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islamica
12-13-2011, 05:31 AM
Facebook - Spy Machine of the Century

Exclusive Interview May 2, 2011

by Russia Today

by Ed Oswald
PC World
May 2, 2011
Reposted in Full

“Julian Assange claims that Facebook is complacent in providing the U.S. government with a way to spy on its citizens, calling it "the most appalling spying machine ever invented." The controversial founder of Wikileaks made the comments in an interview with Russia Today that aired on Monday. Assange is currently in England and is awaiting extradition to Sweden over sexual assault charges filed by two women last year.

Has Facebook automated government snooping? Facebook and other sites all have built-in methods for U.S. intelligence personnel to snoop on users of the site, Assange claims. Users' information, including names, locations, relationships, friends, and communications are all there for the government to see, and Assange appears none too happy about it. "It's not a matter of serving a subpoena, they have an interface they have developed for U.S. Intelligence to use," Assange told Russia Today's Laura Emmett. "Now, is it the case that Facebook is run by U.S. Intelligence? No, it's not like that. It's simply that U.S. Intelligence is able to bring to bear legal and political pressure to them."

The idea that Facebook could be used as a spying tool is nothing new--the Justice Department has already begun training its personnel on how to use social networking sites as tools in evidence gathering. Local law enforcement has also been known to use social networks for evidence gathering on suspects.

Assange's claims do not revolve around these methods, which would typically involve a subpoena or an undercover cop. What he is saying is that the government is getting free reign to spy as it wants without going through the usual legal channels. "Everyone should understand that when they add their friends to Facebook, they are doing free work for United States intelligence agencies," Assange said.

Facebook: We fight back when necessary: Facebook is already facing increasing criticism over privacy issues, and more attention to the topic could harm its reputation even more. Spokesperson Andrew Noyes takes issue with Assange's characterization. "We don't respond to pressure, we respond to compulsory legal process," Noyes told PCWorld in an email. "There has never been a time we have been pressured to turn over data-we fight every time we believe the legal process is insufficient." Noyes did say that Facebook's policies governing the release of data to government officials are dependent on the laws of that particular country, and that the site "respects that standard." (Meaning if it's done in shady ways by that gov't, Facebook respects that "standard" and gives it your info )

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islamica
12-13-2011, 06:12 AM
Facebook or Fitnabook?



Facebook has become a social media that everyone has and it can really be used for lots of good in promoting the Deen and other good things but unfortunately many Muslims have fallen into the trap of Shaytan by putting themselves out there in a very bad way.

Women, instead of guarding their modesty and beauty are putting up photos of themselves out there for the world to see and many are connecting with men, chatting with men and looking for attention, and men are doing the same thing.

Muslims are wasting hundreds of useless hours on "Fitna"book instead of learning their Deen and forming a relationship with Allah, azza wa jaal, and adhering to Quran and Sunnah.


------------------------------------


FACEBOOK CAN MAKE YOU FACE HELL


by Abu Mussab Wajdi Akkari





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Marina-Aisha
12-13-2011, 04:13 PM
i swear theres another thread bout this wots the big deal, so some people go on facebook nw and again its not some big conspiracy...yes some people abuse it but not everyone is like that...
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Galaxy
12-13-2011, 04:29 PM
Facebook is a way to connect your friends and family and there's nothing wrong with that. As long as there's not fitnah, that's fine. Anyone's Facebook can be easily hacked into, I remember a police officer said he could hack into it in 15 minutes so it can be used as a spying tool. There was also a case of a 13 year old boy who wrote something about killing Obama on his wall and there were like men in black after him.
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♥ Sofia ♥
12-13-2011, 05:20 PM
:salamext:

obviously, facebook raises big issues and does promote fitna. however - apart from the whole spying hacking thing - if facebook is used appropriately, it's fine. just try not to expose everything about your life as some tend to do, lol. and don't add people of the opposite sex... sensible people should know that already.

you shouldn't have pictures of yourself up there or on the internet in general. when they're up, anyone can save them and ogle at them or whatever, hijab or no hijab. havin your head covered don't mean it's okay for men to ogle at you... quite the opposite actually.

my facebook's private and hidden from search and so are many of my friends' accounts, but there's always the issue of men walking past and looking, males going on their female friends' facebooks, you know the deal... so i'd rather not take the chance. same goes for males, not singling out us females here.
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islamica
12-13-2011, 07:06 PM
Facebook: Social Networking or Social Engineering?

By: Mirza Yawar Baig - 6 Jumad al-Thani 1431, 20 May 2010

The big question is, ‘What is social networking and how is it useful?’

Of course you will hear the usual bleating saying, ‘It is so nice to know what my sister is doing….blah, blah.’

So ask this person, ‘Why can’t you send your sister an email asking what she is doing and she can respond to you. Or even better, if you can, call your sister and talk to her.’ But no, I must talk to my sister in a space where it is not only the sister who is listening but almost anyone who cares to listen, even if that person is a total stranger. So is it about your concern for your sister or is it something else?

So also in this space are pictures which really have no place outside the home – like the pictures showing you hugging your sister or wife or whoever! And so on and so on. I don’t think I need to describe all that there is to people who put it there in the first place.

Yes, of course there are controls. Tell me all about them. Tell me also how come almost nobody uses them. How many Facebook profiles do you know who have the maximum control activated where only their immediate family can see them? And of course in the end, all control is only as good as the techies and geeks on the Facebook site allow. After all they can access all that information anyway.

So what is really being achieved by Facebook, Twitter and so on? (Twitter?? Whoever coined that term was clever. Talk about under the belt. Who twitters? A twit!! – but then I suppose a twit doesn’t know that he is a twit, right?)

So what is achieved?

What is achieved is what would be the equivalent of peeping in through your window. Wanting to know what you are doing all the time. I want to know what you are doing all the time and I want you to know what I am doing all the time.

Intrusion into privacy when it is done against your will is unpleasant. So what is better? Get you into a state of mind where you will volunteer to tell people all about your internal organs on your own. See the change? An intruder is an intruder only when he intrudes against your will. If you invite him in, then he is a guest, not an intruder. Same person, same you but different rules. And that’s what it is all about, the rules of engagement.

So is it ‘social networking’ or is it ‘social engineering?’

The purpose is to change the rules of the society. Break barriers. Destroy the boundaries that protect us.

And where does this lead to? Addiction and intoxication. Addiction to seeing what others are doing and telling others what you are doing on a daily, hourly, minute by minute basis. And being intoxicated with the false feeling that you are so interesting that people are really interested in what you are doing. Not realizing or willing to believe that these are the actions of other intoxicated people.

You don’t like the word ‘intoxication’? Just don’t log onto your Facebook or Twitter account for two days and monitor your heartbeat, blood pressure, tremor in your mouse, whatever and you will see what I mean.

And all this for what? What is achieved with the time that you spend reading about other’s adenoids and telling them about yours? Incidentally I know what adenoids means and that you don’t talk about them. But let us not mention what facebookers really talk about!

So what did you achieve? Just ask yourself this question, ‘What did I achieve by being on Facebook and Twitter (or whichever of these infernal social networks you are on) over the past month, year or whatever period.’ Remember this is a serious question because you Muslim/ah are spending your time (life) doing it. And that makes it among the first questions that you will have to answer to Allah. So what did you achieve? Prepare the answer. You will need it.

Social networking is social engineering. Its purpose is to change the values and ethics of people. This is done, in its most benign form, to encourage you to indulge more and more in the consumerist society that is all consuming. We think we are the consumers. But we are in reality the consumed. Just think, how many of you buy things, see shows, go to restaurants (and other places), like or dislike things because of campaigns on Facebook and Twitter? See what is happening? Your minds are invaded, your thoughts are influenced, and consequently your actions are manipulated and you may not even realize it.

Today Muslims the world over are very angry with the latest offensive of the Facebook. But an impulsive reaction will hardly do us any good. Just staying off of the offensive site for one day, as many have advocated, will only highlight our capitulation to it.

It is time we rethink what are we doing with our lives and say no to social engineering. It is time to get off of Facebook, Twitter, and other similar sites that are destroying us from within.

http://www.darul-ishaat.co.uk/blog/2010/05/21/facebook-social-networking-or-social-engineering/

----------------

Behind the Facebook Scam

Video: http://www.brasschecktv.com/page/603.html
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Muezzin
12-13-2011, 07:24 PM
Lol, that blog allows readers to share the article on Facebook and Twitter.
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User2024
12-13-2011, 07:42 PM
Originally Posted by marina28
i swear theres another thread bout this wots the big deal, so some people go on facebook nw and again its not some big conspiracy...yes some people abuse it but not everyone is like that...
Yeah the other one I posted in World Affairs...

There are some good things such as

Connecting to college mates and stuff
Very useful for business!

However a lot of people get addicted to it now, instead I think it's replaced mobile phone numbers! Normally when you would chat up a girl you would say give your mobile number now they say give your facebook! ;D

Facebook is 'ok' but too many people post too much personal details..
Oh and the government always spy on people, look at the news they always arrest people over facebook for doing something this is because friends tell and government monitor it to, what about London riots?:exhausted:exhausted
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marwen
12-13-2011, 07:54 PM
I think threads about FB will continue untill facebook is closed or that guy, mark zuckerberg, manages to get a law that sues every person who speaks about FB outside FB.

Some interesting argument from people who are "hypnotised" by the FB forces :
- People used facebook for good purposes.
- People made collective works, collaborative activities.
- Revolutions have been raised through fb. Fighting for noble causes.
- People made business using facebook and gained money.
- Facebook helps you keep in touch with relatives and "friends".
- You can get news from fb.

Beautiful !

Now, also, every muslim knows the bad side of facebook. I just don't want to talk about all the filthy things that you can go through with fb.
But ok fb has negative points and has also some positive points, it's like TV (I like this argument :|) It's how you use it that counts.

Right. But what if I try to use facebook the right way, but I somehow got forced or pushed or lured to use it the bad way. In fb it's so possible that you get forced and drowned into fitna, so easily.
But let's suppose that I manage to use it the good way. You should agree that the minimal harm of facebook is the waste of time. How much time do you spend on fb. In that time, how much knowledge or benefit do you get. How many good deeds and useful things you could do in such time, outside fb, in real life ?

Now one last question. Do you think spending time on fb will make you closer to Allah ?
If the prophet Salla Allahu Alayhi wa Sallam was alive today, and visits you. Will he be happy to know you are on fb. If Muhammad Salla Allahu Alayhi wa Sallam was alive today, will you meet him on fb ? Will he have a fb account ? or will he be against fb ?
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Crystal
12-13-2011, 08:08 PM
You don't have to be part of some spy agency to use facebook to obtain peoples information. People are so ignorant when it comes to their privacy options on Facebook - there is a way of keeping your pictures private and your wall private etc but some people are not aware of this or just not to use this option so people can get information easily - people put too much personal information on facebook not realising who could be looking at their profile in my opinion. I used to have facebook but deleted it since facebook always keeps your pictures even when you delete your facebook - its kinda strange.
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islamica
12-14-2011, 03:01 AM
Originally Posted by Crystal
You don't have to be part of some spy agency to use facebook to obtain peoples information. People are so ignorant when it comes to their privacy options on Facebook - there is a way of keeping your pictures private and your wall private etc but some people are not aware of this or just not to use this option so people can get information easily - people put too much personal information on facebook not realising who could be looking at their profile in my opinion. I used to have facebook but deleted it since facebook always keeps your pictures even when you delete your facebook - its kinda strange.
Thanks to these lack of proper privacy settings. You will find dating sites and matirmonial sites are taking FB users infos and pictures and putting on their sites with a link to the FB for a small fee. There are also porn sites who lure users putting up FB user pictures with deceptive titles and wordings.

Lastly, even if you have it all private and hiden from the world. Those in charge of the site (admins) can see it and do look at it. Other then all that, every person info and picture you put up goes into their database connected with CIA, making a nice profile of you. The best part is that you are stooged into giving them everything without a warrant and on a daily basis!
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islamica
12-15-2011, 05:51 AM
Facebook Knows Where You Go On the Web

Remember when Mark Zuckerberg said you need to get over the fact that there is no privacy on the internet?

He meant it.

Many people, however, think the fun of posting on and the interaction of Facebook overshadows the downside, or they merely ignore the negative aspects.

Well, it turns out it is worse than we previously thought.

Hacker and writer Nik Cubrilovic has a post on his blog today revealing some really scary and downright police state Stasi-like aspects of the popular “service”.

Cubrilovic writes that Facebook keeps track of every website you visit that has its “Like” button on it, even if YOU ARE LOGGED OUT OF FACEBOOK. It does this through the cookies it routinely plants on your computer.

The only solution to this is to delete Facebook’s cookies after every session, or use a separate browser for Facebook usage.

Cubrilovic explains: “With my browser logged out of Facebook, whenever I visit any page with a Facebook like button, or share button, or any other widget, the information, including my account ID, is still being sent to Facebook. The only solution to Facebook not knowing who you are is to delete all Facebook cookies… It is all hidden in plain sight.”

Cubrilovic tried to email Facebook about his concerns on several occasions, but they ignored him.

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CosmicPathos
12-15-2011, 06:44 AM
lol I like that, FaceHell.
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Rhubarb Tart
12-15-2011, 01:43 PM
:sl:
*yawn* at this topic. Will I stop using facebook? no....
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ardianto
12-15-2011, 03:51 PM
Originally Posted by Crystal
I used to have facebook but deleted it since facebook always keeps your pictures even when you delete your facebook - its kinda strange.
Your picture too? with your name or with someone else name?

Until early of 2011 there were many fake Facebook accounts that produced by human or by "Facebook accounts maker robot". They used fake name names from "Fake name generator", but they used photos from real Facebook accounts. Many of these fake accounts have been disabled, but the rest maybe still active. So, don't be surprised if you find two accounts with different name but same photo.
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islamica
12-15-2011, 08:08 PM
Facebook's 'Like' Button Banned by German State

By David Daw - Aug 19, 2011



The German State of Schleswig-Holstein has ordered all state sites to remove Facebook's "like" button. Sites that fail to comply could face fines of up to 50,000 euros, or about $72,000.

Schleswig-Holstein's data protection commissioner, Thilo Weicher, ordered the shutdown after an analysis by his office showed that Facebook builds profiles of users and non-users alike with the "like" button's data. Because such data collection violates Germany's data protection laws, Weicher has given websites operated in Schleswig-Holstein until September 30th to remove all "like" buttons.

Facebook has issued its own statement in response to Weicher's claims. The company has denied Weicher's claims and insists that the "like" button is compliant with European Union data protections standards. According to Facebook, the "like" button only collects the IP addresses of non-users, and even that information is deleted after 90 days.

The European Union--and Germany in particular--has much stricter online privacy laws than does the United States. In fact, this isn't the first time Facebook has clashed with Germany's strict privacy laws--earlier this month, German authorities in Hamburg asked the social networking giant to shut down its facial recognition feature. The EU advisory board also announced it would be looking into Facebook's facial recognition feature, and any EU privacy laws such a feature might violate.




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Crystal
12-15-2011, 08:21 PM
Originally Posted by ardianto
Your picture too? with your name or with someone else name?
I duno adrianto, I just know that facebook retains the right to store all your information which is why I deleted mine.
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Crystal
12-15-2011, 08:23 PM
You could connect everything with the CIA - I don't really care if the CIA had my info - what can they do with me lol

I do care though that Facebook retains the right to keep my info - I don't wana see my picture on some website one day so hopefully I wont!
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Crystal
12-15-2011, 08:25 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
The European Union--and Germany in particular--has much stricter online privacy laws than does the United States.
Yes that is true. I actually did a dissertation on internet law in USA, Iran and Germany. USA is much less strict because of their constitution and the right to free speech etc Germany repsects the right to free speech but not at the costs of hurting others in society e.g Germany bans neo nazi websites while USA doesn't. I like the german model much more.
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islamica
12-15-2011, 09:40 PM
Originally Posted by ardianto
Your picture too? with your name or with someone else name?

Until early of 2011 there were many fake Facebook accounts that produced by human or by "Facebook accounts maker robot". They used fake name names from "Fake name generator", but they used photos from real Facebook accounts. Many of these fake accounts have been disabled, but the rest maybe still active. So, don't be surprised if you find two accounts with different name but same photo.
Mom sues teens over fake Facebook profile of her son

September 25th, 2009

Ah, wasn’t it much simpler when kids just spread outrageous lies about each other through bathroom graffiti?

Instead, four teens allegedly created a Facebook profile for Laura Cook’s son. The page, which featured the teen’s name, photo and cell phone number, claimed that the boy was having sex with other boys and made racist remarks, including one about President Barack Obama. The fake profile might have been nasty and crude, but it was popular, quickly collecting at least 580 online friends.

The page has since been taken down, but Cook, a Chicago-area mom, isn’t satisfied. She filed a lawsuit this week in a county circuit court, claiming that her son was defamed and his reputation damaged, the Chicago Tribune reported.

The lawsuit lists the teen defendants only by their initials, R.C., A.G., K.Z., and M.S. Cook is asking for unspecified damages.


http://www.minortroubles.com/2009/09...le-of-her-son/
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islamica
12-16-2011, 11:45 PM
What Facebook fails to recognise

Facebook has form for being cavalier with users' privacy, but its new facial recognition software has truly dangerous implications

Beth Wellington - 14 June 2011

Remember the uproar in 2009 when Facebook made your list of friends, pages you are a fan of, gender, geographic region and networks publicly available to everyone? Now, the social networking behemoth has silently enabled facial recognition software without your permission under the rather benign tag "Suggest photos of me to friends." Even if you choose to disable the option, Facebook still will have the technical ability to connect your name with your image.

Mark Zuckerberg might say his company is just evolving on privacy – witness his comments in this video interview that:

"We view it as our role in the system to constantly be innovating and be updating what our system is to reflect what the current social norms are."

Contrast this with his former claims that privacy is "the vector around which Facebook operates".

Imagine if, in the name this vector, his company had labelled the new feature "facial recognition photo tags" and required users to opt in, rather than disable it after the fact. Methinks Zuckerberg would have had fewer takers.

But already, the deck is stacked against privacy. As media activist Cory Doctorow noted in a TED lecture, Facebook employs "very powerful game-like mechanisms to reward to disclosure – it embodies BF's Skinner's famous thought experiment, the notion of the Skinner box … lavish[ing] you with attention from the people that you love … in service to a business model that cashes in the precious material of our social lives." Is this new feature really designed to make the site more useful to users or to boost its commercial value as it nears an initial public stock offering?

As Joan Goodchild, senior editor of CSO (chief security officer) Online, noted to me:

"Many privacy advocates feel Facebook needs to do a better job of educating folks about what the new feature is, what it does, and how to opt in or out. Many also feel a user should always be opted out of new features automatically, and should then have to opt in themselves. But it is often the other way around when Facebook rolls out these features."

My concerns go deeper: once users unwittingly make data available to third parties, however temporarily, the cat is out of the bag and beyond retrieval. And it's not just this constant meddling with our settings that's releasing our information – there are also security holes, not to mention scams and release of our data by third-party apps, which the Wall Street Journal found "were sending Facebook ID numbers to at least 25 advertising and data firms, several of which build profiles of internet users by tracking their online activities". More recently, Facebook was adding apps to our profiles that we hadn't requested and which we were unable to permanently disable.

And these front doors – and also back doors – are available for governments, including our own, which has been surveilling such security "risks" as the Quakers and calling Virginia opponents of mountaintop removal "terrorists" (pdf) (while excluding the Ku Klux Klan). There are already huge government-controlled facial databases: your photo on your driver's licence, government-issued identity card, travel visa and passport ends up in a government office. If the government wants to see a photo of your face, it often wouldn't need Facebook to get it. But Facebook's facial recognition feature certainly adds data points and a social graph. As Bruce Schneier, chief security technology officer of BT wrote me:

"Right now, Facebook has the largest collection of identified photos outside of governments. I don't think we know what the ramifications of that will be."

All this reminds me of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report: the 2002 film, based on a 1958 short story by Philip K Dick, featured law enforcement preventing "precrimes" and corporations bombarding passersby with holographic advertisements which crawled up the sides of walls, addressing them by name.

Goodchild recently listed some of the hidden dangers of Facebook. And this is nothing new. As early as 2005 (the year after Facebook's rollout), MIT students were already detailing (pdf) what they saw as Facebook's threats to privacy:

"Users disclose too much, Facebook does not take adequate steps to protect user privacy, and third parties are actively seeking out end-user information using Facebook."

Facial recognition on Facebook arrived with no notice in the US, unless you kept up with the social network's blog last December. The feature came to general light last week, when Facebook extended the feature to other countries and European regulators started investigating.

In the US, Congressman Edward Markey (Democrat, Massachusetts), co-chairman of the bipartisan congressional privacy caucus, has complained:

"Requiring users to disable this feature after they've already been included by Facebook is no substitute for an opt-in process … If this new feature is as useful as Facebook claims, it should be able to stand on its own, without an automatic sign-up that changes users' privacy settings without their permission."

Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Centre (Epic), spearheaded a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission on 10 June that Facebook's deployment of facial recognition software rises to the level of "unfair and deceptive trade practices". Joining Epic were the Centre for Digital Democracy, Consumer Watchdog and the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, all of which asked (pdf) "the commission to investigate Facebook, determine the extent of the harm to consumer privacy and safety, require Facebook to cease collection and use of users' biometric data without their affirmative opt-in consent, require Facebook to give users meaningful control over their personal information, establish appropriate security safeguards, limit the disclosure of user information to third parties, and seek appropriate injunctive and compensatory relief." Facebook has responded to the FTC complaint, with the statement:

"We have heard the comments from some regulators about this product feature and we are providing them with additional information which we are confident will satisfy any concerns they will have."

Facebook provides valuable ways to stay in touch with our friends and families, to network with our colleagues and customers and to coordinate activism. But is hypervisibility really in our best interest, and shouldn't we be the ones making the decisions about what to disclose? Markey submitted legislation (pdf) in May outlawing the tracking of children online. He might need to add something for adults.

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Nate
12-17-2011, 12:45 AM
I hate and love Facebook I have one account and its a business account not personal, I make a living online so naturally I have to have one for work. also I do a lot of research, missing persons tracking, scam researching, bail jumpers, I have found a ton of people with facebook, twitter, & myspace. This is why I my real name is never seen online LOL
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islamica
12-18-2011, 03:23 AM
7.5 million Facebook users are under 13: study

5/10/2011

WASHINGTON — Some 7.5 million of the 20 million minors who used Facebook in the past year were younger than 13, and a million of them were bullied, harassed or threatened on the site, says a study released Tuesday.

Even more troubling, more than five million Facebook users were 10 years old or younger, and they were allowed to use Facebook largely without parental supervision leaving them vulnerable to threats ranging from malware to sexual predators, the State of the Net survey by Consumer Reports found.

Facebook's terms of service require users to be at least 13 years old but many children, or their parents, get around that rule by giving a false birth date when they sign up for the social networking site.

Parents of kids 10 and younger who use Facebook "seem to be largely unconcerned" by their children's use of the site, possibly because they think a young child is less vulnerable to Internet risks, the study says.

But while a 10-year-old might not download pornography on the Internet, he or she does "need protection from other hazards that might lurk on the Internet, such as links that infect their computer with malware and invitations from strangers, not to mention bullies," the study says.

More than five million US households have been exposed in the past year to "some type of abuse" via Facebook, including virus infections, identity theft and bullying, says the study, for which 2,089 US households were interviewed earlier this year.

Consumer Reports urged parents to delete their pre-teens' Facebook accounts -- or ask Facebook to do so by using the site's "report an underage child" form -- and to monitor teenage kids' accounts by friending them or keeping an eye on their activity via siblings' or friends' Facebook pages.

It also called on Facebook to "beef up its screening to drastically reduce the number of underage members."

Facebook was not immediately available for comment.



http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...666cf41808dc7d 84a13a2cd4ccc112e.741



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Docs warn about Facebook use and teen depression

03/28/2011

CHICAGO, Illinois — Add "Facebook depression" to potential harms linked with social media, an influential doctors' group warns, referring to a condition it says may affect troubled teens who obsess over the online site.

Researchers disagree on whether it's simply an extension of depression some kids feel in other circumstances, or a distinct condition linked with using the online site.

But there are unique aspects of Facebook that can make it a particularly tough social landscape to navigate for kids already dealing with poor self-esteem, said Dr. Gwenn O'Keeffe, a Boston-area pediatrician and lead author of new American Academy of Pediatrics social media guidelines.

With in-your-face friends' tallies, status updates and photos of happy-looking people having great times, Facebook pages can make some kids feel even worse if they think they don't measure up.

It can be more painful than sitting alone in a crowded school cafeteria or other real-life encounters that can make kids feel down, O'Keeffe said, because Facebook provides a skewed view of what's really going on. Online, there's no way to see facial expressions or read body language that provide context.

The guidelines urge pediatricians to encourage parents to talk with their kids about online use and to be aware of Facebook depression, cyberbullying, sexting and other online risks. They were published online Monday in Pediatrics.

Abby Abolt, 16, a Chicago high school sophomore and frequent Facebook user, says the site has never made her feel depressed, but that she can understand how it might affect some kids.

"If you really didn't have that many friends and weren't really doing much with your life, and saw other peoples' status updates and pictures and what they were doing with friends, I could see how that would make them upset," she said.

"It's like a big popularity contest — who can get the most friend requests or get the most pictures tagged," she said.

Also, it's common among some teens to post snotty or judgmental messages on the Facebook walls of people they don't like, said Gaby Navarro, 18, a senior from Grayslake, Illinois. It's happened to her friends, and she said she could imagine how that could make some teens feel depressed.

"Parents should definitely know" about these practices," Navarro said. "It's good to raise awareness about it."

The academy guidelines note that online harassment "can cause profound psychosocial outcomes," including suicide. The widely publicized suicide of a 15-year-old Massachusetts girl last year occurred after she'd been bullied and harassed, in person and on Facebook.

"Facebook is where all the teens are hanging out now. It's their corner store," O'Keeffe said...


http://technology.inquirer.net/infot...een-depression


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Mom on Facebook sentenced in son's drowning death

4/15/2011

GREELEY, Colo. (AP) — A northern Colorado woman who was playing a game on Facebook while her 13-month-old baby drowned in a bathtub was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison.

Shannon Johnson, 34, of Fort Lupton, cried as District Judge Thomas Quammen told her he didn't think she was a bad person or that she killed her son on purpose, the Greeley Tribune reported. But, he added, that doesn't mean her action wasn't criminal.

"You left this little boy in a bathtub so you could entertain yourself on the computer by playing games," Quammen said. "And you left that 13-month-old human being, little Joseph, incredibly for those reasons."

Johnson pleaded guilty in March to negligently causing the death of her child. The charge carried a sentencing range of four to 12 years, but it also left open the possibility of alternative sentencing, which means she might have avoided spending time behind bars. Authorities rejected that option, saying they didn't want to play down the seriousness of her crime.

According to court documents, Johnson put her son in the tub for his bath a little after 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 20. She then left him unsupervised as she went to another room to share videos, check status updates and play Café World on Facebook.

When she returned to the bathroom, she found Joseph sideways and face-down in the water.

Johnson called 911 to say Joseph wasn't breathing. Paramedics were able to revive the toddler but he was pronounced dead at a Denver hospital.

According to the affidavit, Johnson told police the boy "wanted to be left alone" and was a very "independent baby." She also told police she knew what it was like to be told "no," and she did not want her baby to be told "no." The affidavit says she also did not want him to be known as a "mama's boy."

Johnson told police she gave the boy a bath every day — sometimes twice a day. She said that on the day Joseph died, the water level might have been higher than usual.

Johnson told police she had been leaving Joseph in the bathtub alone for weeks.

Johnson also told authorities that her son had a seizure at his grandmother's house a month earlier and had been given anti-seizure medication in case it happened again. Doctors didn't diagnose the cause of the seizure and there were no other occurrences, Johnson said.

The investigation into the boy's death was delayed while investigators waited for the final autopsy report. That report came back Jan. 3. It said the baby died of anoxic brain injury, cardiac arrest and drowning, according to the arrest affidavit. Johnson was arrested days later.

She was also sentenced to five years of mandatory parole following her incarceration.

Weld County Undersheriff Margie Martinez told KMGH-TV in Denver that Johnson's mother said she had warned her daughter of the danger of leaving the toddler unattended in water just days before he drowned.

"She told her she wouldn't do it anymore," Martinez said.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...ocId=46deb2a53 d354c0e91a28cc3af971866
Reply

islamica
12-18-2011, 07:22 PM

How Facebook Has Changed Sex


By: Carolyn Kylstra

Several months ago, a male colleague of mine received this Facebook message from a long-ago high school girlfriend: "I know you're happily married, and so am I. But if you're ever in Houston, look me up. We could have some fun . . . no strings attached."

Another guy I know received three sexual propositions on Facebook in a week—two from strangers, and one from a woman he used to work with. The former coworker, who was in a serious relationship at the time, sent my friend this private message: "Is it terrible if I told you that I really want to b_ _ _ you?"

Let's be clear here: Women aren't nearly as forward as men. The unsolicited messages in my own inbox, from strangers and former boyfriends alike, belong in the pages of a bodice-ripping romance novel. Facebook, it seems, has unleashed everyone's inner freak.

And now we have a new survey of almost 3,000 people—1,377 men and 1,540 women—to prove it.

Most surprising stats

24 Percentage of people who don't list their true relationship status . . . so they can keep their "options" open or continue flirting with others.

27% of Facebookers don't list their relationship status at all; only half of these people are single.


70 Percentage of people who say they've used Facebook to flirt.

24% of Facebook-flirters use the social network to flirt with someone other than their current partner.


59 Percentage of people who say they've become jealous over their partner's interactions with someone else on Facebook.

New research from Amy Muise, a Ph.D. candidate in applied social psychology at the University of Guelph, indicates that Facebook actually contributes to jealousy, even in people who aren't naturally predisposed to jealousy to begin with.


29 Percentage of people who say that a wall post or Facebook photo has gotten them in trouble with their significant other.

Does your partner have something to hide?

Turns out, 42% say their partner's beef was justified. And 11% of those surveyed have put a significant other on limited profile so that he or she couldn't see everything they did on Facebook (wall posts, comments, photos).


55 Percentage of people who have sent a friend request to someone they were attracted to, but only knew peripherally (a friend of a friend, or an acquaintance).

Is a "friend request" the new pickup line?

23% of people have sent a friend request to an attractive stranger.


85 Percentage of people who have looked up an ex on Facebook.

Is Facebook feeding an obsession?

17% of these users check their ex's Facebook page at least once a week.


59 Percentage of people who have "stalked" an ex or current partner's Facebook profile, looking for clues about their relationships with other people.

Research into Facebook stalking from Ilana Gershon, Ph.D., a professor of communication and culture at Indiana University, reveals that it's rarely "satisfying"—it causes enormous anxiety, but doesn't actually answer any real questions. Because, in the end, it's all out of context. A picture of a man with his arm around a woman can mean any number of things—some nefarious, others entirely innocent.


32 Percentage of women who have tried to reconnect with an ex on Facebook; 16% of these women were in a relationship with someone else at the time.

What about men?
36% of men have tried to reconnect with an ex on Facebook; 1 out of 5 of these men were in a relationship.

Whatever happened to the "It's-not-you-it's-me" routine?
3% of respondents have broken up with someone by canceling their relationship status on Facebook.


23 Percentage of people who have hacked into their significant other's Facebook account to snoop.

Have you changed your password recently?

* 18% of respondents know their partner's passwords. And while 85% were told the password, 16% simply guessed what it was.
* 9% of respondents have hacked into an ex's Facebook account


5 Percentage of respondents who admit that they've cheated on their significant other in a way that involved Facebook.

How do you cheat on Facebook?


We asked our respondents how Facebook led to—or helped facilitate—cheating on their partner. Here's a sample of the feedback we received. And no, we didn't make any of these up. (We didn't have to.)

"I was in a boring relationship and some Facebook flirting ended up with me cheating."

"I have met, and slept with, two men I have met on Facebook."

"Yes, I cheated on my significant other with someone I met via Facebook (the person I cheated with was mutual friends with another one of my close friends)."

"Made plans to meet through Facebook messages."

"There's this guy I've been involved with for years. Although I've dated others during that time as did he, we've been in contact most of the time through Facebook—arranging meetings, expressing feelings for each other, etc."

"Had a hook-up once out of town and stayed in contact via Facebook for a few weeks, and then, eventually, I cut-off all contact."

"I used personal messages to meet up with an ex."



Reply

GuestFellow
12-18-2011, 07:37 PM
I'm not sure what is so special about Facebook to attract so much controversy. Ugh...
Reply

User2024
12-19-2011, 11:52 AM
Let me make this clear people I got facebook but hardly use it. I remember when someone used my account and uploaded my picture it was a fake account but I managed to get it suspended. Facebook do keep pictures of people even if you delete your account. facebook also track your location and such How do you think they know which friends to suggest?

Here is a quote:

Other information we receive about youWe also receive other types of information about you:

  • We receive data about you whenever you interact with Facebook, such as when you look at another person's profile, send someone a message, search for a friend or a Page, click on an advert or purchase Facebook Credits.
  • When you post things like photos or videos on Facebook, we may receive additional related data (or metadata), such as the time, date and place you took the photo or video.
  • We receive data from the computer, mobile phone or other device you use to access Facebook. This may include your IP address, location, the type of browser you use or the pages you visit. For example, we may find your GPS location so we can tell you if any of your friends are nearby.
  • We receive data whenever you visit a game, application or website that uses Facebook Platform, or visit a site with a Facebook feature (such as a social plugin). This may include the date and time you visit the site, the web address or URL you're on, technical information about the IP address, browser and the operating system you use, and, if you are logged in to Facebook, your User ID.
  • Sometimes we get data from our advertising partners, customers and other third parties that helps us (or them) deliver ads, understand online activity, and generally make Facebook better. For example, an advertiser may tell us how you responded to an ad on Facebook or on another site in order to measure the effectiveness of - and improve the quality of - those ads.
See they know where you are!

If you want to stop using your account, you can either
deactivate
or
delete
it.
Deactivate


Deactivating your account puts your account on hold. Other users will no longer see your profile, but we do not delete any of your information. Deactivating an account is the same as you telling us not to delete any information because you might want to reactivate your account at some point in the future.
You can deactivate your account on your account settings page.
Deletion


When you delete an account, it is permanently deleted from Facebook. It typically takes about one month to delete an account, but some information may remain in backup copies and logs for up to 90 days. You should only delete your account if you are sure you never want to reactivate it.
They probably keep the information...

Also I used to develop Facebook applications since you can use their API (Application Program Interface) The API system is so bad that you can actually program it to get people's photos! even if:

They are not your friends
Have privacy on high and don't show photos.

Many sites allowed users to download Facebook pictures just by putting a persons profile id page (URL) in a box and processing it. It's been blocked now but you can still do it.
Reply

islamica
12-19-2011, 06:13 PM
Facebook Menace - What we should do

The issue of Facebook and their latest antics against our Beloved Muhammad sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam has angered and frustrated the Muslim Ummah. The reaction of the Muslim Ummah in the face of such blasphemy is appreciated. This malevolence is not foreign to Islam and the Muslims. During the time of our beloved Muhammad sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam, individuals like Ka’ab Bin Ashraf , Abu Lahab, his wife and others were also guilty of defaming our Prophet sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam. Their fate is known to all.

Our responsibility as Muslims to our beloved Muhammad sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam is as follows:

1. To delete Facebook accounts and any other media that deems it acceptable to disrespect our beloved Rasoolullah sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam and never to reactivate them again.

2. To inform others of the above as well.

3. Deleting facebook is one form of expressing our love for Rasoolullah sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam. However, objective love of Rasoolullah sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam is to inculcate his teachings in our life.


Boycotting that site on principle alone should be enough. But if you want to look at it on monetary value. Facebook makes $2.39 per user visiting their site and having an account, that's how much you are giving to facebook to insult your prophet. Pakistan's internet traffic composed of 25% was going to facebook, so for example let's just say out of the 200+ millions of Pakistanis, even if only 50 million were visiting facebook that's 50 million times 2.39 = $119.5 million dollars facebook is making of Pakistanis alone. What about rest of the Muslims on there? So you see you are supporting the enemies of Allah and His Messenger by having your account there, and well lets just I would rather not be raised as one of them (kuffars) on Judgment Day nor as a supporter of them.

And since Facebook itself refused to do anything at protest of a nation (Pakistan) shows their position on this and I would venture to say it may even be obligatory for us to not have anything to do with that site.


---------------------

How do I permanently delete my account?


If you deactivate your account from the "Deactivate Account" section on the Account page, your profile and all information associated with it are immediately made inaccessible to other Facebook users. What this means is that you effectively disappear from the Facebook service. However, if you want to reactivate at some point, we do save your profile information (friends, photos, interests, etc.), and your account will look just the way it did when you deactivated if you decide to reactivate it. Many users deactivate their accounts for temporary reasons and expect their information to be there when they return to the service.

If you do not think you will use Facebook again and would like your account deleted, please keep in mind that you will not be able to reactivate your account or retrieve any of the content or information you have added. If you would like your account permanently deleted with no option for recovery, log in to your account and then submit your request by clicking here.

If you are currently unable to access your account, you will need to reset your password in order to log in. In order to do so, click the "Forgot your password?" link that appears above the field where you would normally enter your password. Once you’ve followed the instructions to reset your password and can log in, you can deactivate or delete your account using the steps outlined above.
Reply

islamica
12-20-2011, 06:47 AM
The Importance of Thinking Before You Post

by Will Gardner on Tuesday, February 9, 2010 at 1:10am

Today is Safer Internet Day in the European Union, a day that promotes safe and responsible use of the Internet and mobile technologies among young people. We asked Childnet International, a member of Facebook's Safety Advisory Board , and its CEO Will Gardner to share more about this year's theme and how the organization is working with young people on Internet safety.

When young people discuss the future of the Internet and new technologies, a central theme is keeping safe. Many see it as a right.

At Childnet International, we saw this reaction firsthand as part of the recent Youth IGF Project we organized. The project was developed as a way for young people to have a voice at the Internet Governance Forum and to engage in a dialogue with Internet industry and lawmakers. As Thomas, age 12 and one of the participants, explained, "(We want) to have (the) freedom to go on what we want without being restricted, but (to) still be safe on the Internet."




Safer Internet Day is an important event in the Internet safety calendar and provides a great opportunity to showcase some of the key messages about staying safe online. Held for the past four years on the second Tuesday of the second month, Safer Internet Day has grown beyond its origins in the EU and is now celebrated in countries across the world. The theme this year is "Think Before You Post," a vital message not only for children and young people but, let's be honest, adults as well.

In this Web 2.0 world, where people have the ability to instantly communicate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, it is more important than ever to think about your behaviour online to protect yourself and your friends, as well as for the good of the broader Internet community. While the message of "Think Before You Post" is relevant for all age groups, it is particularly important for those who frequently use social media services like Facebook. Information and images online have longevity and an incredible reach, which we need to factor into any decision to post content. We need to think about the possible implications and impact of our posts.

Consider these questions, compiled by the organisers of Safety Internet Day, before your next posting, and if you're a parent, ask your children these questions to help them learn about responsible posting:



    • Are you using the privacy settings offered by social networking services? On Facebook, you can always adjust them on the Privacy Settings page .




    • Are you selecting friends online that you can trust? Remember it's not just about what you post, but how others may use that content.




    • Are you carefully thinking about the potential consequences of publishing your photos before you upload them?




    • Do you ask for permission from your friends before publishing photos of them? A photo that may be funny to you may cause harm for a friend.



"Think Before You Post" is a positive message. It is about taking control of your online safety and participating in the benefits of social media, with respect for yourself and for others.

Obama advises caution in what kids put on Facebook

...Upon arrival at the school, Obama's motorcade was greeted by a small band of protesters. One carried a sign exclaiming: "Mr. President, stay away from our kids."

Obama didn't mention the uproar.

He preceded his broad-scale talk by meeting with about 40 Wakefield students in a school library, where at one point he advised them to "be careful what you post on Facebook. Whatever you do, it will be pulled up again later somewhere in your life."...





http://www.modernghana.com/news/2371...a-warns-u.html
Reply

islamica
12-20-2011, 08:41 PM
Taking a close look at Facebook




Voluntary surveillance


When Alexander Solzhenitsyn was arrested by Stalin's political police, his captors got lost.

Solzhenitsyn, a war hero (Stalin distrusted and hated war heroes), showed them how to read the map and get to where they were going.

That's what millions of Americans are doing now.

Putting far more personal information that they should about themselves online for easy mining.

Facebook....

Facebook claims over 100,000,000 access their accounts every day.

visit: http://www.brasschecktv.com/page/603.html


------------------

Facebook has "more than 350 million people around the world are using Facebook to share their lives online."











http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=190423927130
Reply

User2024
12-20-2011, 08:48 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
Taking a close look at Facebook





Voluntary surveillance




When Alexander Solzhenitsyn was arrested by Stalin's political police, his captors got lost.

Solzhenitsyn, a war hero (Stalin distrusted and hated war heroes), showed them how to read the map and get to where they were going.

That's what millions of Americans are doing now.

Putting far more personal information that they should about themselves online for easy mining.

Facebook....

Facebook claims over 100,000,000 access their accounts every day.

visit: http://www.brasschecktv.com/page/603.html


------------------

Facebook has "more than 350 million people around the world are using Facebook to share their lives online."



















I remember once when burglar robbed a house and logged in two Facebook ( in the house he was robbing) but forgot to log off, the police caught him lol....
Reply

islamica
12-20-2011, 08:50 PM
Originally Posted by PoweredByGoogle
I remember once when burglar robbed a house and logged in two Facebook ( in the house he was robbing) but forgot to log off, the police caught him lol....
Yea, facebook addiction articles are coming up soon also!
Reply

User2024
12-20-2011, 08:57 PM
Originally Posted by Crystal
You could connect everything with the CIA - I don't really care if the CIA had my info - what can they do with me lol

I do care though that Facebook retains the right to keep my info - I don't wana see my picture on some website one day so hopefully I wont!
What can the CIA do? well for a start they could spy on you, watch everything you do pin stuff on you. for example if you were a Muslim they could be monitoring you and blame some terrorism stuff on you! I am sure they do it, it currently exists > like Barba Ahmeds Case...
Reply

islamica
12-21-2011, 05:13 PM
How Safe Are You on Facebook?

By IOL Health & Science Staff

One of the most popular applications on Facebook was revived after being shut down over a week ago. The Top Friends application, which has more than 1 million active users according to the application's statistics, was taken down as a result of privacy violations. The application allowed people to view partial profiles of anyone else on Facebook exposing personal information such as birth date and relationship status.

This latest incident, again, brings up the issue of privacy risks posed by the popular social-networking site. By personalizing your page with small software programs known as widgets or applications, you could be inadvertently giving out your personal information to the software developers, who could then use this information to harm or at the very least irritate users.

Since Facebook began allowing outside developers to create these downloadable mini programs about a year ago, around 24,000 applications have been developed. More than 95 percent of Facebook users have at least one of these applications installed.

Did you ever consider the privacy risks involved in adding those widgets to your Facebook account? Do you think that developers can abuse your personal information, or are there benefits to this that makes it a risk worth taking?


For those (especially women) who want to protect their private information and pictures, should think hard about what is shown below.

Below is a permission access page for adding an application on a facebook account. Whenever you add any application/game/poll on your facebook account then you are prompted to give permission. You give permission to the third party to use any information about you on your account and your pictures as they see fit, not only that but whenever you give permission you also give permission for them to use anything from everyone of your friends on your account. Even if you do not give permission or add such applications, your information and pictures are still available for them to use because of your friends giving permission for these applications.

Reply

islamica
12-22-2011, 05:13 PM
No such thing as "deleted" on the Internet

May 21, 2009



It's always fun to write about research that you can actually try out for yourself.

Try this: Take a photo and upload it to Facebook, then after a day or so, note what the URL to the picture is (the actual photo, not the page on which the photo resides), and then delete it. Come back a month later and see if the link works. Chances are: It will.

Facebook isn't alone here. Researchers at Cambridge University (so you know this is legit, people!) have found that nearly half of the social networking sites don't immediately delete pictures when a user requests they be removed. In general, photo-centric websites like Flickr were found to be better at quickly removing deleted photos upon request.

Why do "deleted" photos stick around so long? The problem relates to the way data is stored on large websites: While your personal computer only keeps one copy of a file, large-scale services like Facebook rely on what are called content delivery networks to manage data and distribution. It's a complex system wherein data is copied to multiple intermediate devices, usually to speed up access to files when millions of people are trying to access the service simultaneously. (Yahoo! Tech is served by dozens of servers, for example.) But because changes aren't reflected across the CDN immediately, ghost copies of files tend to linger for days or weeks.

In the case of Facebook, the company says data may hang around until the URL in question is reused, which is usually "after a short period of time." Though obviously that time can vary considerably.

Of course, once a photo escapes from the walled garden of a social network like Facebook, the chances of deleting it permanently fall even further. Google's caching system is remarkably efficient at archiving copies of web content, long after it's removed from the web. Anyone who's ever used Google Image Search can likely tell you a story about clicking on a thumbnail image, only to find that the image has been deleted from the website in question -- yet the thumbnail remains on Google for months. And then there are services like the Wayback Machine, which copy entire websites for posterity, archiving data and pictures forever.

The lesson: Those drunken party photos you don't want people to see? Simply don't upload them to the web, ever, because trying to delete them after you sober up is a tough proposition.

http://tech.yahoo.com/blogs/null/142366

Reply

islamica
12-27-2011, 08:29 PM
Want privacy on Facebook? Here is how to get some

December 17, 2009


Over the past week, Facebook has been nudging its users - first gently, then firmly - to review and update their privacy settings.

You may have procrastinated by hitting "skip for now," but Facebook eventually took away that button and forced you to update your settings before continuing to use the site.

After finally accepting Facebook's recommendations or tweaking the privacy settings yourself, though, you might have made more information about you public than what you had intended.

At the same time, Facebook has given users many granular controls over their privacy, more than what's available on other major social networks.

So if you want to stay out of people's view, but still want to be on Facebook, here are some things to look out for as you take another look at your settings.

1. Some of your information is viewable by everyone.

Everyone can see your name, your profile photo and the names of work and school networks you're part of. Ditto for pages you are a fan of. If you are worried about a potential employer finding out about a quirky fetish or unorthodox political leaning, avoid becoming a Facebook fan of such groups. You can't tell Facebook you don't want those publicly listed. Your gender and current city are also available, if you choose to specify them. You can uncheck "Show my sex in my profile" when you edit your profile if you don't want it listed, and you can leave "Current City" blank.

2. Your list of friends may also be public.

Facebook also considers your friends list publicly available information. Privacy advocates worry that much can be gleaned from a person's list of friends - even sexual orientation, according to one MIT study. But there is a way to hide the list. Go to your profile page and click on the little blue pencil icon on the top right of your box of friends. Uncheck "Show Friend List to everyone." Either way, those you are already friends with can always see your full list.

3. You can hide yourself from Web searches.

There is a section for "Search" under Facebook's privacy settings page, which is accessible from the top right corner of the Web site under "Settings." If you click the "Allow" box next to "Public Search Results," the information that Facebook deems publicly available (such as photo, fan pages and list of friends), along with anything else you have made available to everyone, will show up when someone looks up your name on a search engine such as Google. The stuff you've limited access to in your profile will not show up.

This is useful if you want people you've lost touch with, or potential work contacts, to be able to find your Facebook page. If you'd rather not be found, uncheck this box.

A second setting, controlling searches within Facebook, lets you refine who can find you once that person has logged on. Limit searches to friends only if you think you have all the friends you need and don't want anyone to find you when they type in your name to Facebook.

4. Beware of third-party applications.

Quizzes and games are fun, but each time you take one, you first authorize it to access your profile information, even if you have made that available only to your friends. You're also letting the app access some information on your friends.

Under "Application Settings," Facebook lists all the apps you have opened your profile up to. If you no longer want to authorize access to "Which Golden Girl Are You?" you can always remove it by clicking on the "X" next to its name. Apps you use regularly, such as Facebook for Android if you update your status from your mobile phone, should stay.

Next, by clicking on "Applications and Websites" on the privacy settings page, you can edit whether your friends can share your birthday, photos and other specific information. Remember that applications can access your "publicly available information" no matter what.

The security firm Sophos recommends users set their privacy settings for two of Facebook's own popular applications, notes and photos, to friends only.

5. Go over your list of friends.

The average Facebook user has 130 friends. But many people interact with a much smaller group when commenting on status updates, photos and links. So it doesn't hurt to occasionally review your list of your friends to get an idea of just who can view your status posts, vacation photos and funny links you've shared over the years. Don't feel obligated to add anyone as a friend, even if that person adds you first. For professional acquaintance you don't want to snub, send them to a LinkedIn profile you can set up. Some workplaces and schools have rules about Facebook interactions between bosses and employees or students and teachers.

6. Create custom friends groups.

If you have friended a lot of people, sort them. Think of the groups you interact with in real life - co-workers, college buddies, girlfriends, grandma and grandpa - and organize your Facebook friends in these groups, too. Go to "All Friends" under the "Friends" button up top, click on "Create New List" and fire away. Then decide what aspects of your profile, and which status posts and photos, these people will have access to. Or, simply create a "limited" list for acquaintances or distant relatives and limit their access.

7. Customize your status posts.

Type "I'm hungry" into your status update box. Click on the little lock icon. You'll see a range of privacy controls pop up, letting you either allow or limit access to the post. If you want, you can even hide it from everyone by clicking "Only Me" under the custom settings. Click on "Save Setting." Repeat with each post, or create a default setting for most updates and increase or decrease privacy as you see fit.

8. Let your friends know you have boundaries - in person.

Many of us have woken up on a Sunday morning to find that an overzealous friend has posted dozens of photos from that wild party we barely remembered - the good, the bad and the hideous. Chances are, they didn't do this to embarrass you, though if they did you have bigger problems. Rather, they probably don't know that you don't want these photos posted. Sure, tweak your photo privacy settings on Facebook. But if someone starts snapping pictures of you at a party, ask them to check with you before posting it anywhere.

9. Never assume complete privacy.

Even for the most tech-savvy person, unflattering photos, incriminating text messages or angry status posts about work have a way of worming their way out in the open. Just saying.

http://www.physorg.com/news180290362.html

------------------------------------------------------


Facebook CEO Zuckerberg causes stir over privacy

One privacy advocate contends Facebook is pushing users to expect less privacy (see video, below)

By Sharon Gaudin
January 11, 2010 05:28 PM ET

Computerworld - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's contention last week that privacy is becoming less important to online users caused a stir across the Internet and among privacy advocates.

Zuckerberg told an audience at the 2009 Crunchies Awards ceremonies in San Francisco on Friday that social norms are changing and people don't expect or want nearly as much privacy as they have in the past.

"When we got started, the question people asked was, 'Why would I want to put any information on the Internet?'," he said during the presentation of awards to top online startups and makers of innovative technology.

"In the last five or six years, blogging has taken off in a huge way. People have really gotten comfortable sharing more information and different kinds but more openly and with more people," Zuckerberg added.

Zuckerberg went on to say that Facebook has been changing its privacy structure to conform to users' changing preferences. "We view it as our role in the system to constantly be innovating and updating our system to reflect what the current social norms are," he said.

The blogosphere and industry pundits today were lit up with stories about criticizing Zuckerberg's statements on online privacy.

Facebook contends Zuckerberg's statements were blown out of proportion and were "mischaracterized" and "sensationalized" by some pundits.

"He observed that social norms on the Internet are changing and that Facebook is responding, including by offering people more and better tools to decide what to share and with whom," wrote a Facebook spokesperson in an e-mail to Computerworld. "Clearly, people are sharing much more information far more broadly than ever before through blogs, comments on stories, Facebook, Twitter and many other services. A core part of Facebook's mission has always been to deliver the tools that empower people with control over their information."

Kevin Bankston, a senior staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, told Computerworld that he was surprised and concerned about Zuckerberg's statements, especially since Facebook itself has been helping to erode the sense of privacy of its users.

"I think it's rather disingenuous [to talk about how social norms are changing] rather than take responsibility for how Facebook's actions shape social norms," said Bankston. "Facebook is pushing those social norms in a direction more profitable for Facebook."

http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...?taxonomyId=16
Reply

Signor
12-28-2011, 04:01 PM
Something I know about FitnaBook is that they track your IP even you logged out.Like make two accounts on fb,do the same type of activity on each account i.e open webs of similar interest and sooner or later you will find your own accounts on suggestions.This is just a small thing considering pedophiles and many others on fitnabook
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-28-2011, 04:09 PM
Oh God, will this never end. Once upon a time there were other social networking sites...I guess FB is popular in it's usage that it's all people talk about. Don't forget, there are other avenues for fitnah. FB is fitnah, for sure but are people really oblivious to its negatives? Not really...
Reply

GuestFellow
12-28-2011, 09:41 PM
Why don't we just ban the Internet. That will solve all of our problems.
Reply

Beardo
12-28-2011, 09:43 PM
For those who complain, the solution is just as Tragic Typos said above.

Khair insha-Allah.
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-28-2011, 09:55 PM
^^I've said this repeatedly in the past but only get mocked for that statement lol. Whatever :/
Reply

islamica
12-29-2011, 01:40 AM
Originally Posted by Tragic Typos
Why don't we just ban the Internet. That will solve all of our problems.
common response from the blind who refuse to listen to reason or truth.

Originally Posted by Light of Heaven
I guess FB is popular in it's usage that it's all people talk about. Don't forget, there are other avenues for fitnah. FB is fitnah, for sure but are people really oblivious to its negatives? Not really...
You are welcome to do as you please. This thread is for everyone to see the ills of FB. Like alcohol, there is little good in it but the evil out weighs more than good but people either are ignorant of it or choose to be blind to it.

Oh God, will this never end. Once upon a time there were other social networking sites...
There is potential of evil use in everything. FB has lot more issues then other sites, issues related to privacy, people behind the sites working with intelligence agencies and the sheeples foolishly updating their databases for them.


MySpace: 90,000 Sex Offenders Purged From Web Site

February 04, 2009

RALEIGH, N.C. — About 90,000 sex offenders have been identified and removed from the social networking Web site MySpace, company and law enforcement officials said Tuesday.

The number was nearly double what MySpace officials originally estimated last year, said North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper, who along with Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal has led efforts to make social networking Web sites safer for young users.

Cooper said he wasn't surprised by the updated numbers, and demanded that MySpace and rival online networking site Facebook — which claim to have more than 280 million users combined — do more to protect children and teenagers.

"These sites were created for young people to communicate with each other. Predators are going to troll in these areas where they know children are going to be," Cooper said. "That's why these social networking sites have the responsibility to make their sites safe for children."

The attorneys general received agreements last year from MySpace and Facebook to push toward making their sites safer.

Both sites implemented dozens of safeguards, including finding better ways to verify user's ages, banning convicted sex offenders from using the sites and limiting the ability of older users to search members under 18.

Blumenthal, who received MySpace's updated numbers Tuesday through a subpoena, said the information "provides compelling proof that social networking sites remain rife with sexual predators."

A preliminary number of sex offenders found on Facebook was "substantial," but he said the company has yet to respond to a recent subpoena.

MySpace executives said they were confident in the technology they use to find, remove and block registered sex offenders.

The company uses Sentinel SAFE, a database it created in 2006 with the names, physical descriptions and other identifiable characteristics of sex offenders that cross-references against MySpace members.

"Sentinel SAFE is the best industry solution to ensure these offenders are removed from social networks," Hemanshu Nigam, the company's chief security officer, said in a statement Tuesday.

MySpace has more than 130 million active users worldwide.

A spokesman for Facebook, which claims more than 150 million active users (currrently 350 million), said Tuesday that protecting its users has always been a priority.

"We have a policy prohibiting registered sex offenders from joining Facebook," said spokesman Barry Schnitt. "We are glad to be able to report that we have not yet had to handle a case of a registered sex offender meeting a minor through Facebook. We are working hard to make sure it never happens."

Still, Cooper said more should be done.

"Technology moves forward quickly, and it's important for these companies to stay ahead of the technology," he said. "And they're not moving fast enough for us."

The push for better restrictions came during a time when social-networking Web sites were seeing exponential growth, with most of it coming in the form of younger users. But along with the younger members came sexual predators who would lie about their age to lure young victims.

Blumenthal and Cooper, who co-chair the State Attorney General Task Force on Social Networking, have led the charge for tougher restrictions to be placed on who joins online social-networking sites.

The Internet Safety Technical Task Force report, commissioned by the attorneys general in 2008, researched ways to help squash the onslaught of sexual predators targeting younger social-networking clients.

Enhancing Child Safety & Online Technologies, a report by the task force submitted to attorneys general in December, noted was no surefire way to guarantee online child safety.

The task force also played down fears of Internet sexual predators who target children on social-networking sites. While citing other dangers such as online bullying, the panel said cases of predators typically involved youths well aware they were meeting an adult for sexual activities.

But Cooper said the danger posed by sexual preditors online remains.

"Our law enforcement officers investigating these cases tell us that predators are soliciting children on the Internet and in social networking sites," Cooper said. "We're working to provide more law enforcement to protect our kids, but social networking sites and technology companies must do their part as well."

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,.../cybersecurity



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Officials: 29,000 Registered Sex Offenders on MySpace


July 25, 2007

RALEIGH, N.C. — MySpace.com has found more than 29,000 registered sex offenders with profiles on the popular social networking Web site — more than four times the number cited by the company two months ago, officials in two states Tuesday.

North Carolina's Roy Cooper is one of several attorneys general who recently demanded the News Corp. -owned Web site provide data on how many registered sex offenders were using the popular social networking site, along with information about where they live.

After initially withholding the information, citing federal privacy laws, MySpace began sharing the information in May after the states filed formal legal requests.

At the time, MySpace said it had already used a database it helped create to remove about 7,000 profiles of sex offenders, out of a total of about 180 million profiles on the site.
Cooper's office said Tuesday, however, that now the figure has risen past 29,000.

"I'm absolutely astonished and appalled because the number has grown so exponentially over so short of time with no explanation," said Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, who also had pressed the company earlier for sex offender data.

MySpace declined to comment on the figure, focusing instead on its efforts to clean up its profile rolls.

"We're pleased that we've successfully identified and removed registered sex offenders from our site and hope that other social networking sites follow our lead," MySpace chief security officer Hemanshu Nigam said in a prepared statement.

Cooper is pushing for a state law that would require children to receive parental permission before creating social networking profiles, and require the Web sites to verify the parents' identity and age.

For example, social networking sites would have to compare information provided by a parent with commercial databases. Sites could also force parents to submit credit cards or printed forms.

Cooper is working with law enforcement officials in other states in pressuring MySpace to use age and identity verification methods voluntarily.

Based on media reports, Cooper's office found more than 100 criminal incidents this year of adults using MySpace to prey or attempt to prey on children.

Most recently, a Virginia man pleaded guilty Monday to kidnapping and soliciting a 14-year old girl he met on MySpace.

"All we're doing is giving parents the right to make a choice whether their children can go online," Cooper told a state House committee considering the bill on parental involvement and verification.

He said the measure would lead to "fewer children at risk, because there will be fewer children on those Web sites."

Advocates for Internet companies and privacy issues testified against the proposed restrictions, saying the broad parental verification standards would be found unconstitutional because they prohibit free speech or impede interstate commerce.

The experts who testified also said Cooper's idea isn't foolproof, because children could fabricate their parents' information and purported consent.

The parental verification requirement "makes promises to consumers that cannot be kept. It is dangerous language," said Emily Hackett, executive director of the Washington-based Internet Alliance, whose clients include Time Warner Inc.'s (TWX) AOL, Yahoo Inc. (YHOO) and VeriSign Inc. (VRSN ) "There is no way to eyeball a user."

The bill has already passed the North Carolina Senate. Now it goes to a House subcommittee for more consideration.

State Sen. Walter Dalton, a Democrat who is a primary sponsor of the bill, acknowledged that it won't stop all sexual predators from getting on social networking sites. But he said it addresses a problem that shouldn't be ignored, Dalton said.

"There is obviously a compelling state interest to protect our children from sexual predators," he said.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,.../cybersecurity


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Mom, Sex Offender Sentenced in Teen Girl Sex Case


July 23, 2007

MOUNT CLEMENS, Mich. — A man who had sex with a 14-year-old girl with her mother's permission was sentenced Monday to up to 15 years in prison.

Macomb County Circuit Court Judge Matthew Switalski sentenced 21-year-old Christopher M. Garcia to six to 15 years on each of two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct. Garcia also was sentenced to two to four years for failing to register as a sex offender.

Sentences for each of the charges will run at the same time.

Garcia pleaded guilty to the charges June 25.

The girl is pregnant for a third time and living in foster care. Police said she had two earlier miscarriages.

Prosecutors say her 35-year-old mother let Garcia have sex with the girl in their home in the Detroit suburb of Utica. Another man, James E. Przeadzki, also had sex with her daughter's 14-year-old friend in the home, authorities say.

Przeadzki, 21, pleaded guilty June 14 to assault with intent to commit sexual penetration. He was sentenced to nine months in jail and three years' probation.\\

The girl's mother received two years' probation after pleading guilty May 24 to misdemeanor child abuse.

Her daughter was 13 when she fled to Indiana last year with another man she met on the popular MySpace.com. She claimed she was 18 in her Internet postings and the man was not charged.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,290408,00.html
Reply

Beardo
12-29-2011, 02:00 AM
Originally Posted by Light of Heaven
^^I've said this repeatedly in the past but only get mocked for that statement lol. Whatever :/
Well, that's sad. It's true - just be on your guard. Facebook is for people you KNOW, not people you want to meet or hook up with, as in many cases.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-29-2011, 04:53 AM
Well does it specifically say that? lol. I wouldnt know. Same for any other thing where you come across people...be on your guard..no offense but on this forum too. Doesnt matter how proper this place is..you dont know whos lurking behind that screen.
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islamica
12-29-2011, 06:11 PM
Data mining and social networks

Story by Mark Whitehorn, 28-07-2009

At what point does our data become information that belongs to the social networking site we've placed it on?

Last month I tried to convince you that for the first time in history it is possible to analyse in great detail how people interact socially. The Facebooks and Bebos of this world are essentially large databases that record how people interact, so they are eminently amenable to analysis in manifold ways. As an example, it is possible to identify individuals or classes of individual who have significantly more influence on their peers than normal. Such people are clearly a much more cost effective target for advertisers than average members of the general public.

There are many other examples so it is clear that the social networking sites are goldmines ripe for data mining (or perhaps datamines ripe for gold mining.) However, of course, this couldn’t ever happen in practice - could it? Surely there are all sorts of protections in place and the social networking sites are not able to sell the data they hold… are they?

Sadly this is already the source of considerable controversy. In late 2007 Facebook proudly announced Beacon to the world. Beacon essentially tracked a member’s purchases on other sites and pushed that information to friends of the member. Within a month Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook’s Founder and CEO) had to issue an apology and since then the company has been dogged by concerns about how it is using data.

From my point of view (as one who is not so interested in privacy as in the relationship between data and information) the concerns expressed so far seem to have skirted a more fundamental issue. At what point does our data become information that belongs to the social networking site?

Consider a generic Social Networking Site called SNS. It runs a data mining algorithm on its database and uncovers the fascinating information that males who:
  • are 25 years old
  • earn more than £30K
  • party more than once a month
  • have fewer than three female friends

are very, very likely to buy a sports car within three months.

If SNS supplies this finding (without any personal details) to a car manufacturer has it supplied personal data in breach of confidentiality? I would argue (as a database person, not a barrister) that this information belongs to SNS so there is no breach.

Now let’s make it slightly more controversial. Suppose SNS does the same but supplies a list of those individuals complete with contact details. In one sense all SNS has done is to filter the list of all its users (say, 100 million) into a list of, say, 5,000. SNS can argue that it has simply used its own information to filter data that is already in the public domain. Or we can argue that our privacy has been violated. I don’t pretend to know how the law would see this, but I do think these are interesting questions.

http://www.server-management.co.uk/v...ocial_networks
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islamica
12-29-2011, 06:19 PM
Activists hijack Facebook groups 'to expose holes'

11/11/2009

SAN FRANCISCO (AFP) - – Activists claimed to have seized control of nearly 300 Facebook community groups in a self-proclaimed effort to expose how vulnerable online reputations are to tampering.

A group called "Control Your Info" (CYI) claimed credit for commandeering 289 Facebook groups, saying it was simple to get into poorly-protected administrative settings at the website.

"This is just one example that really shows the vulnerabilities of social media," said a blog post at controlyour.info.

"If you chose to express yourself on the Internet, make sure the expressions are your own and not a spammers. This isn't some kind of scare tactic, nor is it a hack, it's a feature that can be used, and is being used, in bad ways."

CYI claimed its motives were pure and that the move was more of a "take-over" than a computer hack of Facebook groups.

Facebook Groups are themed chat venues that users of the social networking service can join to socialize online with people who share interests.

"Facebook Groups suffer from a major flaw," said a message on the CYI blog.

"If an administrator of a group leaves, anyone can register as a new admin. So, in order to take control of a Facebook group, all you really have to do is a quick search on Google."

Once CYI accessed groups as administrators it had authority to change anything, including pictures, descriptions and settings.

CYI fired off messages to the groups telling them they had been "hijacked" and the justification for the attacks. CYI rechristened each group with its name and logo.

CYI promised to restore the violated groups to their original conditions after it makes its point.

"Our main goal is to draw attention to questions concerning online privacy awareness," CYI said. "People have even lost their jobs over Facebook content. We wanted to do something about this."

Facebook said there was no hacking involved and there was no confidential information at risk.

The groups targeted had been abandoned by their owners, which left doors open for group members to make themselves administrators.

"Group administrators have no access to private user information and group members can leave a group at any time," Facebook said.

"In the rare instances when we find that a group has been changed inappropriately, we will disable the group, which is the action we plan for these groups."

http://sg.news.yahoo.com/afp/20091111/ttc-us-it-internet-crime-facebook-0de2eff.html


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Beware Facebook 'Friends' Who Trash Your Laptop

The message that popped into Laurie Gale's Facebook inbox last month seemed harmless enough — a friend had seen a video of her and had sent a link so she could view it.

January 30, 2009

The link led to a video site that prompted her to update her video software, which she did.

"Within seconds, everything started shutting itself down," says Gale, a 37-year-old lamp-works artist from Versailles, Ky.

Gale's new Dell Inspiron laptop had been infected with malicious software, or malware, that has spread through social networking sites like Facebook and MySpace.

"I cried for an hour," Gale says. It took a trip to the local computer repair shop and several phone calls with Dell customer-service representatives for her to restore the computer to its factory settings. "It was three days of torture."

The popularity of social networks and social media sites has grabbed the attention of cyber crooks searching to pilfer passwords, called "phishing," and steal sensitive personal information.

The hackers are exploiting users' sense of safety within these sites, says Pat Clawson, chief executive of Lumension Security, a computer security company.

Earlier this month, Twitter, a social site in which users communicate in short bursts of text, was hit in a campaign to steal users' account passwords. On business-networking site LinkedIn, criminals set up fake celebrity profiles that, when visited, downloaded malware onto users' machines.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,485925,00.html?sPage=fnc/scitech/cybersecurity

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The Downside of Friends: Facebook's Hacking Problem

By Claire SuddathTuesday, May. 05, 2009


You get a quick message from a friend on Facebook, click on the link and absentmindedly log in to a website pretending to be Facebook. This is what happened last week, when scammers unleashed a new attack on Facebook, collecting users' log-in information and passwords and pilfering victims' "friends" lists to target the next dopes. Listen up, people: Although Facebook has a reputation for Internet security — it identified the scam within hours, and the ripple effects only lasted for a couple days — at 200 million members and counting, the size and popularity of the social-networking site has made it the object of increasing attention from hackers and spammers. And if last week is any indication, it's only going to get worse.

"In the '90s, scammers used e-mail," says Michael Argast, a security analyst at Sophos, an antivirus software company. "Today, it's social networking." Argast explains that although people have been trained not to click on suspicious e-mails, they don't operate with the same sense of caution when presented with a link on Facebook or Twitter. Maybe that's why the number of phishing attacks on these kinds of sites — in which people are fishing for account information, as opposed to infecting your computer with a virus — has skyrocketed recently, from 4,600 attacks in 2007 to 11,000 in 2008. This year doesn't look any better, with 6,400 attacks in the first three months of 2009.

Like anything on the Internet, Facebook has never been completely scam-free, but its privacy settings may create a false sense of security: most users can't interact with one another unless they are "friends" or belong to the same general network. The site at first glance would also seem less of a gold mine for swindlers since unlike financial websites, which offer access to victims' bank accounts, there is no direct financial gain from hacking into a Facebook account. But the bad guys know that many of us are lazy or forgetful and use the same password on multiple sites. In early 2008, Facebook noticed a marked increase in the number of scams. "We're the most effective distribution platform on the Internet," says Ryan McGeehan, the company's incidence-response manager. "The level of person-to-person connection doesn't exist anywhere else. And as we get bigger, we become a bigger target."

Facebook monitors users' activity, and when someone goes from a few wall posts a week to hundreds of messages within a few minutes, the security team can logically assume that the account has been hacked. They'll notify the user, reset the password, and the whole issue is usually resolved within a few hours. But when thousands of users are hacked at once — and then their friends are hacked, and their friends' friends are hacked — it can take a few days for Facebook to fix the problem. That's what happened on April 29 and 30, when users found themselves accidentally logging in to a website calledFBAction.net. Designed to look exactly like Facebook, the evil doppelgänger took their info and hacked their accounts.

When MarkMonitor, an outside security company employed by Facebook, shut down the fake website, the scam popped up again on a different site, FBStarter.com. (It too has since been disabled.) "My guess is this was a pretty organized group of people," says Fred Felman, MarkMonitor's chief marketing officer. Felman says the phishers, whoever they were (Internet scammers almost never get caught), were not using the most up-to-date technology, but their creativity and speed makes him think that they have experience and will probably do it again.

A similar phishing scam established a toehold on the website in January. And last year hackers broke into accounts by convincing people to click on links posted on their profile walls. Another common Facebook scam is to hack someone's account and then send messages to friends asking for money (like the old Nigerian businessman scam, but with a hey-it's-your-old-pal twist).

Facebook won't say how many accounts were compromised last week, but a rep notes that the site has never had a scammer hack more than a small fraction of its accounts, adding that the company's security team — which has more than 100 analysts, engineers and programmers — can handle whatever comes their way. "We're going to be attacked again in the future," says McGeehan, "and my role is to be prepared when it happens."

http://www.time.com/time/business/ar...895740,00.html

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Cyber-criminals targeting social networks: experts

By Virginie Grognou - July 30, 2009

VALENCIA, Spain (AFP) - - Facebook, MySpace and other social networking sites are inceasingly being targeted by cyber-criminals drawn to the wealth of personal information supplied by users, experts warn.

Data posted on the sites -- name, date of birth, address, job details, email and phone numbers -- is a windfall for hackers, participants at Campus Party, one of the world's biggest gatherings of Internet enthusiasts, said.

A vicious virus Koobface -- "koob" being "book" in reverse -- has affected thousands Facebook and Twitter users since August 2008, said Asier Martinez, a security specialist at global IT solutions provider Panda Security.

"Its spread has been very significant and it has been detected in 4,000 different variants," he told AFP at the week-long event which wraps up Sunday in Valencia in eastern Spain.

The virus hijacks the accounts of social networking site users and sends messages steering friends to hostile sites coontaining malware, a malicious software often designed to infiltrate a computer system for illicit purposes.

In one of its variants, Koobface sends the victim a warning that its Flash player is outdated along with an invitation to download a new version, which is is in fact the virus.

Malware can be used to steal bank account data or credit card information once installed on a personal computer.

Facebook has sought to resist attacks by Koobface and similar viruses by blocking links to hostile sites and shutting down accounts from users that show signs of infection, such as sending too many messages.

"You also must be very careful with people who ask to join your friends list," said Laura Garcia, who writes a popular blog about Internet security, adding that hackers often send requests.

Another danger of social networking sites are the popular quizzes, horoscopes and games made available for free to users which can sometimes be used to hide links to hostile sites, she added.

Birthday greetings and as well as messages sent at Christmas and other holidays may also appear to come from friends when in fact they are linked directly to sites that try to convince would-be victims to reveal personal information like passwords or bank numbers, said Martinez.

The vulnerability of social networking sites was underscored in a study by security company Sophos made public earlier this month.

It found that about half of all companies in the United States block some or all access to them due to concerns about cyber incursions via the sites.
Facebook says that less than one percent of its users have been affected by a security issue, such as a virus, since the site opened in 2004.
Garcia said the number of viruses detected in recent years has exploded while the profile of cyber-criminals has changed.

"Before it was very savvy teenagers who wanted to show off their computer skills. Now you don't really need to know much about information technology to be a hacker, all the tools have already been created," she said.

Real cyber-crime mafias have now taken over, especially in Russia, China Brazil and the Ukraine whose goals are purely economic gain, she said, underscoring that hacking could be highly lucrative.

For an initial investment of $1,500 dollars (1,050 euros) for Mpack, a programme created to infect web pages, hackers can obtain a profit of between $21,000 and $847,000 dollars in just one month, Martinez said.

Around 6,000 people are expected to attend the Campus Party, which unites participants from all over the world to share ideas, experiences and all types of activities related to computers, communications and new technology.

The annual event began in Spain in 1997. Editions of the event have since been held in Brazil and Colombia.

http://www.physorg.com/news168151908.html
Reply

GuestFellow
12-29-2011, 06:37 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
common response from the blind who refuse to listen to reason or truth.
Salaam,

I'm being serious. Ban the Internet. Let's assume Facebook is banned. People will develop new social networking sites. The ultimate solution is to ban the Internet.

Besides, Facebook is just a new means of communication. Telephones, mobile phones, email address, Facebook, forums and twitter are a means to communicate to other people. For Facebook, it has additional features like uploading your pictures.

Even on forums, people can take advantage over you.

As long as you keep your personal details to yourself, you are safe...unless you get hacked. :skeleton:
Reply

islamica
12-29-2011, 06:47 PM
When one student is bad in a class, you send him to the office and not cancel the class. When one member here is bad, you ban him and not shut down the forum. FB is here to stay in this digital age and so is the internet. Educating yourself and not using the sites you know are bad news is the key to navigating through this digital age. It doesn't matter if you keep your details to yourself, you will be hacked and if not your details are available to the owners of the site, thus to 3rd parties and intelligence agencies.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-29-2011, 07:27 PM
If FB wasn't so popular, people would not be talking about. FB has been around for many years now, but no fuss was up about it before as it is now. Now that the number of users r increasing, it's the thing to be talking about. I used to have myspace and let me tell you I had more stalkers there, never any on FB but hey no one talks about myspace. Point is...it's not only FB...at least be fair and talk about other social networks as well, if you want to bring awareness to others. Talking about only one does not do the job...that's all.

People can use any avenue to be idiots. Your computer is hackable in general. How many people keep personal files on it? A lot, I assume. Hackers are hackers...they'll want to get into anything and ruin your life lol.
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islamica
12-29-2011, 07:33 PM
Originally Posted by Light of Heaven
If FB wasn't so popular, people would not be talking about. FB has been around for many years now, but no fuss was up about it before as it is now. Now that the number of users r increasing, it's the thing to be talking about. I used to have myspace and let me tell you I had more stalkers there, never any on FB but hey no one talks about myspace. Point is...it's not only FB...at least be fair and talk about other social networks as well, if you want to bring awareness to others. Talking about only one does not do the job...that's all.

People can use any avenue to be idiots. Your computer is hackable in general. How many people keep personal files on it? A lot, I assume. Hackers are hackers...they'll want to get into anything and ruin your life lol.
Either you are not reading the posts or the replies I have to miss the whole point as well as the bigger picture. Other social sites don't engage in what FB does. Your details are available to the owners of the site, thus to 3rd parties and intelligence agencies.

But I guess it doesn't matter for you if your in pak because the sell out government already gave all your details and copy of their database to USA.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-29-2011, 07:39 PM
Details are passed out to third parties apart from FB and they're not even social networks. I used to get spam mails even from myspace. FB is not the only place where info can be leaked out about u, that's my point.
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islamica
12-29-2011, 07:42 PM
Originally Posted by Light of Heaven
Details are passed out to third parties apart from FB and they're not even social networks. I used to get spam mails even from myspace. FB is not the only place where info can be leaked out about u, that's my point.
the articles here speak volumes of the deeds of FB. If others want to use it then go ahead, no need to make excuses for themselves.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-29-2011, 07:46 PM
Why do you automatically assume someone is defending FB if they arent speaking directly against it? Lol. Im not gunna lose sleep over not using FB, nor do I condone sitting on FB like an addict. All I'm saying is be fair when you (generally) talk about not using a certain something. There's an endless list of things that do the same thing, social network or not but no one talks about it. I'm not against people advising against FB, I'm just getting sick of multiple threads about FB. FB is getting more air than anything.
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islamica
12-29-2011, 07:49 PM
When other social networks are as dangerous as FB then I'll talk about them as well. You should really start reading the articles posted here to understand the whole evilness of FB over other social sites.



Fraudster used Facebook to hack bank accounts

A hacker stole £35,000 from his neighbours' online bank accounts after working out the answers to their security questions from information they posted on Facebook and Friends Reunited.

14 Aug 2011

Iain Wood spent up to 18 hours per day online, working out passwords from personal information posted on social networking sites by his acquiantances.

He targeted people living in his block of flats in a complex fraud and used his friends' personal details to get past security checks and hack into their bank accounts - stealing more than £35,000 over two years which he blew on gambling.

His scam only came to an end when he became over-confident and changed his system and the authorities were alerted.

Jailing him for 15 months, Judge Guy Whitburn said at Newcastle Crown Court:

"This is the first time I've come across a sophisticated fraud such as this, it was very well planned, complex and clever.

"He was using other people's identities and there was a considerable breach of trust in assuming his neighbours' identities.

"It is an extremely bad deception on people in the same block of flats as he. People's blood runs cold when they see money taken from their accounts."

Wood, 33, was living at Pandon Gate House, on City Road in Newcastle's East End, at the time of the offences, which went on between June 2008 and June last year.

He had got away with his fraud until he dropped his guard and changed his operation by directly transferring money out of one neighbour's account directly into his own, in November 2009.

When the victim was contacted over the withdrawal of £1,500, he realised he had been the victim of a fraud and the police were called.

At that stage the police thought it was a one-off, but when they arrested him Wood blurted out "Have you been on to me for a while?"

A subsequent search of his flat found a variety of bank account pin numbers, someone else's passport, bills and other paperwork, much of which he had taken from the post boxes of other residents in the block.

He admitted hacking into various bank accounts, most of them dormant, and intercepting other people's post when interviewed by police.

Neil Pallister, prosecuting, said: "He said he had figured out how to access online bank accounts.

"He would go on and say he couldn't remember the password and would be asked security questions about date of births and mother's maiden names and he was able to give correct details in some cases.

"He said he would be on the computer 18 hours per day to find out information about people on websites such as Facebook and Friends Reunited.

"He would make friends with people on Facebook and have got their usernames he would try it on the bank websites, on the basis people use the same passwords.

"If that did not work he would fill in the security information which he had got from Facebook and Friends Reunited."

On the occasions he successfully got access to the bank accounts he would change the address details and intercept the cards and take out cash.

Although most of the accounts he targeted were dormant, he was able to exploit the overdraft facility before anyone realised.

Wood, who runs a carpet fitting business, pleaded guilty to seven counts of false representation and asked for a further six similar offences to be taken into account.

He also admitted possessing article for the use in fraud.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/facebook/8700762/Fraudster-used-Facebook-to-hack-bank-accounts.html
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-29-2011, 07:57 PM
So because other social networks have "less" evil, we can swipe them under the carpet for now? Why not make mention of it and have people avoid it, before it becomes a pile of dirt too big to clean? The more popular something be omes, the more you will have people talking about it, many of which involves criticism. And because other networks are not popular, no one gives a cookie about it and hence no one will dig up info about it. That's how it always works.

I've read them so many times (off of here) I don't think another read will make a difference. Im not implying I'm head over heels with FB, just don't let it be the only thing people are talking about. One thread should be sufficient to talk about FB. We have more than two. I'm just bothered by the number of threads on this forum only about Facebook, nothing more nothing less.
Reply

Cabdullahi
12-29-2011, 08:52 PM
The TV is more evil than FB...you have no control...you could be watching the news one minute and the next minute you could be watching a toilet paper advert with bums on display

That never happens on FB...but it still has some fitna and it shouldn't be singled out as the only dangerous fitna.
Reply

islamica
12-30-2011, 02:34 AM
Originally Posted by Light of Heaven
So because other social networks have "less" evil, we can swipe them under the carpet for now? Why not make mention of it and have people avoid it, before it becomes a pile of dirt too big to clean? The more popular something be omes, the more you will have people talking about it, many of which involves criticism. And because other networks are not popular, no one gives a cookie about it and hence no one will dig up info about it. That's how it always works.

I've read them so many times (off of here) I don't think another read will make a difference. Im not implying I'm head over heels with FB, just don't let it be the only thing people are talking about. One thread should be sufficient to talk about FB. We have more than two. I'm just bothered by the number of threads on this forum only about Facebook, nothing more nothing less.
Everybody and their uncle is on FB. It has such a large member base that it can easily be considered 4th largest country in the world. It has privacy issues and concerns that even the non-Muslims are talking about. It is all over the news making headlines because of it's practices. It and it's features are being banned in European countries, in china and in other nations. It is being used by employers to not hire you and fire you, by adult sites to use the info to lure people to their sites, by matrimonial sites to use the info to lure people to their sites, by corrupt people to set up sex flings (especially in saudi), by pedophile predators to go after kids. And the list goes on and one, when other sites start making headlines and those articles become readily available, i'll post them here. If you or others have concerns about fair coverage then you are more than welcome to open up another thread about other social sites that you think are causing as much fitnah.
Reply

GuestFellow
12-30-2011, 08:23 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
When one student is bad in a class, you send him to the office and not cancel the class.
Salaam,

Same with Facebook. You may get cases when intelligence services have been using the website to gather information on certain users. That does not mean you ban the entire thing.

Educating yourself and not using the sites you know are bad news is the key to navigating through this digital age.
I don't even use Facebook. I think it's a waste of time. But to ban it is pointless because people will make new social networking websites (not sure what you are advocating).

It doesn't matter if you keep your details to yourself, you will be hacked and if not your details are available to the owners of the site, thus to 3rd parties and intelligence agencies.
Not everyone has been hacked. I'm sure there are other people computers have not been hacked. Besides, the government has information about you. Intelligence services can get their information from the government or track you down.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-30-2011, 11:31 PM
^^FB is a waste of time, but so is generally sitting on the computer lol. Nothing wrong with stating the negatives of something, especially if its serious...just theres no need for multiple threads..about it.

Also I'm not gunna waste time making a thread about one social network in specific...probably if I start a thread, itll be general, detailed advice that covers many things. These FB threads should all be merged together, I think.
Reply

islamica
12-30-2011, 11:32 PM
Originally Posted by Tragic Typos
Salaam,

Same with Facebook. You may get cases when intelligence services have been using the website to gather information on certain users. That does not mean you ban the entire thing.



I don't even use Facebook. I think it's a waste of time. But to ban it is pointless because people will make new social networking websites (not sure what you are advocating).
wa'salaams,

i rather people ban it and start a whole new site then continue using it considering all the harms it entails. There is facebook4muslims.com and other such sites. But i'm done with this thread, there's enough info in these articles for those think to know what to make of it.
Reply

GuestFellow
12-30-2011, 11:34 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
wa'salaams,

i rather people ban it and start a whole new site then continue using it considering all the harms it entails. There is facebook4muslims.com and other such sites. But i'm done with this thread, there's enough info in these articles for those think to know what to make of it.
:sl:

That new site can be hacked too.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-30-2011, 11:37 PM
Nothing is hack free. Even you just leaving logging into a site with ur IP address...opens doors for hackers. Online shopping, anything with credit cards. The government has numerous ways of tracking you down and getting information on your life...FB and all. Even forums like the ones we're on currently are watched constantly.
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islamica
12-30-2011, 11:46 PM
Originally Posted by Tragic Typos
:sl:

That new site can be hacked too.
wasalaams

they are not in bed with the CIA. Stop arguing pointlessly and go do what you like, if you don't like the info on here then don't read it.
Reply

Cabdullahi
12-31-2011, 12:01 AM
hey! I never saw you complain when everyone had MySpace


just kidding


I agree with you facebook has more good than bad in it....are we strong enough to avoid the bad...if we can't its better we just refrain from it.
Reply

GuestFellow
12-31-2011, 12:24 AM
Originally Posted by islamica
wasalaams

they are not in bed with the CIA. Stop arguing pointlessly and go do what you like, if you don't like the info on here then don't read it.
:sl:

Ah I'm certain intelligence agencies monitor all forms of social networking to gather information, with or without their permission. All sites can be hacked. When did I say that new site was in bed with the CIA?

I will argue as much as I want until I get bored or the topic is closed. :p: You can ignore my posts if you want...unless you prefer to have the last say. O____o
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 12:39 AM
Facebook “Causes Syphilis”

Date: Mar 26, 2010

A researcher has claimed Facebook is connected to a rise in syphilis as it is a hotbed of casual sex, unsurprisingly something Facebook angrily denies.

Professor Peter Kelly, a public health official in northern England, found that the Teeside region he is responsible for is the area of Britain with the highest rates of Facebook and SNS usage, and asserts that their research found a link between this usage and a jump in the cases of syphilis the area is experiencing:

“Syphilis is a devastating disease. Anyone who has unprotected sex with casual partners is at high risk.

There has been a fourfold increase in the number of syphilis cases detected with more young women being affected.

I don’t get the names of people affected, just figures, and I saw that several of the people had met sexual partners through these sites.

Social networking sites are making it easier for people to meet up for casual sex.”

Facebook scoffs at the claims:

“The assertion that Facebook is responsible for the transmission of syphilis is ridiculous.

Facebook is no more responsible for STD transmission than newspapers responsible for bad vision.”

Rather less convincingly, they claim the site is purely a wholesome family friendly one:

“As Facebook’s more than 400 million users know, our website is not a place to meet people for casual sex – it’s a place for friends, family and co-workers to connect and share.”





Facebook 'linked to rise in syphilis'


Facebook has contributed to a resurgence in the sexually-transmitted disease syphilis, a health expert has claimed.
Published: 24 Mar 2010

Case have increased fourfold in Sunderland, Durham and Teesside, the areas of Britain where Facebook is most popular.

Professor Peter Kelly, director of public health in Teesside, claimed staff had found a link between social networking sites and the spread of the bacteria, especially among young women.

He said: “Syphilis is a devastating disease. Anyone who has unprotected sex with casual partners is at high risk.

"There has been a fourfold increase in the number of syphilis cases detected with more young women being affected.

"I don't get the names of people affected, just figures, and I saw that several of the people had met sexual partners through these sites.

"Social networking sites are making it easier for people to meet up for casual sex."

In Teesside there were 30 recorded cases of syphilis last year, but the true figures are expected to be much higher.

Research has shown that young people in Sunderland, Durham and Teesside were 25 per cent more likely to log onto social networking sites than those in the rest of Britain.

A Facebook spokesman said: “The assertion that Facebook is responsible for the transmission of syphilis is ridiculous. Facebook is no more responsible for STD transmission than newspapers responsible for bad vision. Today’s reports exaggerate the comments made by the professor, and ignore the difference between correlation and causation.

"As Facebook’s more than 400 million users know, our website is not a place to meet people for casual sex – it’s a place for friends, family and co-workers to connect and share.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/facebook/7508945/Facebook-linked-to-rise-in-syphilis.html





Facebook: what social networking site 'is blamed for' amid syphilis claims

There are, it seems, few social ills that have not at one stage or another been blamed on Facebook.

Published: 25 Mar 2010

Since its creation in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg the site has been held responsible for everything from the breakdown of marriage to childhood obesity. Most recently, a public health official even linked social network sites to a resurgence in the sexually-transmitted disease syphilis.

Below are a few examples of the more unexpected outcomes which have been pinned on social network sites by everyone from the head of the Catholic church in Britain to University researchers.

* Facebook ‘fuels divorce’

Lawyers blamed Facebook for almost one in five of online divorce petitions, saying the social networking site, which connects old friends and allows users to make new ones online, was behind the increase increasing number of marital breakdowns and the temptation for people to cheat on their partners.

* Facebook leads ‘children to suicide’

The head of the Catholic Church in England and Wales, Archbishop Vincent Nichols, warned that Facebook encouraged teenagers to view friendship as a "commodity" and was leading them to suicide. It was, he argued, one of the many social networking sites that led teenagers to build "transient relationships", leaving them unable to cope when their network collapse.

* Facebook ‘killing off traditional sayings’

The social networking site was blamed for the slow death of British sayings such as “a little birdie told me” and “hold your horses”. In a survey on communication trend researchers found phrases commonly used by parents and grandparents were disappearing.

* Facebook blamed for ‘rickets surge’

Facebook has been blamed for the surge in the number of children suffering from rickets. Researchers writing in the British Medical Journal found the social networking site, and computer games had led to the disease, caused by chronic vitamin D deficiencies, which can be triggered by long periods out of natural sunlight and a poor diet, being “disturbingly common” among British children.

* Facebook ‘turning Britons into introverts’

A study from Mintel, the market research company, found more than half of adults who use sites such as Facebook admitted they spent more time chatting online than they did actually speaking to friends and family. Researchers also found users made fewer phone calls, sent fewer texts and emails, watched less television and spent less time playing computer games because of their online habit.

* Facebook ‘makes partners jealous’

University of Guelph researchers found Facebook use increased jealousy in relationships, amid greater social exchanges with friends and previous partners. They found that the more time one person spends online on the social networking site monitoring his or her partner, the more suspicious that person becomes.

* Facebook ‘challenges legal restrictions’

In the wake of the Baby P case, legal restrictions that banned the naming of Tracy Connelly, Peter’s mother and Steven Barker, her boyfriend, provoked a furious backlash on the site. Facebook campaigners challenged their right to anonymity while several sites were set up to fight for “justice for Baby P”. There were concerns that some of the groups could lead to their trial being aborted amid fears they would not get a fair hearing.

* More middle-aged people ‘learning to love’ Facebook

But despite perceived problems, Ofcom, the communications regulator, found more middle-aged people are logging on to social networking sites such as Facebook in ever larger numbers. It found the phenomenon of signing up for social networking sites had "begun to mature", with the number of 35 to 54-year-olds accessing such sites jumping by 25 per cent over the past year alone.

* Facebook makes users ‘feel unattractive’

Millions of Facebook users say they avoid uploading photos and remove their name from all pictures of them on the site because they feel too fat, old or ugly. A survey found almost one in two people admitted to leaving out pictures from their "fat days" when uploading pictures to their online profile.

* MI6 chief Sir John Sawers ‘compromised by wife’s Facebook page’

Sir John Sawers, the new head of MI6, was left exposed in a potential security breach after his wife, Lady Shelley Sawers, published intimate photographs and family details on Facebook. Sir John who became chief of the Secret Intelligence Service in November was left embarrassed after his wife's entries on the social networking site detailed where they lived and worked, who their friends were and where they spent their holidays.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...is-claims.html
Reply

Cabdullahi
12-31-2011, 12:45 AM
................
Reply

Ğħαrєєвαħ
12-31-2011, 12:50 AM
As'Salaam Alaaykum

I agree with both sides, as they both have a point.

However, we can go on arguing on this forever and never agree, even though we've both made our points numerous of times ..

I only believe the sister posted this thread for our own benefit, the point i believe she was making were stating the dangers of fb, although this isnt only the case with fb and i'm sure we'd all agree on this. It is true that no matter how many times we bring up this topic, fb won't be closed down and even if that is the case they'll probably have some other site up and running..but we will atleast become aware of the dangers in general perhaps, and not restricting it just to fb and also others including the net as stated many times before throughout other fb threads.

However, let's not forget that there are things that have more good than bad, sometimes the good outweighs the bad and the bad outweighs the good, so either we promote it or we leave it, our personal choice, i'm sure through all these posts i've seen we're wise enough to figure this one out inshaa'Allaah ..

So anyways, I'm sure we've all made our point and with that I hope this thread can be closed.. not that i'm a mod :\
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-31-2011, 01:06 AM
Originally Posted by islamica
wasalaams

they are not in bed with the CIA. Stop arguing pointlessly and go do what you like, if you don't like the info on here then don't read it.
That's uncalled for, no offense.
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 01:18 AM
There is no need to close the thread. I"m merely posting articles to inform others, those who disagree can voice their opinions all they like.
Reply

Cabdullahi
12-31-2011, 01:26 AM
In the left corner we have islamica, a staunch social networking hater who believes the root of all evil is facebook and on the right we have jazzy the light of heaven, a facebook addict.

how will this face-off end?
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-31-2011, 02:06 AM
^^ Lol I'm not a FB addict!
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-31-2011, 02:07 AM
Originally Posted by islamica
There is no need to close the thread. I"m merely posting articles to inform others, those who disagree can voice their opinions all they like.
Then why the offensive comment before? The one I quoted...at least dont say that if ure encouraging differing opinions.
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islamica
12-31-2011, 02:32 AM
Originally Posted by Light of Heaven

Then why the offensive comment before? The one I quoted...at least dont say that if ure encouraging differing opinions.
it was offensive to you, maybe a matter of perspective?
Reply

Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
12-31-2011, 02:40 AM
No it was actually mean lol. If youre ok with different views, why call it pointless...wheres perspective in that?
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 02:46 AM
Israel 'using Facebook to recruit Gaza collaborators'

By Jon Donnison - 5 April 2010

In a busy internet cafe in the centre of Gaza City, lots of people, mostly young, are typing and clicking away.



Some of them are engrossed in the world of Facebook. "I use it 10 hours a day," says Mohammed who owns the shop. "I have over 200 Facebook friends."

But Hamas, the Islamic movement that controls the Gaza Strip, believes the population's love of social networking websites is making it easier for Israel to recruit spies.

Israel has long maintained networks of informers in the West Bank and Gaza in its effort to derail the activities of militant groups.

Historically, collaborators have often been killed if discovered, and this week Hamas announced it would execute anyone caught acting as an agent for Israel.

Personal problems

Facebook "is a big, big thing that the Israelis use", says Ehab al-Hussein, a spokesman for the Hamas-run interior ministry.

"Many people don't have security sense. They go on the internet and talk about all their personal problems such as with their wives or girlfriends," he says.

Israel's intelligence services can then contact people by telephone, e-mail or using existing Israeli agents in Gaza, and use the information to pressure people to become spies.

The internet "allows them to make people feel Israel knows everything about them", says Mr Hussein.

Ronen Bergman, an Israeli expert on intelligence and author of Israel's Secret War with Iran, says monitoring social networking sites is the very minimum you would expect from his country's intelligence services.

"Israel is using the personal information that is put in massive amounts on the internet to identify the people who can maybe help Israel," he says.

"If in 50 years they open up the secret files of the Israeli secret service, the Shin Bet, and military intelligence, the sophistication of electronics that is being used by Israel now in the Gaza Strip would put even the legendary Q from the James Bond movies to shame."

But Mr Bergman says that the intelligence community's current thinking is that using personal information gleaned from the internet to pressure or even blackmail potential informants is not considered effective in recruiting long-term informants.

He says such threats are not often enough to get people to commit such a serious offence as collaborating.

But online detail, he says, can help intelligence services identify people who might be useful - such as those with good access to Hamas or to criminal networks.

When asked to comment, the Israeli government said it was not its practice to talk about its security services' modes of operation.

Phone fears

Even Mr Hussein admits he has a Facebook page, "but I'm careful about the information I put on," he says. "I only say I am a Hamas spokesman."

He is probably not the only member of Hamas communicating on Facebook and the internet.

This is partly because other forms of communication, particularly mobile phones, are easily bugged and can be used to track movements, Mr Bergman says, so the internet has become a more preferable option.

One reason Israeli intelligence is watching the social networking websites to try to identify potential informants is because a historical source of collaborators no longer exists, according to Mr Bergman.

Up until the second intifada, or Palestinian uprising, started in 2000, thousands of Gazans had permits to enter Israel each day to work.

These people had direct contact with Israelis and were sometimes approached by Israeli intelligence officers and asked to collaborate.

But these days the border is virtually sealed.

Virtually the only Palestinians allowed through are often in wheelchairs or bandaged up, seeking medical treatment in Israel.

Some of those say they've been asked for information about Hamas and Islamic Jihad.

"They asked if I knew any people in my neighbourhood who were members," says Khaled, a young man from Gaza City, who will give only his first name.

'Not safe'

He had to go to Israel to seek medical treatment after being injured in last year's conflict with Israel.

He says he did not pass on any information that the Israelis would not already have known.

But he gives an insight into how intelligence officers pressure people to become informants.

"They say that they know everything about you, but actually it's information you have already published on Facebook," he says.

"It's not safe to publish such information - I believe it allows Israel to keep watching our movements."

Last year, Israel dismissed as "simply ludicrous" allegations that its security forces had told Palestinians seeking permits to exit Gaza for medical treatment that they would only be allowed to leave if they supplied information on militant groups.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/h...st/8585775.stm
Reply

Cabdullahi
12-31-2011, 01:46 PM
Jazzy throws the first punch, by pointing to the fact that islamica used an offensive remark,but islamica is no fool, she put her guard up and blocked jazzy's allegations by saying its all in your mind jazzy!...its all in your mind!

jazzy, however is adamant that it was offensive and quickly throws a 'mean' left hook that catches islamica unaware, whilst she was posting the next 'FB is evil' post.
Reply

Ramadhan
12-31-2011, 02:44 PM
sorry off-topic (and to defuse the rather heated argument :)),

but Abdullaahi, your best ever ringside commentary was during the great debate between brother MustafaMC and pastor Grace Seeker.
That was without doubt the highlight of your career, you are going downhill now :p
Reply

Cabdullahi
12-31-2011, 02:48 PM
Originally Posted by Ramadhan
sorry off-topic (and to defuse the rather heated argument :)),

but Abdullaahi, your best ever ringside commentary was during the great debate between brother MustafaMC and pastor Grace Seeker.
That was without doubt the highlight of your career, you are going downhill now :p
Wallahi you are true, brother can you help me retrieve all the funny posts that were deleted by the super mod...i think it was muezzin ...Allah knows best.

Im going down hill because the people have lost their ability to smile and laugh,,,but i was never a joker....i do this to alleviate stress


Remember the character 'bushy' lol
Reply

GuestFellow
12-31-2011, 02:49 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
I"m merely posting articles to inform others, those who disagree can voice their opinions all they like.
Salaam,

How many articles are you going to post? I mean cannot you not do a summary and then post the sources?
Reply

Haya emaan
12-31-2011, 03:03 PM
assalam o alaikum

the debate going on here is a never ending debate and is found now a days every where around us.. its right that facebook has both good and evil sides. it may have lots and lots and lots of good but the facts the OP posted also can not be denied and here i find the purpose of this thread is to highlight the other side. So whats wrong in it? why are we arguing like this..
at the end it all comes to the users decision but for that he should be aware of both the sides..

lets keep this thread just an awareness thread for those who want to know and if any one wants to bring above the goods of FB he/she is welcomed (and if its not fine here he/she can him make a new thread for it) so that both the sides can clearly come up and will be easy for us to understand our opportunities, vastness, dangers and limits with the specific social community...
Reply

ardianto
12-31-2011, 03:41 PM
There was a rumor, a madrasah in East Java, Indonesia issued a fatwa "Facebook is haram". Then people in my city ask a local aleem, KH Miftah Faridl, and he said, Facebook can be used for good purpose or bad purpose. KH Miftah Faridl himself use facebook for da'wah.

Also, when I visited a website that created by alumnae of Dammaj Darul Hadith in Indonesia I found list of facebook accounts. The owner of those accounts are students of Shaykh Yahya Al Hajoori.

I agree with KH Miftah Faridl, Facebook can be used for good purpose or for bad purpose. Depend on the user themselves. However, from my observation, Facebook is the favorite social networking site for wrong people who use Facebook for bad purpose.


PS: I do not use Facebook.
Reply

ardianto
12-31-2011, 03:56 PM
Originally Posted by ardianto
There was a rumor, a madrasah in East Java, Indonesia issued a fatwa "Facebook is haram".
Sorry, forgot to explain. Fatwa "Facebook is haram" just a rumor. There was a confirmation, the fatwa that issued by that madrasah was not "Facebook is haram", but "Haram to use Facebook for wrong purpose"
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 06:28 PM
Originally Posted by Tragic Typos
Salaam,

How many articles are you going to post? I mean cannot you not do a summary and then post the sources?
wa'salaams,


why? does it bother you? does it take up too much space? or are you getting tire do of negating everything posted thus far?
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 06:31 PM
Originally Posted by ardianto
There was a rumor, a madrasah in East Java, Indonesia issued a fatwa "Facebook is haram". .
Imams forbid use of Facebook for flirting or gossiping

Indonesian imams label "virtual" flirting a sin


Surabaya, INDONESIA (Agencies)

A group of Indonesian imams warned Muslims on Friday not to use popular Internet networking sites like Facebook for flirting or gossiping.

A non-binding resolution issued after a meeting of hundreds of scholars from Java and Bali islands warns that using sites like Facebook can lead to sinful lust and "obscenity."

"We forbid the use of Facebook, Friendster and other social networking sites unless they are being used to foster Islamic teaching," a spokesman for the clerics, Abdul Muid Shohib, said.

"So spreading ill words about others, gossiping and other things that go against religious teaching on social networking sites in the virtual world are forbidden according to Islamic law."

Facebook is hugely popular in the world's most populous Muslim country, and while rulings from Islamic clerics are influential they are rarely followed to the letter.

Indonesia ranks fifth behind the United States, the United Kingdom, Italy and France in terms of Facebook use, according to Internet tracking website Alexa.com.

This is despite its crumbling or, in many areas, non-existent digital infrastructure, and the fact that the majority of the country's 234 million people have little or no access to computers.

Shohib acknowledged that the networking site, where people can set up their own profile pages and share comments and pictures with their friends, was also popular among students and imams at Indonesia's conservative Islamic schools.

"We realize that the virtual world is hard to control," he said.

"There are many senior imams who worry because Por*nographic images often pop out while they interact through Facebook," he added.
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 06:32 PM
Trapped girls updated Facebook instead of calling police

By Bonnie Malkin in Sydney - 08 Sep 2009

Police in Australia have voiced their concern about the growing use of social networking sites after two young girls who were trapped in a drainage well system updated their Facebook profiles instead of calling the emergency services for help.

The girls, aged 10 and 12, used their mobile phones to access the popular website and update their statuses, alerting friends and family that they were lost in a storm drain in Adelaide's southern suburbs. Their exact status updates have not been released.

The girls were rescued at about 7.30pm on Sunday night after a friend, who was online at the time, decided to call the police. Ambulance crews were sent to the scene but the girls were not injured and did not require treatment.

Glenn Benham, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Fire Service (MFS) in Adelaide, said it was lucky that someone had seen their status update and realised that it was not a joke. Storm drains are prone to flash flooding and are very dangerous, the fire service has warned.

"It is a worry for us because it causes a delay on us being able to rescue the girls," he told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

"If they were able to access Facebook from their mobile phones, they could have called 000 [the Australian equivalent of 999], so the point being they could have called us directly and we could have got there quicker than relying on someone being online and replying to them and eventually having to call us via 000 anyway."

Terry Flew, Professor of Media and Communications at the Queensland University of Technology, said Facebook and sites like it had become the first port of call for young people who wanted to get their message – no matter how serious – out into the public realm.

"For these kids, by the sounds of it, being on Facebook is just such a pervasive part of their lives that it seems the first line of response if they need to communicate a message to others.

"I guess for these people the natural way to send a message out to their friends and others is via Facebook, unfortunately in this case the message was that they were stuck in a stormwater drain."

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/facebook/6155017/Trapped-girls-updated-Facebook-instead-of-calling-police.html
Reply

GuestFellow
12-31-2011, 07:13 PM
Originally Posted by islamica
wa'salaams,


why? does it bother you? does it take up too much space? or are you getting tire do of negating everything posted thus far?
:sl:

It does not bother/tire me. Just asked.
Reply

islamica
12-31-2011, 07:29 PM
I got few mores then i'll be done.
Reply

ardianto
01-01-2012, 04:02 AM
Originally Posted by islamica
A group of Indonesian imams warned Muslims on Friday not to use popular Internet networking sites like Facebook for flirting or gossiping.

A non-binding resolution issued after a meeting of hundreds of scholars from Java and Bali islands warns that using sites like Facebook can lead to sinful lust and "obscenity."
Just clarify. Those Imams/scholar are from an organization that run a number of female madrasah. Not scholars from MUI (Indonesian ulama council)

Before issued fatwa about Facebook, they issued four fatawa. Only one of those four fatawa that approved by MUI, the rest were refused because these are based on very weak daleel.
Reply

islamica
01-01-2012, 07:43 PM
7.5 million Facebook users are under 13: study

5/10/2011

WASHINGTON — Some 7.5 million of the 20 million minors who used Facebook in the past year were younger than 13, and a million of them were bullied, harassed or threatened on the site, says a study released Tuesday.

Even more troubling, more than five million Facebook users were 10 years old or younger, and they were allowed to use Facebook largely without parental supervision leaving them vulnerable to threats ranging from malware to sexual predators, the State of the Net survey by Consumer Reports found.

Facebook's terms of service require users to be at least 13 years old but many children, or their parents, get around that rule by giving a false birth date when they sign up for the social networking site.

Parents of kids 10 and younger who use Facebook "seem to be largely unconcerned" by their children's use of the site, possibly because they think a young child is less vulnerable to Internet risks, the study says.

But while a 10-year-old might not download pornography on the Internet, he or she does "need protection from other hazards that might lurk on the Internet, such as links that infect their computer with malware and invitations from strangers, not to mention bullies," the study says.

More than five million US households have been exposed in the past year to "some type of abuse" via Facebook, including virus infections, identity theft and bullying, says the study, for which 2,089 US households were interviewed earlier this year.

Consumer Reports urged parents to delete their pre-teens' Facebook accounts -- or ask Facebook to do so by using the site's "report an underage child" form -- and to monitor teenage kids' accounts by friending them or keeping an eye on their activity via siblings' or friends' Facebook pages.

It also called on Facebook to "beef up its screening to drastically reduce the number of underage members."

Facebook was not immediately available for comment.



http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iVX-3tpqh_5t_ahAQ40cg8tARMJw?docId=CNG.7666cf41808dc7d 84a13a2cd4ccc112e.741



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Docs warn about Facebook use and teen depression

03/28/2011

CHICAGO, Illinois — Add "Facebook depression" to potential harms linked with social media, an influential doctors' group warns, referring to a condition it says may affect troubled teens who obsess over the online site.

Researchers disagree on whether it's simply an extension of depression some kids feel in other circumstances, or a distinct condition linked with using the online site.

But there are unique aspects of Facebook that can make it a particularly tough social landscape to navigate for kids already dealing with poor self-esteem, said Dr. Gwenn O'Keeffe, a Boston-area pediatrician and lead author of new American Academy of Pediatrics social media guidelines.

With in-your-face friends' tallies, status updates and photos of happy-looking people having great times, Facebook pages can make some kids feel even worse if they think they don't measure up.

It can be more painful than sitting alone in a crowded school cafeteria or other real-life encounters that can make kids feel down, O'Keeffe said, because Facebook provides a skewed view of what's really going on. Online, there's no way to see facial expressions or read body language that provide context.

The guidelines urge pediatricians to encourage parents to talk with their kids about online use and to be aware of Facebook depression, cyberbullying, sexting and other online risks. They were published online Monday in Pediatrics.

Abby Abolt, 16, a Chicago high school sophomore and frequent Facebook user, says the site has never made her feel depressed, but that she can understand how it might affect some kids.

"If you really didn't have that many friends and weren't really doing much with your life, and saw other peoples' status updates and pictures and what they were doing with friends, I could see how that would make them upset," she said.

"It's like a big popularity contest — who can get the most friend requests or get the most pictures tagged," she said.

Also, it's common among some teens to post snotty or judgmental messages on the Facebook walls of people they don't like, said Gaby Navarro, 18, a senior from Grayslake, Illinois. It's happened to her friends, and she said she could imagine how that could make some teens feel depressed.

"Parents should definitely know" about these practices," Navarro said. "It's good to raise awareness about it."

The academy guidelines note that online harassment "can cause profound psychosocial outcomes," including suicide. The widely publicized suicide of a 15-year-old Massachusetts girl last year occurred after she'd been bullied and harassed, in person and on Facebook.

"Facebook is where all the teens are hanging out now. It's their corner store," O'Keeffe said...


http://technology.inquirer.net/infotech/infotech/view/20110328-328089/Docs-warn-about-Facebook-use-and-teen-depression


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Mom on Facebook sentenced in son's drowning death

4/15/2011

GREELEY, Colo. (AP) — A northern Colorado woman who was playing a game on Facebook while her 13-month-old baby drowned in a bathtub was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison.

Shannon Johnson, 34, of Fort Lupton, cried as District Judge Thomas Quammen told her he didn't think she was a bad person or that she killed her son on purpose, the Greeley Tribune reported. But, he added, that doesn't mean her action wasn't criminal.

"You left this little boy in a bathtub so you could entertain yourself on the computer by playing games," Quammen said. "And you left that 13-month-old human being, little Joseph, incredibly for those reasons."

Johnson pleaded guilty in March to negligently causing the death of her child. The charge carried a sentencing range of four to 12 years, but it also left open the possibility of alternative sentencing, which means she might have avoided spending time behind bars. Authorities rejected that option, saying they didn't want to play down the seriousness of her crime.

According to court documents, Johnson put her son in the tub for his bath a little after 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 20. She then left him unsupervised as she went to another room to share videos, check status updates and play Café World on Facebook.

When she returned to the bathroom, she found Joseph sideways and face-down in the water.

Johnson called 911 to say Joseph wasn't breathing. Paramedics were able to revive the toddler but he was pronounced dead at a Denver hospital.

According to the affidavit, Johnson told police the boy "wanted to be left alone" and was a very "independent baby." She also told police she knew what it was like to be told "no," and she did not want her baby to be told "no." The affidavit says she also did not want him to be known as a "mama's boy."

Johnson told police she gave the boy a bath every day — sometimes twice a day. She said that on the day Joseph died, the water level might have been higher than usual.

Johnson told police she had been leaving Joseph in the bathtub alone for weeks.

Johnson also told authorities that her son had a seizure at his grandmother's house a month earlier and had been given anti-seizure medication in case it happened again. Doctors didn't diagnose the cause of the seizure and there were no other occurrences, Johnson said.

The investigation into the boy's death was delayed while investigators waited for the final autopsy report. That report came back Jan. 3. It said the baby died of anoxic brain injury, cardiac arrest and drowning, according to the arrest affidavit. Johnson was arrested days later.

She was also sentenced to five years of mandatory parole following her incarceration.

Weld County Undersheriff Margie Martinez told KMGH-TV in Denver that Johnson's mother said she had warned her daughter of the danger of leaving the toddler unattended in water just days before he drowned.

"She told her she wouldn't do it anymore," Martinez said.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iokFgScS_SdJIMEyh4jPBokkoJKA?docId=46deb2a53 d354c0e91a28cc3af971866
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♥ Sofia ♥
01-01-2012, 08:25 PM
:salamext:

those articles are craaaaazy. shows what the internet can do to people. i think my friend was telling me about how a couple neglected their own child, resulting in it's death... all because they were busy caring for their VIRTUAL baby. :rolleyes: audhubillah...
Reply

Cabdullahi
01-01-2012, 08:41 PM
Originally Posted by ♥ Sofia ♥
:salamext:
Yeah whatever




Walaykum Assalamu warahmatulahii wa barakatuhu
Reply

marwen
01-01-2012, 08:49 PM
^ son, reply to salams at least. All these video games made you so rude !
Reply

♥ Sofia ♥
01-01-2012, 08:50 PM
Originally Posted by Cbdullahii
Yeah whatever




Walaykum Assalamu warahmatulahii wa barakatuhu
lol, good save, almost missed the white part :D
Reply

GuestFellow
01-01-2012, 08:50 PM
Originally Posted by marwen
^ son, reply to salams at least. All these video games made you so rude !
Salaam,

Look closer. :p:
Reply

marwen
01-01-2012, 08:58 PM
^ aah ! he got me again. Cbdullahi is very smart. :rolleyes:

Abdullahii what is the C for in your new name ?
Reply

islamica
01-01-2012, 11:37 PM
Infographic: 6 Privacy Problems In Facebook’s Updates


Timeline and the open graph call for a review of one’s privacy settings.

People continue to ignore the ever-growing number of privacy concerns with Facebook. Here are some warnings from CheckPoint ZoneAlarm‘s infograph about timeline and open graph.







How to disable Facebook Timeline and get the old profile back


by Sharon Vaknin November 29, 2011

When Facebook Timeline was announced, it didn't take long for the Internet to figure out that even though the new profile design isn't yet available to the public, anyone could get it immediately with this little hack.

Today, over 1.5 million users have activated Timeline with this workaround, making the new profile visible to each of them and anyone else who has enabled it.

Eventually, Facebook will mandate Timeline for everyone, and when that happens, expect a lot of backlash. Many people, even those who opted in to the new design, seriously dislike it. They're calling it narcissistic, cluttered, and creepy.

If you concur, and you were one of those people who enabled Timeline, there's still a way to enjoy the old profile design (while it lasts.)

Step 1: Head to the Facebook Developers page where you originally created an app to enable Timeline. Click "Edit app."





Step 2: The only way to remove Timeline is to delete the app. If you are an actual developer, you're out of luck. Otherwise, click "Delete app" in the left sidebar.








Once you confirm the app deletion, your Facebook Timeline will be disabled.

http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-...d-profile-back

Reply

GuestFellow
01-01-2012, 11:46 PM
We need to do a summary. A summary that includes the advantages and disadvantages of using Facebook. If the disadvantages outweighs the advantages, then Facebook should not be used. To ban it is another question...
Reply

marwen
01-04-2012, 09:55 AM
Let me share with you my Problem with Facebook :

3 years ago. I was at university. I was good with my studies, but I was moneyless. And I was looking for a job to get some money to continue my studies, but nothing was appearing to go the right way. So I was extremely depressed, and was loosing years of hard work because of thing beyond my hands.
I was doing my prayers at masjid, but my imaan was decreasing and I was loosing hope. I was already imagining myself when I will be 40 or 50 years old without home and without wife because I didn't get a nice job to ensure my living.
Meanwhile I was also using FB, like every guy. It started with class friends sharing stupid stuff, comments, likes etc. I was already thinking that facebook is really a waste of time (to facebook lovers, no offence intended, just my personal opinion. you know what I mean, bla bla)
But really, It was like : when someone shared something beneficial, like important news or scientific reserach or knowledge, you don't find anyone interested, except some fake 'likes' just to not hurt you. But when you share something extra stupid just to make a laugh or to pass time because you can't sleep, then you find hundred of comments and likes. I was convinced that human "nafs" is not interested in serious and beneficial things, "nafs" is only interested in passtimes, laughs, and in compliments. "Nafs" is also not interested in sincere critics.
And Facebook creators where aware of this weakness in this nafs, so they gave us what we need in the name of "social networking" and "it let's you find your friends and keep in touch with family" or whatever. And the result is young people loosing their precious youth's energy and their time in just empty talks.
Add to that, haram online talks and relationships (between opposite genders), immodest pictures, songs, games, etc..
And add to that, the insults about religions. What made me more depressed and more angry is that 90% of facebook users are inexperienced, uncultivated young people. Most of them do not know about the different religions and what is every religion about. They even don't know what are the atheist arguments and what religious people have already replied to them. I don't have any problem with people of different religion or way of thinking as long as they are intelligent enough to carry on a civilized discussion.
But the problem is that some people used facebook to insult islam, prophet muhammad pbuh, and Allah without supporting their point of view with sound argument. They made FB pages about the prophet and posted offensive pictures.
One stupid thing I did is that I was thinking as a muslim, my duty is to stay on FB and reply to these offenders. I was logging into their filthy pages and trying to discuss with them and to defend islam.
But after months of "fights" I realized I was stupid, what was I thinking about ? They are not even ready to talk, they are racist uneducated people who are mad about islam and they don't want to talk to muslims, they only want to insult us and feel better.
The FB users who are Muslims are not making things better, they are whether starting fight with those bigots, or even worse, they are spreading the offensive pictures or messages without being aware of that.
In facebook I was between tow bad things : the fitnah of social networks, and the fitnah of anti-muslims. There was some good stuff, like ulama' fan pages where you find some lectures or courses. But was not able to concentrate and learn too much from this stuff, because of the environment of FB : pictures of girls at the right, chat messages at the bottom, advertisments, etc..
The most upsetting thing about FB is that facebook was not doing any measures about these offensive anti-islam pages, But it was quickly closing every page that attacks zionism or israel or about the right of palestinians.
At that moment things were clear : Like every media tool, facebook is taking the same way : attacking Islam, and controlled by the same rich zionist minority.
I decided that FB is not my place (Facebook lovers : personal opinion, remember)
I disabled my account. But I was suffering addiction remains.
So I wanted to join a clean community, to learn more about my deen to protect myself against anti-muslims and to find answers for some questions I have. and to replace my need to FB.
First I was searching for a FB-like muslim social network : I find many examples, but not really "islamic". I kept searching and googling again. I found IslamicBoard on the list of links, I don't remember what is the order, but what I remember is that it attracted me because of the thread it was discussing at that time. It was about the existence of God. What surprised me too is the diversity of religions here : I found beautiful discussions where you find muslims, christians, atheists, and sometimes jews, or hindus, etc. That made me think that islam could flourish more in a free civilized environment, then in an oppressing or uncivilized area.
I loved this forum and loved all the members here, and since then, I didn't leave it.
Reply

islamica
01-11-2012, 06:06 PM
Facebook Menace - What we should do

The issue of Facebook and their latest antics against our Beloved Muhammad sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam has angered and frustrated the Muslim Ummah. The reaction of the Muslim Ummah in the face of such blasphemy is appreciated. This malevolence is not foreign to Islam and the Muslims. During the time of our beloved Muhammad sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam, individuals like Ka’ab Bin Ashraf , Abu Lahab, his wife and others were also guilty of defaming our Prophet sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam. Their fate is known to all.

Our responsibility as Muslims to our beloved Muhammad sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam is as follows:

1. To delete Facebook accounts and any other media that deems it acceptable to disrespect our beloved Rasoolullah sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam and never to reactivate them again.

2. To inform others of the above as well.

3. Deleting facebook is one form of expressing our love for Rasoolullah sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam. However, objective love of Rasoolullah sallallāhu ῾alayhi wasallam is to inculcate his teachings in our life.


Boycotting that site on principle alone should be enough. But if you want to look at it on monetary value. Facebook makes $2.39 per user visiting their site and having an account, that's how much you are giving to facebook to insult your prophet. Pakistan's internet traffic composed of 25% was going to facebook, so for example let's just say out of the 200+ millions of Pakistanis, even if only 50 million were visiting facebook that's 50 million times 2.39 = $119.5 million dollars facebook is making of Pakistanis alone. What about rest of the Muslims on there? So you see you are supporting the enemies of Allah and His Messenger by having your account there, and well lets just I would rather not be raised as one of them (kuffars) on Judgment Day nor as a supporter of them.

And since Facebook itself refused to do anything at protest of a nation (Pakistan) shows their position on this and I would venture to say it may even be obligatory for us to not have anything to do with that site.


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How do I permanently delete my account?


If you deactivate your account from the "Deactivate Account" section on the Account page, your profile and all information associated with it are immediately made inaccessible to other Facebook users. What this means is that you effectively disappear from the Facebook service. However, if you want to reactivate at some point, we do save your profile information (friends, photos, interests, etc.), and your account will look just the way it did when you deactivated if you decide to reactivate it. Many users deactivate their accounts for temporary reasons and expect their information to be there when they return to the service.

If you do not think you will use Facebook again and would like your account deleted, please keep in mind that you will not be able to reactivate your account or retrieve any of the content or information you have added. If you would like your account permanently deleted with no option for recovery, log in to your account and then submit your request by clicking here.

If you are currently unable to access your account, you will need to reset your password in order to log in. In order to do so, click the "Forgot your password?" link that appears above the field where you would normally enter your password. Once you’ve followed the instructions to reset your password and can log in, you can deactivate or delete your account using the steps outlined above.
Reply

Muezzin
01-14-2012, 07:32 PM
^You know, it would have saved a lot of time to have just posted the above message at the beginning of this currently seven page long thread...
Reply

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