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Badrul
10-15-2010, 10:47 PM
As Salaamu'Aaikum all,

Al Kauthar Institute presents:

The Raid Of The Mongols
The History Of The Tartar Invasion
Taught by Sheikh Isam Rajab (as seen on Ramadan T.V 2010)
18th & 19th Dec 2010
Manchester


In the seventh century of Islamic history an event occurred that changed the world. Had this episode of history not been documented they say it would not have been believed! The Mongol army headed west into the Muslim lands and Baghdad and attacked the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate.

Among the many incidents that occurred during this time was the infamous sacking of Baghdad, which was left in a state of utter ruin.

The famous historian Ibn Al Athir said, “For some years I continued averse from mentioning this event, deeming it so horrible that I shrank from recording it and ever withdrawing one foot as I advanced the other. To whom, indeed, can it be easy to write the announcement of the death-blow of Islam and the Muslims, or who is he on whom the remembrance thereof can weigh lightly? O would that my mother had not born me or that I had died and become a forgotten thing before this befell! Yet, withal a number of my friends urged me to set it down in writing, and I hesitated long, but at last came to the conclusion that to omit this matter could serve no useful purpose.

The Invasion of the Tartars into the Muslim lands was an event that was noted for its ruthlessness and devastation. In this course we will look at what were the circumstances that surrounded this time in history and the lessons that can be learnt.

More details to follow in the coming weeks inshaAllah...
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Woodrow
10-23-2010, 09:13 PM
:sl:

My ancestors do have a very brutal and savage past. One small correction we are Tatars not Tarters. Tarter is an English misspelling that seems to have persisted.

While the past of the Tatar is one of savage Barbarianism, we had a wonderful conclusion. As a result of our attempting to conquer the Islamic world, my ancestors accepted Islam and gave up their pagan and Barbarian ways. The Western world has much to thank Islam for. If it had not been for accepting Islam, my ancestors probably would have continued westward and the people living in Europe would be speaking Mongolian today.

After this thread comes to a conclusion I will add more about my ancestors the Lietuva Lipkas (Lithuanian Tatars)
Reply

Abdul-Raouf
10-23-2010, 09:21 PM
Remember...there was a thread running in LI long ago...about Tartars...


Any link available to watch that TV online.... will the speech on Mongols..be scheduled on TV ???
Reply

Badrul
10-28-2010, 11:56 PM
:wa:

JazakAllahu Khair for your concern and the correction in spelling. However I would like to reasure you and everyone the course primary objective isn't so much about the 'Mongals' or the 'Tatars' although the Sheikh will cover some sessions on these civilisations, rather the main objective of the course will be; the events leading up to the invasions, how the Muslims reacted to it, what happened in Baghdad, comparison of what happened then and our current state and also what lessons we can derive from this era etc.

We as an organisation try our upmost not to insult or ridicule any ethnicity regardless of their background or Faith. Our main objective is to Seek the Pleasure of Allah by seeking Sacred Knowledge and how to put that Knowledge into practice.

Hope this has clarified any misunderstanding.

Once again JazakAllahu Khair
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Badrul
10-28-2010, 11:58 PM
Salaam Akhi,

Im sorry akhi, but I don't remember that thread, however I look search for it inshaAllah
Reply

Woodrow
10-29-2010, 12:06 AM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
:wa:

JazakAllahu Khair for your concern and the correction in spelling. However I would like to reasure you and everyone the course primary objective isn't so much about the 'Mongals' or the 'Tatars' although the Sheikh will cover some sessions on these civilisations, rather the main objective of the course will be; the events leading up to the invasions, how the Muslims reacted to it, what happened in Baghdad, comparison of what happened then and our current state and also what lessons we can derive from this era etc.

We as an organisation try our upmost not to insult or ridicule any ethnicity regardless of their background or Faith. Our main objective is to Seek the Pleasure of Allah by seeking Sacred Knowledge and how to put that Knowledge into practice.

Hope this has clarified any misunderstanding.

Once again JazakAllahu Khair
JazakAllahu Khair

The spelling is understandable as that seems to have become very common. I believe the error began with the Chef that named a beef recipe as Beef Tartar.

I am looking forward to your posts, that was a very interesting era and it was a time that changed the world. And have no fear of offending, most of us of Tatar ancestry are aware of how savage our ancestors were before they accepted Islam.
Reply

Badrul
10-29-2010, 12:14 AM
Thank you for understanding. I've learnt something new :statisfie

Can I ask, will you be in Manchester (U.K) on these dates 18th & 19th Dec 2010? Personally I think you will benefit from ths course, what do you think?
Reply

Badrul
10-29-2010, 12:15 AM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
As Salaamu'Aaikum all,

Al Kauthar Institute presents:

The Raid Of The Mongols
The History Of The Tartar Invasion
Taught by Sheikh Isam Rajab (as seen on Ramadan T.V 2010)
18th & 19th Dec 2010
Manchester


In the seventh century of Islamic history an event occurred that changed the world. Had this episode of history not been documented they say it would not have been believed! The Mongol army headed west into the Muslim lands and Baghdad and attacked the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate.

Among the many incidents that occurred during this time was the infamous sacking of Baghdad, which was left in a state of utter ruin.

The famous historian Ibn Al Athir said, “For some years I continued averse from mentioning this event, deeming it so horrible that I shrank from recording it and ever withdrawing one foot as I advanced the other. To whom, indeed, can it be easy to write the announcement of the death-blow of Islam and the Muslims, or who is he on whom the remembrance thereof can weigh lightly? O would that my mother had not born me or that I had died and become a forgotten thing before this befell! Yet, withal a number of my friends urged me to set it down in writing, and I hesitated long, but at last came to the conclusion that to omit this matter could serve no useful purpose.

The Invasion of the Tartars into the Muslim lands was an event that was noted for its ruthlessness and devastation. In this course we will look at what were the circumstances that surrounded this time in history and the lessons that can be learnt.

More details to follow in the coming weeks inshaAllah...
FREEPHONE 0800 014 8286ext 0
Email manchester at alkauthar dot org
Reply

Woodrow
10-29-2010, 12:25 AM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
Thank you for understanding. I've learnt something new :statisfie

Can I ask, will you be in Manchester (U.K) on these dates 18th & 19th Dec 2010? Personally I think you will benefit from ths course, what do you think?

Sadly it is quite a distance from Zeeland, North Dakota to the UK and we are now in our blizzard season. Most likely by Dec 1, we will so snowed in we will be unable to even leave the house.

I sincerely do wish I could attend and if I saw it as a real possibility I would say yes without hesitation.
Reply

S.Belle
10-29-2010, 03:33 PM
format_quote Originally Posted by Woodrow
The Western world has much to thank Islam for. If it had not been for accepting Islam, my ancestors probably would have continued westward and the people living in Europe would be speaking Mongolian today.

Agreed I watched a PBS documentary about Ghenghis Khan and all his invasions and I must say that the Mongols were pretty darn feirce it could have easily happened.
Wow so you could be one of the 1 in 200 men ( in the documentary it said 1 in every 200 men can trace their ancestry back to Ghenghis Khan).
Reply

Badrul
10-30-2010, 11:25 PM
format_quote Originally Posted by Mila


Agreed I watched a PBS documentary about Ghenghis Khan and all his invasions and I must say that the Mongols were pretty darn feirce it could have easily happened.
Wow so you could be one of the 1 in 200 men ( in the documentary it said 1 in every 200 men can trace their ancestry back to Ghenghis Khan).
PBS? When & which country was this on? Also what was the title? Sounds like a good programme!
Reply

Woodrow
10-30-2010, 11:43 PM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
PBS? When & which country was this on? Also what was the title? Sounds like a good programme!
:wa:

PBS= Public Broadcasting System, a free educational network here in the USA. I can't get it where I live, but it is available nearly every place else in the USA
Reply

S.Belle
10-30-2010, 11:54 PM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
PBS? When & which country was this on? Also what was the title? Sounds like a good programme!
Woodrow answerd better than I could have
format_quote Originally Posted by Woodrow
PBS= Public Broadcasting System, a free educational network here in the USA. I can't get it where I live, but it is available nearly every place else in the USA

and it was called Ghenghis Khan
I tried to find it on youtube but failed
I have not watched this one but it should be interesting as well
Reply

'Abd Al-Maajid
11-01-2010, 05:04 PM
Genghiz Khan was a Muslim? Wikipedia says, his full name as 'Ahmed Lindov'. :hmm: However I heard somewhere that there is no evidence that Ögedei Khan, his successor, was his own son because his wife was kidnapped by a rival tribe. :? can anyone explain this to me?
Reply

Woodrow
11-01-2010, 06:11 PM
format_quote Originally Posted by abdulmājid
Genghiz Khan was a Muslim? Wikipedia says, his full name as 'Ahmed Lindov'. :hmm: However I heard somewhere that there is no evidence that Ögedei Khan, his successor, was his own son because his wife was kidnapped by a rival tribe. :? can anyone explain this to me?
I have never seen any evidence Genghis Khan was a Muslim.



Religion

Genghis Khan's religion is widely speculated to be Shamanism or Tengriism, which was very likely among nomadic Mongol-Turkic tribes of Central Asia. But he was very tolerant religiously, and interested to learn philosophical and moral lessons from other religions. To do so, he consulted Buddhist monks, Christian missionaries, Muslim merchants, and the Taoist monk Qiu Chuji.
SOURCE



The Mongols did not accept Islam until after they invaded the Islamic nations. My ancestors that came into Lithuania were Muslim this was long after the invasion of the Islamic world and they did not come to Lithuania as invaders, they came invited to help protect the land against the Christian invaders during the crusades of the North. this was long after Genghis Khan had died.
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Badrul
11-02-2010, 12:28 AM
For me this is a era which I really don't know much about. More the reason to look into things to get a better understanding...
Reply

Woodrow
11-02-2010, 12:34 AM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
For me this is a era which I really don't know much about. More the reason to look into things to get a better understanding...
Genghis Khan died in 1227 The raid on Baghdad took place in 1258 The Mongols accepted Islam some time after then. So it is very improbable Genghis Khan ever accepted Islam, But his son could have. Berke the Grandson of Genghis Khan is considered to be the first Mongol ruler to accept Islam.

The Tatars come from the Golden Horde (Mongols) and the White Horde (Turks, Macedonians and Arab) Most of my ancestors the Lithuanian Tatars (Lietuva Lipkas) are from both hordes. The Tatars came to Lithuania in the early 1300s and were Muslim. However in the 1400s the Christians finally over ran Lithuania and by the 1800s nearly all the Lipkas were exiled, killed or forced to accept Christianity. Many, such as myself, have now reverted to Islam often without knowing the Lipkas were originally Muslim before being forced into Christianity.
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Maryan0
11-02-2010, 12:34 AM
“It is not sufficient that I suceed - all others must fail.”
“I am the punishment of God...If you had not committed great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.”
“The greatest happiness is to scatter your enemy, to drive him before you, to see his cities reduced to ashes, to see those who love him shrouded in tears, and to gather into your bosom his wives and daughters.”
Genghis Khan quotes
:skeleton: Scary man.
Salam
Reply

Badrul
11-04-2010, 01:24 AM
format_quote Originally Posted by Maryan0
“It is not sufficient that I suceed - all others must fail.”
“I am the punishment of God...If you had not committed great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.”
“The greatest happiness is to scatter your enemy, to drive him before you, to see his cities reduced to ashes, to see those who love him shrouded in tears, and to gather into your bosom his wives and daughters.”
Genghis Khan quotes
:skeleton: Scary man.
Salam
:hiding: Man I'm glad he's not around nowadays!
Reply

Maryan0
11-04-2010, 01:48 AM
format_quote Originally Posted by Badrul
:hiding: Man I'm glad he's not around nowadays!
So am I.:phew
The only reason I know of this portion of history is because of the cartoon movies made for muslim kids the lion of An Jalut which is about Sultan Qutuz, Baybars, Kublai Khan etc. You could probably look up those movies.
Salam
Reply

جوري
11-06-2010, 09:26 PM
I think this is a fantastic piece and for more than one reason.. I actually wanted to post this in light of another thread where some are under the impression that the liege to rulers and succumbing to their injustice simply because they bear the term 'Muslim' was somehow a part of Islamic existence!

enjoy:

Although the Chagatai Khanate and the Golden Horde both established themselves in regions already inhabited by Muslims, their invasions of Central Asia and Russia, respectively, did not have the catastrophic effect on the native Islamic faith that the Mongol invasion of Persia and Iraq had. Although the faith prevailed, and the Mongol invaders were eventually converted to Islam, the Mongol destruction of the Islamic heartland marked a major change of direction for the region. By destroying the Islamic empires that existed before they came, the Mongols instigated a new era for the Islamic world, in which most of the region's power would fall to three great empires - the Ottoman, the Safavid, and the Mughal - as we will see in Chapter 5.
The Mongols began their push into Central Asia and Persia in the early 13th century under Genghis Khan. The cities of Bukhara and Samarkand, later to become part of the Chagatai Khanate, fell to Genghis Khan's armies in 1220. From there it was not difficult to raid Persia, and by 1221 the Persian cities of Merv, Nishapur, and Balkh had fallen. In the inevitable pillaging that followed Mongol attacks, the invaders decimated the population of these regions, sparing only the artisans they deemed useful. The Mongols also uprooted many Muslim graves in their wake, including that of Harun al-Rashid, the 8th century Abbasid caliph who was featured in The Thousand and One Nights fables.
The Muslims inflicted their first defeat on the Mongols in 1221 at the Battle of Parwan, in present-day Afghanistan, under the leadership of Jalal al-Din, son of a Central Asian Muslim ruler. The victory provided a temporary morale boost for the Muslim army, but the Mongols soon regrouped and devastated Jalal's troops later that year. After that initial setback, the Mongols swept through Central Asia into Persia and Iraq. The Persian city of Isfahan fell in 1237, and the Mongols gradually moved closer to Baghdad, the centre of the Abbasid caliphate.
The decision to attack the Abbasid caliphate was made at the same time as the election of the Great Khan Mongke in 1251. The Chagatai Khanate and the Golden Horde were already firmly established empires in the Islamic world, and the Great Khan disliked the fact that his new Muslim subjects worshipped a man - the caliph - that they deemed to be in a higher position than the Great Khan. Mongke decided to send his brother, Hulegu, into Iraq at the head of the invading Mongol army, with the goal of sacking Baghdad and destroying the Abbasid caliphate there. Hulegu set out in 1253, and en route he encountered the Muslim group known as the Assassins, an Ismaili sect that practised an extreme version of Shi'ism. The Assassins were based in Alamut, in northwestern Persia, which Hulegu reached in 1255. The Mongols easily destroyed the small Assassins force, and the remaining members of the group fled south to the Sindh region of present-day Pakistan, where they lived as an underground sect for centuries. After this victory, the Mongols had an open path into Baghdad. Great Khan Mongke had instructed Hulegu to attack the Abbasid caliphate only if it refused to surrender to the Mongols. The Abbasids, led by the caliph, Musta'sim, indeed refused to surrender, making a battle inevitable.
Before the fighting even began, the Abbasids were at a disadvantage. While they theoretically had a large enough army to compete with the Mongols, their troops had been neglected by the caliphate and were not prepared for battle at the time of the Mongol invasion. Another problem for the Abbasids was the centuries-old rift between the Sunni and Shi'ite Muslims. The caliphate was Sunni, as were most of its subjects, but there was a Shi'ite minority under Abbasid control who welcomed the Mongol invaders as a potential means of bringing down the Sunni caliph. Many Shi'ites in Iraq joined the Mongol forces for that reason. Additionally, the caliph's vizier, or second-in-command, was himself Shi'ite, and it has been suggested that he might have also co-operated with the Mongols in attacking the caliphate. The Mongols also had the support of non-Muslims under Abbasid control. Many Christians in the region saw the Mongols as saviours, hoping that by decimating Islam's adherents, the faith itself would also be destroyed. Indeed, in return for Christian support, the Mongols - some of whom were Nestorian Christian themselves - spared Christian churches and communities from their pillaging.
With all these factors working against the Abbasids, the fall of Baghdad and the destruction of the caliphate in 1258 came rather quickly. The caliph himself, Musta'sim, was captured and killed, and the 500-year-old Abbasid dynasty came to an abrupt and violent end. With Iraq and Persia thus under Mongol control, Hulegu continued west, towards Syria and Egypt. Ayyubid descendants of Saladin held power in Syria at this time, while the European Crusaders had a tenuous hold on the Syrian coast. Egypt, meanwhile, was still recovering from the coup that had ousted the Ayyubids and brought the Mamluks, a class of Turkish slave soldiers, to power. As professional soldiers, the Mamluks would present the Mongols with their only serious and continuous challenge. Syria, however, was easily defeated, since the Ayyubids and Crusaders refused to join forces in defending their territory. The major cities of Aleppo and Damascus fell within a month of each other in 1260, but an immediate invasion of Egypt was halted by the death of the Great Khan Mongke in Mongolia.
While Hulegu was distracted by the ensuing succession struggle between his brothers, Kublai and Arik-Boke, the Mamluks launched an attack on the Mongols in Syria. It was the first time in almost 50 years that a Muslim army initiated an attack on the Mongols, and it paid off for the Muslim Mamluks, who defeated the Mongols and occupied their Syrian base at Gaza. A few months later, a second Mamluk attack succeeded in killing Hulegu's commander and driving the Mongols out of Syria altogether. The Mamluks continued to defeat Hulegu's army for the duration of its presence in the region. One reason for the Mamluk success was their status as professional soldiers. The Mamluk state featured very little cultural, intellectual, or administrative development; its existence was devoted solely to military training, and thus the quality of the Mamluk army easily matched that of the powerful Mongols. A second reason that has been suggested for the Mamluks' success is the fact that the Mamluks had been using horseshoes for their horses since about 1244. The Mongols did not use horseshoes, and the rocky terrain of Syria reportedly injured the Mongol horses' hooves to the extent that they were unable to fight effectively. Additionally, the Mamluks realised that grasslands were needed to pasture the Mongols' horses. Therefore, the Mamluks often burned grasslands in Syria in their wake, to prevent the Mongol horses from grazing.
At any rate, the initial Mamluk victories over the Mongols in 1260 were a turning point for Hulegu's army, as several challenges arose after that point. Mongke's death had signalled an end to a united Mongol Empire, as the struggle over his successor split the realm. As we saw in the previous section on the Golden Horde, their Muslim Khan, Berke, had become hostile to Hulegu following the latter's destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258. Berke supported Arik-Boke's claim to the Great Khan position, while Hulegu supported Kublai. When Kublai prevailed in 1260, Hulegu enjoyed the Great Khan's favour for his support, and an increase in cultural interaction between Hulegu's Persian empire and Kublai's Chinese empire ensued, but the unity of the Mongol Empire as a whole was destroyed by Berke's refusal to recognise Kublai. This rift deepened as the years went by. Following Kublai's victory, Hulegu named his empire the Il-Khanate, or "subordinate Khanate," as a sign of his allegiance to Kublai and the greater Mongol Empire. By 1263, Berke had negotiated an alliance between the Golden Horde and almost all other states surrounding Hulegu's Il-Khanate: the Mamluks in Egypt, the Byzantines in Constantinople, and even the Italian city-state of Genoa, which provided a much needed naval link between the Golden Horde and Mamluk Egypt. The Golden Horde was soon fighting a full-scale war with the Il-Khanate, which continued after the deaths of Hulegu in 1265 and Berke in 1266.

Hulegu's son and successor, Abaqa, ended the war some years later, and the religious reason behind the animosity between the two groups ended when they both eventually became Islamic states. Before that happened, however, Islam in the Il-Khanate suffered under a string of Mongol Buddhist Khans. Many Mongols had adopted Buddhism early in the 13th century, as they were exposed to the religion in China, Tibet, and northern India. Hulegu had adopted some Buddhist customs, but he is primarily regarded as a traditional Mongol shamanist. The fact that he was buried with several young women testifies to this fact, since neither Buddhism nor Islam would have sanctioned human sacrifice. Abaqa, Hulegu's son, was a devout Buddhist who mercilessly persecuted the Muslims of the Il-Khanate. He even promoted Christian interests ahead of Muslim, simply to harass the Muslims. Abaqa's son, Arghun, also a Buddhist, was even harder on Muslims than his father had been. During this period of Buddhist leadership in traditionally Islamic lands, many Buddhist symbols appeared. Numerous Buddhist temples dotted the landscape of Persia and Iraq, none of which survived the 14th century, unfortunately. The Buddhist element of the Il-Khanate died with Arghun, however, and Islam soon spread from the population to the ruling classes.
One instigator for the change was Arghun's brother, Gaykhatu, who succeeded him. Eager to make a name for himself as an Il-Khan, Gaykhatu introduced paper money from China into Islamic trading circles. Islamic merchants in the Il-Khanate refused to accept the unrecognisable new money, however, and trade came to a virtual standstill. The experiment was such a disaster that Gaykhatu was forced to abandon it after six months, and the ensuing rebellion ousted him from power in 1295. His successor, Arghun's son, Ghazan, was the first Muslim of Mongol heritage to rule the Il-Khanate, and all rulers of Persia since him have been Muslim. Ghazan adhered to the Sunni form of Islam, but he was tolerant of Shi'ites. He focussed his religious persecution instead on the Buddhists, who had been so intolerant of Muslims for the past 30 years in the Il-Khanate. Ghazan converted all Buddhist temples to mosques, and he forced the Buddhist priests and monks to either convert to Islam or return to India, Tibet, or China. Christians were also persecuted, in retaliation for their special treatment at the expense of the Muslims under the Buddhist rulers of the Il-Khanate. Ghazan reorganised the administration of the Il-Khanate to reflect its new official Islamic faith. He replaced traditional Mongol law with the Sharia, or Islamic code of law, and adopted Islamic military codes for the Mongol army. At Ghazan's death in 1304, virtually all Mongol elements in the Il-Khanate had been absorbed into Islamic culture.
Ghazan's successor, his brother, Oljeitu, took the empire in a different direction. Oljeitu was a Shi'ite Muslim, and he embarked on a campaign against the majority Sunnis of the realm. His persecution of Sunnis damaged the Il-Khanate's relationship with the neighbouring Mamluks in Egypt, who were Sunnis. Relations between the two groups were almost at the point of war when Oljeitu died in 1316. Oljeitu's son and heir, Abu Said, was the first Mongol to have an Islamic name since birth. He restored Sunnism as the state religion of the Il-Khanate and made peace with the Mamluks. Peace to the west did not mean peace to the north, however, since the alliance between the Mamluks and the Golden Horde had dissolved after Berke's death in 1266. Abu Said thus found himself involved in a renewed conflict with the Golden Horde over the territory of the Caucasus Mountains. Abu Said died in 1335 while at war with the Golden Horde, and his death marked the beginning of the Il-Khanate's decline and eventual collapse.
A series of succession struggles after 1335 weakened the empire, as did the loss of soldiers and civilians to the Black Death, which had been ravaging Persia. The chaos opened the way for foreign invasion, which occurred in 1357 when the Golden Horde Khan, Jani Beg, attacked Tabriz, the Il-Khanate capital. Although the Golden Horde was not successful in annexing the Il-Khanate to its own empire, it succeeded in adding to the political turmoil of the land. When Timur invaded from Central Asia in 1393, the Il-Khanate was swallowed up into his rapidly expanding empire.

The Black Death
The Mongol invasion of the Islamic heartland had mixed effects. On one hand, the Islamic world never regained its previous power. Much of the six centuries of Islamic scholarship, culture, and infrastructure was destroyed as the invaders burned libraries, replaced mosques with Buddhist temples, and destroyed intricate irrigation systems. In fact, the irrigation equipment necessary for farming in the Mesopotamian desert was not rebuilt until the 20th century. Additionally, Gaykhatu's attempt to introduce paper money at the end of the 13th century virtually destroyed trade in the region, from which it was difficult to recover.
On the other hand, the Mongol invasion was not entirely negative for the Islamic world. Perhaps the most significant achievement for the Muslims under Mongol rule was their ability to absorb the Mongols into their Islamic culture, rather than allowing its destruction at Mongol hands. This feat can be seen in the triumph of the Islamic faith over Mongol shamanism and Buddhism. It had occurred so quickly, in fact, that only 40 years after the fall of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258, the Mongols responsible for it had themselves adopted Islam as the official religion of their empire.
A similar trend is seen in language. Because the majority of the inhabitants of the Central Asian steppe were Turks, and the Mongol army and administration often employed more Turks than Mongols, it did not take long for the Turkish language to replace Mongol in certain regions of the Il-Khanate. The province of Azerbaijan in northern Persia, for example, which is an independent country today, has remained a Turkish-speaking region since Mongol times. Turkish did not become the language of administration in the Il-Khanate, as it had in the Golden Horde by 1280, but it was influential nonetheless. The Seljuk Turks in Asia Minor particularly benefited from their status as Mongol vassals. Perhaps because of their fierce determination to retain their Turkish language and culture under the foreign rulers, or perhaps because of the Mongol favouritism towards the Turks, the Turkish language in the Seljuk region was used for literary purposes for the first time, and it received official recognition.
The Muslims could also thank the Mongols for introducing them to gunpowder, which the Mongols brought from China. While China is generally accepted as the empire that invented gunpowder, the Muslims are credited with applying the invention as a propellant, and thus a weapon. This spread of the native language and culture to the Mongol invaders is seen in the Il-Khanate as well as the Mongol-ruled Yuan Dynasty in China, both of which had rich cultural, linguistic, and religious traditions that pre-dated the Mongol invasion. By comparison, the Golden Horde in southern Russia, despite converting to Islam and adopting the Turkish language, remained true to its Mongol heritage as pastoral nomads and warriors. The Mongols of the Golden Horde remained Mongols; in the Il-Khanate and China, however, the Mongols were so absorbed into the native culture that hardly any trace of them remained by the 16th century. Their legacy was not easily forgotten, however, particularly in Persia, where the Mongol invasion had fuelled the age-old Persian nationalism that would eventually result in the formation of the powerful Safavid Empire there in the 16th century.
Proceed to The Timurid Empire




http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_histo...ilkhanate.html
Reply

Badrul
11-12-2010, 11:57 PM
As Salaamu'Alaikum wa Rahmatullah,

JazakAllahu Khair, a very interesting read mashaAllah. This just makes me wan to know more about this era, can't wait for the course to come to Manchester! =)
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Badrul
11-13-2010, 12:12 AM
Some of the objectives:



1- Giving hope! Without hope there will be no action or application. Some people think that we are in the worst period ever therefore, they don't want to work, cooperate with others and they are waiting for a miracle to happen! This course will show them that Muslim Ummah went through a harder time and survived!



2- Putting History in perspective: There are current developments taking place in the Muslim world that are similar, can any parallels be drawn?



3- Awareness. Some Muslims don't know their history. Any Ummah does not know its history is a weak Ummah. There were bright examples of heroism and bravery in the time of weakness of this Ummah. We want Muslims to become resilient by following its role models.



4- Where to go from here? Many Muslims know their history but they don't know what to do with the knowledge they have and where to go from here? This course will give work plan and action items for people to follow to better themselves.
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Badrul
11-13-2010, 12:13 AM
Who is this course for?

* Every Muslim who wants to gain an understanding of the benefits of studying history
* For every Muslim who would like to understand the circumstances that prevailed during the 7th century of Islamic history
* To put history into perspective by comparing on contrasting events through the ages.
* For every Muslim who wants to understand how previous nations had been tested and what are the lessons that can be taken for our time.
* For every Muslim teacher in Islamic schools who wishes to raise his/her students with the knowledge of Islamic history
* For those seeking enlightenment and hope from the promises of Allah.
Reply

Badrul
11-13-2010, 12:14 AM
What will you come out with at the end of the course?

* A binder complete with notes on The Raid Of The Mongols.
* Veneration for the book of Allah and the power of His Words and Promises.
* Tremendous boost to your emaan.
* An appreciation of a part of Islamic history and the trials that the Muslims faced at that time.
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Badrul
11-13-2010, 12:15 AM
http://www.youtube.com/user/Alkautha.../0/BteJvwOnZk4
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Badrul
11-23-2010, 08:52 PM
Salaam all,

Check this youtube trailer out! Reminds me of a movie...

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Badrul
11-26-2010, 11:48 PM
The Abbasid Caliphate

The Rise:

The Abbasid caliphs descended from Abbas ibn Abd al-Muttalib (566 – 662), one of the youngest uncles of Muhammad Sal Allahu ‘Alaihi wa Sallam, because of which they considered themselves the true successor of Muhammad as opposed to the Umayyads. The Umayyads were descended from Umayya, and were a clan separate from Muhammad's in the Quraish tribe. They won the backing of Shiites (i.e. the Hashimiyya sub-sect of the Kaysanites Shia) against the Umayyads by temporarily converting to Shia Islam and joining their fight against Umayyad rule.
The Abbasids also distinguished themselves from the Umayyads by attacking their moral character and administration in general. According to Ira Lapidus, "The Abbasid revolt was supported largely by Arabs, mainly the aggrieved settlers of Marw with the addition of the Yemeni faction and their Mawali".[2] The Abbasids also appealed to non-Arab Muslims, known as mawali, who remained outside the kinship-based society of the Arabs and were perceived as a lower class within the Umayyad empire. Muhammad ibn 'Ali, a great-grandson of Abbas, began to campaign for the return of power to the family of Muhammad, the Hashimites, in Persia during the reign of Umar II.
During the reign of Marwan II, this opposition culminated in the rebellion of Ibrahim the Imam, the fourth in descent from Abbas. Supported by the province of Khorasan, Iran, he achieved considerable success, but was captured in the year 747 and died in prison; some hold that he was assassinated. The quarrel was taken up by his brother Abdallah, known by the name of Abu al-'Abbas as-Saffah, who defeated the Umayyads in 750 in the Battle of the Zab near the Great Zab and was subsequently proclaimed caliph.
Immediately after their victory Abu al-'Abbas as-Saffah sent his forces to North Africa and Central Asia, where his forces fought against Tang expansion during the Battle of Talas (the Abbasids were known to their opponents as the: "Black robed ones"[citation needed]). After the battle many captive Chinese craftsmen introduced the world's first recorded paper mill in Baghdad, thus beginning a new era of intellectual rebirth in the Abbasid domain. Within 10 years the Abbasids built another renowned paper mill in the Umayyad capital of Córdoba in Spain.
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Badrul
11-29-2010, 09:31 PM
As Salaamu'Alaikum

Golden Age:

The Islamic Golden Age was inaugurated by the middle of the 8th century by the ascension of the Abbasid Caliphate and the transfer of the capital from Damascus to Baghdad. The Abbassids were influenced by the Qur'anic injunctions and hadith such as "the ink of a scholar is more holy than the blood of a martyr" stressing the value of knowledge. During this period the Muslim world became the unrivaled intellectual center for science, philosophy, medicine and education as the Abbasids championed the cause of knowledge and established the House of Wisdom in Baghdad; where both Muslim and non-Muslim scholars sought to translate and gather all the world's knowledge into Arabic.
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AQEEDAH
12-02-2010, 11:48 AM
The course will also be done by Shaykh Dr. Isam Rajab, a classically trained scholar, is the founder and Director of AREES Institute. Shaikh Isam was born in Kuwait and graduated with a BA in Shari'ah from the Islamic University of Madinah. He holds a Masters and Ph.D in Islamic Studies. He has over 10 years of experience as an Imam in the US and Kuwait. Specialized and licensed in the Inheritance system of Islam, . He has 2 Ijazas in memorizing the Quran and is the author of a book about the Qira'at of the Qur'an.

Ive been to a class taught by him and mashaAllah TabarakAllah he has a very unique teaching style :)

Really looking forward to be taught by him once again inshaAllah!
Reply

Badrul
12-12-2010, 01:18 AM
As Salaamu'Alaikum all,

Venue:

University of Salford
Mary Seacole Building
Frederick Road Campus
Frederick Road
Salford M6 6PU


If you haven't already done so please enrol as soon as possible, we are hoping for a full house inshaAllah. Only 6 days to go!
Reply

Badrul
12-20-2010, 12:59 AM
As salaamu'Alaikum wa Rahmatullah,

Alhamdulillah what a fantastic course we had this weekend! We were welcomed by heavy snow and icy roads on Saturday yet our dedicated students still turned up. From my understanding we even had one sister fly in all the way from Chech Republic MashaAllah!

JazakumAllahu Khairen to Sheikh Isam, AK Manchester and to all our Students, may Allah Subhana wa Ta'la Reward you all with nothing less than Jannat ul Firdous 'Alaa for making this journey to seek 'Ilm, Ameen.

AK B'ham, you guys are in for a treat! May Allah preserve our Sheikh and bless his family for the sacrifices they have to make.

Hope you all benefited and enjoyed as much as I did inshaAllah.

Until next time...

Ma'ssalaamah
Reply

Woodrow
12-20-2010, 01:49 AM
Masha Allaah, it went well for you. Insha Allaah one day you will be able to offer it in the US preferably in the North Central States Region such as Bismarck, North Dakota or Fargo, North Dakota, if not Winnipeg Canada is about the same distance from me as Fargo.
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