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islamirama
05-27-2010, 04:00 AM
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islamirama
06-02-2010, 01:39 AM
Pakistan has world's largest WiMAX network - Will America catch up?", wondersTMCnet

December 14th, 2008

Doesn't that headline just put a smile on your face? You're not the only one. It's great to see that the significant human effort augmented by billions of dollars invested in Pakistan's IT infrastructure and skill-development are bearing tangible fruit. There are several areas where Pakistan is leading the pack already, and others where it is threatening to.
  1. Pakistan is the most connected country in South Asia, with the highest teledensity
  2. Pakistan's communications costs are lower than any other country in the region
  3. Pakistan has the world's largest biometric database (NADRA); this system (not the data) is now being provided to allied countries
  4. Pakistan has the world's largest WiMAX network
  5. Pakistan has one of the world's most aggressive Fibre-to-the-Home (FTTH) rollouts
  6. Pakistan has one of the highest rates of cellular connectivity growth in the world (According to PTA 2007's report the rate of growth in Pakistan's mobile sector is fourth highest in the world)
  7. Pakistan was the winner of the 2007 GSM industry association award
  8. The US is importing UAVs designed and built in Pakistan to protect America's borders
  9. With WLL (CDMA), WiMAX, GSM and FTTH, Pakistan is pretty much leading the pack in terms of diversity and breadth of connectivity
  10. According to Gartner, Pakistan is a "first category" offshoring location; this ranking has grown by leaps and bounds
  11. Pakistani companies won several awards at Asia's APICTA startup/innovation conference and were considered the most "interesting" and cutting edge in Asia
  12. The world's youngest Microsoft Certified Professional is a Pakistani and so is the world's youngest Cisco CCNA professional
  13. Pakistani students excelled in MIT's global software talent competition
  14. Citations of Pakistani scientific publications are rising sharply
  15. Over two dozen Pakistani scientists are working on the Large Hadron Collider; the grandest experiment in the history of Physics

And I tire listing all of these out… there are so many more. The point is that the Pakistani IT industry is rapidly developing and this is most definitely an area where significant progress is being made, ****ing all the torpedoes and naysayers. Pretty exciting on its own, right? But progress in IT doesn't just mean progress in IT. It means a vibrant economy, better healthcare through Telemedicine, increased efficiency in government through record automation (e.g. land records project), a more effective defence, increased outreach for higher education and much more.

Technology is a transformational vehicle for our society. And we're just now starting to see the impact. Many times, progress in specific areas will appear slow, but in part that is explained by the exponential curves normally associated with technology adoption. When you start small, high growth rates aren't 'visible on the ground' for the first few months or years because the overall numbers remain small. But this changes when you hit the knee of the curve, at which point things are fundamentally transformed and are altered for ever.

In Pakistan, these transformations have occurred in many areas already, and will continue to occur in numerous others. Frankly, I just consider myself lucky to be around to watch the awesome progress unfold!

http://techlahore.wordpress.com/2008/12/14/pakistan-has-worlds-largest-wimax-network-will-america-catch-up-wonders-tmcnet/
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جوري
06-02-2010, 01:48 AM
zoorona tajidoon ma yasrkoum =)
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marwen
06-02-2010, 02:00 AM
Wow Pakistan is really beautiful, and its a big Power. But why don't Pakistan use a part of this power (nukes) to serve the islamic Ummah. Pakistan can put pressure on israel and on the US and has enough military force to have a strong position. It can also make economic and politic pressure on the west to leave the muslim world.
But I think the Pakistani government is not representing their muslim people, like all our governments. But the only difference is that the Pakistani governments is strong and has no excuse to serve the US.
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غزالی
06-02-2010, 02:45 AM
i think pakistani has big hidden mineral resources, more talent than any nation in the world, but all these are wasting due to lack of leadership, Proper and management in Pakistan.
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IslamicRevival
06-02-2010, 02:55 AM
I've always known Pakistan has a lot to offer the World, but as usual the backward thinking and the not so common sense is the only thing which is stopping them from fulfilling their potential. Pakistan is a shambles right now its such a waste
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CosmicPathos
06-02-2010, 03:00 AM
islamirama: nice post, mashAllah. Surely, we got the brains. Just have to capitalize on them to become the smartest nation in the world :p We can start by filtering out the the pseudo-Muslim rulers and their ilk. Taliban can help us in doing that. Then we can utilize visionaries and thinkers (Muslims) who can create a roadmap for becoming a shining torch of Islamic civilization. As it stands, about 80% Pakistanis are Sunnis and 15% seem to be Shiites, the rest 5% are Hindus, Christians, Sikhs etc. The 80% sadly includes all the deviant sects such as barelvi and what not. I guess we can address sectarian issues later on. But it seems sects wont agree upon a single Islamic leader ....

my personal issue is with the rise in number of Pakistani atheists. Not many people have acknowledged this and studied this phenomenon. As I said, there was a time when I would meet any pakistani and assume hes a Muslim. I'd start talking in common language and culture i.e. Islam. But recently ... I have been proven wrong when I came across ex-Muslims .... :(
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BlackMamba
06-02-2010, 08:48 AM
theres one thousand times more Pakistani huffaz than Pakistani atheists. Pakistanis are good at hifz, I know that much. It seems like all huffaz (at least in America) are desi.
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غزالی
06-02-2010, 10:52 AM
Originally Posted by Shakoor15
theres one thousand times more Pakistani huffaz than Pakistani atheists. Pakistanis are good at hifz, I know that much. It seems like all huffaz (at least in America) are desi.
There are secular peoples in pakistan but this atheism is not yet introduced. i have never met or listen about any atheist in pakistan. may be there are but they will be very small in numbers.
For Hufaz, there is much trend of hifz in pakistan due to tabligh work, Alkhamdullilah, My Father, Me & my Two Brothers are Hafiz e Quran.
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CosmicPathos
06-02-2010, 03:28 PM
yes mashAllah we have many hufaaz.

yea atheists are in small numbers but they are there. All the friends of my cousin whom I met in Lahore last year were atheists. I was probably the only "believer" in the company for 5-6 days. I have vowed to never meet them again as I found them to be irrational.
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tango92
06-02-2010, 08:13 PM
far more than any other country pakistan has exceptional people, who are intelligent and sincere.
but the corruption makes it hard for them to make a difference.

due to the government many people simply arent interested in politics, cause they fight to keep their heads above water financially. and education is lacking.
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islamirama
06-03-2010, 12:19 AM
Pakistanis among the most philanthropic people in the U.S.

by Hussain, S. Amjad

A CIVIL society depends on the generosity of its citizens for the support and strengthening of its basic fabric. Charitable giving adds to the beauty and durability of the warp and weft of this fabric.

Americans, considered the world's most generous people, give away $240 billion a year to charitable causes and a full 75 percent comes not from big corporations or foundations but from individual donors. About 86 percent of American households share their blessings.

America is not a monolith but a sum total of its numerous ethnic groups. Among this mosaic is a relatively small group, 500,000 by some conservative estimates, who lead the pack in charitable giving. They are the Pakistani-Americans.
There is a general assumption that immigrants in general and recent arrivals in particular tend not to give as much or as often as the established ethnic groups. This assumption also considers Pakistanis as more clannish, more inward-looking and thus not inclined to share their money with others in the society.

Not true, says professor Adil Najam, director of the Pardee Center for the Study of Long Range Future at Boston University. Mr. Najam shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with former Vice President Al Gore and the scientists who served on Mr. Gore's International Climate Council.

Recently Mr. Najam discussed the findings of an extensive survey of Pakistani expatriates in the United States that was published in his 2006 book, Portrait of a Giving Community: Philanthropy by the Pakistani-American Diaspora (Published by Global Equity Institute of the Asia Center at Harvard University).

Taking the colors and hues from the pallet of his methodical and extensive research, Mr. Najam paints a flattering picture of Pakistanis in America.

There are approximately 500,000 people of Pakistani origin in America who give away $250 million in cash and kind every year. In addition, they contribute more than 43 million hours to volunteer work which, when translated in monetary terms, come to $750 million, making the total giving an impressive $1 billion.

Forty percent of this giving goes to charities in Pakistan and an additional 20 percent to Pakistani causes in this country. Forty percent is donated to causes that have no connection with Pakistan.

In the post 9/11 climate, support of causes in Pakistan has declined because of fear of sending money abroad and a relative lack of clarity about restrictions on foreign remittances.

The most striking finding, however, was that Pakistani-Americans give 3.5 percent of their estimated household income to charity, whereas the national average in America is 3.1 percent. And yet, the researchers found, Pakistani-Americans suffer from what Mr. Najam calls a misplaced sense of philanthropic inferiority.

Somehow, Pakistanis believe that they do not give as much as some other ethnic communities in America. They also think that people living in Pakistan give proportionally more to charities than they do.

The study also found some interesting idiosyncrasies. Most Pakistani giving, for example, has a faith-based motivation. Pakistanis also tend to give to individuals in need rather than to charitable organizations. This, in part, is the result their general distrust of charitable organizations, here in the U.S. but particularly in Pakistan.

Though they do appreciate and trust faith-based charitable organizations, Pakistanis still prefer to give to individuals rather than to organizations. They just have no confidence in the Pakistani government and the myriad nongovernmental organizations to use their donated money wisely and prudently.

It is a shame that because of historic distrust of the government and other organizations, Pakistani-Americans are not helping institution-building in their native land. Giving to individuals and families in need is commendable and gratifying in the short term. One can see the results immediately and in real time. But the future direction of a country or people is set not by feeding a hungry person but by building and nurturing institutions.

I met Mr. Najam last week in Detroit, where he spoke at a fund-raiser for the Human Development Foundation. The foundation, based in Chicago, works in Pakistan to ameliorate poverty by improving literacy, providing micro-credit and vocational training for women, and other activities in rural and so-called backward areas of the country. In one evening the group, true to Mr. Najam's research, raised $250,000.

Philanthropy is an attitude that is not dependent on the amount of wealth one has. People give because they want to spread the blessings around for the greater good of the society and humanity. Pakistani-Americans, to their credit, are trend setters in this arena.

http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080520/COLUMNIST12/805200315
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Mohamed_Sadiq
06-03-2010, 12:49 AM
Intresting facts about Pakistan.
One thing i know about Pakistan is it has weak government that follows around the western like a puppet.
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islamirama
06-03-2010, 01:10 AM
Pakistan is a great nation with all the resources available within the country, with proper leadership and gov't it can easily become a super power that no one can dare touch.

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waji
06-03-2010, 07:39 AM
Thanks for all the shared information of Pakistan
Yes our leaders and we(including) are weak and corrupt

قرآن عمل کی کتاب تھی
دعا کی کتاب بنادیا

سمجھنے کی کتاب تھی
پڑھنے کی کتاب بنادیا

زندوں کا دستور تھا
مردوں کا منشور بنادیا

انقلاب کی کتاب تھی
صرف ثواب کی کتاب بنادیا

جو علم کی کتاب تھی
اسے لاعلموں کے ہاتھ تھمادیا

تصقیر و قنعت کا درس دینے آئی تھی
صرف مدرسوں کا نصاب بنادیا

مردہ قوموں کو زندہ کرنے آئی تھی
مردوں کو بخشوانے پر لگادیا

آے مسلمانوں یہ کیا تھا
ہم نے کیا کردیا
کیاتھا ہم نے کیا بنادیا
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غزالی
06-03-2010, 08:05 AM
Hidden Pearl of Pakistan


Neelam Valley Azad Kashmir





Shaunter Lake (AJK)




Noori Top connecting Naran Valley With Neelam Valley





Lake Situated in Naran Valley Near Noori Top
"Lake Doshi Pat Sir"





"Rati Gali Pass" Just Like Noori Nar Pass (Noori Top) It connected Kaghan Valley with AJK.Beautiful place & heaven for Trekers & Jeepers






A Typical Kashmiri House at Sharda "Neelam Valley AJK"



shogran Pakistan.

.




The Beautiful Peak by the name of "Braak Zhan" in Raikot Glacier in Pakistan.






A view of Nanga Parbat from Fairy Meadows





Beautiful flowers spreader on babusar Pass, Pakistan




Zarkhana in Lower Chitral, Pakistan.





A typical view of winter in Malam Jabba





Sheosar lake deosai, Pakistan.





K2

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islamirama
06-03-2010, 10:33 PM
Nawaz Sharif In a Traffic Jam

This story is dedicated to all those Pakistanis who believe we have a savior in Mr. Nawaz Sharif. Mr. Nawaz Sharif’s midweek trip to the hilly Murree resort didn’t end well. On his way back, his motorcade was stuck in a traffic jam. Instead of waiting for the cars to move like all Pakistanis do, Mr. Sharif had a solution. His brother is the chief executive of the province where Murree is located. So he simply called the Chief Secretary of the Punjab province.

Resolving traffic congestions is not in the job of this bureaucrat, the Chief Secretary. But since he works for a government run by a family-run political party, the poor civil servant has to lick boots to promote his career. So he wasted no time in dispatching government employees to end the traffic jam and rescue a restless Mr. Nawaz Sharif.
Story doesn’t end here.

Some thirty police officers were ’suspended’ from duty the next day because they failed to make Mr. Sharif’s picnic a smooth drive [What were they supposed to do? Reinvent a lousy traffic system?]

This feudalistic, paternal attitude by Mr. Sharif is nothing new to the elite, superrich class of Pakistani politicians. Ordinary middle class Pakistanis are virtually banned entry to these feudal-owned political parties.

This is why Mr. Sharif will never understand why what he did is wrong.

http://pakalert.wordpress.com/2009/08/23/nawaz-sharif-in-a-traffic-jam/
Presidents of Pakistan...

Interesting Facts about Presidents of Pakistan...

What happens at Age "64"

Sikander Mirza Died @ "64" Years of Age

Ayub Khan Died @ "64" Years of Age.

Yahya Khan Died @ "64" Years of Age

Fazal Elahi Died @ "64" Years of Age

Zia Ul Haq Died @ "64" Years of Age

And

Asif Zardari ? ? ? ? ? Will Be @ "64" In 2010...

The public is requested to have patience, it's only a matter of one year.
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Candle
06-03-2010, 10:55 PM
Beautiful. I didn't know any of that about Pakistan--it was quite shocking actually. It is sad to see the people suffer while the politicians party. Seriously, they're in an SUV limo too, perhaps the trashiest vehicle invented besides the hummer.
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islamirama
06-04-2010, 02:15 AM
Pakistan Enhances Second Strike Nuclear Capability

May 31, 2009

WASHINGTON: Pakistan has addressed issues of survivability in a possible nuclear conflict through second strike capability, says a US congressional report.

The first part of the report, published on Friday, deals with Islamabad’s efforts to develop new weapons, while the second part studies its strategy for surviving a nuclear war.

According to the report, Pakistan has built hard and deeply buried storage and launch facilities to retain a second strike capability in a nuclear war. It also has built road-mobile missiles, air defences around strategic sites, and concealment measures.

The report prepared by the Congressional Research Service recalls that as the United States prepared to launch an attack on the Afghan Taliban after September 11, 2001, former military dictator Gen (retd) Pervez Musharraf ordered that Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal be redeployed to ‘at least six secret new locations.’ This action came at a time of uncertainly about the future of the region, including the direction of US-Pakistan relations. Islamabad’s leadership was uncertain whether the US would decide to conduct military strikes against Pakistan’s nuclear assets if Islamabad did not assist the United States against the Taliban. Indeed, Musharraf cited protection of Pakistan’s nuclear and missile assets as one of the reasons for Islamabad’s dramatic policy shift.

The CRS points out that these events, in combination with the 1999 Kargil crisis, the 2002 conflict with India at the Line of Control, and revelations about the A.Q. Khan proliferation network, inspired a variety of reforms to secure the nuclear complex. Risk of nuclear war in South Asia ran high in the 1999 Kargil crisis, when the Pakistani military is believed to have begun preparing nuclear-tipped missiles.

The report, however, notes that even at the high alert levels of 2001 and 2002, there were no reports of Pakistan mating the warheads with delivery systems.

The CRS refers to a Nov 5, 2007 statement by former prime minister Benazir Bhutto who said that while Musharraf claimed he had firm control of the nuclear arsenal, she was afraid this control could weaken due to instability in the country.

The report then quotes Michael Krepon of the Henry L. Stimson Centre, Washington, as arguing that ‘a prolonged period of turbulence and infighting among the country’s president, prime minister, and army chief’ could jeopardise the army’s unity of command, which ‘is essential for nuclear security.’ During that period between late 2007 and early 2008, US military officials also expressed concern about the security of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons. Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency Mohamed ElBaradei also said he feared that a radical regime could take power in Pakistan, and thereby acquire nuclear weapons. Experts also worried that while nuclear weapons were currently under firm control, with warheads disassembled, technology could be sold off by insiders during a worsened crisis.

Since then, however, US intelligence officials have expressed greater confidence regarding the security of Islamabad’s nuclear weapons.

The Pakistani military’s control of the country’s nuclear weapons is ‘a good thing because that’s an institution in Pakistan that has, in fact, withstood many of the political changes over the years,’ says Donald Kerr, Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence.

Washington has ‘no reason at this point to have any concern with regard to the security’ of Islamabad’s nuclear arsenal, argues a Pentagon spokesperson.

http://pakalert.wordpress.com/2009/05/31/pakistan-enhances-second-strike-nuclear-capability/
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Masuma
06-04-2010, 10:16 AM
Woah! Now wasn’t that a treat?! :D Brother islamirama, mashAllah great share! Jazakamullahu Khair.

@ Candle:
Yeah I too didn't know any of this before. :hiding:
But you know one thing, the thread has basically pointed out good points about Pakistan. That is not all “about Pakistan”. Yes, Pakistan has got great potential but that doesn’t seem to be utilized in the right direction…



Originally Posted by marwen
But why don't Pakistan use a part of this power (nukes) to serve the islamic Ummah.
The same question I ask all the time. :hmm:

Originally Posted by marwen
Pakistan can put pressure on israel and on the US and has enough military force to have a strong position. It can also make economic and politic pressure on the west to leave the muslim world.
But I think the Pakistani government is not representing their muslim people, like all our governments. But the only difference is that the Pakistani governments is strong and has no excuse to serve the US.

Brother, Pakistan is a SLAVE of US. Yes it doesn’t have and shouldn’t have any excuse to serve it but it still do. Innocent people are constantly dying in drone attacks in Balochistan but Pakistan won’t do a thing about it!
And if talking about the general population; I see no difference between an ordinary namesake Muslim and a Hindu. Both are living the same lifestyle.
And about “putting pressure on Israel”, do you know that Pakistan not even sent a penny for the aid of people in Gaza on freedom flotilla?! The political and religious groups here which so much talk about the rights of Palestinians; not even one of these hypocrites went there with the aid ships!

The thing which always overwhelms me with grief is that Pakistan was founded for a purpose. But it forgot it completely.

“Pakistan ka matlab kiya? LA ILLAHA ILLALLAH” …what a beautiful slogan it was, never to be repeated again…I guess. :hmm:


And I can write like 2 or 3 pages about what Pakistan really is but that would only make people hopeless and maybe that it would come across as “unacceptable” to some people.


So the final words are
“Pakistan needs a leadership but only and only a true ISLAMIC LEADERSHIP!
Many of you have given your solutions here and so I give mine too.
Pakistan NEEDS one Dr.Zakir Naik!
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Masuma
06-04-2010, 10:27 AM
Originally Posted by mad_scientist
We can start by filtering out the the pseudo-Muslim rulers and their ilk. Taliban can help us in doing that.
your kidding... right??? :ooh:

:exhausted
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islamirama
06-05-2010, 01:03 AM
Pakistan, A Sleeping Superpower

Masood Sharif Khan Khattak - 2009 June 11

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan—Way back in the 1960s Pakistan was truly on the move.

The early Ayub years gave us the “Green Revolution” because of the construction and commissioning of dams such as Mangla and Tarbela. Barrages were erected all the way down to the Guddu near Hyderabad.

These dams and barrages gave birth to an efficient network of canals and small distributaries which in the sixties not only made Pakistan self-sufficient but surplus in agricultural products.

In the 60s the building that we all know as Habib Bank Plaza in Karachi was the tallest building all the way from the Middle East down to Singapore. In the 1960s almost every army, navy and air force in the Middle East was manned by Pakistani officers and men. We literally raised those armed forces.

Many airlines that operate from the Gulf have actually been trained, organized and manned by PIA staff when they initially started operations. Today they are amongst the best in the world while PIA is in a total mess.

In 1972 it was Pakistan that created history and paved the way for the world to move in the direction that it actually has moved by being instrumental in bringing about President Richard Nixon’s visit to Beijing (then Peking). That visit helped both China and USA equally and opened the world to be shaped as it is today. Not long after that, in 1979, if Pakistan had not taken on the USSR on its own initially, along with the Afghan Mujahideen, the world today would have been very different.

One can go on recounting many more aspects of Pakistan to show what a potently viable country it should have been today with an economy strong enough to stand it in good stead for exercising an independent foreign policy as well as in bringing about an environment in which the country would have had a content population which would, in turn, have excluded space to all sorts of disruptions.

What, then, went wrong and why do people now talk in terms of whether Pakistan will be able to outlast its present crisis?

Pakistan indeed lost its way in the years that followed the incidents I have quoted; military coups, the judicial murder of an elected prime minister, frequent derailing of the political process, an erratic foreign policy pursued by a bunch of minds that were driven by reasons other than prudent statecraft, importing of self-seeking bankers and making them prime ministers, denying of provincial autonomy to the federating units, allowing ethnic and other kinds of militancy to grow, letting fiefdoms be created right under the nose of the state, making talent become subservient to cronyism, treating education as if it was insignificant and so much more is all responsible for the dire straits we find ourselves in after having made a great start in the early years of our freedom.

It is said that South Korea laid its foundations for progress and prosperity on Pakistan’s First Five Year Plan. Pakistan never made a second five-year plan and in fact the First Five Year Plan was followed by unplanned improvisation. Who knows, had Pakistan followed its own First Five Year Plan like South Korea did, in the subsequent years Pakistan too may well have been one of the biggest economies of the world today. (South Korea is now the fourth-biggest of Asia and the world’s 15th.)

Most Pakistanis are known to have a strong faith in the country’s ability to bounce back from the wilderness. Pakistan is not a country that can be written off because a handful of insurgents have taken the state on frontally and because the state has not responded as responsibly as it ought to have ever since the crisis was evolving. Reacting to situations when crises explode in the face cannot be the best of situations for any state.

The present crisis should never have gotten to where it now stands. Now that it has and now that it has to be handled, let all Pakistanis take strength from the fact that this great country needs to be put back on the track from which it got derailed in the 1960s.

We Pakistanis have to once again regain our lost glory and win back our rightful, respectable and dignified place in the comity of nations. We can and must do it.

The writer is former director general of the Intelligence Bureau and former vice president of the PPP Parliamentarians.

This column was published by The News International. Email: masoodsharifkhattak@gmail.com

http://pakalert.wordpress.com/2009/06/11/pakistan-a-sleeping-superpower/
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CosmicPathos
06-05-2010, 01:49 AM
Originally Posted by An33za
your kidding... right??? :ooh:

:exhausted
Why am I kidding?

Sorry, I forgot to mention. I also despise educated Pakistanis who have attained some university degrees and think they can make a judgment on taliban.
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'Abd Al-Maajid
06-05-2010, 03:55 AM
Islamirama, about India?
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islamirama
06-05-2010, 04:49 AM
Originally Posted by abdulmajid
Islamirama, about India?
What about it?
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'Abd Al-Maajid
06-05-2010, 05:39 AM
Originally Posted by islamirama
What about it?
LOL nothing about India. I just requested you to post a thread about India. :p
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غزالی
06-05-2010, 07:09 AM
Originally Posted by abdulmajid
LOL nothing about India. I just requested you to post a thread about India. :p
see his avatar, account disabled is displaying.
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'Abd Al-Maajid
06-05-2010, 07:28 AM
Originally Posted by hafizsaad
see his avatar, account disabled is displaying.
Yea, I did notice it too, His account got disabled couple of hours ago, after my request:p. :hmm:I dont know why his account is disabled, I liked his posts and news articles.
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Supreme
06-05-2010, 10:30 AM
Perhaps it was disabled at his own request?
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Masuma
06-05-2010, 10:33 AM
@ brother mad_scientist:
So you support Talibans?! :offended: Do you even know that they are of two types? Pakistani and Afghani Talibans? And you support them both? :ooh: Afghani Talibans; I've no problem with and I know very little about them. But Pakistani Talibans are Satan's forces and I would never support them. Even Afghani Talibans disapprove of all their ruthless killing!

And I'm not a university graduate yet so your statement doesn't even fit! K?! :offended:
And as far as forming our own judgement is concerned, know that I had seen a whole 2 years of slaughter of innocent people by these monstrous people and have had enough of time and proof to form correct and sound judgements of my own!
In the past few years, they've killed more than thousand innocent people in suicide bomb attacks! ...innocent children who had nothing to do with America and its forces! :cry:
And also know that Allah says in Quran:
''those who take the life of an innocent, it is as if he has killed the whole of humanity...''
So go on supporting them and one day Allah will bring everyone to justice!
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CosmicPathos
06-05-2010, 02:34 PM
Originally Posted by An33za
@ brother mad_scientist:
So you support Talibans?! :offended: Do you even know that they are of two types? Pakistani and Afghani Talibans? And you support them both? :ooh: Afghani Talibans; I've no problem with and I know very little about them. But Pakistani Talibans are Satan's forces and I would never support them. Even Afghani Talibans disapprove of all their ruthless killing!

And I'm not a university graduate yet so your statement doesn't even fit! K?! :offended:
And as far as forming our own judgement is concerned, know that I had seen a whole 2 years of slaughter of innocent people by these monstrous people and have had enough of time and proof to form correct and sound judgements of my own!
In the past few years, they've killed more than thousand innocent people in suicide bomb attacks! ...innocent children who had nothing to do with America and its forces! :cry:
And also know that Allah says in Quran:
''those who take the life of an innocent, it is as if he has killed the whole of humanity...''
So go on supporting them and one day Allah will bring everyone to justice!
I wont say I support Taliban, at least on the net. I am just neutral. I look at both sides of arguments.

Evidence for killing of "innocent people' by Pakistani taliban is flimsy. We know that American institutions are working inside Pakistan. They could have planted these bombs by hiring some people who portray themselves to be taliban. Moreover, pakistani ISI is known to have done these kind of evil things in the past too. So why not this time ....

My comment regarding university degree was not directed to you sister. I was just stating what I saw when I visited Pakistan and what I saw on fb.
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Masuma
06-05-2010, 04:39 PM
@ brother mad_scientist:
So why would Talibans accept the responsibility of bomb blasts?! they accept it proudly as if they've done sth worthy to be proud of! and you are putting blame on other institutions and laying alegations against them, but do you've any proof for that? yes i do agree that black water and other such agencies have been carrying out some activities in pak but we don't have any proof!
talibans always accept responsibitity of the attacks; isn't that enough of a proof for you???
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Masuma
06-05-2010, 04:50 PM
@ brother mad_scientist:
also that you are talking without any proof. you said that you look to both sides of the story, but i think you forgot to do so this time. i'm just shocked as to how can YOU support Taliban! :offended: if some group calls itself a Muslim, it doesn't just simply make them so!
and do you despise then yourself too as you yourself is passing judgements about Taliban? :offended:
may ALLAH show you the truth! :cry:
Reply

CosmicPathos
06-08-2010, 04:23 AM
@ aneeza: taliban are better than the punjabi rulers of Pakistan with those ugly mustaches! I wont discuss this with you anymore. Just like any other typical Pakistani from elite social class, you have showed your colors in this regard. and I have nothing personal against you. and your living in pakistan and watching all those channels such as geo news etc, I wont blame you for the views you have. The other day I met anohter "religious sunni" pakistani who said that she is okay with making Ahmadis her friends even though she doesnt accept their beliefs. i am just WOWED at Pakistani version of Sunni Islam.
Reply

Masuma
06-09-2010, 09:50 AM
@ brother mad_scientist:
good :) very good!
you too is no more different from a Taliban who has been brainwashed and told that by killing innocent people in bomb blasts, he would earn a place in jannah!
go on with your beliefs and we'll see in the end who was right!
best of luck!
Reply

islamirama
09-05-2010, 01:56 AM
Flood Victims need help Now...






“The believer's shade on the Day of Resurrection will be his charity.” (Al-Tirmidhi)

Facts about Pakistan

  • More than 73 percent of the population lives on less than $2 a day.
  • 24 percent of the population is undernourished.
  • 38 percent of children are underweight.


Situation Facts:


  • Estimated 17million people affected (one-eighth of country’s population)
  • More than 1,500 dead
  • 6 million people in need of life-saving assistance (WHO)
  • At least 6 million homeless; estimated one million homes damaged or destroyed
  • More than 200 hospitals and clinics destroyed
  • Worst flooding in 80 years; an area the size of Italy submerged by floods
  • Affected more than Haiti quake, 2004 Asia tsunami, 2005 Pakistan quake combined
  • Landslides and flashfloods washed away entire villages
  • 1.7 million acres of farmland uprooted
  • Waterborne disease like diarrhea and cholera threaten the victims


What are the greatest needs now in Pakistan?


The most immediate concern right now is the risk of water- and vector-borne disease (such as diarrhea, malaria, and dengue fever), as huge swathes of the country remain underwater. Right now, more than 30,000 people are suffering from water- and hygiene-related infections like acute diarrhea — which is easily treated under good conditions but potentially fatal during emergencies like this. There is an urgent need for clean water and sanitation facilities, as well as soap and other hygiene supplies. Oxfam is responding to these needs, but the resources currently available now only cover a fraction of what is required. [...]





_____________________________________________

https://donation.hidaya.org/donation.aspx?projectId=45 – 94% goes to the needy after administrative and overhead cost

https://www.islamicreliefusa.org/SSLPage.aspx?pid=499 – 94% goes to the needy after administrative and overhead cost

http://www.lifeusa.org/site/PageServ...an_floods_2010 – 91% goes to the needy after administrative and overhead cost

https://www.helpinghandonline.org/Donate.aspx?proid=75 – 85% goes to the needy after administrative and overhead cost
Reply

tigerkhan
09-05-2010, 02:37 PM
dil tu chahta ha bht kuch kahon, but only line is enough
i love u pakistan
Reply

tigerkhan
09-05-2010, 02:57 PM
also i thing i want to clear my bro and sis about pak ppl. may be u ppl bcz of media think pakistan as a land of terrerist, zalim and ignorant ppl...as all over the world media is enlighting our shortcommings even its circket scandle, sialkot accident or what so ever....... blv our ppl r much better than many ppl of the world......what that is happening today is just a AZAB of ALLAH SWT on us. bcz its comes in hadith, when ALLAH SWT get naraz/angry wid some ppl, ALLAH disgrace their respect (as we see today ppl all over the world know pakis as bad ppl) and make azab on them (see flood and our goveronment).....and u know AZAB comes on ppl who are near to ALLAH SWT....
its my personal thinking that pakistan is center to dawa work in all over the world. and u know when some nation dont accept dawa then its fact from quran and history ALLAH SWT disgrace such ppl and make azab on them ,so its my personal thinking that ALLAH SWT will keep punishing pakis ppl unless they make toba and come toward deen and islamic life.
so dont think paksi as bad ppl. i am v.hopefull from pakis and may be u know about GHAZWA HIND... its v.blessed laskar/force of mmujahideen of islam form KHURASAN (todays pakistan). so i blv insh pakis will make toba and isnh soon ALLAH will take work of dawa and jihad from them to make islam superior all over the world.
JAZAKALLAH
Reply

Woodrow
09-05-2010, 03:36 PM
Originally Posted by marwen
Wow Pakistan is really beautiful, and its a big Power. But why don't Pakistan use a part of this power (nukes) to serve the islamic Ummah. Pakistan can put pressure on israel and on the US and has enough military force to have a strong position. It can also make economic and politic pressure on the west to leave the muslim world.
But I think the Pakistani government is not representing their muslim people, like all our governments. But the only difference is that the Pakistani governments is strong and has no excuse to serve the US.
As a weapon nukes are almost useless. It is very doubtful any nation would be foolish enough to depend upon them for either defense or aggression. The possession of such is more of a psychological weapon effective only against nations that do not have them.

Nukes are expensive, unreliable, dangerous to possess and not an effective weapon. More likely to cause more damage to the country using them, then to the nation they are used against.

Ever wonder why only two (Fat Man and Little Boy) have been used in warfare and both before being fully tested one having never been tested (Little Man) and it was unknown if it was even possible to trigger detonation by compression of a sub-critical mass.

Ever wonder why the USA did not use nukes in North Korea or Vietnam? Ever wonder why the Soviet Union did not use them against the USA, when at one point they had Thermonuclear Superiority by sheer numbers?

No sane government would ever use a nuke as a weapon and an insane Nation would most likely self destruct before using them. Nukes only have value as a psychological deterrent and are quite useless for anything else. Possession of them reduces a country's usable military strength. If they had not made the error of going nuke, they most likely would have the strength to be a formidable military power to aid the Ummah. But, the day they built their first nuke they became a slave to it and are now controlled by the ownership of it. Being a nuclear nation is the selling of a nation to the Shaytan.

Nukes are very much a double edged sword and the user of them will be cut as much as the Nation that sword is used against. I think Pakistan is learning that it was a huge mistake to become a nuclear power and like all nuclear powers has been shackled by becoming an owner of those rabid puppies. Nukes bring about a strong barrier to conducting a winning war.
Reply

abdussattar
09-06-2010, 05:58 PM
What are salt mines? as much as I know, salt is manufactured from seawater...?
Reply

'Abd Al-Maajid
09-06-2010, 06:18 PM
Originally Posted by islamirama
[B]...
Interesting Facts about Presidents of Pakistan...

What happens at Age "64"

Sikander Mirza Died @ "64" Years of Age

Ayub Khan Died @ "64" Years of Age.

Yahya Khan Died @ "64" Years of Age

Fazal Elahi Died @ "64" Years of Age

Zia Ul Haq Died @ "64" Years of Age

And

Asif Zardari ? ? ? ? ? Will Be @ "64" In 2010...

The public is requested to have patience, it's only a matter of one year.
Muahaha...2010 is here..now what...:p
Reply

Grace Seeker
09-06-2010, 07:12 PM
Originally Posted by abdulmājid

Muahaha...2010 is here..now what...:p
Now you have a year's wait to see if there is any value in using the coincidences of history for predicting future events in real life or if it is all just another form of being superstitious.
Reply

Woodrow
09-06-2010, 08:29 PM
Originally Posted by abdussattar
What are salt mines? as much as I know, salt is manufactured from seawater...?
:sl:

Most salt comes from mines. Many people do feel that the sea water salt is the better choice, but it is cost prohibitive for many people. The salt mines are the remains of ancient seas that dried up millions of years ago, so you can say that is also sea water salt, free from the additives of pollution dumped into the worlds oceans. While many people feel the sea salt is the healthiest, The degree of pollution now in the oceans may make it the least healthy.

Typical sea salt is harvested on ocean beaches.

Typical salt harvesting along the beach:

Sea water is dumped into shallow pools or filled during high tide.



The water is allowed to evaporate and the salt is then scooped into piles and shoveled out.



This process can only be done in hot, dry areas that border the sea. The countries surrounded the Mediterranean are ideal for sea salt production.

A very large percentage of sea salt is harvested from the shores of the Dead Sea in Israel. Nearly all commercially sold sea salt is an Israeli product.

The beautiful white beaches of the Dead Sea are salt deposists.



Reply

abdussattar
09-07-2010, 03:26 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
The salt mines are the remains of ancient seas that dried up millions of years ago, so you can say that is also sea water salt, free from the additives of pollution dumped into the worlds oceans.
Ooh. Jazakallah for telling. Btw, are salt mines underground?
Reply

Woodrow
09-07-2010, 08:36 AM
Originally Posted by abdussattar

Ooh. Jazakallah for telling. Btw, are salt mines underground?
:sl:

Yes, and beneath layers of bed rock that keeps rain water from dissolving them. One of the largest salt mines in the USA was destroyed when a company drilling for oil accidentally drilled into it and an entire lake drained into it and dissolved it.


The Salt mines in Pakistan and Siberia are amongst the largest and most famous ones. There are salt flats such as the Bonneville salt flats which are dried up inland seas. However, they can only exist in deserts and would be destroyed by rains in a wet climate.

The salt flats in the deserts are amazing. Pools form during the brief rains which become extremely salty water and last only a few hours or a day at most and during that brief time brines shrimp eggs hatch and billions of brine shrimp live out their life cycle and lay trillions of eggs which will remain dormant until the next rain which may be 10 to 20 years later.

Most deserts have these salt flats. And they all contain trillions of brine shrimp, triop, and Daphne eggs all waiting for the next rain. Even what looks like the deadest places on earth contain life waiting for the next rain.

The salt flats high in the Andes Mountains in South America are fascinating.:







The salt basins of the Atacama Desert in the high Andes are formidable places to call home. Located in a desert atop a high-altitude plateau in the middle of a lofty white-capped Andean cordillera of volcanoes and mountains, these austere basins are among the most extreme habitats on Earth. Once covered by water, the salt basins, or salt flats, are now arid landscapes of salt-covered soil. The blindingly white patina of this world may be inviting to the photographer’s lens, but not to most living organisms. Those who have come to live in such an unwelcoming habitat have been compelled to evolve a set of fascinating, specialized adaptations.
SOURCE

The salt flats of the world are amazing sights to behold, but for table salt, the mines are the best sources and the salt mines of Pakistan are among the best.

The entrance to the world's largest salt mine, which is in Pakistan.







There are shops, restaurants and even a Masjid in the mine

Reply

abdussattar
09-07-2010, 09:03 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
The salt flats in the deserts are amazing. Pools form during the brief rains which become extremely salty water and last only a few hours or a day at most and during that brief time brines shrimp eggs hatch and billions of brine shrimp live out their life cycle and lay trillions of eggs which will remain dormant until the next rain which may be 10 to 20 years later.
Mashallah what a great miracle by Allah swt.
Reply

islamirama
09-12-2010, 06:58 PM
Who cares about Pakistan?

By Jude SheerinBBC News

Donations have been sluggish to the Pakistan floods appeals, as they were back in 2005 when the part of Kashmir the country administers was torn apart by an earthquake. The BBC News website asked some experts to comment on possible reasons why.



Full article @ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11035270

----------------------------------------------

Pakistan flood victims 'have no concept of terrorism'


Three weeks after the start of the floods in Pakistan, a fifth of the country is under water. More international aid is now reaching the country - but the world's media finds it hard to stop talking about terrorism.

When the world media reports on the tragedy, it finds it difficult to leave behind a decade-long habit of linking everything to terrorism.

The reporters look for a banned militant organisation involved in relief work, usually some random men with beards will do. And we are told, in good faith I am sure, that if the victims are not provided with relief, they will all turn to the Taliban.

Our own politicians join the chorus.

A friend involved in relief work in Sindh pointed out that a hungry person is not likely to ask your views on terrorism before accepting your packet of food for the simple reason that their children are starving.

If this was a disaster movie, its poster would include the young man swimming across a deluge with his rooster tied around his neck.

A puzzled relief worker wondered aloud why the world would think that this man who has just swum cross a raging flood would want to bring about a bloody Islamist revolution in a far-flung country that he has never heard of?

Is it not obvious that he just wants to save his chickens?

But this is no movie.

That half-naked child that you see in pictures with his face covered in flies is not dead. Not yet. He has dozed off out of hunger and heat and exhaustion.

When he wakes up in a little while, he will ask for what every hungry child in the world asks for.

We were told that everyone, everywhere understands that language.

Full article @ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/8931886.stm

----------------------------------------------

Pakistani flood victims' anger at US

Some criticised the government, saying the aid was not fairly distributed.

Others blamed the West, including the US, for failing to give enough help.

One man turned his anger on me: "What about your country?" he said, heatedly. "Why aren't you giving more?"

Some say their communities have been knocked back about 25 years

Elsewhere in the small camp, businessmen were handing out donations from the local community.

If there was not more support, they said, the security situation might worsen.

There has been fighting already in the camps, said one.

"We're doing so much to help the United States in the war on terrorism. Now we're in crisis and we expect help," said one of the businessman donors.

His colleague agreed: "Now's the time for them to prove their commitment to us."

Ayaz Amir, an MP in Nawaz Sharif's opposition party, said: "The United States is spending $5bn every month on the war in Afghanistan. That puts into context what they're giving us."

The implication is that if the US does not do much more, Pakistan's ability - and willingness - to support the US-led battle against Islamist insurgents will suffer.

Mr Amir added: "If Pakistan can't recover, then one thing which will be washed away is the so-called war on terror. This front will not be functioning."

Full article @ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11040904
Reply

DancesWithChair
09-13-2010, 03:21 AM
The New York prayer building near ground zero will cost $100,000,000.00

US muslims could fix 2 problems in one go.

Its all a matter of priorities.

-
Reply

islamirama
09-13-2010, 05:59 PM
Originally Posted by DancesWithChair
The New York prayer building near ground zero will cost $100,000,000.00

US muslims could fix 2 problems in one go.

Its all a matter of priorities.

-
would you cut down eating once a day in order to better help those in need?
Reply

islamirama
09-13-2010, 06:01 PM
Angelina Jolie has donated almost twice as much as Zardari to Pakistan relief efforts

Angelina Jolie, the actress, has donated $100,000 (£64,000) towards flood relief efforts in Pakistan, almost twice the amount pledged by the country’s president, Asif Ali Zardari.

By Rob Crilly, Islamabad - 26 Aug 2010

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newsvideo/celebrity-news-video/7949553/Angelina-Jolie-on-raising-flood-aid-to-Pakistan.html

The comparison is another embarrassment for Mr Zardari, who travelled to Europe even as the full scale of the flooding became apparent.

His handling of the floods has been roundly condemned, and now his donation of five million rupees, or $58,000 (£37,000), has been highlighted.

Farhatullah Babar, Mr Zardari’s spokesman, said the comparison was unfair. “We appreciate what Angelina Jolie has done, but it is not some sort of race,” he said.

Mr Zardari is known as one of the country’s richest businessmen having amassed a fortune while his wife Benazir Bhutto was prime minister during the 1990s, earning the nickname Mr Ten Per Cent for his alleged taste in kickbacks.

Pakistan’s anti-corruption body claims he has amassed a property empire worth almost £1 billion, with a chateau in France, homes in Britain, Spain and Florida, and bank accounts in Switzerland.

Jolie, who is a Unicef goodwill ambassador, said she was concerned about the sluggish response to appeals for cash.

She added that she understood “it is getting hard for people – they see Haiti, they see these other events ... and they get exhausted by the time another big one rolls around”.

She has also hinted that she may visit the devastated country as media coverage fades.

The Pakistani government has confirmed 1,600 people have been killed and more than 2,300 wounded. The catastrophe has already affected more than 17 million people and left eight million dependent on aid. Officials warn millions more are at risk from disease and food shortage.

Sir Anthony Bamford, the JCB chairman, donated two backhoe loader diggers worth a total of £160,000 to help in the reconstruction programme.

“Britain has been leading the way with the level of its donations to Pakistan and as a British manufacturer I am keen for us to help in any way possible and hope that JCB’s donation of machines can assist in some small way,” he said.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/pakistan/7966019/Angelina-Jolie-has-donated-almost-twice-as-much-as-Zardari-to-Pakistan-relief-efforts.html

------------------------------------------------

Saudi relief for Pakistan flood victims

8/11/2010

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia will start airlifting relief supplies for Pakistan’s flood victims on Wednesday, an official statement said on Tuesday. The supplies were ordered by Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah to alleviate the suffering of flood victims.

“The Saudi Royal Air Force will establish an air bridge to Islamabad to transport the relief supplies,” the statement said. The Saudi Finance Ministry has already arranged large amounts of foodstuffs, medicine, blankets and tents for the flood victims.

“We are coordinating with UN organizations to distribute humanitarian and emergency relief supplies worth $100 million, which the Kingdom had earlier allocated to support victims of natural calamities in Pakistan,” the statement said.

Pakistan’s worst floods have hit more than three million people so far and the death toll has climbed over 1,400, a spokesman for the U.N. Children's Fund said on Tuesday. Abdul Sami Malik said 1.3 million people were severely affected by the floods in the northwest.

Pakistani authorities are struggling to help victims of the flooding, many of whom have lost their homes and livelihood and say they had not received any official warnings that raging waters were heading their way.

http://www.paknewsnet.com/news_details.aspx?newsid=66
Reply

islamirama
09-13-2010, 06:04 PM




May the Peace, Mercy, and Blessings of the Creator be with You
Please forward this message to your family, friends, and email lists...



What if you had the option of having your own non-profit organization to implement projects in Pakistan? Given the current devastated infrastructure in Pakistan due to the Floods, and the needs in the region being so great, Hidaya Foundation (www.hidaya.org) is now offering individuals and worldwide non-profit organizations an opportunity to propose a project of their own and utilize Hidaya's infrastructure for implementation. Hidaya has over 150 plus full time employees and offices/warehouses throughout Pakistan, from Abbottabad to Karachi.

Here is how:
· Send an outline of a project that you would like to implement in Pakistan to Hidaya. Be clear about defining your objectives such as who you think should benefit and the name of the place in Pakistan where this project is to be implemented.


The project must fit one of the 30 project categories listed on Hidaya’s website under our four programs (Education, Environment, Social Welfare and Health Care - http:// www.hidaya.org/programs/).


· You must fill out a project proposal document provided by Hidaya and give an estimate of the cost of implementing the project.

For further information, please visit: http://www.hidaya.org/social-welfare...infrastructure


Online: To donate online using electronic check or credit card kindly visit: https://donation.hidaya.org/donation.aspx?projectId=45

Donate by Mail: To donate by check payable to ‘Hidaya Foundation’, mail check to:
Hidaya Foundation, P.O. Box 5481, Santa Clara, CA 95050


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Allow Self Sufficiency: Pakistan Flood Relief

Assalaamu Alykum,

Over a month of flooding has caused severe damage to the infrastructure of Pakistan. Along with making millions of Pakistanis homeless, the floods have also caused the hardworking poor to lose their livelihood.

Apart from the immediate needs like food, shelter and medical services, we should start thinking of how we can help them in building a livelhood; to gain sustainablity and self sufficiency.

Interest Free Micro-Financing:

Your one time donation allows for interest free loans for the poor, the unemployed and the widows. That family uses the interest free loan to start a small business or purchase livestock for example, that will become a source of livelihood for them. This will allow self sufficiency and the loan will be repaid. The repaid loan then goes back into the pool of money that will be used to loan out money to others in need. The cycle continues and it becomes a form of

sadaqa–e-jariya. The best form of charity.

We can make our charity multiplefolds in this time.

www.hhrd.org

May Allah allow us to make the best of these last few days in Ramadan.

-HHRD Team


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
How to help Pakistan (even better than money!)

One of the countless Pakistani citizens who’re working day and night for the flood relief efforts is Fakhre-Alam, a young celebrity known well in the nation. Previously, he’d spearheaded a prolonged and effective relief campaign for the earthquake victims in 2005. Now, he joins Pakistan’s national airline, PIA, to bring focused and effective relief for the millions who’re awaiting help.

This video has been made especially for people residing abroad, who want to help with the relief campaign on the ground. PIA, the national carrier, has declared it will ship to Pakistan free of cost any donations that people abroad want to send for the flood victims.



Watch the video to learn more: http://www.youtube.com/v/hCNomdB6V0U&autoplay=1

A summary of the items described in the video above:

1) Get a box, preferable size 12 inches x 15 inches x 15 inches
2) A white sheet
3) Two 1.5 liters mineral water (not more, not less)
4) Twelve-pack of any juice with straw
5) One box of salty biscuits
6) Two boxes of sweet biscuits (1 big, 1 small)
7) One box of chocolates
8) Milk carton (1-1.5 liters) – expiration date should be far off
9) One bag of potato chips
10) Two to four soap bars
11) One box of dates
12) ORS (Oral Rehydration Salts / dehydration-prevention supplement- pedialyte)
13) One pack of disposable cups

Reply

freezium
09-13-2010, 09:07 PM
Salaaam!!!!

Originally Posted by islamirama
Pakistan has world's largest WiMAX network - Will America catch up?", wondersTMCnet

December 14th, 2008

Doesn't that headline just put a smile on your face? You're not the only one. It's great to see that the significant human effort augmented by billions of dollars invested in Pakistan's IT infrastructure and skill-development are bearing tangible fruit. There are several areas where Pakistan is leading the pack already, and others where it is threatening to.
it was great feeling to have that information.really it gave some courage in present situation i.e, wen country seems to be in trouble from awl sides.....
may i post this information on my forums ???i want to share it with my friends toooo........

Thanx again for the Infromation
Reply

islamirama
09-13-2010, 09:31 PM
Wa'alaikum as'salaam,

you're welcome to take whatever you like.
Reply

Woodrow
09-14-2010, 01:20 AM
:sl:

Jazakallahu Kharan to Brother Islamarama for his post pointing out the needs of Pakistan today. This is a very important matter and we all need to take what ever action we are capable of to come to the aide of our Brothers and Sisters who desperately need our help and support.

Rather than trying to separate out his posts and make them into a new thread (Which I would mess up and probably loose the entire thread) I am going to take it upon myself to change the title of this thread and Inshallah place the current emphasis and topic on Flood Relief.
Reply

DancesWithChair
09-14-2010, 03:57 AM
Originally Posted by islamirama
would you cut down eating once a day in order to better help those in need?



If the muslims stopped the building they can say they are showing respect for the feelings of others.


And at the same time, the $100,000,000 is sent to Pakistan.


The whole world would stand up and applaud muslims.


-
Reply

Woodrow
09-14-2010, 04:36 AM
Originally Posted by DancesWithChair
If the muslims stopped the building they can say they are showing respect for the feelings of others.


And at the same time, the $100,000,000 is sent to Pakistan.


The whole world would stand up and applaud muslims.


-
I can understand why you would believe that and if we were institutionalized as many religions are, that could be feasible. But, we have no central earthly clearing house. Each Masjid is local and locally built often by the donations of just one person or a small group. To stop the building would not give any assurance that even one penny of that money would find it's way to Pakistan. But, if constructed, it could assure that donations for disaster relief would be collected and used properly.

New York has a large Muslim population, but it is scattered. The building of a large centrally located Masjid would provide a means of bringing about a central location for New York Muslims and eventually be a gateway through which donations from New York area Muslims could be collected for causes such as this. Strange as it seems, this big expenditure is the means by which donations for disasters can be collected and properly dispersed.

What you see as an unneeded expense, I see as a means to help provide for future emergencies.
Reply

islamirama
09-14-2010, 09:10 PM
Pakistan floods: 'Desperate for doctors'

Eyewitnesses in three areas affected by the floods in Pakistan describe the lack of food, water and medical help that is fuelling fears of a growing public health disaster in the country.



Omar Ahsan, in Shangla district

Omar Ahsan, an interior designer living in Karachi, has visited 17 remote mountain villages in Shangla district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (formerly North West Frontier Province or NWFP).

"I have a comfortable life in Karachi and when this calamity hit, me and some of my friends felt we had to help some of the affected people. First we took food relief to Peshawar and some other urban areas of the NWFP.

Then I got a phone call from a driver, who used to work for me. He said he's been seeing bodies in the river where he lives, about 150km (95 miles) from Islamabad. He said there were many, many bodies, hundreds of them, and that they all came from Shangla district.

At that moment I decided I should go to that place. I came over here alone. I managed to get one truck of relief. It's a big district, hundreds of kilometres. The whole network had collapsed, the telecommunication network has come down.

When I reached the end of the roads, I had to start walking.

I spent the last four days travelling on the outskirts of Shangla district, walking in a mountainous terrain. I covered about 55km and visited 17 villages.

People there are hungry and thirsty. There's no electricity, no water, no gas, no food supplies. The nearest place where food is being distributed is Karora and the queues are 3-4km long.

Thousands of people come down from the mountains and stand in the sun for a whole day in order to get a bag of flour. The queues are long, these are simple people, their patience is compromised, queues are broken and some go away with bruises and injuries.

In each village I went I was supported by the elders and I was joined by volunteers. Elders would tell me how many houses were destroyed, I would gather the data and issue them with a token to come to Karora where we had our own food supplies waiting for them.

Yesterday we set up a camp in Karora. From early morning till late afternoon we distributed food to 300 families, which is probably more than 3,000 people. It was a tough day.

But work is far from over. People desperately need more food and most importantly they need lady doctors. There are hundreds of thousands of women and children without a doctor. Kids were crying of pain and mothers were begging me to bring them female doctors.

If someone is ill, they put him on a stretcher which four men carry down the mountain until they reach the nearest hospital. That could take a couple of days of walking. And there are hundreds of thousands of people stuck there without any help."

Nasrullah Jamali, from a village in Balochistan

Nasrullah Jamali fled to Karachi after his village in Balochistan was hit by the floods a week ago. He describes the devastation for him and his villagers.

"Our homes are gone, everything is gone. The water level is now 6 to 8ft. People can't live there. There's nothing left.

We knew the water was coming, we knew it was expected, we were seeing that it was coming.

Me and my family left and we are now staying in the house of my uncle in Karachi. But many people couldn't afford to leave.

I speak to my villagers all the time.

They are now staying in shelters made by themselves using plastic sheets. They don't have water and food. Yesterday there was one helicopter to get food to them, but it's not enough.

There's a nearby place - about 3km away from my village - I am told there are six people trapped there, surrounded by water.

I try to organise aid for them. I am contacting the army to send relief helicopters to them.

There are sick people and they don't have any medicine. I can't describe it in words - it's a very serious situation.

I don't know when we'll be able to return to our home. It will probably take six months. There's nothing we can do. We are still in the state of shock."

Ghulam Nabi Magsi, who visited flood-hit Sindh Province

Ghulam Nabi Magsi was visiting relatives in the province of Sindh in the middle of August, when the floods swept through the village. Now back in Lahore, he describes that moment - and the current situation in the village.

"I was on holiday visiting my relatives in their small village in Ghotki district, Singh province, when the floods came. It was a horrible situation. The floodwaters were everywhere.

Our area was the first to be affected after the flood in Punjab. We thought it was not going to be that big, but it turned out to be a mega flood. The houses were completely flooded.

People fled leaving everything behind. Me and my immediate family returned to Lahore and other relatives went to Karachi.

The waters have moved south and a few of my relatives, all men, have returned to the village. They say the water level is down, but there are many problems.

The houses are damaged by the water, but they'll repair them. The problem they now face is lack of water. The water is not suitable for drinking and there's the danger of water-borne diseases.

They get help from the government and from people living in nearby areas that haven't been affected.

They expect their wives and children to join them by the end of the month."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11069270
Reply

islamirama
09-15-2010, 09:39 PM
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Assalaamu Alykum,

The real work begins now. The water is receding and we are gradually seeing the affects of the disaster. The damage to homes, property , possessions and material goods.

16 medical clinics are running to provide medical treatment to the Flood affected. Please view these pictures from the field.

Helping Hand for Relief and Development had arranged food distribution from Mianwali to Kot Mittan and Jampur. Souther Punjab was the most affected area in the floods. Please watch interview with beneficiaries of the Eid distribution in Jam Pur.

Please view this video with Br. Fazal ur Rahman explaining what the situation is while his visit to make food distributions in Rajan Pur, one of the most affected areas. The damage is immense. The women and children are out in the open.

Br Fazal ur Rahman Country Director Pakistan HHRD has given us an update on his Eid gift and Food Distribution visit to Southern Punjab. Please Listen.

Assalaamu Alykum,

The real work begins now. The water is receding and we are gradually seeing the affects of the disaster. The damage to homes, property , possessions and material goods.

16 medical clinics are running to provide medical treatment to the Flood affected. Please view these pictures from the field.

Helping Hand for Relief and Development had arranged food distribution from Mianwali to Kot Mittan and Jampur. Souther Punjab was the most affected area in the floods. Please watch interview with beneficiaries of the Eid distribution in Jam Pur.

Please view this video with Br. Fazal ur Rahman explaining what the situation is while his visit to make food distributions in Rajan Pur, one of the most affected areas. The damage is immense. The women and children are out in the open.

Br Fazal ur Rahman Country Director Pakistan HHRD has given us an update on his Eid gift and Food Distribution visit to Southern Punjab. Please Listen.
Reply

Grace Seeker
09-15-2010, 09:58 PM
I'm glad you keep this before us, islamirama. From what I learned dealing with a much smaller flood there are several phases to the crisis. First there is the need for emergency response as the water rises. However long that last, multiple by ten for the length of time for the initial remedial work of first responders. And then multiply that by 10 again for the restorative recovery phase to simply bring people back to whatever their new, post-flood, since of normal is going to be. In other words, for a flood lasting weeks, it is going to be years that they need long-term help. Let us pray to God that we not grow tired.
Reply

islamirama
09-16-2010, 07:23 PM
Last updated Sept 14, 5:54 p.m. Eastern Time
Current Situation

Health risks remain a major concern among Pakistan’s flood victims. At least 200 hospitals and clinics have been destroyed by the floods.
"The situation on the ground remains critical," a U.N. official told reporters on September 14. As floodwaters recede, stagnant pools of water pose serious health risks, the official added.

Islamic Relief has set up multiple mobile health clinics, to help see and treat thousands of sick flood victims.
Hundreds of Islamic Relief aid workers also continue to distribute food and clean drinking water and provide temporary shelter, while others construct sanitation facilities to help prevent the spread of disease. You can help save lives. Donate today.
Islamic Relief has assisted more than 100,000 Pakistani flood victims so far, but millions are still in desperate need for support.
The worst monsoon floods to hit Pakistan in the country’s recorded history have affected more than 18 million people and left at least 6 million people homeless.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said it was the worst disaster he has ever seen.
"I will never forget the destruction and suffering I have witnessed,” he told reporters after viewing the destruction firsthand. “In the past I have witnessed many natural disasters around the world, but nothing like this."
While Islamic Relief staff-members work to deliver aid and supplies to flood victims, Islamic Relief USA is coordinating a $23 million aid shipment filled with medical supplies and medicines to benefit the victims.
Yesterday, Islamic Relief released a two-year program strategy to help aid Pakistan's flood victims. Proposed projects aim to reduce health risks, ensure availability of safe drinking water, provide highly-effective emergency health assistance, support provision of a well-coordinated nutritional response, provide emergency shelter, help rehabilitate lost livelihoods, and more. Your support is desperately needed to help the people of Pakistan. Donate today.
Islamic Relief USA has increased its original $1 million appeal to $10 million in the wake of the increased flooding and suffering. Act now to save lives.

Situation Facts:


  • Nearly 20 million people affected (one-eighth of country’s population)
  • More than 1,600 dead
  • At least 6 million homeless; estimated one million homes damaged or destroyed
  • More than 200 hospitals and clinics destroyed
  • 8 million people at risk for contracting disease
  • Worst flooding in 80 years; an area the size of Italy submerged by floods
  • Affected more than Haiti quake, 2004 Asia tsunami, 2005 Pakistan quake combined
  • Landslides and flashfloods washed away entire villages
  • More than 1.7 million acres of farmland uprooted
  • Waterborne disease like diarrhea and cholera threaten the victims

Act now to save lives. Donate today.
Islamic Relief’s Emergency Response

  • Increased original $1 million appeal to $10 million in response to increased flooding and suffering
  • Working to provide $23 million aid shipment of medical supplies and medicines
  • Assisted more than 100,000 flood victims thus far
  • Setting up mobile health clinics in Muzaffargarh to help curb spread of disease
  • Administering camps housing thousands of internally displaced people and setting up another camp for hundreds more
  • Hundreds of Islamic Relief staff-members working in four flood-hit provinces: Kyber-Pakhtubkhwa (KPK), Balochistan, Punjab, and Pakistan-administered Kashmir (AJK)
  • Providing cooked food to hundreds of starving families in Charsadda
  • Distributed food packs to benefit thousands of displaced flood victims in disaster zone
  • Provided family hygiene kits, household kits, kitchen sets, water jugs and other emergency supplies to benefit tens of thousands of people
  • Distributing hundreds of tents and emergency shelters to help house thousands of flood victims
  • Setting up hygiene sessions to educate flood victims about importance of hygiene for their health
  • Released two year strategy to help the flood victims

People are continuing to pour into camps and register for food distributions, but supplies and capacity are dwindling rapidly. Donate today to help Islamic Relief aid as many people as possible.
Reply

islamirama
09-18-2010, 12:12 AM
What are the greatest needs now in Pakistan?


The most immediate concern right now is the risk of water- and vector-borne disease (such as diarrhea, malaria, and dengue fever), as huge swathes of the country remain underwater. Right now, more than 30,000 people are suffering from water- and hygiene-related infections like acute diarrhea — which is easily treated under good conditions but potentially fatal during emergencies like this. There is an urgent need for clean water and sanitation facilities, as well as soap and other hygiene supplies. Oxfam is responding to these needs, but the resources currently available now only cover a fraction of what is required. [...]


Will providing more aid reduce support for the Taliban? Will it reduce the likelihood of further instability?



The purpose of humanitarian aid should be to alleviate suffering and reduce poverty. If it gets mixed up with political and military objectives, assistance might easily be provided to the wrong people in the wrong way and for the wrong reasons. For example, populations could be assisted on the basis of their vulnerability to extremism instead of their humanitarian needs. It’s true that development can reduce the likelihood of further instability – but targeting areas on that basis can actually exacerbate existing tensions.


How do I know my donation will not be lost to corruption or diverted to an extremist organization in Pakistan?


Oxfam works closely with partner organizations on the ground, which helps ensure that our response to emergencies like the Pakistan floods is swift, effective, and culturally appropriate. But we conduct careful checks before accepting any local organization as a partner. We have well-developed financial reporting procedures, and we monitor and assess the work we fund to ensure that aid is being delivered in a fair and responsible manner. Neither Oxfam nor its partners has allowed its resources to be diverted to extremist organizations.
Facts about Pakistan


  • More than 73 percent of the population lives on less than $2 a day.
  • 24 percent of the population is undernourished.
  • 38 percent of children are underweight.


Situation Facts:


  • Estimated 17million people affected (one-eighth of country’s population)
  • More than 1,500 dead
  • 6 million people in need of life-saving assistance (WHO)
  • At least 6 million homeless; estimated one million homes damaged or destroyed
  • More than 200 hospitals and clinics destroyed
  • Worst flooding in 80 years; an area the size of Italy submerged by floods
  • Affected more than Haiti quake, 2004 Asia tsunami, 2005 Pakistan quake combined
  • Landslides and flashfloods washed away entire villages
  • 1.7 million acres of farmland uprooted
  • Waterborne disease like diarrhea and cholera threaten the victims

Act now to save lives. Donate today.
Reply

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