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View Full Version : Death in Lahore - American who sparked diplomatic row is a CIA spy



Junon
02-21-2011, 02:34 PM
Salaam

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Junon
02-21-2011, 04:10 PM
Salaam

Page 2


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Junon
02-21-2011, 04:16 PM
Salaam

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جوري
02-21-2011, 04:28 PM
Hope they execute him insha'Allah in a public square for all to see!

:w:
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Junon
02-21-2011, 04:31 PM
Salaam

Its really really tense, the government dare not let him go yet they have to, otherwise a confrontation with the US.

Sorry about the images, there not that great, Ill try and fix it later on
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CosmicPathos
02-21-2011, 04:31 PM
inshAllah.

The wife of the killed man committed suicide while saying "i need justice." But the cattle-minded populace of Pakistan still did not wake up.
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جوري
02-21-2011, 04:49 PM
it is amazing that people are more afraid of other people than they are of God.. who cares of their relationship to the U.S? he is a captured criminal/spy and should stand justice in the country where he committed his crime.. it is outside of the U.S jurisprudence for now.. btw when will the Pakistanis have their own revolution?
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CosmicPathos
02-21-2011, 05:11 PM
Originally Posted by τhε ṿαlε'ṡ lïlÿ
it is amazing that people are more afraid of other people than they are of God.. who cares of their relationship to the U.S? he is a captured criminal/spy and should stand justice in the country where he committed his crime.. it is outside of the U.S jurisprudence for now.. btw when will the Pakistanis have their own revolution?
I doubt they will.

The intra-regional differences are far more dear to them. There are four provinces based on ethnicity and language. All 4 are against each other. And then within each province, there are different ethnicities and castes. And fights with each other. I dont see any revolution coming from Pakistani lands, except perhaps something from Peshawar or Northern Areas, hallmark of Pathan peoples. The current political parties work by benefitting from these ethnic and lingual differences! There are Mohajirs (migrants), Punjabis, Sindhis, Pathans, Balochis, Kashmiris blah blah and then Memons, Jutts, Butts, Chaudharys, Rajputs, Maliks, Khokars, Kayanis, etc etc
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جوري
02-21-2011, 05:13 PM
casts? what the? are they Hindus or are they Muslims?
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CosmicPathos
02-21-2011, 05:19 PM
Originally Posted by τhε ṿαlε'ṡ lïlÿ
casts? what the? are they Hindus or are they Muslims?
castes, there are many, far too many to list here, to the extent that they made relationship to the Prophet through Fatima a caste, Syed!

Muslims of course. But I think its ignorance inherited through Hindu/Sikh ancestral legacy.
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LavaDog
02-21-2011, 05:40 PM
he should at least get life imprisonment for working for xe. anyone who works for that company is a monster.
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Zuzubu
02-21-2011, 05:47 PM
Originally Posted by mad_scientist
hallmark of Pathan peoples
Pathan = Zuzubu

Pakistan is focused on race and not Islam. Nationalism/tribalism is indeed a very bad thing. :(
Look at the government, the people of the leaders are happy(if it's possible to be happy in Pakiland!) and the people from other races are on their own. Seriously, no government at all. Besides the leaders of pakistan are usually rapists, theives, mafia people (gangsters, drug dealdealers), and kidnappers.

Pakistan is also really up on goofying for USA, and being dependent on them.

Insha'Allah someone will take care of them and execute those leaders.
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Argamemnon
02-21-2011, 09:03 PM
Originally Posted by τhε ṿαlε'ṡ lïlÿ
Hope they execute him insha'Allah in a public square for all to see!

:w:
or hang him from a crane Iran style as a lesson for all western leaders :w:
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IslamicRevival
02-21-2011, 09:11 PM
I'd rather the Pakistani government grow some balls and DEMAND the US to release Dr Aafia Siddique..Maybe they could come up with some sort of agreement and release this CIA/Alqaeda terrorist in exchange for our sister of Islam, Dr Aafia Siddique.

Failing that, Hang the Pig
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Junon
04-13-2011, 01:04 PM
Salaam

Sorry for posting this a little late but a hardly surprising devlopment - the spinelessness of the Paksitani government knows no bounds. . . . . .



Raymond Davis, the CIA spy charged with murder in Pakistan, has flown out of the country after the relatives of two men he killed dropped charges in exchange for "blood money" of at least $2.3m (£1.4m) and help in resettling abroad.

Davis slipped out of Lahore on a special flight from the old city airport after being released from the sprawling jail where he had been held for almost 10 weeks amid a diplomatic storm that rocked relations between the two allies and sucked in President Barack Obama.

A Pakistani official said the 36-year-old US spy was bound for an airbase in Afghanistan, then on to the US.

Davis was freed under Islamic laws that allow a murderer to walk free on payment of compensation to the family of his victims. The acquittal took place during a closed hearing at Kot Lakhpat jail where no reporters were present.

"The court first indicted him, but the families later told the court that they have accepted the blood money and they have pardoned him," said Rana Sanaullah, the Punjab law minister. The US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, thanked the families for pardoning Davis and allowing the American to go. Speaking from Cairo, Clinton said the US had not paid to win Davis's release.

The dramatic case has become an obsession in Pakistan since Davis, a bulky former special forces soldier, opened fire on two men at traffic lights on 27 January. Davis claimed he acted in self-defence against robbers, but prosecutors said he shot one in the back as he ran away. Several officials said the men he killed were linked to Pakistani intelligence.

The deal to free Davis was an unusual mix of Islamic law and tense backroom negotiations between American and Pakistani spies and diplomats. Court documents detailed payments of almost $1.2m to the mother, widow and eight siblings of Faizan Haider, while relatives of the other dead man, Muhammad Faheem, received a similar amount. A senior Pakistani official said compensation was also paid to the family of a third man killed by a US rescue vehicle, presumed to be driven by CIA employees.

It is believed the money was transferred by Pakistani authorities, pending reimbursement from the US, allowing Clinton to make her denial of payment on Wednesday. Washington also undertook to facilitate the future resettlement of family members in the US or a Gulf state such as Dubai, the official added. "The Americans will be helpful to the families," he said. But the deal was also a defeat for US diplomacy, which had insisted Davis was a bona fide diplomat who enjoyed immunity from prosecution. In the early stage of the controversy, the US accused Pakistan of "illegally detaining" Davis, while Obama defended him as "our diplomat".

The carefully orchestrated legal events in Lahore belied weeks of negotiations between the CIA and Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), which have been at barely concealed loggerheads over the incident. The legal manoeuvres were "a fig leaf", one official admitted. The idea of a payment was first mooted between Pakistan's ambassador to the US, Husain Haqqani, and Senator John Kerry in February. But the arrangement first needed the co-operation of Pakistani intelligence, which seemed determined to press its advantage.

Relations between the two spy agencies had been fragile for months. In December the CIA station chief had to leave Islamabad after being named in the press; ISI officials were angry that their chief, General Shuja Pasha, had been named in a New York lawsuit brought by victims of the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

rest here

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011...pakistan-blood
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