PDA

View Full Version : Labor and Delivery in Shackles



nousername
07-17-2010, 07:13 AM
SubhanAllah I couldn't imagine being treated so inhumanely...



It's a practice so hidden, many don't realize it exists: the shackling of incarcerated women during childbirth.
Across the U.S., there are stories of women going from jails or prisons to hospitals, where they labor and sometimes even deliver while restrained with handcuffs, leg shackles or both.
In recent years, a growing number of states have moved to ban the practice. Ten states now have anti-shackling legislation: California, Colorado, Illinois, New Mexico, New York, Texas, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia — and as of two weeks ago, Pennsylvania.
There have also been lawsuits in a number of states. On Thursday, a jury in rural Arkansas found that a guard had violated the constitutional rights of a woman by shackling her while she was in labor, though they awarded her just $1. In May, a shackling case was settled in Washington state for $125,000. And in Illinois, there's a class action lawsuit against Cook County and its sheriff, Tom Dart.
Legs Chained, Handcuffed To The Bed
Chicago attorneys Tom Morrissey and Ken Flaxman believe there could be as many as 100 to 150 women included in the class action suit, with cases dating back to late 2006. They're seeking an end to the shackling of inmates during childbirth, and compensation for their clients, including Jennifer Farrar, 25.
In November 2008, Farrar was arrested for cashing fake payroll checks. She was charged with forgery, and booked into the Cook County Jail, a sprawling complex on the southwest side of Chicago, and one of the largest jails in the country. She was almost seven months pregnant at the time.
One day the following January, Farrar went to court for a hearing, and there the pains began. An ambulance was called. Farrar says officers cuffed her hands and chained her legs together. Another chain was placed around her belly, connecting her hands to her feet. When she got to the hospital, she says, the belly chain was removed, but her legs were still chained, and one hand was cuffed to the bed.
"The doctor and the nurse," Farrar says, "they were telling the officer, is this necessary, you know? Where is she going to go? She's in labor you know."
She says she remained that way for eight or nine hours, until it came time to push. At that point, the correctional officer unlocked the leg restraints, but left one arm cuffed to the bed. An hour later, Jennifer Farrar delivered her baby girl.
"Here I am, a mother giving birth," Farrar says. "It should be a happy time in my life. I know that I did something wrong, and you have to take the responsibility for what you do. But it wasn't like I was a murderer."
"Tantamount To Torture"
Another plaintiff, Cora Fletcher, was 17 years old in 2006 when she was charged with retail theft. A year later, she missed a court date, and a warrant was issued for her arrest. A year after that, officers showed up at her house, and took her in when she was eight months pregnant.
A couple weeks later, in a prenatal checkup at the jail, it was discovered that Fletcher's baby had no heartbeat. She was taken to the county hospital, where her arms and her legs were shackled to opposite sides of the bed.
Doctors tried to induce her, but it wasn't until three days later that she went into labor. Even then, Fletcher says, she was left with one hand and one leg shackled to the bed. "It was difficult to try to have a baby like that," Fletcher says. "Especially by this being my first baby. It was so painful ... and you can't move around like how you want to."
After delivering her stillborn child, Fletcher was allowed to hold the baby for 20 minutes.
Gail Smith, executive director of the group Chicago Legal Advocacy for Incarcerated Mothers, has worked in Illinois jails and prisons for 25 years and says shackling female inmates during labor is tantamount to torture. "I think that there is a general attitude on the part of some people that they don't deserve to be treated with full human rights," Smith says. "And I find that appalling."


Rest of story can be found on this website http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...563037&ps=cprs
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
Snowflake
07-17-2010, 08:07 AM
Obviously 'civilised society' only applies to small fragments of the West.
Reply

جوري
07-17-2010, 05:28 PM
I am not sure how I feel about that.. to be honest I have been around dangerous criminals in hospital settings, I have also been around ones that I felt didn't deserve the treatment they received like one elderly cuban man who was shackled because he 'was illegal' he was broken and humiliated in front of the staff and his basic needs and rights forget it.. on the other hand there were those who really needed restraints.. I mean you guys heard of the 'prom mom'? yes some women are that criminal and that oblivious.. I think it is a judgment call but the fact of the matter is a judgment call that pertains to the law isn't left to the discretion of health care professionals..

:w:
Reply

nousername
07-17-2010, 07:29 PM
Yes but retail theft and check forgery aren't crimes that I believe make these women dangerous nor did they deserve to be shackled like animals. I mean anyone who has been in labor knows that trying to escape while in labor would be ludicrous.
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
جوري
07-17-2010, 08:16 PM
Originally Posted by nousername
Yes but retail theft and check forgery aren't crimes that I believe make these women dangerous nor did they deserve to be shackled like animals. I mean anyone who has been in labor knows that trying to escape while in labor would be ludicrous.
Believe me when I tell you that some people can be a danger to themselves and others even when in immense pain and I at times believe that pain itself can lead people to do irrational things.. I agree with you otherwise, people justify their crimes to themselves, no one thinks of themselves as a bad person.. but some behavior isn't the norm or is tolerated by others, for instance attacking nurses or staff or doctors, or harming the infant, and I know you think how can a mother kill her newborn, to which I direct you to a woman who went into labor during her prom, had a child in the toilet fished him out dumped him in the garbage and went on to request a song to dance with her boyfriend right after giving birth.. you think it is superhuman strength but some criminals truly are psychotic and getting away with their crime or the high they feel can give them 'super human strength' may Allah swt save us from such inhumanity..

:w:
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!