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mahfuja
11-02-2010, 11:42 AM
Assalaamu'alaikum

With the will of Allah we have alhamdulillah established an organisation 'Nour' working to abolish domestic violence within the Muslim community using Islam as our tool.

We have an advisor section, for those suffering to ask our islamic/health advisors any questions which they would like to know regarding their situation.

www.nour-dv.org.uk [in our advisors section]

Please keep Nour in your humble du'aas and may this organisation be a means of alleviation to those who are in dire need.

JazakAllah khair.
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Ummu Sufyaan
11-02-2010, 12:20 PM
wa alaykum us-salaam
mashaAllah, may Allah reward your efforts and make them fruitful.
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Asiyah3
11-02-2010, 01:19 PM
:wa:
Masha'Allah. May Allah reward you and make it successful. May Allah protect the victims.
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purple
11-02-2010, 04:04 PM
salm
ameen ameen

gud wrk!
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Cabdullahi
11-05-2010, 12:19 AM
[B]More than 40% of domestic violence victims are male, report reveals

November 4th, 2010

About two in five of all victims of domestic violence are men, contradicting the widespread impression that it is almost always women who are left battered and bruised, a new report claims.

Men assaulted by their partners are often ignored by police, see their attacker go free and have far fewer refuges to flee to than women, says a study by the men’s rights campaign group Parity.

The charity’s analysis of statistics on domestic violence shows the number of men attacked by wives or girlfriends is much higher than thought. Its report, Domestic Violence: The Male Perspective, states: “Domestic violence is often seen as a female victim/male perpetrator problem, but the evidence demonstrates that this is a false picture.”

Data from Home Office statistical bulletins and the British Crime Survey show that men made up about 40% of domestic violence victims each year between 2004-05 and 2008-09, the last year for which figures are available. In 2006-07 men made up 43.4% of all those who had suffered partner abuse in the previous year, which rose to 45.5% in 2007-08 but fell to 37.7% in 2008-09.

Similar or slightly larger numbers of men were subjected to severe force in an incident with their partner, according to the same documents. The figure stood at 48.6% in 2006-07, 48.3% the next year and 37.5% in 2008-09, Home Office statistics show.

The 2008-09 bulletin states: “More than one in four women (28%) and around one in six men (16%) had experienced domestic abuse since the age of 16. These figures are equivalent to an estimated 4.5 million female victims of domestic abuse and 2.6 million male victims.”

In addition, “6% of women and 4% of men reported having experienced domestic abuse in the past year, equivalent to an estimated one million female victims of domestic abuse and 600,000 male victims”.

Campaigners claim that men are often treated as “second-class victims” and that many police forces and councils do not take them seriously. “Male victims are almost invisible to the authorities such as the police, who rarely can be prevailed upon to take the man’s side,” said John Mays of Parity. “Their plight is largely overlooked by the media, in official reports and in government policy, for example in the provision of refuge places – 7,500 for females in England and Wales but only 60 for men.”



The official figures underestimate the true number of male victims, Mays said. “Culturally it’s difficult for men to bring these incidents to the attention of the authorities. Men are reluctant to say that they’ve been abused by women, because it’s seen as unmanly and weak.”

The number of women prosecuted for domestic violence rose from 1,575 in 2004-05 to 4,266 in 2008-09. “Both men and women can be victims and we know that men feel under immense pressure to keep up the pretence that everything is OK,” said Alex Neil, the housing and communities minister in the Scottish parliament. “Domestic abuse against a man is just as abhorrent as when a woman is the victim.”

http://nour-dv.org.uk/2010/11/04/mor...eport-reveals/[/I]



Something interesting i found on the website
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Muhaba
11-05-2010, 12:43 AM
May Allah help you succeed in this endeavor.

what is needed in the islamic community is education for girls and women as well as men. Girls need to be taught their islamic rights from the beginning, possibily in school, as well guidance on who to turn to for help. boy especially need to be taught about women's rights. this sort of education will insha-Allah change society. Once everyone in society realizes their rights and responsibilities including women's rights, then domestic violence and neglect of women's rights should decrease, insha-Allah.
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