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yasirslm
06-04-2012, 10:07 AM
Dear Brothers/Sister,


I heard peoples going to different DARBARS for Manat Purpose...can any one explation what is MANAT and it's concept according to QURAN and Sunnath.





Thanks and Regards.
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Endymion
06-04-2012, 06:46 PM
:sl:

It give me a hard time understand what you actually write in the title.I thought its Japanese :p It will be better if you post your thread in Urdu section where people can better understand what you are talking about.

To my knowledge,people think that the saints are choosen people and if we ask them,they can fulfill our wishes.They make a Mannat that if they will get what they ask,they will give money,food or anything else to the darbar people.

Quran and Sunnah strictly forbid this.Quran and sunnah both are to direct people towards Allah.

(35:13) He causes the night to phase into the day and the day into the night, and He has subjected the sun and the moon, each running its course to an appointed term. That is Allah, your Lord; to Him belongs the Kingdom; but those whom you call upon, apart from Allah, possess not so much as the skin of a date-stone.

Here is a beautiful message i posted before in the forum.Hope this will make things clear for you.Also,it is in urdu.Here.

http://s1037.photobucket.com/albums/...image001-1.jpg

Salam :statisfie
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Snowflake
06-04-2012, 10:09 PM
As sis Endymion said, mannat means making a vow in the name of a deceased person believed to be a saint, that if your prayer is accepted through them, you will gift something in their name, usually at their tomb/grave. Sometimes a vow involves other than gifts, such as not cutting/trimming a lock of a child's head until he is able to visit the tomb himself. May Allah protect us from shirk and misguidance. Ameen.


Allah subhan wa ta 'ala says in the Quran:

“And invoke not, besides Allaah, any that will neither profit you, nor hurt you, but if (in case) you did so, you shall certainly be one of the zaalimoon (polytheists and wrongdoers).” [Yoonus 10:106]


He causes the night to enter the day, and He causes the day to enter the night and has subjected the sun and the moon - each running [its course] for a specified term. That is Allah , your Lord; to Him belongs sovereignty. And those whom you invoke other than Him do not possess [as much as] the membrane of a date seed. [35:13]





If you invoke them, they do not hear your supplication; and if they heard, they would not respond to you. And on the Day of Resurrection they will deny your association. And none can inform you like [one] Acquainted with all matters. [35:14]

“And if Allaah touches you with harm, none can remove it but He, and if He touches you with good, then He is Able to do all things.” [al-An’aam 6:17]


The meaning of the verse five in surah al Fatiha tells us that we are only to invoke Allah for help:
Iyyaaka na'abudu wa iyyaka nasta'iin - It is You we worship and You we ask for help.




Wa alaykum assalam.












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Snowflake
06-04-2012, 10:23 PM
Invoking other than Allah is shirk, So what is shirk and what are its types?




Major and Minor Shirk


Praise be to Allaah.
One of the most important obligations is to know the meaning of shirk, its seriousness and its different types, so that our Tawheed (belief in the Oneness of Allaah) and our Islam may be complete, and our faith may be sound. We say – And Allaah is the Source of strength and true guidance comes from Him:

Know – may Allaah guide you – that the word shirk in Arabic means taking a partner, i.e., regarding someone as the partner of another. It is said [in Arabic]: ashraka baynahuma (he joined them together) when he regarded them as two of equal status; or ashraka fi amrihi ghayrahu (he introduced another into his affair) when he made two people involved in it. In terms of sharee’ah or Islamic terminology, shirk means ascribing a partner or rival to Allaah in Lordship (ruboobiyyah), worship or in His names and attributes.


A rival is a peer or counterpart. Hence Allaah forbids setting up rivals with Him and he condemns those who take them (rivals) as gods instead of or besides Allaah in many verses of the Qur’aan. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“Then do not set up rivals unto Allaah (in worship) while you know (that He Alone has the right to be worshipped)”
[al-Baqarah 2:222]


“And they set up rivals to Allaah, to mislead (men) from His path! Say: ‘Enjoy (your brief life)! But certainly, your destination is the (Hell) Fire!’” [Ibraaheem 14:30]

In the hadeeth it is narrated that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever dies claiming that Allaah has a rival, will enter Hell.” Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 4497; Muslim, 92.

The types of shirk: The texts of the Qur’aan and Sunnah indicate that shirk and the ascribing of rivals to Allaah sometimes puts a person beyond the pale of Islam and sometimes does not. Hence the scholars divided shirk into two types which they call shirk akbar (major shirk) and shirk asghar (minor shirk). There follows a brief description of each type:


1 – Major shirk
This means ascribing to someone other than Allaah something that belongs only to Allaah, such as Lordship (ruboobiyyah), divinity (uloohiyyah) and the divine names and attributes (al-asma’ wa’l-sifaat). This kind of shirk may sometimes be outward, such as the shirk of those who worship idols and graves, or the dead or absent. Or it may sometimes be hidden, such as those who put their trust in other gods besides Allaah, or the shirk and kufr of the hypocrites. For even though their (hypocrites’) shirk puts them beyond the pale of Islam and means that they will abide forever in Hell, it is a hidden shirk, because they make an outward display of Islam and conceal their kufr and shirk, so they are inwardly mushriks but not outwardly.

Shirk may sometimes take the form of beliefs:
Such as the belief that there is someone else who creates, gives life and death, reigns or controls the affairs of the universe along with Allaah.

Or the belief that there is someone else who must be obeyed absolutely besides Allaah, so they follow him in regarding as permissible or forbidden whatever he wants, even if that goes against the religion of the Messengers. Or they may associate others with Allaah in love and veneration, by loving a created being as they love Allaah. This is the kind of shirk that Allaah does not forgive, and it is the shirk of which Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): “And of mankind are some who take (for worship) others besides Allaah as rivals (to Allaah). They love them as they love Allaah” [al-Baqarah 2:165]

Or the belief that there are those who know the Unseen as well as Allaah. This is very common among some of the deviant sects such as the Raafidis (Shi’ah), extreme Sufis, and Baatinis (esoteric sects) in general. The Raafidis believe that their imams have knowledge of the unseen, and the Baatinis and Sufis believe similar things about their awliya’ (“saints”), and so on. It is also shirk to believe that there is someone who bestows mercy in a manner that is befitting only for Allaah, so he shows mercy as Allaah does and forgives sins and overlooks the bad deeds of his worshippers.
Shirk may sometimes take the form of words: Such as those who make du’aa’ or pray to someone other than Allaah, or seek his help or seek refuge with him with regard to matters over which no one has control except Allaah, whether the person called upon is a Prophet, a wali (“saint”), an angel or a jinn, or some other created being. This is a kind of major shirk which puts one beyond the pale of Islam. Or such as those who make fun of religion or who liken Allaah to His creation, or say that there is another creator, provider or controller besides Allaah. All of these are major shirk and a grave sin that is not forgiven.


Shirk may sometimes take the form of actions: Such as one who sacrifices, prays or prostrates to something other than Allaah, or who promulgates laws to replace the rulings of Allaah and makes that the law to which people are obliged to refer for judgement; or one who supports the kaafirs and helps them against the believers, and other acts that go against the basic meaning of faith and put the one who does them beyond the pale of Islam. We ask Allaah to keep us safe and sound.


2 – Minor shirk
This includes everything that may lead to major shirk, or which is described in the texts as being shirk, but does not reach the extent of being major shirk.

This is usually of two types:
1 – Being emotionally attached to some means which have no basis and for which Allaah has not given permission, such as hanging up “hands”, turquoise beads etc on the grounds that they offer protection or that they ward off the evil eye. But Allaah has not made them the means of such protection, either according to sharee’ah or according to the laws of the universe.
[Translator’s note: the “hands” referred to are objects made of metal, pottery etc, usually blue or turquoise in colour, that some people hang up to ward off the evil eye, according to their mistaken belief]

2 – Venerating some people or things in a way that does not go so far as ascribing lordship to them, such as swearing by something other than Allaah, or saying, “Were it not for Allaah and So and so,” etc. The scholars have stipulated guidelines to distinguish major shirk from minor shirk when shirk is mentioned in the texts of sharee’ah. These guidelines include the following:

(i) – When the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) states clearly that this action is minor shirk, such as in al-Musnad (27742) where it is narrated that Mahmoud ibn Labeed said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The thing that I fear most for you is minor shirk.” They said: “O Messenger of Allaah, what is minor shirk?” He said: “Showing off, for Allaah will say on the Day when people are recompensed for their actions: ‘Go to those for whom you were showing off with your deeds in the world, and see what reward you find with them.’” Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Silsilah al-Saheehah, 951.

(ii) – When the word shirk is used in the texts of the Qur’aan and Sunnah in the indefinite form [without the definite article al-]. This usually refers to minor shirk, and there are many examples of this, such as when the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Incantations, amulets and love spells are shirk.” Narrated by Abu Dawood, 3883; classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in al-Silsilah al-Saheehah, 331. What is meant by shirk here is minor shirk, not major shirk. Amulets are things that are hung on children such as turquoise beads and the like, which they claim will protect them from the evil eye. Love spells are something that they do, claiming that it will make a woman beloved to her husband and a man beloved to his wife.


(iii) – If the Sahaabah understood from the texts of sharee’ah that what was meant by shirk here was minor shirk, not major. Undoubtedly the understanding of the Sahaabah carries weight, because they are the most knowledgeable of the people concerning the religion of Allaah, and the most knowledgeable as to the intent of the Lawgiver. For example, Abu Dawood (3910) narrated from Ibn Mas’ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Tiyarah (superstitious belief in omens) is shirk, tiyarah is shirk,” three times, and there is no one among us but (will have some of that) but Allaah will rid him of it by means of tawakkul (putting his trust in Allaah). The words “there is no one among us…” are the words of Ibn Mas’ood, as was explained by the prominent scholars of hadeeth. This indicates that Ibn Mas’ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) understood that this was minor shirk, because he could not have said, “There is no one among us…” referring to major shirk. Moreover, major shirk cannot be eliminated by means of tawakkul, rather it is essential to repent therefrom.


(iv) – If the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) interpreted the words shirk or kufr in a manner which indicates that what is meant is a minor form thereof and not the major form. For example al-Bukhaari (1038) and Muslim (74) narrated from Zayd ibn Khaalid al-Juhani that he said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) led the morning prayer for us at al-Hudaybiyah following rainfall during the night. When the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) finished, he turned to face the people and said to them: “Do you know what your Lord has said?” They said: “Allaah and his Messenger know best.” He said: “This morning one of My slaves became a believer in Me and one a disbeliever. As for him who said: ‘We have been given rain by the grace of Allaah and His mercy,’ that one is a believer in Me, a disbeliever in the stars; and as for him who said: ‘We have been given rain by such-and-such a star, that one is a disbeliever in Me, a believer in the stars.’” The interpretation of the word kufr here is given in another report narrated from Abu Hurayrah who said: The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Do you not know what your Lord said? ‘I do not send any blessing upon My slaves but a group among them become kaafirs thereby because they refer to the stars and attribute things to the stars. This explains that if a person attributes rainfall to the stars by believing that they caused it to fall – when in fact Allaah has not made the stars a means of causing rainfall – his kufr is a kind of ingratitude for the blessing of Allaah. It is well known that ingratitude for the blessing of Allaah is minor kufr. But if a person believes that the stars are controlling the universe and they are the ones that cause the rain to fall, then this is major shirk.


Minor shirk may sometimes take the form of outward actions, such as wearing talismans, strings, amulets and the like, and other words and deeds. And sometimes it may be hidden, like a little bit of showing off.

It may also take the form of beliefs: Such as the belief that something may be a cause of bringing benefit or warding off harm, when Allaah has not made it so; or believing that there is barakah (blessing) in a thing, when Allaah has not made it so. It sometimes takes the form of words: Such as when they said, “We have been given rain by such and such a star,” without believing that that the stars could independently cause rain to fall; or swearing by something other than Allaah, without believing in venerating the thing sworn by or regarding it as equal with Allaah; or saying, “Whatever Allaah wills and you will,” and so on.

It sometimes takes the form of actions: Such as hanging up amulets or wearing a talisman or string to dispel or ward off calamity, because everyone who attribute powers to a thing when Allaah has not made it so either according to sharee’ah or according to the laws of the universe, has associated something with Allaah. This also applies to one who touches a thing seeking its barakah (blessing), when Allaah has not created any barakah in it, such as kissing the doors of the mosques, touching their thresholds, seeking healing from their dust, and other such actions.

This is a brief look at the division of shirk into major and minor. We cannot go into great detail in this short answer. Conclusion:

What the Muslim must do is to avoid shirk in both its minor and major forms. The greatest sin is shirk and transgression against the unique rights of Allaah, which are to be worshipped and obeyed alone, with no partner or associate. Hence Allaah has decreed that the mushrikeen will abide forever in Hell and has told us that He will not forgive them, and He has forbidden Paradise to them, as He says (interpretation of the meaning):
“Verily, Allaah forgives not that partners should be set up with Him (in worship), but He forgives except that (anything else) to whom He wills; and whoever sets up partners with Allaah in worship, he has indeed invented a tremendous sin”
[al-Nisa’ 4:48]

“Verily, whosoever sets up partners (in worship) with Allaah, then Allaah has forbidden Paradise to him, and the Fire will be his abode. And for the Zaalimoon (polytheists and wrongdoers) there are no helpers” [al-Maa'idah 5:72]

Every wise and religiously-committed person should fear shirk for himself and should turn to his Lord, asking Him to help him avoid shirk, as al-Khaleel [Ibraaheem – peace be upon him] said: “and keep me and my sons away from worshipping idols” [Ibraaheem 14:35 – interpretation of the meaning]


One of the salaf said: “Who can claim to be safe from this after Ibraaheem?”

So the sincere believer’s fear of shirk should increase as should his desire for his for his Lord to keep him away from it, and he should say the great du’aa’ which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) taught to his companions when he said to them: “Shirk among you will be more subtle than the footsteps of an ant, but I will teach you something which, if you do it, both minor and major shirk will be kept away from you. Say: Allaahumma inni a’oodhu bika an ushrika bika wa ana a’lam wa astaghfiruka lima la a’lam (O Allaah, I seek refuge with You from associating anything with You knowingly, and I seek Your forgiveness for that of which I am unaware).”
Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Jaami’, 3731

The above refers to the difference between major and minor shirk, defining each and describing its types. With regard to the difference between them as far as the ruling is concerned: Major shirk puts a person beyond the pale of Islam, so the one who does that is judged to be out of Islam and to have apostatized therefrom, so he is a kaafir and an apostate.

Minor shirk does not put a person beyond the pale of Islam, rather it may be done by a Muslim but he still remains in Islam; but the one who does that is in great danger because minor shirk is a major sin. Ibn Mas’ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: “If I were to swear by Allaah falsely, that is better for me than if I were to swear by something other than Him sincerely.” So he regarded swearing by something other than Allaah (which is minor shirk) as being worse than swearing by Allaah falsely, and it is well known that swearing by Allaah falsely is a major sin.
We ask Allaah to make our hearts steadfast in adhering to His religion until we meet Him, and we seek refuge in His Might – may He be glorified – from going astray, for He is the Ever-Living Who never dies, but the jinn and mankind will die. And Allaah knows best and is most wise, and to Him is the final return of all.



http://islamqa.info/en/ref/34817



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yasirslm
06-05-2012, 05:35 AM
Ok,thanks all for making one part clear to me.

I have one more question,all things mentioned above are related to "Asking a Mannat through some source(WASILA) like going to DARBAR etc etc"
What if an Individual asks a Mannat DIRCTLY to GOD(Not asking through any source)...

Thanks and regards
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Pure Purple
06-05-2012, 06:49 AM
Originally Posted by yasirslm
What if an Individual asks a Mannat DIRCTLY to GOD(Not asking through any source)...
It will depend upon your mannat....
For e.g
If you will ask allah(swt) If my so and so mannat will come true I will murder some one.....This will be invalid .Even your mannat fulfilled in that case also you are not suppose to do it.You need to ask to a scholar what to do in that case.
If you asked mannat and if my so so work will comleted successfully I will feed 7 needy people,or I will sadqa(charity) in that case you need to do this,otherwise you will be sinner.(gunahgaar)
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Snowflake
06-05-2012, 10:09 AM
Originally Posted by yasirslm
Ok,thanks all for making one part clear to me.

I have one more question,all things mentioned above are related to "Asking a Mannat through some source(WASILA) like going to DARBAR etc etc"
What if an Individual asks a Mannat DIRCTLY to GOD(Not asking through any source)...

Thanks and regards
^That's the correct way Brother. There is no vow except by the name of Allah & His Attributes. Allah told Maryam, the Mother of Prophet Isa (a.s.) to say:

‘[Maryam said:] I have vowed a fast unto the Most Beneficent (Allaah)…’ [Maryam 19:26].”



This article covers vows and their types, and why Rasulullah (sallahu alayhi wa sallam) discouraged some types of vows).





Different types of vows (nadhr) and the rulings concerning them - 2587

Q: Assalam-o-alaikum,
what is the ruling of shariah on nazr wa niaz.




A: Praise be to Allaah.

There follows an explanation of the issue of vows, describing different kinds of vows and the basic rules concerning them, so that you and other readers may benefit from this information, in sha Allaah.



Al-Isfahaani (may Allaah have mercy on him) says, in his book Mufradaat Alfaaz al-Qur’aan (Vocabulary of the Qur’aan), p. 797:
“Al-Nadhr (vow): when you oblige yourself to do something that is not obligatory because of something that you want to happen. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): ‘[Maryam said:] I have vowed a fast unto the Most Beneficent (Allaah)…’ [Maryam 19:26].”
So a vow is the action, on the part of a person who is adult and of sound mind (mukallaf), of obliging himself to do something that is not obligatory, whether he intends to do it straight away or makes his doing it conditional upon something else.



Vows are mentioned in the Qur’aan in approving terms. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): “Verily, the abraar (pious, who fear Allaah and avoid evil), shall drink a cup (of wine) mixed with water from a spring in Paradise called Kaafoor, a spring wherefrom the slaves of Allaah will drink, causing it to gush forth abundantly. They (are those who) fulfil their vows, and they fear a Day whose evil will be widespreading.” [al-Dahr 76:5-7]. So Allaah makes their fear of the horrors of the Day of Resurrection and their fulfilment of their vows some of the reasons for their salvation and admittance to Paradise.



Ruling on vows. Fulfilling legitimate (shar’i) vows is obligatory according to sharee’ah. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): “Then let them complete the prescribed duties (manaasik of Hajj) for them, and perform their vows…” [al-Hajj 22:29]. Imaam al-Shawkaani said: “This means that they have to do this.”



Numerous ahaadeeth have been reported from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) discouraging vows and describing them as makrooh. Abu Hurayrah said: “The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ‘Do not make vows, for vows do not change qadar (the divine decree) in the slightest, but they make the stingy person give something up.’” (Reported by Muslim).
‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with them both) said: “The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) began to discourage us from making vows, and said, ‘They do not change anything, although they may make the miser give up something.’” (Reported by al-Bukhaari and Muslim).



One might ask, how is it that those who fulfil their vows are praised, then making vows is discouraged? The answer is that the kind of vow that is praised is the vow to do acts of worship that are not connected to anything – i.e., not conditional upon anything – which makes a man force himself to do acts of worship and prevent himself from being lazy, or in thanksgiving for some blessing. The kinds of vow which are discouraged are of different types, including vows that are made in return for something, whereby a person makes his doing an act of worship conditional upon attaining something or warding off something, and if that does not happen, he does not do the act of worship. This is what is discouraged, perhaps for the following reasons:

because then the person who made the vow would be doing the act of worship reluctantly, because it has become something he cannot avoid or get out of.


Because when the person making the vow makes the act of worship conditional upon his getting what he wants, his vow becomes a kind of exchange or barter which corrupts his intention; if the sick person is not cured, he will not give the charity which he vowed to give if the sick person was healed. This is miserliness, because the miser will not give anything except for something in return in this life (as opposed to the Hereafter), and what he gains is more than what he gives.


Some people ignorantly believe that making a vow guarantees that they will get whatever they made the vow for, or that Allaah will make it happen for them because of the vow.

Another ignorant belief is the idea that making a vow can change qadaa’ (the divine decree), or that it can bring them some immediate benefit or ward off some harm. So vows were discouraged lest ignorant people believe such things, and as a warning of the danger that such attitudes present to sound belief.



Types of vows and their fulfilment

1 - Vows which must be fulfilled (vows to do acts of worship and obedience to Allaah)

This includes every vow which involves a promise to do some kind of act of worship, such as praying, fasting, performing ‘Umrah or Hajj, upholding family ties, doing I’tikaaf (retreat for worship in the mosque), jihaad, enjoining what is good and forbidding what is evil. For example, a person may say, “It is my duty towards Allaah to fast such-and-such (days)” or to give such-and-such in charity, or to go for Hajj this year, or to pray two rak’ahs in al-Masjid al-Haraam [in Makkah] in thanksgiving to Allaah for curing a sick person. Or he may make a vow of doing some act of worship conditional upon something that will benefit him if it happens, so he says, “If my absent loved one returns or Allaah protects me from the evil of my enemy, I will fast such-and-such (days) or give such-and-such in charity.”
The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever vows to do some act of worship and obedience to Allaah, then let him do it, and whoever vows to do some sin, let him not do it.” (Reported by al-Bukhaari, 6202).



If a man vows to do some act of worship then circumstances change and prevent him from fulfilling his vow, such as he vows to fast for a month or to go for Hajj or ‘Umrah, then he falls sick and is unable to fast or travel, or he vows to give charity, then he becomes poor and is unable to give what he promised, then in such cases he must offer expiation (kafaarah) for breaking his vow, which is the same as kafaarat yameen (expiation for breaking an oath). Ibn ‘Abbaas (may Allaah be pleased with them both) said, “Whoever makes a vow and is then unable to fulfil it, his expiation is kafaarat yameen.” (Reported by Abu Dawood. Al-Haafiz Ibn Hajar said in Buloogh al-Maraam, Its isnaad is saheeh, and some huffaaz thought it was mawqoof.).



Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah said in al-Fataawa (33/49): “If a man intends to vow to do some act of worship and obedience to Allaah, then he must fulfil it. If he does not fulfil his vow to Allaah, then he must offer kafaarat yameen, according to the majority of the salaf (early generations of Islam).”


2 - Vows which it is forbidden to fulfil, and for which kafaarat yameen must be offered
This includes different types of vows:


Vows to commit sin:
This is every vow which involves disobedience to Allaah, such as vows to bring oil, candles or money to graves or shrines (mashhads), or to visit tombs and shrines of shirk. This is in some ways like making vows to idols. It is also forbidden to fulfil vows which promise to do some sin, like committing zinaa (adultery, fornication), drinking alcohol, stealing, taking orphans’ property, denying someone’s rights, or cutting family ties by cutting a certain relative off or not entering his house for no shar’i reason. All of these are not permitted at all, and (the person who makes such a vow) must offer kafaarat yameen in expiation for his vow. The evidence (daleel) that it is not permissible to fulfil this kind of vow is the hadeeth of ‘Aa’ishah (may Allaah be pleased with her) who reported that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Whoever vows to do some act of worship and obedience to Allaah, then let him do it, and whoever vows to do some sin, let him not do it.” (Reported by al-Bukhaari). ‘Imraan ibn Husayn reported that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “There should be no fulfilment of a vow to commit sin.” (Reported by Muslim, 3099).
Vows that go against a shar’i text (of the Qur’aan or Sunnah)



If a Muslim makes a vow then it becomes clear to him that this vow of his goes against a clear, saheeh text that contains some command or prohibition, then he must refrain from fulfilling his vow, and offer kafaarat yameen for it. The evidence for this is the report of al-Bukhaari (may Allaah have mercy on him) from Ziyaad ibn Jubayr, who said: “I was with Ibn ‘Umar and a man asked him, ‘I made a vow to fast every Tuesday or Wednesday as long as I live, and it so happens that this day is Yawm al-Nahr (the Day of Sacrifice, i.e., the first day of Eid al-Adha).’ He said, ‘Allaah has commanded us to fulfil vows and we are forbidden to fast on Yawm al-Nahr.’ He repeated this to him, and said no more and no less.” (Saheeh al-Bukhaari, 6212).




Imaam Ahmad reported that Ziyaad ibn Jubayr said: “A man asked Ibn ‘Umar, whilst he was walking in Mina, ‘I made a vow to fast every Tuesday or Wednesday, and it so happens that this day is Yawm al-Nahr, so what do you think?’ He said, ‘Allaah, may He be exalted, has commanded us to fulfil our vows, and the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) forbade us [or he said: we were forbidden] to fast on Yawm al-Nahr.’ The man thought that he had not heard him properly, so he said, ‘I made a vow to fast every Tuesday or Wednesday, and it so happens that this day is Yawm al-Nahr.’ [Ibn ‘Umar] said, ‘Allaah, may He be exalted, has commanded us to fulfil our vows, and the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) forbade us [or he said: we were forbidden] to fast on Yawm al-Nahr.’ They kept repeating this exchange until they reached the mountain.”
Al-Haafiz Ibn Hajar said: “The scholars agree that it is not permitted to fast on Yawm al-Fitr and Yawm al-Nahr, neither as an act of worship nor in fulfilment of a vow.”



3 – Vows concerning which there is no ruling other than kafaarat yameen

There are some vows concerning which there is no ruling other than that the one who makes such a vow must offer kafaarat yameen in expiation for his vow. These include:



- Non-specific vows

If a Muslim makes a vow but does not specify what the vow is about, such as saying, “I make a vow if Allaah heals this sick person” – but does not specify anything, then he must offer kafaarat yameen. ‘Uqbah ibn ‘Aamir reported that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The expiation for a vow is kafaarat yameen.” (Reported by Muslim). Imaam al-Nawawi said: “Maalik and many others – indeed the majority – interpreted this as meaning absolute vows, such as saying ‘I vow’ [without being specific].” (Sharh Muslim li’l-Nawawi, 11/104).



- Vows concerning things that one does not possess.

If a person makes a vow concerning something that is not his, then he has no option but to offer kafaarat yameen. For example, if he vows to give charity from someone else’s wealth, or to free someone else’s slave, or to give a garden that he does not own to someone. The evidence for this ruling is the hadeeth of ‘Amr ibn Shu’ayb from his father from his grandfather, who said: “The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ‘The son of Adam cannot make any vow concerning that which is not his, he cannot free (any slave) who is not his, and he cannot divorce any wife who is not his.” (Reported by al-Tirmidhi, 1101. He said: The hadeeth of ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Amr is a saheeh hasan hadeeth).



4 – Vows where one has the option of fulfilling the vow or of offering kafaarat yameen
There are vows where a person has the option of fulfilling the vow or of offering kafaarat yameen. This kind of vow includes:


- Vows made in desperation or in anger:


This means every vow that comes in the form of an oath made to urge for something to be done or to stop something from being done, or to swear that something is true or not true, where the person does not really intend to make a vow to do some act of worship. For example, a man might say in anger, ‘If I ever do such-and-such I have to go for Hajj, or fast for a month, or give one thousand dinars in charity’ or, ‘If I ever speak to So-and-so I have to free a slave, or divorce my wife,’ and so on, then he does the thing he said he would not do, but all he really meant by his words was that he would not do that thing – he had no intention of either doing it or the thing he vowed to do if he did.



In such a case, this person – who made the vow for argument’s sake or to express the urgency of doing or refraining from something – has the choice of either fulfilling the vow, or expiating for it by offering kafaarat yameen, because his vow was essentially an oath (yameen).
Ibn Taymiyah said: “If a vow is made in the form of an oath, such as saying, ‘If I travel with you then I have to go for Hajj, or give all my wealth in charity, or free a slave,’ in the opinion of the Sahaabah and the majority of the scholars this is hilf al-nadhr (an oath by vowing), it is not a vow. If he does not do what he promised to do, it is sufficient for him to offer kafaarat yameen.” Elsewhere, he said, “The obligation of vows made in anger or desperation is one of two things, according to the majority: either expiation, or doing the thing promised. If he does not fulfil the vow, he must offer expiation (kafaarah).”



- Vows concerning permissible things.

This means every vow that includes permissible things, such as vowing to wear a certain type of clothes, eat special foods, ride a certain animal, enter a certain house, and so on.



Thaabit ibn al-Dahhaak said: “A man vowed to sacrifice a camel in Bawaanah (according to one report: because a male child had been born to him). He came to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and said: ‘I have vowed to sacrifice a camel in Bawaanah.’ The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ‘Was there one of the idols of the Jaahiliyyah there that people used to worship?’ They said, ‘No.’ He asked, ‘Did they used to celebrate any of their festivals there?’ They said, ‘No.’ The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ‘Then fulfil your vow, for there is no fulfilment of vows that involve disobedience to Allaah, or that concern things that the son of Adam does not possess.’” (Reported by Abu Dawood, 2881).



This man had vowed to sacrifice a camel in Bawaanah (a place beyond Yanboo’) in thanksgiving to Allaah, may He be exalted, because He had blessed him with a male child. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) allowed him to fulfil his vow, so he sacrificed a camel in that place.


We ask Allaah to help us to do that which He loves and will please Him. May Allaah bless our Prophet Muhammad.



Islam Q&A

Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid
Reply

~ Sabr ~
06-05-2012, 11:37 AM
Mannat maangna is basically asking Allaah to give you something and you will do something in return. For example, ask Allaah that if You grant me this job, I will pray 20 nafl for you, etc.
Reply

Periwinkle18
06-05-2012, 12:55 PM
^ yup sis
Reply

yasirslm
06-06-2012, 06:02 AM
thanks
Reply

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