply

- Qatada -
04-21-2010, 07:12 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh

So do 'affuw on us. And forgive us. And have mercy on us. [Baqarah 2:286]


There's a beautiful du'a that Allah mentions near the end of Surah Baqarah:

وَا عْفُ عَنَّا وَاغْفِرْ لَنَا وَارْحَمْنَا

Translation: So do 'affuw on us. And forgive us. And have mercy on us. [Baqarah 2:286]

Allah mentions three things, in order:



  1. 'Affuw 'annaa: Affuw linguistically means to erase something; to obliterate something; to completely destroy something and leave no traces of it whatsoever. This du'a is saying: make affuw of our sins. Remove them completely.
  2. Waghfir lanaa: Ghafira linguistically means to protect--that's why a helmet is called a mighfaar. Read up about Allah's two names: Al-Ghafuwr and Al-Ghaffaar. Here, the du'a is saying: and if you do not 'affuw our sins, forgive us, and protect us from the consequences of them.
  3. Warham naa: Rahmah is mercy; Allah has two names related to this quality--Ar-Rahman and Ar-Raheem. Here, the du'a is saying: and if you do not even forgive our sins, then have mercy on us! Subhanallah!


What an amazing du'a! Do affuw of our sins; and if not, forgive us and protect us from their effects; and if not, have mercy on us!

THAT'S your Lord!

http://www.ilmfruits.com/forgiveness...r-forgiveness/
Reply

Chuck
04-22-2010, 02:52 AM
Originally Posted by - Qatada -
Imagery is explained in detail here: http://www.islamicboard.com/showthre...uran-Example-2.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-23-2010, 03:32 PM
Wali vs Mawlaa. [Baqarah 2:257]

Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh

Wali vs Mawlaa.



Point #1:

Allah ta’ala says in suratul Baqarah ayah [2:257]:

وَلِيُّ الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا يُخْرِجُهُمْ مِنَ الظُّلُمَاتِ إِلَى النُّورِ
‘Allah is the Wali of those who believe, He brings take them from the darknesses into the light.’



اللَّهُ وَالَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا أَوْلِيَاؤُهُمُ الطَّاغُوتُ يُخْرِجُونَهُمْ مِنَ النُّورِ إِلَى الظُّلُمَاتِ
‘and those who disblieve their Awliyaa are taghoot, they bring them out of the light to darknesses.’



Wali is a special type of friend, who expresses the will to help to you and support you. A wali is a friend that you turn to for help, protection and support. The wali is the primary in the relationship, they are the dominant party.

Take for example, if a father is the wali to his son, then the father is the primary in the relationship.

Allah ta’ala says in the beginning of the ayah that He is the Wali for the believers.Those who disbelieve have Taghoot (anything and everything that is worshipped besides Allah) as their Awliyaa (plural of wali).


There are two comparisons taking place in this verse:

1) The believers and those who disbelieve, and
2) Allah (azza wa jal) and taghoot [those worshipped besides Him].
Looking at the verse again, we see that there is a different arrangement for each comparison: when Allah ta’ala says He is the Wali of the believers, He comes first.

But for those who disbelieve, their wali [those who are worshipped along with Allah] is mentioned last (as a sign of humiliation to them).



Why is the arrangment different?

Allah ta’ala is being ‘compared’ to taghoot [i.e. the disbelievers attempt to take their taghoot as equals to Allah], yet: there is NOTHING like Him, NOTHING can be compared to Him. These taghoot do not deserve to be mentioned in the same place as Allah (azza wa jal) was mentioned. They do not deserve to be mentioned in even the same sentence. So the Taghoot are placed the furthest away from Allah's Name.




Point #2:

Allah ta’ala says in Surat Muhammad ayah 11,

ذَ*ٰلِكَ بِأَنَّ اللَّهَ مَوْلَى الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا وَأَنَّ الْكَافِرِينَ لَا مَوْلَىٰ لَهُمْ

‘That is because certainly Allah is the Mawlaa of those who believe, and indeed the disbelievers have no Mawlaa.’


Mawlaa is more than a Wali; a Mawlaa is someone who can protect you and actually does so–they are protecting you, while a Wali is someone who is willing to protect you.

When it came to Wali, both the believers and disbelievers had one, but when it comes to Mawlaa – someone who CAN protect you – only the believers have One, and the disbelievers have no Mawlaa [Protector].




SubhanAllah.

Allahumma faqihnaa fid deen, O Allah grant us understanding of the deen [religion], Ameen.




Reply

- Qatada -
04-23-2010, 03:36 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


He whose scales are heavy.. and he whose scales are light... [al-Qari'ah 101:6-7]

فَأَمَّا مَن ثَقُلَتْ مَوَازِينُهُ
فَهُوَ فِي عِيشَةٍ رَّاضِيَةٍ
وَأَمَّا مَنْ خَفَّتْ مَوَازِينُهُ
فَأُمُّهُ هَاوِيَةٌ
وَمَا أَدْرَاكَ مَا هِيَهْ
نَارٌ حَامِيَةٌ

“He whose scales are heavy” [Qari'ah 101:6] according to Allah’s measures and His
evaluation, “shall enjoy a life of satisfaction”.

Allah makes this statement general without any detailed information. Thus, the statement imparts to man’s feelings the connotations of content and satisfaction or, indeed, pure happiness. “But he whose scales are light”, according to the same measures of Allah and His evaluation, “shall have the abyss for his home”

The Arabic text uses the term “mother” for what is rendered here as “home”. It is to his mother that a child turns for help and protection as he seeks shelter and security at home. But such people with light scales can turn and resort only to the abyss! The expression is a fine one, beautifully ordered. It has also a shade of obscurity preparing the way for subsequent clarification which adds to the depth of the intended effect: ” Would that you knew what this is like!” It is again the cryptic exclamation used often in the Qur’an which emphasises that it is beyond comprehension and vision.

Then comes the answer in the closing note: “It is a raging fire”. So this is the mother of the one whose scales are light. This is his mother to whom he turns for help and protection and for security and comfort. But what does he find with such a mother? - The abyss and the raging fire. It is a sudden shock rendered by the expression to represent the hard reality.

[Fi Dhilal al Qur'an -in the shade of the Quran - Surah al Qari'ah]


Reply

- Qatada -
04-23-2010, 03:41 PM
To abide therein... (al-Nisaa 4: 13-14)

Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh.



Allah ta’ala says in Surat al-Nisaa 4: 13-14, in two seemingly balanced ayaat:



وَمَن يُطِعِ اللَّهَ وَرَسُولَهُ يُدْخِلْهُ جَنَّاتٍ تَجْرِي مِن تَحْتِهَا الْأَنْهَا رُ خَالِدِينَ فِيهَا ۚ وَذَ*ٰلِكَ الْفَوْزُ الْعَظِيمُ

Those who obey Allah and His Messenger will be admitted to Gardens with rivers flowing beneath, to abide therein (for ever) and that will be the supreme achievement.



وَمَن يَعْصِ اللَّهَ وَرَسُولَهُ وَيَتَعَدَّ حُدُودَهُ يُدْخِلْهُ نَارًا خَالِدًا فِيهَا وَلَهُ عَذَابٌ مُّهِينٌ

But those who disobey Allah and His Messenger and transgress His limits will be admitted to a Fire, to abide therein: And they shall have a humiliating punishment. (al Nisaa 4:13-14)

Do you notice anything different from ayah 13 and ayah 14?



When Allah ta’ala describes the one who obeys Allah ta’ala and His messenger (alayhi salaatu wa salaam): he will be admitted into Gardens with rivers flowing beneath, خَالِدِينَ , ones abiding eternally therein.


When Allah ta’ala describes the one who disobeys Allah ta’ala and His messenger alayhi salaatu wa salaam, and transgresses His limits: he will be entered into the fire, خَالِدًا,one abiding eternally therein.


Although the ayah is in the singular (he obeys/he disobeys), not plural, Allah ta’ala uses the plural (khaalideena) for the companion of Jannah/Paradise, while keeping the singular (khaalidan) for companion of the fire.



The translation does not capture this intricate detail. The one who reaches Jannah/Paradise will have passed the grave, the day of Judgment, the Siraat, the Qantarah all by themselves (with the Mercy of Allah), but when they reach Jannah, they will be with their families, their spouses, their children, their friends in the dunya, the righteous of the past and after them, with the angels greeting them from all doors–together, celebrating the praises of Allah and enjoying the delights of Jannah, خَالِدِينَ .




The one who enters the hell-fire will have gone through the trials of the aakhirah [next life] alone, and they will be left to themselves in punishment, with their regrets and despair.

We read many times in the Qur’an that the people of hell fire will have no one to help (naseer) nor any close friend (wali) to their aid, nor anyone to hear their cries and calls. They will be alone in their punishment, خَالِدًا.

Even in this dunya, we see the psychological effects of solitude. What is the worst punishment one can receive in prison? Solitary confinement. Indeed, one is the loneliest number.


May Allah ta’ala envelop us in His mercy, and make us among those who will be rejoicing in the company of the Prophet sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam and with our families and friends in Jannatul Firdaws, Ameen.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-23-2010, 03:53 PM
Allaah Alone is Waahid!

Allaah Alone is One.


As-salaamu `alaykum wa rahmatullaah wa barakatuh

Point #1:
Reading through Soorat Maryam had me thinking of various points, one of which was the repetitive use of the word فرد as opposed to the word واحد - they both mean ‘one’/single/aloneetc but people tend to use them interchangeably. I wondered if there was more to this & then I noticed that throughout the Qur’aan when it speaks of Mankind being raised up and the wrongdoers brought to Allaah for judgement it says that they will come, فرادى (alone) and the word waahid is not mentioned as much.


So why is this the case if they both mean the same thing?!

Well, do they both mean exactly the same thing?


No actually, not if we dig deep enough. icon smile 1 -


They say that:
الفرد: لا يفيد الانفراد من القرن
الواحد : يفيد الانفراد من القرن في الذات أو الصفة


In other words, the term fard has no special connotation to it, and the one who is described as beingfard is one that is alone, with no special value or rank. He is completely alone and carries nothing of material gain or even honour in some cases.
This is in contrast to the term waahid which indicates that although the person is one and alone, they have شأن (status), degree and is distinguished from others. They are alone but yet they carry with them much more, like respect, honour and value.


This is remarkable considering how Allaah (`azza wa jall) always describes Himself in the Qur’aan as being ‘Waahid’ and never ‘Fard’

Point #2:
This is also the reason perhaps, that Allah says:

أَفَرَأَيْتَ الَّذِي كَفَرَ بِآيَاتِنَا وَقَالَ لَأُوتَيَنَّ مَالاً وَوَلَداً
“Have you seen him who disbelieved in Our Verses and says: “I shall certainly be given wealth and children.” [Maryam 19: 77]


وَنَرِثُهُ مَا يَقُولُ وَيَأْتِينَا فَرْداً

“…We shall inherit from him all that he talks of (i.e. wealth and children), and he shall come to Us alone (fardan)” [Maryam: 80] - i.e. without all the materialistic gains and honour/position which he had attributed to himself.

Interestingly, it also says in Soorah al-An’aam:


وَلَقَدْ جِئْتُمُونَا فُرَادَى كَمَا خَلَقْنَاكُمْ أَوَّلَ مَرَّةٍ

“And truly you have come unto Us alone (furaada) as We created you the first time…”
[al-An'aam 694]


In tafseer al-Kashaaf [by Zamakshari], it mentions that this verse actually came down regarding al-Waleed ibn al-Mugheerah who incredibly was nicknamed ‘al-Waheed’ by the people They say that he was called so due to his leadership, wealth and honour.
Subhanallaah, what a powerful message then this ayah sends to him, when Allaah says, ‘You have come to Us alone’ - using the term fard instead of waahid [so Allah has replaced Waleeds/Waheed's honorable name into a humiliated one (Fard)].


Point #3:

If you thought that was something, see what He `azza wa jall says in al-Muddathir (in those 16 verses that were revealed about al-Waleed):

ذَرْنِي وَمَنْ خَلَقْتُ وَحِيداً

“Leave Me Alone (to deal) with whom I created Alone (waheed).”



Subhanallaah! Indeed, what a humiliation for al-Waleed ibn al-Mugheerah. Truly, Allaah alone is al-Waahid al-Waheed.


Allaahu akbar.


Differences in terms taken from: سلسة الفروق اللغوية

Source: http://fajr.wordpress.com/2008/06/04...-alone-is-one/


FOOTNOTE: Al Waleed ibn al Mugheerah was the father of Khalid ibn al Waleed, a Noble from Quraysh and from the clan of Bani Makhzoom. He was so rich, wealthy and honored by the Quraysh - that he was titled as al Waheed/Independent from anyone else in wealth/honor/children etc. (as explained above.)

Also see;
http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...sibly-say.html




Reply

- Qatada -
04-24-2010, 07:12 PM
Your refuge is the Fire. It is most worthy of you, and wretched is the destination. [Surah Hadeed 57:15]


Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.



فَالْيَوْمَ لَا يُؤْخَذُ مِنكُمْ فِدْيَةٌ وَلَا مِنَ الَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا ۚ مَأْوَاكُمُ النَّارُ ۖ هِيَ مَوْلَاكُمْ ۖ وَبِئْسَ الْمَصِيرُ

So today no ransom will be taken from you or from those who disbelieved. Your Mawla is the Fire. It is most worthy of you, and wretched is the destination.

[Surah Hadeed 57:15]


As we know
; ‘That is because certainly Allah is the Mawlaaof those who believe, and indeed the disbelievers have no Mawlaa.’ [Surah Muhammad 47:11]


The meaning of Mawlaa is one who is willing to protect you, and does protect you.


Your Mawlaa is An-Naar [the fire] - which can not protect anyone, so in reality its not a "mawlaa" [protector]. By what we understand from the word is like "the only thing that you could take for a mawlaa is an-naar [the fire]" "that is your only refuge", when that is not even really a protector. Infact, it's your own enemy.



This is similar to when Allah says;

أَ وَالَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا وَكَذَّبُوا بِآيَاتِنَا أُولَٰئِكَ صْحَابُ الْجَحِيمِ


But those who disbelieve and deny Our signs - those are the companions (As-haab) of Hellfire. [Ma'idah 5:10]



Because the hellfire is not a good companion, rather it is your enemy. And a Sahabi [companion] is someone who is always with you.



Reply

- Qatada -
04-24-2010, 07:19 PM
Allah has 'chosen'... (Surah Hajj 22:75)

Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah wabarakatuh.

The Precise “Selection”


Bismillah walhamdulillah.



Point #1:

In Suratul Hajj (22:75) Allah ta’ala uses two distinct words to give the meaning of “selection”. ( اجتبى and اصطفى)

Allah ta’ala says in ayah 75:

اللَّهُ يَصْطَفِي مِنَ الْمَلَائِكَةِ رُسُلًا وَمِنَ النَّاسِ
Allah selects messengers out of angels and man.

Then He ta’ala says in ayah 77:

هُوَ اجْتَبَاكُمْ
He has selected you (muslims).
Both of these words carry the same English meaning of ’selection’ or ‘to choose’, yet there is a profound difference between the two which shows the precise choice of these words.


Istafaa
is from the root saad-fa-wow ( ص ف و) and it means to be chosen based on purity. When Allah ta’ala selects Messengers, He selects the purest of mankind. We learn this from our creed (aqeedah) that the Messengers are all pure. The Jews and Christians on the other hand did not keep this standard and in their books that they claim to be divine, there are references to these Messengers that are lewd and horrifying. When we hear anything horrendous, we automatically know it is wrong based on this ayah. We know it cannot be from the revelation because it questions the purity of the Messengers.

Another meaning of istafaa’ is to make a choice that is purely your own, no explanation is needed for this choice and it is free from any agendas, pressures and dictates. This protects another aspect of the Messengers. At the time of the Prophet sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam, the Jews and the Quraysh denied the Messengership of the Prophet sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam just because he was not Jewish or not rich; they questioned the choice of Allah ta’ala. Allah’s Choice is BEYOND our question, and by using istafaa’ Allah ta’ala makes that clear. We cannot say the Messenger alayhi salaatu wa salaam was picked for X, Y or Z reasons–we should stop at: Allah chose Him.



Ijtibaaon the other hand is from jeem-ba-ya (ج ب ي), Ijtibaa’ is to pick something for a purpose, an agenda, and based on qualifications. For example, this word is used to collect taxes, and when collecting taxes there is a purpose: to store the money in the treasury. Another example is when a recruiter hires an employee: he chooses based on the qualifications of the employee. There is a reason for ijtibaa’.

Everyone who has the priviledge of saying la ilaaha il Allah [there is no god but Allah] has been selected. Allah ta’ala did not just select us, but there is a reason, something that He the Most High sees in us that He sees us as qualified for this task and the mission of this ummah [muslim Nation].

The vast majority of the people on this earth were not chosen; yet we make up the small minority of those whom Allah ta’ala selected.

This shows great honor, but at the same time: great responsibility. SubhanAllah.




Point #2:

These two examples are from Surat al-Hajj, and it connects with the last ayah of this surah which is an emotional roller coaster:
وَجَاهِدُوا فِي اللَّهِ حَقَّ جِهَادِهِ ۚ هُوَ اجْتَبَاكُمْ وَمَا جَعَلَ عَلَيْكُمْ فِي الدِّينِ مِنْ حَرَجٍ ۚ مِلَّةَ أَبِيكُمْ إِبْرَاهِيمَ ۚ هُوَ سَمَّاكُمُ الْمُسْلِمِينَ مِنْ قَبْلُ وَفِي هَـٰذَا لِيَكُونَ الرَّسُولُ شَهِيدًا عَلَيْكُمْ وَتَكُونُوا شُهَدَاءَ عَلَى النَّاسِ ۚ فَأَقِيمُوا الصَّلَاةَ وَآتُوا الزَّكَاةَ وَاعْتَصِمُوا بِاللَّهِ هُوَ مَوْلَاكُمْ ۖ فَنِعْمَ الْمَوْلَىٰ وَنِعْمَ النَّصِيرُ

[Surah Hajj 22:78]

(I did not translate this ayah for a reason)



In a previous ayah, ayah 22:74, Allah ta’ala said:مَا قَدَرُوا اللَّهَ حَقَّ قَدْرِهِthey did not make a just estimate of Allah as He deserves. The ayah above begins [22:78] with an impossible goal: جَاهِدُوا فِي اللَّهِ حَقَّ جِهَادِهِ to struggle before Allah as much as He deserves/a true striving.

SubhanAllah! Can we ever thank Allah as He deserves? Can we ever pray to Allah as He deserves? Can we ever fear Allah as He deserves? The first thing we think of when reading this statement is that we cannot do it! It’s too difficult!

But directly after this statement, Allah azza wa jal says: هُوَ اجْتَبَاكُمْ He selectedyou. Allah azza wa jal sees it in us to carry this task.

He says after that: وَمَا جَعَلَ عَلَيْكُمْ فِي الدِّينِ مِنْ حَرَجٍ He did not place in this deen/religion for you any difficulty. Our deen is not that hard.

Then He reminds us that we are the continuation of a legacy before us: مِلَّةَ أَبِيكُمْ إِبْرَاهِيمَ the religion of your father Ibrahim (alayhi salaam).


Ibrahim alayhi salaam struggled so much in his life: he was thrown into the fire, sought to slaughter his beloved son, leaving his wife and child in the desert. Ibrahim alayhi salaam left his child [Isma'il] and wife in a barren desert, a certain death (except that Allah kept them alive and lookaftered them)! The last thing we think of about his life alayhi salaam is that it was easy, yet Allah ta’ala says that there is no haraj (hardship) in this deen.

What is the lesson here? If Allah ta’ala can make jumping into the fire easy for Ibrahim, if He can substitute a ram in place of his son, if He can send a river in the middle of the desert for his family…then what do you have that is so hard? There is no comparison.







Point #3:

Then Allah ta’ala reminds us that: هُوَ سَمَّاكُمُ الْمُسْلِمِينَ He is the one who named you “Muslims”. In Surat ul Baqarah, Allah states that Ibrahim made the duaa while building the Ka’bah and said to Allah to make us “ummatan Muslimatan.” [people who submit to Allah/are Muslims] If this ayah means that Allah named accepted his du'a & made us Muslims, then we should be in trust to Allah that He chose us and named us.

How do you feel now? Encouraged, right?


But Allah reminds us that with this Qualification comes Responsibility:

لِيَكُونَ الرَّسُولُ شَهِيدًا عَلَيْكُمْ so that the Messenger is a witness against you. Allah ta’ala says عَلَيْكُمْ, ‘alaa here means against. If the Messenger alayhi salaam is a witness against us, then that means we have a mission to complete. Just because of the qualification, doesn’t mean we will do the job. Allah ta’ala is reminding us here, if we do not fulfill our mission then our Messenger will be the one complaining to Allah azza wa jal!

Furthermore, وَتَكُونُوا شُهَدَاءَ عَلَى النَّاسِ and that you all are witnesses against mankind. Not only is the Messenger alayhi salaatu wa salaam a witness against us; we will also be a proof and witness against humanity, if we fulfilled our mission or not. SubhanAllah, on one side it is the Messenger sal Allahu alayhi wa sallam complaining and on the other side it’s humanity!

Now we realize the magnitude of our mission, but before you become uneasy, Allah ta’ala consoles us again:

فَأَقِيمُوا الصَّلَاةَ وَآتُوا الزَّكَاةَ t hen perfectly establish the prayer and give zakah. Salah is the therapy and reinforcement for the Muslim, and through giving zakah, Allah ta’ala ensures our purification. And if you want to pray and give zakah properly: وَاعْتَصِمُوا بِاللَّهِ and hold fast to Allah. Hold fast to the rope of Allah, the Qur’an.

Then Allah ta’ala says at the end of this ayah:
هُوَ مَوْلَاكُمْ He is your Mawlaa. Not only is a Mawlaa a friend, but a Mawlaa is the ONLY ONE who can protect you. When you embark on this hard journey, this great mission, He is the One who will help you.

and how awesome a Mawlaa, and how awesome a Helper.
فَنِعْمَ الْمَوْلَىٰ وَنِعْمَ النَّصِيرُ
SubhanAllahil A’dheem. O Allah we ask you to grant us istqaamah and to make us bearers of Your deen, and to grant us success as callers. Ameen.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-24-2010, 07:25 PM
And to Madyan, their BROTHER Shu’ayb (al-A'raf 7:85)

Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.


Bonds of Brotherhood

Bismillah.


In surah Shu’ara (26:106), Allah ta’ala mentions the stories of many Prophets, and He says:

إِذْ قَالَ لَهُمْ أَخُوهُمْ نُوحٌ

When their brother Nuh (alayhi salaam) said to them [Shu'ara 26:106], and this format repeats for Saalih, Lut and Hud (alayhum assalaam). Whenever a nation is mentioned, Allah saysأَخُوهُمْ” their brother about the specific Prophet mentioned.


However, when Allah ta’ala mentions Shu’ayb alayhi salaam, He says:

كَذَّبَ أَصْحَابُ الْأَيْكَةِ الْمُرْسَلِينَ
The companions of the thicket/forest/trees denied the messengers



إِذْ قَالَ لَهُمْ شُعَيْبٌ

When Shu’ayb (alayhi salaam) said to them
.
(Shu'ara 26: 176-177)

Why see that the other Prophets receive the title; “their brother”, and Shu’ayb (alayhi salaam) does not. However, in another ayah/verse, Allah says about Shu'ayb;
وَإِلَىٰ مَدْيَنَ أَخَاهُمْ شُعَيْبًا

And to Madyan, their brother Shu’ayb (al-A'raf 7:85). Allah mentions Shu'ayb being their ‘their brother’ in this ayah.


So why is Shu'ayb mentioned as brother in one ayah and not in another?




To understand this, we need to look at the city of Madyan itself. There are two names of Madyan in the Qur’an:

The first one is Madyan and the second one is As-haabul Aykah (companions of the tree/forest). Aykah refers to a giant tree that they used to worship.

So, when it comes tolocation, the city is referred to as Madyan. When it comes to the people, the city is referred to as As-haabul Aykah.


How does Allah ta’ala refer to them in Surah Shu’ara, where “their brother” is not mentioned? He says:



كَذَّبَأَصْحَابُ الْأَيْكَةِ الْمُرْسَلِينَ

As-haabul Aykah denied the messengers. (Shu'ara 26:176)


When Allah ta’ala mentions the location(such as 7:85), He ta’ala says أَخَاهُمْ their brother.

When it comes to their religious identity, Allah ta’ala does not say “أَخَاهُمْ“ [their brother].

When it comes to the location, Shu’ayb alayhi salaam is their brother. But when it comes to the religion, they are not brothers even though they have the same blood line, the same citizenship, the same identity and the same geographical location.

The precision of the Qur’an, SubhanAllah!





October 21, 2008 · 2 Comments
source
http://tayyibaat.wordpress.com/
Reply

- Qatada -
04-24-2010, 07:31 PM
TRULY that is CERTAINLY from the noble tasks. (Shoora 42:43)

Allah mentions this statement many times in the Qur’an:



إِنَّ ذَلِكَ مِنْ عَزْمِ الْأُمُورِ

Certainly that is from the noble tasks. [Luqman 31:17], [aal Imraan 3:186].


When this statement occurs in the Qur'an, it is always in reference to Sabr (patience).

However, when this statement appears in Surah Shoora (42:43), something different occurs that does not in all the other ayaat. Allah (azza wa jal) states:


إِنَّ ذَ*ٰلِكَ لَمِنْ عَزْمِ الْأُمُورِ

Truly that is certainly from the noble tasks. (Shoora 42:43)


This ayah is a special case because there is an extra letter, a laam. This laam is for emphasis: certainly. But why does this ayah have more emphasis, but the rest of the similar ayaat on patience do not? Because there areTwo different types of patience (sabr) being referenced for these two ayaat:




The Two types of Patience


There are many types of sabr [patience] in this deen/religion, but they all fall into two basic categories:


  1. When something happens to you and you do not have the power to respond.
  2. When something happens to you and you have the power to respond and take action (ie, revenge/retaliate).



1) In situations when you cannot take take action, it is still a great thing to have patience. For example the Sahaba [companions of Prophet Muhammad] in Makkah, they did not have the power to retaliate but Allah ta’ala still commanded them to have patience and He praised those who were patient. Also with the Battle of Uhud or Ahzaab, they did not have the power to retaliate but still had patience in their situation.

2) Then the Conquest of Makkah occured, and those who overpowered the Sahaba before, those who kicked them out of their homes, those who tortured them and their families were right there–the Sahaba were easily able to take revenge. Does THAT not require sabr? Which sabr/patience is more difficult? It is the sabr that one practices when they have the ABILITY to take revenge and retaliate, but they do not!



Which is the Best Patience?

Allah ta’ala mentioned in the same ayah before that statement:وَلَمَنْ صَبَرَ وَغَفَرَ “and for the one who has patience and forgives” [Shura 42:43] This person could have had sabr, and retaliated BUT they had sabr and chose to forgive…so this ayah, the only time it occurs in the Qur’an, gets an extra laam.




وَلَمَنْ صَبَرَ وَغَفَرَ إِنَّ ذَ*ٰلِكَ لَمِنْ عَزْمِ الْأُمُورِ

“And surely, whosoever shows patience and forgives that would truly be from the noble tasks” (Shura 42:43)

If you have the upper hand and you are in a position to retaliate and respond, but you chose to forgive – that is the harder sabr, and truly from the noble tasks.





http://tayyibaat.wordpress.com/2008/...asks/#more-797
Reply

- Qatada -
04-24-2010, 07:36 PM
So, verily, with every hardship, there is ease. (Inshirah 94: 5-6)

Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh.


فَإِنَّ مَعَ الْعُسْرِ يُسْرًا
So, verily, with every hardship, there is ease:

إِنَّ مَعَ الْعُسْرِ يُسْرًا
Verily, with every hardship there is ease.

[Surah Inshirah 94: 5-6]


The ال issue you mentioned can be explained in one of two ways I know of:

1) al-Jurjani said that if you say,


إن مع الفارس سيفاً، إن مع الفارس سيفاً
(Indeed, the horseman has a sword, indeed the horseman has a sword)


then it means that there has to be one horseman who has two swords. So it means there is only one hardship, but two different eases. This is also the opinion held by al-Farraa’ regarding the meaning of this verse. Tha‘lab also mentioned that if the Arabs mentioned a definite noun and repeated it, then it is for emphasis and it is the same noun, but if they mentioned an indefinite noun and repeated it then they are two separate objects.


2) The repetition of the verse was for the sake of emphasis, and this is common in the Arabic language, such as when Allaah repeated the phrase in Surah Mutaffifeen: وَيْلٌ يَوْمَئِذٍ لّلْمُكَذّبِينَ which was for the sake of emphasizing the meaning in the souls and hearts of the reader.

Some of the scholars conjectured on what the ease refers to – some said it was the conquests that happened in the days of the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) and the Khulafaa’, others said it was the ease of this life and the Hereafter (as in the reference to Ihdaa al-Husnayan [Tawba 9:52]). So if it is a definite ease that is intended, the question is why is it mentioned indefinitely, without the definite marker ٱلْ ?

The answer is (Allah knows best) for aggrandizement, and it is as though Allaah is saying, With the hardships you have gone through, O Muhammad, [which is in reference to the Mushriks of Makkah taunting him (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) and the believers about their poverty and facing torture/hardships until he (sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) came to believe that they were not embracing Islam due to the poverty of the Muslims and their contempt] will come a great, copious, abundant amount of ease, so do not despair of My mercy.”

The other beautiful point with regards the language is the use of إِنّ مّع (‘indeed with’) instead of, for example, إِنَّ بَعد (‘indeed, after’) because the word مع is used to indicate that something accompanies something else, so how can it be said that ease accompanies hardship when they are two completely opposite things? It was mentioned in this way (wallaahu a3lam) as though Allaah is being merciful to them by telling them that before they know it, the ease will come to them, as though they will feel it is such a short timethat it is happening right then, at the exact same time as the hardship, to increase their strength and hope.




The "ف" [ fa ] is just a conjunction used to indicate continuation (‘due to what has been said then do such and such.’) The "ف" used in this manner can carry the same meaning as ثُمَّ but the difference is that the "ف" is after a shorter period of time.

With hardship there is ease, SO [really soon] there is (another) ease with that hardship.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-28-2010, 01:12 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.

AND IF My servants ask thee about Me - behold, I am near; I respond to the call of him who calls, whenever he calls unto Me... [Baqarah 2:186]

وَإِذَا سَأَلَكَ عِبَادِي عَنِّي فَإِنِّي قَرِيبٌ أُجِيبُ دَعْوَةَ الدَّاعِ إِذَا دَعَانِ فَلْيَسْتَجِيبُواْ لِي وَلْيُؤْمِنُواْ بِي لَعَلَّهُمْ يَرْشُدُونَ

AND IF My servants ask thee about Me - behold, I am near; I respond to the call of him who calls, whenever he calls unto Me: let them, then, respond unto Me, and believe in Me, so that they might follow the right way. [al Baqarah 2:186]




When you take this ayah and compare it with the other ayahs where Allah responds to things which the people asked about, you immediately notice one difference. Allah says {to His Messenger wwwislamicboardcom - } "Qul" ("Say: ") ... then the answer is given. For example:


يَسْأَلُونَكَ عَنِ الأهِلَّةِ قُلْ هِيَ مَوَاقِيتُ لِلنَّاسِ وَالْحَجِّ وَلَيْسَ الْبِرُّ بِأَنْ تَأْتُوْاْ الْبُيُوتَ مِن ظُهُورِهَا وَلَـكِنَّ الْبِرَّ مَنِ اتَّقَى وَأْتُواْ الْبُيُوتَ مِنْ أَبْوَابِهَا وَاتَّقُواْ اللّهَ لَعَلَّكُمْ تُفْلِحُونَ
THEY WILL ask thee about the new moons. Say: "They indicate the periods for [various doings of] mankind, including the pilgrimage." [165] However, piety does not consist in your entering houses from the rear, [as it were,] but truly pious is he who is conscious of God. [166] Hence, enter houses through their doors, and remain conscious of God, so that you might attain to a happy state.

Just to take the relevant parts of the ayahs, we see the pattern is like this:


يَسْأَلُونَكَ عَنِ الأهِلَّةِ قُلْ
THEY WILL ask thee about the new moons. Say...
يَسْأَلُونَكَ مَاذَا يُنفِقُونَ قُلْ
THEY WILL ask thee as to what they should spend on others. Say....
يَسْأَلُونَكَ عَنِ الشَّهْرِ الْحَرَامِ قِتَالٍ فِيهِ قُلْ
They will ask thee about fighting in the sacred month. Say.....
يَسْأَلُونَكَ عَنِ الْخَمْرِ وَالْمَيْسِرِ قُلْ
THEY WILL ask thee about intoxicants and games of chance. Say....
وَيَسْأَلُونَكَ عَنِ الْيَتَامَى قُلْ
And they will ask thee about [how to deal with] orphans. Say....
وَيَسْأَلُونَكَ عَنِ الْمَحِيضِ قُلْ
AND THEY will ask thee about [woman's] monthly courses. Say...


All of these questions, they ask something, and it is [Oh Prophet] Say this and this....




But:

وَإِذَا سَأَلَكَ عِبَادِي عَنِّي فَإِنِّي قَرِيبٌ أُجِيبُ دَعْوَةَ الدَّاعِ إِذَا دَعَانِ

AND IF My servants ask thee about Me - behold, I am near; I respond to the call of him who calls, whenever he calls unto Me.

Not, if my servants ask you about me then say I am near... no, it is just if they ask you about me then I am near. This is the exception to the pattern, and Allah does not make exception for no reason. Every word or lack of word is there for a purpose so we can see that the omission/removal of "Qul" ["say: "] in this ayah/verse must have a purpose, and the effect of not having this Qul here is to make the saying more intimate between Allah and His servant. If we ask about Allah, He is near, He answers the one who makes dua [calls upon Him].

There is no intermediary in this and this structure of the ayah and omission of "qul" even emphasises this point about the nature of dua being a direct line between Allah and His servants, and His closeness to us. And the use of first person enhances this feeling of closeness with Allah aswell, and brings to mind his merciful and soft attributes as opposed to His majestic and glorious ones which you get from plural of majesty. This makes the servant feel at ease to approach their Lord in dua and turn to Him like a close friend, to trust Him and confide in Him.




Reply

- Qatada -
04-28-2010, 01:18 PM
And when your Lord proclaimed: "If you give thanks , I will give you more, but if you are thankless , verily! My Punishment is indeed severe." [Surah Ibrahim 14:7]


وَإِذْ تَأَذَّنَ رَبُّكُمْ لَئِن شَكَرْتُمْ لَأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ ۖ وَلَئِن كَفَرْتُمْ إِنَّ عَذَابِي لَشَدِيدٌ


And when your Lord proclaimed: "If you give thanks , I will give you more, but if you are thankless , verily! My Punishment is indeed severe." [Surah Ibrahim 14:7]






The Secret to Happiness:



لَئِن شَكَرْتُمْ لَأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ
If you give thanks, I will give you more



This verse contains one of the secrets to happiness, success and contentment, and it is as though Allaah is saying to us, “I shall impart this simple secret to you if you are wise enough to take heed.”

The secret? “All you have to do is be thankful to Me for what I have given you, and oh-so-much-more will come your way. All you have to do is to thank Me, and your rizq [provisions] will come; you need not worry about overburdening yourself and spending sunrise to sunset seeking your rizq [provisions] (although of course you should work),just give Me thanks and praise Me for what you already have and I will give you more!”

How is He saying all of this through just 3 words? By emphasizing the concept, then emphasizing it more, then emphasizing it once again, and even emphasizing it a fourth time, so that there is no doubt in our minds about it.


In just these three short words, there are four emphases; or to be even more accurate there are only two words that make up this clause for the third is entirely for emphasis.



Be Grateful, Allah will give you more:



لَئِن شَكَرْتُمْ لأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ
If you give thanks, I will give you more


The first two emphasis are the initial laam al-qasm followed by the particle إِنْ in لَئِن; the third is another laam al-Qasm in لأَزِيدَنَّكُمْ and the fourth is the letter noon of emphasis in the same word. Four different instances of emphases for one concept – that if we thank Allaah for what He has already given us, He will provide us with more.


[This is because the La لَ is used as an emphasis [to strengthen the certainty of the statement], and the the 'In إِنْ means 'without doubt'.]


Look back now to the English translation, If you give thanks, I will give you more. Diyaa’i mentioned in his article Dalaalat al-Tawkeed fee al-Jumlah al-‘Arabiyyah, one of the aims of using emphasis in Arabic is to remove all doubts from the mind of the addressee about a concept which would otherwise contain doubts.


The greater the doubts, or the more important the concept, the greater the number of emphases used. So when you have a concept which has been emphasized four times, this should tell us how important this concept is to us.





..But if you're ungrateful:


And just as this part of the verse has been emphasized four times, so too has the second part of the verse warning us of the consequences of being ungrateful; a warning from which we seemingly prefer to turn our ears by not granting ourselves access to it,




وَلَئِن كَفَرْتُمْ إِنَّ عَذَابِي لَشَدِيدٌ
..but if you are thankless, verily! My Punishment is indeed severe.



Something to think about next time we complain.
Reply

- Qatada -
04-28-2010, 02:08 PM
Asalaam alaikum Warahmatulah Wabarakatuh.

An Arabic Qur'an...

Allah tells us continuously that the Qur'an is in the Arabic language, a response to those who might argue that translations in other languages can be a replacement.


So we notice that whenever Allah mentions the Qur'an in a language, it is none other than Arabic;

إِنَّا أَنزَلْنَاهُ قُرْآنًا عَرَبِيًّا لَّعَلَّكُمْ تَعْقِلُونَ

Indeed, We have sent it down as an Arabic Qur'an [Qur'anan 'arabiyyan] that you might understand.

[Yusuf 12:2]



وَكَذَٰلِكَ أَنزَلْنَاهُ حُكْمًا عَرَبِيًّا

And thus have We sent it (the Quran) down to be a judgement of authority in Arabic.. [hukman arabiyyan].

[ar-Ra'd 13:37]



وَكَذَٰلِكَ أَنزَلْنَاهُ قُرْآنًا عَرَبِيًّا

And thus We have sent it down as an Arabic Qur'an [qur'anan 'arabiyyan].. [Qur'an Taha 20:113]




Also see the ayaat/verses in Surahs to prove this further
;

* (Yusuf 12:2), (ar-Ra'd 13:37), (Taha - 20:113) (Zumar 39:28), (Fussilat 41:3), (ash-Shuraa 42:7) (az-Zukhruf 43:3), (al Ahqaf 46:12)



Reply

- Qatada -
05-11-2010, 03:27 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh

More Divine Surahs' are completed alhamdulillah;



Surah Shams , Kafiroon, Bayyinah, and Humazah.


previously completed
;

Tariq, Naba, A'la, Zalzala...


check them out now! see the miracles in the Book of Allah!

LinguisticMiracle.blogspot.com

Reply

Gabriel Ibn Yus
05-17-2010, 11:54 AM
Beautiful!!

You should write this in a book or published form!
Reply

- Qatada -
06-05-2010, 06:21 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarkatuh


Have they tied their knot on remaining in Disbelief..?




Ibram means to - tie a knot to keep something firm, i.e. your Shoelaces. Or the Arabs in the past would tie ropes to the foundation beams of a building, and these knots would keep the beams firm - so the house could be built upon this foundation.



In arabic, there are Nouns, and there are Verbs.

The Noun form is used when someone is firm and committed in their role. I.e. a Mu'min is someone who is committed to Emaan [belief].

Muslims are called 'aladheena aamanoo' - those who say they believe. So they are described in Verb form, because sometimes/temporary they are committed, but sometimes they're not fully committed.

Now going back to the word Ibram, Allah says about the disbelievers;

أَمْ أَبْرَمُوا أَمْرًا فَإِنَّا مُبْرِمُونَ

Have they tied their knot (Verb/temporary Form) in their plan [of disbelief]?

Then surely We [Allah] have tied ourknot/plan (Noun/permanent form) [of sealing/knotting their destiny in the hellfire].


[az-Zukhruf 43:79]


We Learn from this;

The Disbelievers - who have chosen to remain firm on disbelief - have (verb = temporarily) tied their knot to their disbelief, and Allah has tied His knot (noun = permanently - sealed/knotted their destiny for the hellfire].


Why was their decision a verb/temporary and Allah's decision a noun/permanent decision?




On Judgment Day
...


Because on Judgment Day - the disbelievers would wish they were Muslims;

رُّبَمَا يَوَدُّ الَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا لَوْ كَانُوا مُسْلِمِينَ


Perhaps those who disbelieve will wish that they had been Muslims.

[al Hijr 15:2]

- on Judgment Day and in Hell - so their verb of wanting to stay on disbelief was temporary, but Allah's decision of punishing them in hellfire is permanent, and forever, ongoing and will not change.

http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...remaining.html
Reply

almahdali
06-05-2010, 06:39 PM
awesome, subhanallah, I need to read them few times to grasp the points into my memory, thank you :)
Reply

- Qatada -
07-02-2010, 09:22 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh



Replace the word Sky with Man, and Earth with Woman...


In Surah Shams (91), Allah took an Oath by the Sky (samaa') and the Earth;


وَالسَّمَاءِ وَمَا بَنَاهَا . وَالْأَرْضِ وَمَا طَحَاهَا

And [by] the sky and He who constructed it. And [by] the earth and He who spread it out.


(surah ash-Shams 91: 5-6)


In this surah [al Layl (92)], Allah swears by the One who made the Male and Female;


وَمَا خَلَقَ الذَّكَرَ وَالْأُنثَىٰ

And [by] He who created the male and female,


(surah al Layl 92:3)


The Similarities in their Relationship with each other:

Allah is making a parallel and comparison between the sky and earth, just like He is making a parallel between the male and the female.


The sky and Earth are different in their characteristics - but they work together to produce vegetation, fruits and plants of benefit - for life to continue.

Similarly, the male and female are different in their characteristics - but they work together to produce children - for life to continue.



Impregnation:

The sky sends down water, which penetrates through the Earth and impregnates it.

The liquid water then penetrates the seed - giving it life so it grows gradually, and finally the seed is born - coming out of the mother Earth. This newborn plant then continues to grow healthily until it reaches its peak age. This plant then either benefits humanity, or it does not.

Its seeds spread for future generations to be born.

Then as time passes - it gradually withers away, becomes wrinkly, and dies.


Now Replace the word Plant with Human in the above Paragraph. And replace the word Sky with father, and Earth with Mother.


Do you notice similarities between the world around you, and your own self?





Your Ressurection
:



وَمِنْ آيَاتِهِ أَنَّكَ تَرَى الْأَرْضَ خَاشِعَةً فَإِذَا أَنزَلْنَا عَلَيْهَا الْمَاءَ اهْتَزَّتْ وَرَبَتْ ۚ إِنَّ الَّذِي أَحْيَاهَا لَمُحْيِي الْمَوْتَىٰ ۚ إِنَّهُ عَلَىٰ كُلِّ شَيْءٍ قَدِيرٌ

And among His Signs (in this), that you see the earth barren and still, but when We send down water (rain) to it, it is stirred to life and growth (of vegetations).

Surely, He Who gives it life, surely, (He) is Able to give life to the dead (on the Day of Resurrection). Indeed! He is Able to do all things.

[Surah Fussilat 41:39]


http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...and-earth.html
Reply

- Qatada -
07-02-2010, 09:35 PM
Asalaam alaikum warahmatulah wabarakatuh.



His Mother is Hell..

[See al Qari'ah 101:9]



Arab idiom: If someone is having a really really hard time, the arabs would say to such a person: huwat ummuhu - his mother fell off a cliff and dived into a deep cannion (and died). That's how depressed this person looks.


Allah twisted the sequence order of this Arab idiom and made a new and more deeper meaning by saying;

فَأُمُّهُ هَاوِيَةٌ

Ummuhu hawiyah
; His mother is the deep cannion in hell.



فَأُمُّهُ هَاوِيَةٌ

Ummuhu [his Mother] = Mother = Hell is his Mother (ummuhu hawiyah).

A child runs towards his mother.

Who wants to run towards the hellfire? Nobody. But hell is now there mother - who there body will fall to at speed.

A mother wraps herself around her child, to protect it, and she doesn't let it go. And when the mother is carrying the baby in pregnancy, the baby is protected inside of her and it cannot come out of her.

The person is trapped in this mother of a hell, who holds him tightly, who does not let him escape her grip.



http://linguisticmiracle.blogspot.co...cle-dream.html
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