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Vigno
09-15-2010, 09:27 PM
Just a question

What is the religion that most atheists follow when they finally start to believe?
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Karl
09-15-2010, 10:39 PM
Born again Christian.
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marwen
09-15-2010, 10:56 PM
Originally Posted by Vigno
Just a question

What is the religion that most atheists follow when they finally start to believe?
:sl: brother.

Not really sure I got the question. But I think they will try to find the religion that gives perfectly the answers to most of their unanswered questions.
Fortunately today, every person can browse all the existing religions and learn about them, and then finds his path.
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DavidK565
09-16-2010, 12:50 AM
That is an interesting question. I don't know if I've ever seen statistics on that, but I would like to find some.

I figure that they would either join their family's religion (whatever it was before they became an atheist) or one of the faster growing religions: evangelical (born-again) Christian, or Muslim.

I wonder if at this point in time, we are seeing more people become Atheists or more people turning to religion....
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Vigno
09-16-2010, 03:45 AM
Originally Posted by DavidK565
That is an interesting question. I don't know if I've ever seen statistics on that, but I would like to find some.

I figure that they would either join their family's religion (whatever it was before they became an atheist) or one of the faster growing religions: evangelical (born-again) Christian, or Muslim.

I wonder if at this point in time, we are seeing more people become Atheists or more people turning to religion....
I reckoned someone here knows a statistics about it or perhaps a background of it. Oh well maybe not..

I think the ones who are serious about following a path would care to learn about religions. On the other hand, the ones who just want to be "free" would rather follow stuff like the big bang to set their minds free of thought and do as they please.

So looking at the huge number of "freedom seekers" these days, the longer ark may unfortunately be pointing towards atheists.
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Ramadhan
09-16-2010, 08:35 AM
I think many atheists are attracted by some easy, god-less religions such as buddhism (like this forum's trumble)
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Latitudinarian
09-16-2010, 01:56 PM
Last I heard, more theists were turning to atheism/agnosticism than the other way around but I suppose this is all region-dependent. Due to the popular New Atheist movement, droves of people are now professing their atheism in the UK and other commonwealth countries. It has also been acknowledged that many atheists will report themselves as religious to avoid social stigma in their families and in places that are feverishly religious, such as the southern USA and the Middle East.

Certainly there are known former atheists that became religious, for example, notable Christian apologists, William Lane Craig and Kirk Cameron. Some come to religion via marriage - it helps if you outwardly share the same religion as your spouse and, in some cases, you have to be identified as a believer for the marriage to be sanctioned. The born-again Christian and other evangelical movements were able to reign in many non-practicing individuals who had previously been living out-of-control, aimless, hedonistic lifestyles.

It's the lifestyle of the religious that is perhaps most appealing for those who become practicing theists. The sense of community, social support, ritual, righteousness and the pride of affiliation all factor into the equation. Indeed, there are plenty of atheists who have joined Churches and Mosques for this very reason - not because they actually believe in the scriptures and dogma but rather as a means to fulfill their emotional and social needs.

The suggestion that atheists are those who reject religion so that they can live the easy free life is a complete fallacy. First of all, most atheists were raised in a religion and, in my experience, each struggled for some time to keep their comforting beliefs. Since most of the world is still clings to the inherited beliefs of their families, it's a difficult position to go against the grain. Ritual and spirituality have always been integral aspects of human life so they are not easy nor advisable to divorce oneself from. When one is no longer able to believe mystic explanations and commands, a psychological void needs to be filled. For some, it is via innocuous belief systems or practices that don't contradict reason. For example, many atheists, whether they practice Buddhism or not, meditate regularly. Similarly, former Muslims I know will continue to do their daily prayers as an alternate form of meditation. Then there are others still, like myself, who unable to believe ancient stories, scriptures and doctrines, continue to believe in God but as a deist.
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DavidK565
09-16-2010, 03:40 PM
Originally Posted by Latitudinarian
....The suggestion that atheists are those who reject religion so that they can live the easy free life is a complete fallacy. First of all, most atheists were raised in a religion and, in my experience, each struggled for some time to keep their comforting beliefs. Since most of the world is still clings to the inherited beliefs of their families, it's a difficult position to go against the grain. Ritual and spirituality have always been integral aspects of human life so they are not easy nor advisable to divorce oneself from.....
This was an excellent post. I'm glad you mentioned the above statement here. I was gonna say something similar. There is no "easy" path when it comes to one's belief system. I trust that nearly everyone put a lot of thought into how they believe the world works around them. People in this thread need to be careful not to disparage anyone for having a different belief system.
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Vigno
09-16-2010, 09:34 PM
Allah says about this :-

002.171 The parable of those who reject Faith is as if one were to shout like a goat- herd, to things that listen to nothing but calls and cries: Deaf, dumb, and blind, they are void of wisdom.
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LauraS
09-16-2010, 10:02 PM
It's to me that quite a few people have an interest in Bhuddism. :S Out of all the religions it seems to be one that has caused less controversy.
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Zafran
09-16-2010, 11:47 PM
Salaam

Its not that hard being an athiests in the west as religion realy isnt that important in peoples life Today - to be an athiest in a society that is preety Godless and likes religion out of the public sphere - its an easy choice to reject religion all togather as it has no value in the ordinary humans life.

Theres also different types of athiests - some that like promoting there beliefs like a religion eg - richard dawkins and others more "laid back" athiests who see it as a personal choice and are not too fussed about promoting it.

The same can be said about the muslims in the Islamic world or hindus in india - or Bhuddists in Tibet - or christains in south america.

peace
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Vigno
09-17-2010, 12:01 AM
Originally Posted by Zafran
Salaam

Its not that hard being an athiests in the west as religion realy isnt that important in peoples life Today - to be an athiest in a society that is preety Godless and likes religion out of the public sphere - its an easy choice to reject religion all togather as it has no value in the ordinary humans life.

Theres also different types of athiests - some that like promoting there beliefs like a religion eg - richard dawkins and others more "laid back" athiests who see it as a personal choice and are not too fussed about promoting it.

The same can be said about the muslims in the Islamic world or hindus in india - or Bhuddists in Tibet - or christains in south america.

peace
Wa Alekum asalam

True!
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Vigno
09-17-2010, 12:14 AM
Quite sad when I got to know from someone from Russia that her "muslim" mother avoids her from praying or reading Quran because she doesn't want Islam to interfere with her life. What life?!
What's the purpose of living then? Were we born to eat, sleep, get a career and money and family and live for the purpose of living?
Are we going to take our money or fame with us to the grave? Does it matter then if they say every once in a year "oh this person was a great scientist"?

I think when the parents are so, then that's the start of becoming atheists, when religion is abandoned and when people say "they can't make time for praying" which sounds exactly like "can't make time for Allah and for what I was born".

Work for life overlapping work for afterlife is another reason, for the more the love of this world increases, the more the faith drops.
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Woodrow
09-17-2010, 01:23 AM
I doubt very much that enough Atheists ever convert to any religion, to make it possible to form any reliable statistics. A person who reverts to a religion is very often a very strong believer of God(swt) and has a deep love for him. They are seeking the best way to serve God(swt) who they already love.

Many reverts to Islam come from very strong religious backgrounds and lived their religious belief the best they can. they come to Islam because they know it is the True way to serve Allaah(swt) It does seem a very large percentage of reverts to Islam were former Church leaders such as Priests, Rabbis and Ministers. Most atheists will never have a desire to serve God(swt) as they do not believe there is a God(swt)
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DavidK565
09-17-2010, 01:59 AM
Originally Posted by Vigno
Work for life overlapping work for afterlife is another reason, for the more the love of this world increases, the more the faith drops.
I don't think these two things are mutually exclusive. There is no reason why one can't have a love for God and also a love for this world. In fact, love for this world is quite important. It keeps things in perspective. If we don't care for ourselves in this world and appreciate what we have, then we can't enjoy our lives. Our lives are short, and I doubt that our sole purpose for being here is to prepare for the afterlife. I'm certain we're supposed to live life to the fullest as well.

It's also important that people spend their time working, making money, getting an education, etc. Because while it may not matter when you die, it makes life better for everyone around you while you're here. And then someone else can carry the torch.
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titus
09-17-2010, 02:36 AM
I would imagine that the answer would be heavily influenced by location. The answer would be different in the US than it would be in Egypt or India.
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Ramadhan
09-17-2010, 03:34 AM
Originally Posted by DavidK565
I don't think these two things are mutually exclusive. There is no reason why one can't have a love for God and also a love for this world. In fact, love for this world is quite important. It keeps things in perspective. If we don't care for ourselves in this world and appreciate what we have, then we can't enjoy our lives. Our lives are short, and I doubt that our sole purpose for being here is to prepare for the afterlife. I'm certain we're supposed to live life to the fullest as well.

It's also important that people spend their time working, making money, getting an education, etc. Because while it may not matter when you die, it makes life better for everyone around you while you're here. And then someone else can carry the torch.
"live life to the fullest" is a favorite motto among atheists as they don't believe in the hereafter.
All I can say is that Islam provides guidance for balanced life, that conforms to our true "fitrah" (nature) which makes us truly peaceful/happy in both this world and hereafter.
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DavidK565
09-17-2010, 04:03 AM
Don't read between the lines... Its a figure of speech. Regardless of your religiosity, there is no reason to not enjoy life as much as possible, rather than thinking about this world as an unimportant stopgap.
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Zafran
09-17-2010, 04:35 AM
Originally Posted by DavidK565
Don't read between the lines... Its a figure of speech. Regardless of your religiosity, there is no reason to not enjoy life as much as possible, rather than thinking about this world as an unimportant stopgap.
Whatever "living life to the fullest" means - I have heard many people say it - It also makes perfect sense why we would live to prepare for an afterlife - life being short is one good reason as you stated - the second would be the only think that we can be certian about life is that it will end and it has a limit - how are we meant to live to the fullest when life itself has a limit already on it?

By the way no muslim said that "this world is an unimportant stopgap" - its actaully very important for the next phase. The afterlife will be based on what we do here in this world which is full of limits.
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Ramadhan
09-17-2010, 04:49 AM
Originally Posted by DavidK565
Don't read between the lines... Its a figure of speech. Regardless of your religiosity, there is no reason to not enjoy life as much as possible, rather than thinking about this world as an unimportant stopgap.
I doubt you ever heard a true muslim thinks/says that this world is an unimportant gap, while in actuality all muslims consider this world is extremely important because whatever we do in this world contribute to determine our fate in the hereafter.

I know that it is hard for anyone to understand if they do not believe in the life after this world.
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DavidK565
09-17-2010, 04:59 AM
Originally Posted by Vigno
Work for life overlapping work for afterlife is another reason, for the more the love of this world increases, the more the faith drops.
naidamar, this was the quote I was referring to.
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Ramadhan
09-17-2010, 10:44 AM
Originally Posted by DavidK565
"Work for life overlapping work for afterlife is another reason, for the more the love of this world increases, the more the faith drops."

naidamar, this was the quote I was referring to.
And I agree with the quote, in general.

not loving this world does not mean we neglect our worldly affairs or are not enjoying it. We are allowed to enjoy the blessings from Allah SWT and in fact it is incumbent upon us to be grateful. But we have to be fully aware and realize that this world is not everlasting and is just an illusion and that there is infinitely far greater and real life after this world. This is what is most commonly called as zuhd in islam, which roughly means modesty in the way life is lived.

Unlike other religions, in order to achieve afterlife successes, Islam does not teach to abandon worldly affairs (ascetism) such as what happens with buddhist monks, hindu or christian priests. I think you need to understand that Islam encouraged us to work hard, be productive, have family, build good relationships with neighbors, pay zakat/alms/charity, etc etc. Islam is not against worldly successes and enjoyments as long as they are halal/lawful.
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Vigno
09-17-2010, 10:21 PM
Originally Posted by naidamar
And I agree with the quote, in general.

not loving this world does not mean we neglect our worldly affairs or are not enjoying it. We are allowed to enjoy the blessings from Allah SWT and in fact it is incumbent upon us to be grateful. But we have to be fully aware and realize that this world is not everlasting and is just an illusion and that there is infinitely far greater and real life after this world. This is what is most commonly called as zuhd in islam, which roughly means modesty in the way life is lived.

Unlike other religions, in order to achieve afterlife successes, Islam does not teach to abandon worldly affairs (ascetism) such as what happens with buddhist monks, hindu or christian priests. I think you need to understand that Islam encouraged us to work hard, be productive, have family, build good relationships with neighbors, pay zakat/alms/charity, etc etc. Islam is not against worldly successes and enjoyments as long as they are halal/lawful.
Nicely said

I never meant anything about ignoring this life. Just not taking it as our main aim and always remembering the hereafter. Being modest and happy with all we get.
This way we can be happy in this world and in the next inshallah.
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