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Junon
07-01-2011, 09:48 AM
Salaam

Interesting article




By leaving the issue until the last minute, and undermining earlier agreements, Fifa is failing to live up to its stated values

It matters little to the game of football how players are attired, but the standardisation and attention to detail in regulating even this aspect of the game is tight. Sleeves have to be of the right length and sponsors' logos of the correct dimensions. Is it any surprise, then, that Fifa has taken issue with the Iranian FA's interpretation of a suitable kit for women's teams?

The Iranian national women's team was banned from a qualifying matchfor the 2012 London Olympics against Jordan because of the Islamic clothing worn by the players. In Iran, the decision has been criticised by everyone from the head of women's affairs at the Iranian Football Federation to President Ahmadinejad himself.

Discussion around Islamic clothing in international competitions is a recurring issue. In 2010, the Iranian women's youth team was refused participation in the Youth Olympics in Singapore because of the headscarf. Negotiations between the Iranian Football Federation and Fifa followed, and a compromise was reached where the team was allowed to wear headgear that did not cover the neck, allowing Iran to return to the field.

The Iranian team that came out to play in Jordan this year wore the same headgear previously given the green light by Fifa. Ali Kafashian, the head of the Iranian Football Federation, wrote in a letter to Sepp Blatter that Iran had received only one document from Fifa relating to the kit since the 2010 Youth Olympics. That document, received on March 7 2011 (before the game against Jordan) confirmed the agreement between the two parties from the year before. The only addition to the team's outfit was in fact their shirts, which now covered their necks.

It is understandable that some media reports quote "health and safety" as the basis of Fifa's discontent, while others state that the controversy is because of the prohibition of "religious messages" in the outfits of the players.

When it comes to the Islamic headscarf, Fifa is rarely clear on the specifics. Often it cites law four of the laws of the game, which specifies the basic compulsory equipment of players. This law bans dangerous items (such as jewellery) and any equipment that has "political, religious or personal slogans or statements".

Let us ignore for a moment that the law specifies "slogans or statements", and include in that category (for the sake of argument) any item that has some religious significance. It should be mentioned that covering the body, in this case with the shirt, is as important a tradition (and a more commonly shared one) in the Islamic world than the headscarf; the scarf does not have "more" religious significance than the shirt.

Nevertheless, the acceptance by Fifa of the adapted head covering of the women's youth team in Singapore shows one of two things: either Fifa, perhaps with religious experts, accepted that new head cover was not "Islamic" and therefore did not come under the ban on religious clothing, or the "renegotiated" kit satisfied Fifa's concerns about health and safety.

If the adapted headcover was thought to be safe, all we have left is the shirt. Kafashian writes: "It says nowhere in law four that our shirts are unsafe or dangerous" and adds "Many of the [other] teams use similar shirts". Indeed, it would be difficult for Fifa to argue that the reason behind the referees' decision in Jordan was safety concerns over the high-neck collar – remember the recent ban on snoods hadn't come into effect. In the eyes of the Iranians, the high collars satisfied all the conditions for law four.

For many in the Iranian press, the Bahraini nationality of the referees was crucial to the matter, considering the Iranian government's hostility to that country's violent repression of recent pro-democracy protests against the Gulf-backed monarchy.

Whatever the reasons for the referees' decision and Fifa's discontent, by leaving the issue until the last minute, and undermining earlier agreements between the Iranian Football Federation and Fifa, the organisation is responsible for denying a team the opportunity to qualify for the Olympic games and must take responsibility for an error that once again undermines its very existence.

Fifa states that its role is to promote friendly relations between members, to stand against discrimination of any kind and to promote the game of football globally – surely this was the perfect opportunity to live up to those principles? But instead we have to ask ourselves, if it indeed matters what footballers wear, who has the right to decide? Is it Blatter, who thinks "female players are pretty" and should therefore wear tighter shorts when playing football, or his "council of wisdom", still awaiting its first female member?

The Women's World Cup 2015 is to be held in Canada, a country whose football federation banned 11-year-old Asmahan Mansour from playing in her headscarf in 2007. Considering Fifa's latest move, they might as well state it clearly now: hijabis need not apply.

http://www.iransportspress.com/natio...g-message.html
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Ramadhan
07-01-2011, 12:26 PM
I don't see how the iranian football team dress affect "health and safety".
This is so arbitrary and clearly discrimination against the women.
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Who Am I?
07-01-2011, 02:00 PM
Originally Posted by Ramadhan
I don't see how the iranian football team dress affect "health and safety".
This is so arbitrary and clearly discrimination against the women.
I agree. They approved the same uniform once before, only to change their minds?

Sepp Blatter is a chauvenist, plain and simple. I never have been impressed with the guy anyway.
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missy
07-01-2011, 08:13 PM
:sl:

It's really not fair!

This law bans dangerous items (such as jewellery) and any equipment that has "political, religious or personal slogans or statements".
Fifa is partial….they seem to have no problem at all with Kaka wearing the "I belong to Jesus" tee.





^ Isn't this "religious" ? :-\
This simply shows their hatred of Islam.

Soccer referee sidelined for wearing hijab
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GuestFellow
07-01-2011, 10:59 PM
Salaam,

Muslims should not participate in these sports. We should remain fit and healthy to serve Allah, not to entertain the public.
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Who Am I?
07-02-2011, 04:15 AM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
Salaam,

Muslims should not participate in these sports. We should remain fit and healthy to serve Allah, not to entertain the public.
So is playing a sport like football (soccer to Americans) or basketball haraam?
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ardianto
07-02-2011, 06:49 AM
Originally Posted by King of Nines
So is playing a sport like football (soccer to Americans) or basketball haraam?
Not haram. I played soccer too when I was young, usually as defender.

But honestly, I don't like to see women play man's sport like soccer. It's makes those women look masculine.
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Tyrion
07-02-2011, 06:54 AM
Originally Posted by missy
Fifa is partial….they seem to have no problem at all with Kaka wearing the "I belong to Jesus" tee.
Watching him play in the world cup was awesome. Just hearing the announcers screaming his name... "AND KAKA HAS THE BALL! THERE GOES KAKA! LOOK AT KAKA GO!"... I know it's slightly immature, but hey... It made us laugh. :p:
Reply

Ramadhan
07-02-2011, 08:55 AM
Originally Posted by King of Nines
So is playing a sport like football (soccer to Americans) or basketball haraam?
Playing sport is not haram, in fact it is advisable to make us strong and not weak.

If my memory serves me right, Rasulullah SAW said (or did?) three sporting activities as part of sunnah: swimming, horse riding, archery.
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Starrynight
07-02-2011, 11:32 AM
Women should be able to play any sport that men play. Who cares how they look? We should look at their skills.
I read about this right after it happened and my heart broke for these poor women. Can you imagine working so hard and then not being able to play because of these people? I hope that the world figures itself out soon because I'm sick of women being punished for wearing hijabs.
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piXie
07-02-2011, 12:33 PM


On one side fighting to wear the hijaab. n.. on th other side.. totally forgotten the meaning of hijaab ? :ermm:

Certain sports are better suited to men.
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FS123
07-02-2011, 01:10 PM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
Salaam,

Muslims should not participate in these sports. We should remain fit and healthy to serve Allah, not to entertain the public.
That is just an opinion, but on the other hand, we should participate to get accept. Whoever put that FIFA ban will be happy with this view for all the wrong reasons.
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GuestFellow
07-02-2011, 02:08 PM
Originally Posted by King of Nines
So is playing a sport like football (soccer to Americans) or basketball haraam?
No. Playing sports is fine. I think Muslims should avoid participating in these sports. One of the main reasons is nationalism.

Originally Posted by FS123
That is just an opinion, but on the other hand, we should participate to get accept.
Why?
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FS123
07-02-2011, 05:23 PM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
Why?
Why do you think women team that wears Islamic attire was banned from FIFA? To fight for our rights thats why.
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Starrynight
07-02-2011, 05:42 PM
Whether people think women should or shouldn't play these sports won't matter. It is going to happen.
I think the issue that needs attention is that they were not allowed to play because of hijab and their shirts. This is simply one more step the world is taken to oppress women based on their CHOICE to wear a hijab. Ironic isn't it? Most of the people banning it claim that these women are "oppressed" into wearing it. By forbidding it they themselves are taking away the choice women have and these banners become monsters themselves.
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GuestFellow
07-02-2011, 05:51 PM
:sl:

Originally Posted by Starrynight
Whether people think women should or shouldn't play these sports won't matter. It is going to happen.
This is about both Muslim men and women participating in these sports.

Originally Posted by FS123
Why do you think women team that wears Islamic attire was banned from FIFA? To fight for our rights thats why.
It is pointless. Why should Muslims waste their time and energy to get accepted by these non-Muslim organisations? FIFA can get lost. Muslims should focus on more serious issues. There is an element of nationalism in these sports which can lead to divisions within the Muslim community.
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Tyrion
07-02-2011, 05:52 PM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
No. Playing sports is fine. I think Muslims should avoid participating in these sports. One of the main reasons is nationalism.
Uhh.... What? If playing sports is fine (Which as you said, it is), then Muslims shouldn't have to avoid participating in them. And this fear of 'nationalism' isn't really based on anything... Really hardcore nationalism is one thing, but telling people not to play a sport is no way to fight it. Just because a person plays for his country doesn't really mean anything. People are allowed to have pride in their countries, and to represent them.

Originally Posted by Guestfellow
It is pointless. Why should Muslims waste their time and energy to get accepted by these non-Muslim organisations? FIFA can get lost. Muslims should focus on more serious issues. There is an element of nationalism in these sports which can lead to divisions within the Muslim community.
Why do you waste time and energy on ANYTHING that you enjoy? Come on. :p:
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GuestFellow
07-02-2011, 06:01 PM
Originally Posted by Tyrion

Uhh.... What? If playing sports is fine (Which as you said, it is), then Muslims shouldn't have to avoid participating in them.
Salaam,

Let me make myself clear. People should participate in sports to keep fit and have fun. There is nothing wrong with this.

These sports, organised by FIFA are about countries competing against each other. For example, Iranian football team vs Jordan football team. I'm personally against this.

And this fear of 'nationalism' isn't really based on anything...
Egypt-Algeria World Cup anger turns violent in Cairo

EDIT: I will address your remaining points later.
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missy
07-02-2011, 06:32 PM
Originally Posted by Tyrion

Watching him play in the world cup was awesome. Just hearing the announcers screaming his name... "AND KAKA HAS THE BALL! THERE GOES KAKA! LOOK AT KAKA GO!"... I know it's slightly immature, but hey... It made us laugh. :p:
lol…I love the soccer craze at the time of world cups! Just witnessed two since I actually started liking soccer…haha
sad Brazil couldn't make it to the Finals.


Originally Posted by Guestfellow
It is pointless. Why should Muslims waste their time and energy to get accepted by these non-Muslim organisations? FIFA can get lost. Muslims should focus on more serious issues. There is an element of nationalism in these sports which can lead to divisions within the Muslim community.
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
These sports, organised by FIFA are about countries competing against each other. For example, Iranian football team vs Jordan football team. I'm personally against this.
I kinda agree with this.
We should just sit back and enjoy the games :D

Maybe this link could be of some help.
Ruling on playing soccer
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Starrynight
07-02-2011, 06:50 PM
I think this is a big issue. Maybe sports aren't important to some people (including me) but I don't like seeing people being prejudice. If a worldwide organization is now attacking the hijab (and not just certain countries like France) it shows that the problem is growing.
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GuestFellow
07-02-2011, 06:50 PM
:sl:

Originally Posted by Tyrion
Really hardcore nationalism is one thing, but telling people not to play a sport is no way to fight it.
Nationalism and hardcore nationalism are both bad. Nationalism is to have pride for your nation. No one has control over where they are born. So how can a person be proud of their country when they have no control over? It is like being proud of the colour of your skin.

I'm not telling people not to participate in sports. I'm telling Muslims to not participate in sports organised by FIFA or where your participating in a sporting activity for your country.

Just because a person plays for his country doesn't really mean anything.
It does mean something. These people have pride for their country and represent them in sports.

People are allowed to have pride in their countries, and to represent them.
I disagree. We should be proud of being Muslims and put Islamic teachings into practice.

Why do you waste time and energy on ANYTHING that you enjoy? Come on
There is no need for the Iranian football team to complain against FIFA to do something that they enjoy. If they really want to play football, I'm sure there are places in Iran where they can organise their own football match. See how simple this is?

To conclude, I see nationalism as one step away from racism. You should eliminate or partially eliminate all possible routes to something that is wrong. Nationalism in sports is one of them. It is like fornication. Free-mixing can lead to dating and dating can lead to fornication.
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FS123
07-03-2011, 10:22 AM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
It is pointless. Why should Muslims waste their time and energy to get accepted by these non-Muslim organisations? FIFA can get lost. Muslims should focus on more serious issues. There is an element of nationalism in these sports which can lead to divisions within the Muslim community.
It is not about getting in to a non-muslim organisations, it is about preventing alienating ourselves in a society. Jews did the same thing in Europe, pre-world war, look what happened. When Nazis were persecuting them they didn't had a backing in the German society.


The Prophet (Allah bless him) stated, “None makes the religion difficult except that it overcomes him. So, aim for what is right, stick to the moderate way…” [Bukhari, Sahih]

The Prophet (Allah bless him) stated, “Beware of excessiveness in religion for those before you only perished due to excessiveness in religion.” [Ahmad, Musnad]
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GuestFellow
07-03-2011, 11:25 AM
Originally Posted by FS123
It is not about getting in to a non-muslim organisations, it is about preventing alienating ourselves in a society. Jews did the same thing in Europe, pre-world war, look what happened. When Nazis were persecuting them they didn't had a backing in the German society.
:sl:

I agree that Muslims should not alienate themselves in a society and most have not done that in western countries. Many attend University, have jobs, give Dawah, are politically active, volunteer and so on.

Anyway, we should get involved unless it goes against our beliefs or there is a potential for it to cause further division within the Muslim community. The latter applies here.
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Mr.President
07-03-2011, 11:41 AM
And say to the believing women that they should lower their gaze and guard their modesty; that they should not display their beauty and ornaments except what (must ordinarily) appear thereof; that they should draw their veils over their bosoms and not display their beauty except to their husbands, their fathers, their husband's fathers, their sons, their husbands' sons, their brothers or their brothers' sons, or their sisters' sons, or their women, or the slaves whom their right hands possess, or male servants free of physical needs, or small children who have no sense of the shame of sex; and that they should not strike their feet in order to draw attention to their hidden ornaments. And O ye Believers! turn ye all together towards Allah, that ye may attain Bliss.

Al Quran 24:31
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FS123
07-03-2011, 08:50 PM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
:sl:

I agree that Muslims should not alienate themselves in a society and most have not done that in western countries. Many attend University, have jobs, give Dawah, are politically active, volunteer and so on.

Anyway, we should get involved unless it goes against our beliefs or there is a potential for it to cause further division within the Muslim community. The latter applies here.
How it goes against our beliefs when those ladies are wearing hijab in the sports? They were banned because they were wearing hijab in sports, which is discrimination. I don't think playing in a team makes division in the muslim community.
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GuestFellow
07-03-2011, 09:37 PM
Originally Posted by FS123
How it goes against our beliefs when those ladies are wearing hijab in the sports?
:sl:

That statement was not speciailly made towards the Iranian female football team. To make myself clear, I said we should not get involved in any kind of activity that goes against our belief.

I'm more concerned about these football matches leading to divisions within the Muslim community.

They were banned because they were wearing hijab in sports, which is discrimination.
Which is irrelevant because we should not be involved.

I don't think playing in a team makes division in the muslim community.
Riot police in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, quelled a violent demonstration near the Algerian embassy in the early hours of Friday.

It has lead to divisions in the past.
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FS123
07-04-2011, 07:20 AM
Originally Posted by Guestfellow
I'm more concerned about these football matches leading to divisions within the Muslim community.

Which is irrelevant because we should not be involved.

Riot police in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, quelled a violent demonstration near the Algerian embassy in the early hours of Friday.

It has lead to divisions in the past.
That's true, it is other side of the equation. But it depends on the attitude of people, if it is not sports then it will be something else, and I don't think they are practicing muslims to begin with. But muslims brothers and sisters with correct attitude can be an example and lead the way. Nobody in my family I've seen people fighting over sports, it is just sports, but it comes down to how we were brought up.
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Muhaba
07-04-2011, 07:48 AM
Originally Posted by Junon
Salaam

Interesting article




By leaving the issue until the last minute, and undermining earlier agreements, Fifa is failing to live up to its stated values

It matters little to the game of football how players are attired, but the standardisation and attention to detail in regulating even this aspect of the game is tight. Sleeves have to be of the right length and sponsors' logos of the correct dimensions. Is it any surprise, then, that Fifa has taken issue with the Iranian FA's interpretation of a suitable kit for women's teams?

The Iranian national women's team was banned from a qualifying matchfor the 2012 London Olympics against Jordan because of the Islamic clothing worn by the players. In Iran, the decision has been criticised by everyone from the head of women's affairs at the Iranian Football Federation to President Ahmadinejad himself.


http://www.iransportspress.com/natio...g-message.html
The iranian players' clothing isn't islamic. additionally, muslim women shouldn't even take part in sports that will be watched by men. it is against muslim women's modesty.

what have the muslims come to? instead of non-muslims begging us to take part in their activities and to have their events hosted in muslim countries and non-muslims changing their rules to make that happen, it's the muslims who are begging non-muslims to let them take part in their activities. it should be muslims to say to the non-muslims "we aren't taking part in this activitiy because this thing is against our religion" etc. but its the other way around. shows who has the upper hand.
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