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View Full Version : How many calories are in those Laduree macroons?



جوري
07-08-2012, 04:38 AM
http://www.laduree.fr/en/fabricant/produits/macarons

can't seem to find the calories anywhere in there.. maybe they're falling on my blind spot?
also anyone have the recipes for them (even the rose and cassias ones) as they're mad expensive you've to nibble on them slowly to get your money's worth.. lol






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Hulk
07-08-2012, 08:44 AM
Wow that looks delicious.. Is it a cake thingy? According to myfitnesspal one average macaron is about 75 calories :)
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Qurratul Ayn
07-08-2012, 10:21 AM
Try this website for the recipe, the recipe has been tried and tested :D

http://www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/r...ured-macaroons

They are very expensive, in Waitrose (a supermarket that is appointed by Her Royal Majesty, thus it being higher up on the chain) they cost £6.80 for a pack of 7!!!

Attachment 4974
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جوري
07-08-2012, 02:28 PM
Originally Posted by Hulk
Wow that looks delicious.. Is it a cake thingy? According to myfitnesspal one average macaron is about 75 calories :)
No not a cake at all.. it is a succulent piece of yumyum unfortunately the sort you have once a year lol.. me and my sister were taking bites out of each other's macaroons and I was telling her how that reminded me of those odd twins way back when I was a kid who'd always pretend to be each other to annoy the teachers and constantly lick each other's tongues ;D
my fitness pal gives me different readings too. I had a few of them yesterday really wanted specifics bas khlas one day being bad I'll makeup for it today in shaa Allah

Originally Posted by Qurratul Ayn
Try this website for the recipe, the recipe has been tried and tested :D

http://www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/r...ured-macaroons

They are very expensive, in Waitrose (a supermarket that is appointed by Her Royal Majesty, thus it being higher up on the chain) they cost £6.80 for a pack of 7!!!

Attachment 4974
her royal behind eats macaroons and of course why wouldn't she since the British civilians are paying for it.. lol.. high time you guys got rid of that leach..
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جوري
07-08-2012, 02:31 PM
btw that website has only the typical ones colored.. I had some pretty odd flavors last night.. rose and apple, cassias and violet and other things I don't even remember.. I guess it is their own secret which I am yet to find...:(
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muslimah bird
07-08-2012, 03:51 PM
macron sounds like Macaroni :p which always has less calories
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Beardo
07-08-2012, 03:52 PM
I make macaroons at home and I'll tell you... All it is, is just sugar and butter.

I was making chocolate chip cookies the other day, and it's literally flour, sugar, and butter. After stirring it up myself, I just couldn't get myself to eat it. So fattening.
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جوري
07-08-2012, 03:56 PM
Actually macaroons are typically made with coconuts.. however those weren't.. and they didn't taste artificial either.. they really did taste of apples and coffee and roses.. so I am not sure.. at any rate maybe it is for the best one doesn't know the recipes I can see how it can become fattening if one keeps popping those in.. :X
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Hulk
07-08-2012, 04:30 PM
Yes at first I thought sis was talking about macaroni lol. But this gives me an idea, perhaps I should learn to make them and then sell them here. An untouched sweet spot for business! :statisfie

I was just daydreaming, this looks troublesome
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marwen
07-08-2012, 05:01 PM
Those macroons seem dangerously delicious !
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جوري
07-08-2012, 07:33 PM
Originally Posted by Hulk
Yes at first I thought sis was talking about macaroni lol. But this gives me an idea, perhaps I should learn to make them and then sell them here. An untouched sweet spot for business! :statisfie

I was just daydreaming, this looks troublesome
I have never been able to make meringue :( in fact it always fell flat.. that broad was just showing off when she held it over her head.. I notice none of them show you the second by second peak forming.. they always seem to skip which leads me to believe that it is all propaganda.. you can't get egg whites to do that :unsure:
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GuestFellow
07-08-2012, 11:22 PM
Asslamu Aliakum...

They look horrible and diseased. :/
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جوري
07-08-2012, 11:49 PM
Originally Posted by Qurratul Ayn
Also, back on topic (lol) have you found any macaroons recipes??? Especially the different flavoures ones from the norm? They do sound interesting
No, but after sampling 24 flavors over the span of two days until I almost vomited I narrowed it down to:
Number 1 is rose. just so creamy dreamy petaly lovely lovely it is like the macaroon that kisses you for eating it
2- almond
3- Pistachio
4- coconut
didn't care much for the fruity ones and my least favorite is lemon so glad I didn't end on that note.. the very last one I ate was peanut butter..
anyhow I guess it is a matter of preference I am sure some people would like lemon I just found it artificial tasting and not in a good way.. always my least flavor of anything is grape.. I always rid of those but this today definitely topped it in yuckiness..
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جوري
07-09-2012, 12:41 AM
I did find this on some random blog:
Lavender & Rose Macarons

by peasepudding on March 4, 2009
The first time I made macarons was in a commercial kitchen under the watchful eye of a French Head Chef. There were often a choice fews words flying around the kitchen when a batch didn’t turn out the way it should and I think he was convinced only the French could make them consistently! I have since learnt from many Blog or Web sites that even the greatest chefs have their failures with macarons and perhaps it is just practice that gives you the ‘feel’ for making them.
I decided after 4 years ‘out of the industry’ that it was time to make them at home, fully expecting to eat a few batches of failures therefore I was thrilled when my first batch came out really well (lavender coloured ones) and I pranced around the kitchen feel pleased with myself. That was until the second batch, from the same mixture as the first just coloured pink, all cracked…..that’s macarons for you.
So certainly not for the faint hearted or impatient but certainly worth the effort when they come out right. Not that we wasted the cracked ones, they also received some filling and we promptly ate them.
I used David Lebovitz chocolate macaron recipe because I liked the method and enjoyed his stories of making them. I adjusted it slightly to produce lavender flavoured and rose flavoured macarons.
Both the lavender and rose went well with the faint floral flavours complementing the macaron.
Ingredients for macaron batter

  • 100g icing sugar
  • 55g powdered almonds ( finer than ground)
  • 2 large egg whites (room temperature)
  • 65g castor sugar

Method

  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (180 degrees C).
  • Line two large baking trays with greaseproof paper and prepare 2 pastry bags with 2cm pipping tip.
  • Blend in a food processor icing sugar and ground almond.
  • In a bowl whisk egg whites until they begin to hold their shape.
  • Gradually add castor sugar while continuing to whisk until mixture is stiff. It is important to add the sugar slowly at this stage, if you add it too quickly the egg white can liquify and not become stiff.
  • Carefully fold dry ingredients into the whisked egg mix with a metal spoon or rubber spatular until almost combined.
  • Before completely combined separate into two bowls and add a drop or two of pink food colour to one batch and purple to the other.
  • You want the mixture to hold it’s shape when piping but you don’t want any peaks to stay on top of the macaron, they wont cook out. If you think the mixture is too stiff give it a few more folds with the spoon which should make it smoother.
  • Put mixture into piping bags and pipe onto prepared trays about 1 inch circles and 1 inch apart.
  • Bake them for 15-18 minutes and allow to cool before removing from baking sheet,

Ingredients for filling

  • 100ml cream
  • 1 tablespoon icing sugar
  • 100g white chocolate
  • Rose water
  • Lavender essence or lavender flowers

Method

  • Heat cream to scalding in microwave and then add the chocolate to the cream
  • Allow chocolate to melt with the heat of the cream and whisk together.
  • Once chocolate is completely melted add icing sugar and beat.
  • Half the mixture and add two drops of rose water to one and lavender essence to the other.
  • If you are using lavender flowers, put two lavender flowers into the heated cream and allow it to infuse for a few minutes (this is the method I used).
  • Allow to cool, should be a smooth firm paste.

Assemble

  • http://peasepudding.wordpress.com/2009/03/04/lavender-rose-macarons/


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جوري
07-09-2012, 01:18 AM
Can't find a single rose extract that's alcohol free..
Do they have non-alcoholic extracts in England? I know they do for vanilla but haven't found any for rose yet :hmm:
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Hulk
07-09-2012, 05:04 AM
Sis why not just use rose syrup cordial? Is it possible? lol..

Now everytime I read sis qurratulayn's post it will be in a british accent in my mind.
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جوري
07-09-2012, 05:08 AM
I have rose syrup and 'ma ward' but it isn't as potent as extract is it?
I found one Bulgarian rose extract that's alcohol free but in England and it is absurdly overpriced :hmm:
but then again it is understandable it is the queen of flowers and you need a zillion flower to distill so little out..
anyhow I lost interest now because I ate so many of them-- I don't want to have them for a while..so it is all good :D
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جوري
09-06-2012, 11:17 PM
found a really good recipe and I have concluded from this guy that my meringue never works because the egg whites need to be at room temperature.

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Hulk
09-07-2012, 06:03 AM
please post pics once you've made them :statisfie:statisfie:statisfie:statisfie:statisfie :statisfie:statisfie:statisfie
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جوري
09-07-2012, 06:06 AM
I put three egg whites out so they'd be at room temp. .. and bought the almond flour and the organic colors so we'll see in shaa Allah.
I have never made meringue successfully unfortunately :( so we'll see how it goes with that chef's advise
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جوري
09-07-2012, 06:22 PM


still no matter how hard I tried I couldn't get it to stiff peaks :skeleton: it fell flat and I added way too much sugar I'll get some young kid to taste it first
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Hulk
09-08-2012, 11:46 AM
That looks soooo sweeet! lol would love to steal a lick.;D


plsppls take a pic im sure it looks awesome :D
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جوري
09-08-2012, 03:59 PM
Came out a mess .. Gonna try another patch today in shaa Allah
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Hulk
09-08-2012, 05:39 PM
Sounds good, don't give up and InshaAllah you'll get it right :statisfie

I bought a packaged(not fresh) macaroon just now but it doesn't look like the one in the pics instead it looks like this



I just had 2 cause I was sharing it with someone but man it was sweeeeet. Tastes like coconut and condensed milk. Next time I will check if the one you're eating is available or not :statisfie
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Galaxy
09-08-2012, 06:30 PM
I'm going to step back into the past a bit and say...those remind me of the episode of Spongebob where he sells colourful crabby patties called pretty patties...wow I didn't know they were real.
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~Zaria~
09-08-2012, 06:48 PM
Originally Posted by منوة الخيال

still no matter how hard I tried I couldn't get it to stiff peaks :skeleton: it fell flat and I added way too much sugar I'll get some young kid to taste it first
Nice try ukthi : )

I have no idea what 'Laduree macroons' are, but just felt like sharing my own baking disaster from today.....

Dont you just hate it when you are baking for a group of people.......and your cup-cakes come out lop-sided?

And then, when you try to make icing to conceal the 'defect'/ 'smooth out the edges'.......you cant, cos the butter is frozen?

And then, when you try to make icing using just sugar, water and vanilla (as per recipe that you just found thanks to google).......its sweet enough to induce diabetes to all who are brave enough to eat it?

And so......you decide to leave home without the cup-cakes......

And give them to your family to eat (cos the defective cup-cakes are still tasty, and they still love you for it!)

And decide to try again that evening insha Allah.

Cos you tell yourself: Dont ever give up! (even if the kitchen looked like a tornado had hit that morning)

Take 2......

Everyone read 'bismillah' with me.......#sigh#
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جوري
09-08-2012, 09:13 PM
Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
Dont you just hate it when you are baking for a group of people.......and your cup-cakes come out lop-sided?
well my dad especially likes to remember all the disasters and none of the successes like that pretty awesome chicken pot pie with fennel I made not a week ago. You know I am new at this, all throughout medical school I had this Indian roommate who would make me all sorts of good stuff and if she wasn't in the mood I lived on sandwiches ... so now I just bought a few books and trying to be completely self-sufficient (at everything I do thank you very much) except I don't the part where I can conceive a child on my own but nonetheless I am now officially a jack of all trades and a master of none :p
I think the things that come out of failure are amazing they just add to your experience so don't give up .. for what it is worth anyone here is a better cook than me..

Originally Posted by Galaxy
I'm going to step back into the past a bit and say...those remind me of the episode of Spongebob where he sells colourful crabby patties called pretty patties...wow I didn't know they were real.
:haha: brilliant.. and those laudree ones must be sold by Mr. crabs - they're pretty d@mn expensive and only taste yummilicious for two days or so
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جوري
09-08-2012, 09:33 PM
Originally Posted by Hulk
Sounds good, don't give up and InshaAllah you'll get it right :statisfie

I bought a packaged(not fresh) macaroon just now but it doesn't look like the one in the pics instead it looks like this



I just had 2 cause I was sharing it with someone but man it was sweeeeet. Tastes like coconut and condensed milk. Next time I will check if the one you're eating is available or not :statisfie
The original macaroons are indeed made of coconut which is a middle eastern dessert but the 'french' one is made from almond flour. I just saw an Italian recipe as well but don't think I'll attempt it, requires melting the sugar etc. and my meringue is always runny as is probably would go completely flat with a hot liquid added (chemistry has always been the bane of my life) =((
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جوري
09-09-2012, 01:06 AM
2nd batch I made is even worst than the first lol.. which I didn't think was possible but at least the taste is there and not so eggy like the first batch.. they're rosy and sweet but odd crunchy and thin can't figure out what is wrong.. maybe it is the quality of eggs here I don't know =(
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~Zaria~
09-09-2012, 05:53 PM
[QUOTE=منوة الخيال;1539734 can't figure out what is wrong.. maybe it is the quality of eggs here I don't know =([/QUOTE]

Of course it is!

Yep, blame it on the eggs...... lol :P
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Hulk
09-09-2012, 06:17 PM
is it like too runny??? :s

if its too runny would adding more flour help lolll.
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جوري
09-09-2012, 06:26 PM
Originally Posted by ~Zaria~
Of course it is!

Yep, blame it on the eggs...... lol :P
:D well what else could it be?

Originally Posted by Hulk
is it like too runny??? :s

if its too runny would adding more flour help lolll.
I do too know what I am doing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
but I do look like that when I am cooking indeed...
I can't add more flour the eggs need to be stiff they're never stiff they're creamy.. Maybe it is the sugar I don't know I bought new type of sugar. Let's see what the third time around will be like.. :raging:
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yahia12
09-09-2012, 07:51 PM
Meánwhile in Africa.
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جوري
09-09-2012, 08:20 PM
Originally Posted by abdyahia12
Meánwhile in Africa.
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Hulk
09-10-2012, 04:54 AM
Hehehe I found this video about making macarons and it doesn't seem too bad so I thought I'd put it here in case you haven't seen it and maybe you might find it useful!:p

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جوري
09-10-2012, 04:59 AM
Originally Posted by Hulk
Hehehe I found this video about making macarons and it doesn't seem too bad so I thought I'd put it here in case you haven't seen it and maybe you might find it useful!
You know it is all about the conquest for me. I can't stand the idea of not being able to do something (well) it is really bugging. I lost interest in the suckers too and after all the supplies I got to make them perfect. But I intend to do it again in shaa Allah- I'll post the pix and do my victory dance (in shaa Allah) the latter in private.

Thanks for the vid. I watched a zillion of those I wish I could get back time lost :embarrass
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جوري
09-10-2012, 05:06 AM
glad this professional pastry chef girl said she too had difficulties over the years. I did use a little bit of cream of tartar last time but I think the timing is always off, the meringue has always always been runny for me and that's what the problem essentially is.
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جوري
09-11-2012, 10:03 PM
I

had several takes today so I'll post the pix of a couple of failures lol.. bottom line is it is cheaper to buy the $4.00 a piece macaroon than to make at home, that's what I have concluded :skeleton:



always starts simple just four ingredients gahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh







hehe.. ok so this went into the garbage after spending $$$$$$$$$$ on caster sugar and amond flour :(





last attempt for today.. waiting for them to develop a 'crust' but I think I know where they too are headed :(
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جوري
09-11-2012, 10:24 PM
oh my God I just checked on those guys in the oven and they turned into a cake.. ;D
I have to have a sense of humor about this .. it is unbelievable. I feel like organic chemistry lab all over again.
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Hulk
09-12-2012, 12:17 AM
hahahaha! well at least you got a surprise cake out of it!;D

The last picture actually looks really good, I thought for sure it was gonna happen this time. The second last pic was funny ;D
For real though I admire your persistence! I would've probably threw in the towel halfway through my first try. At the end of the day at least you know you have tried your best :statisfie

I bet that surprise cake tasted pretty good!
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جوري
09-12-2012, 12:50 AM
No I dumped it, by cake I meant all of it coalesced but still fell flat- worst part was pieces of it fell to the bottom of the oven and almost caused the fire dept. to get here the whole place was beeping and smoke all over the place I had to scour that oven when it was hellish hot. I had a crappy crappy day but what's crazy is my obsession because I have more egg whites on the counter and I am looking to buy a professional mixer... I keep buying new things and I think if at the end I am successful I'll never eat them again.
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جوري
09-12-2012, 03:26 AM
these three guys make it look super easy
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Aprender
09-12-2012, 05:01 AM
Originally Posted by منوة الخيال
these three guys make it look super easy
Challenge accepted.

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جوري
09-12-2012, 05:02 AM
take pix wlie and let me see..:p
seeing is believing you know..
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Aprender
09-12-2012, 05:06 AM
Originally Posted by منوة الخيال
take pix wlie and let me see..
seeing is believing you know..
in shaa Allah
you got it sista!
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جوري
09-12-2012, 05:11 AM
I am getting the itch to try again now lol..
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جوري
09-12-2012, 06:12 AM
tada.. almost there.. but I followed those guy's advise. I made it into stiff peaks without any sugar then added the sugar worked perfect..
maybe measurements are off and I am not smooth eyeballing size but I can perfect the next step once I get over that first one.... was really bugging me an unhealthy obsession. I don't even want to eat them but I disliked the idea of not being able to do it.


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جوري
09-20-2012, 12:42 AM
success.. woohoo..
see like the adage goes.. if a fool persists in his folly he'll become a wise man..

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CosmicPathos
09-20-2012, 12:55 AM
I'v been eating a lot of sugar recently. I can certainly feel some gynecomastia ... :phew
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جوري
09-20-2012, 01:06 AM
Originally Posted by CosmicPathos
I'v been eating a lot of sugar recently. I can certainly feel some gynecomastia ... :phew
lols.. they're called moobies ..;D
astghfor Allah..
at any rate yeah these are loaded with sugar I am actually trying to find a recipe that doesn't use so much sugar I was flying off the walls after having one.. it is certainly the depressed person cookie..
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Aprender
09-20-2012, 01:08 AM
Originally Posted by منوة الخيال
I was flying off the walls after having one..
Hehehe I can't imagine you flying off the walls. But congratulations on getting them right! Woohoo! What did you fill them with?
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جوري
09-20-2012, 01:10 AM
vanilla buttercream .. I need to find something lighter because the sugar was off the roof.. and I naturally fly off the wall .. I just had extra spring in my wings after those babies...
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Hulk
09-20-2012, 05:22 AM


well done!!!
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جوري
09-20-2012, 09:45 AM
Thanks for your patience while we trouble shoot!
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جوري
10-17-2012, 07:00 PM



tadaaaaaaaaa.. this is why they say if at first you don't succeed try and try again.. of course I have no way of telling what they taste like so it can be all looks and no substance :hmm:____________:skeleton:
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Hulk
10-17-2012, 07:13 PM
Oh man sis ur macaron fillings are like thicker than average thats GOOD I want some!
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جوري
10-17-2012, 07:16 PM
you're welcome to them.. I am afraid of what it will taste like lols.. could be all looks and no susbtance so I am glad you volunteered yourself..
This is mint cookie with white mocha buttercream filling..
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Hulk
10-17-2012, 07:21 PM
lol ive experienced cooking something that looked good but tastes bad. I made this burger patty without adding salt or anything and people were saying wow it looks good cant wait to try some, so i taste tested it and it was super tasteless so i threw it all out and told everyone i finished them all lol. im sure urs tastes good though they look sooo good! is it in the oven now? exciting..
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جوري
10-17-2012, 07:28 PM
lol I have too much pride too you know prefer to keep my mistakes to myself but this was a journey wasn't it? .. at least I know how to make them now because I struggled so much especially with the meringue and even still the time before last I made them they were a fine mess.. Also tasteless or not salted isn't a big deal you can always add salt later.. with this I used mint syrup instead of extract and the white mocha buttercream is from a godiva drink so God knows we'll see .. let's hope for the best in shaa Allah
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جوري
10-17-2012, 07:46 PM
by the way this is the recipe I use now.. none of the others worked for me not even Martha's.. although from her recipe I use the pinch of tartar

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Macaron...9=Photo_3&me=1
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glo
10-17-2012, 07:54 PM
Originally Posted by شَادِنُ
tadaaaaaaaaa.. this is why they say if at first you don't succeed try and try again.. of course I have no way of telling what they taste like so it can be all looks and no substance ____________
Have you got no taste testers to hand? You wouldn't have to ask me twice! They look delicious! :statisfie
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جوري
10-17-2012, 08:19 PM
no- everyone is fasting.. i should invite my sis to bring my niece but she's not partial to odd flavor combination she's predictable like most kids..
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جوري
10-17-2012, 10:56 PM
ahh.. just tried them.. they put the zing zing in my heart' strings.. :p
I should pass em around IB for anyone who needs a sugar fix
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glo
10-18-2012, 05:15 AM
Originally Posted by شَادِنُ
I should pass em around IB for anyone who needs a sugar fix
Yes, you should! :p
Perhaps they can be the prize for the writing competition ...
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Hulk
10-18-2012, 06:38 AM
seeee didnt i say they're gonna taste good :statisfie:statisfie
10/10 for u!
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جوري
10-18-2012, 09:39 AM
indeed indeed.. yesterday I had $12 worth of macaroons i.e 3 of them.. gonna start charging the going rate at laudaree hehehe.. except mine have no artificial ingredients and I don't use alcoholic extracts.. It is only the good stuff so I'll up the price for quality... :p
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GuestFellow
10-18-2012, 10:31 PM
Originally Posted by شَادِنُ
success.. woohoo..
see like the adage goes.. if a fool persists in his folly he'll become a wise man..

:sl:

This is pure torture...I want some of those.
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جوري
10-18-2012, 11:12 PM
Originally Posted by GuestFellow
:sl:

This is pure torture...I want some of those.
you like vanilla ice cream? It is my favorite flavor
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GuestFellow
10-19-2012, 09:34 PM
Originally Posted by شَادِنُ

you like vanilla ice cream? It is my favorite flavor
:sl:

I LOVE vanilla ice cream. Haven't had one since last year... :/
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جوري
10-19-2012, 09:45 PM
Originally Posted by GuestFellow
:sl:

I LOVE vanilla ice cream. Haven't had one since last year... :/
:wa:

these are my two favorite of all times:



and



are my all time fav. but sometimes when in the mood I like butterscotch.

folks don't think you can get ice cream wrong and any flavor will do but I disagree :)

bryers just has vanilla, sugar and cream so the flavors are really robust.. Hagen has a nice complexity of creaminess and nuttiness because well sometimes I feel like a nut
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Ramadhan
10-22-2012, 04:44 AM
Originally Posted by GuestFellow
:sl:

I LOVE vanilla ice cream. Haven't had one since last year... :/
:sl:

AAAHh.. NOW I remember who you are
:)
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جوري
11-13-2012, 10:10 PM
look what I found:

Eid Mubarak & My Macaron Story

Eid Mubarak! I want to wish everyone a very happy Eid al-Adha! You might remember that for Eid al-Fitr (which is the Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan) I made Syrian Ice Cream, which was flavored with lovely things like pistachio and rose. As a play on those lovely flavors I wanted to remake them into another dessert, Pistachio Macarons with Rose Buttercream. I chose macarons because they’re special and very celebratory, and besides, with all my failed attempts and macaron-making woes, I thought it was high time I mastered the recipe. Without further ado, I give you my macaron story.
* * *
I’ve gone and mentioned the unmentionable. Made the unmakeable (at least for me!). Macarons, those little fear and lust-inciting bites of heaven are indeed the topic I’m tackling today. Since they’re no longer my nemesis, I feel like I can speak freely of them. Share my knowledge on the topic, in hopes of helping someone out there who, like myself, had been beaten by them on several occasions prior.
You see, the first time I made them (which was just over a year ago) I tried grinding my own almond meal. It turned into nut butter and I (ever the optimist) still continued onward with the recipe. As you can probably guess, it wasn’t pretty. The second time I made them (which was during the summer) was on a hot and humid day but I thought that since I was making them in a climate-controlled environment the weather wouldn’t be an issue. Turns out, it was. The third time I made them I didn’t quite work the batter enough to achieve macronnage (what a taunting word that is!). I was getting closer though, at least they had feet! I continued on in this way a few more times, each time failing but learning something. (You might be wondering why I persisted in my macaron experimentation for over a year. Maybe the simultaneous best and worst thing about me (definitely my Achilles’ heel anyway) is that when I set my mind on mastering something there really isn’t any way I can be dissuaded. And I refused to let a cookie beat me, lol!) And now I present you with my masterpiece, which has produced consistently beautiful results on three separate occasions.
When I first started looking for a macaron recipe to make I was blown away by the sheer volume of recipes out there. I finally decided to start with Martha Stewart’s recipe for Parisian Macaroons (I figure she didn’t get to be the domestic goddess she is by having non-workable recipes, right?). Sadly, the recipe didn’t work for me. I ended up making so many alterations and tweaks throughout my experimentation process that my masterpiece no longer looks anything like Martha’s original recipe. The other thing that completely frustrated me when I was looking for a macaron recipe is the fact that most recipes only give ingredient amounts in grams, ounces, or cups, but never all three (when you’re playing around with a recipe, this is really helpful information to have)! This is why for my masterpiece I list amounts in grams, ounces, and cups.
The trickiest thing about making macarons is that there are so many variables that affect the end result. Here are some tips I’ve discovered during my macaron project:

  1. Weather: Don’t make macarons on a day that’s too hot or humid.
  2. Baking Pan: Choose your baking pan carefully. Since I don’t have special insulated macaron pans, I like to use heavy-duty half sheet pans.
  3. Almonds: Don’t try to grind your own almonds. I was ambitious enough to think that my food processor was capable of a fine grind…of course I ended up with almond butter before I had a grind that was fine enough.
  4. Eggs: I don’t bother with old eggs or room temperature eggs or special eggs that have been laid from super chickens; instead, I use a pretty fool-proof method. I put the eggs in a small bowl and fill it with hot water from the faucet (about 105F). Once the eggs don’t feel hot or cold to the touch, they’re ready to use.
  5. Macronnage: This crucial step is where macarons are truly made. The batter is finicky in that it needs to be worked enough so that the feet develop and there are no points on top, but not worked too much, which will result in the macarons being flat or cracked. It’s a fine line, my friends. Here is an easy way to see if the batter is ready: use a rubber spatula to lift and drop the batter onto itself; if the ribbon gradually disappears into the batter within 30 seconds, it’s ready to go. If this step is done correctly, you will not end up with points on top of the macarons; by the time you’re done piping the first row, the points will have disappeared. (In the past, I’ve used a damp finger to push the points down; granted, this does get rid of the points, however it doesn’t fix the underlying problem, which is that the batter wasn’t worked long enough).
  6. Piping: Start off by fitting a pastry bag with a round 1/2 inch tip. Put the bag in a tall glass and pour the batter in. You’re ready to pipe. Hold the bag straight above the tray (this gives you the most control of how fast the batter comes out) and gently apply pressure to squeeze out 1-inch circles. Speaking from experience, you will get much better at this with practice.
  7. The Shell: Let the macarons sit at room temperature before baking until they form a shell that’s dry to the touch. How long this takes depends on the temperature, humidity level, and how fickle the macaron batter is feeling that day. In general, this can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours or more.
  8. Baking Time: Determining when macarons are done baking can be somewhat tricky, as baking time can vary based on several factors, including your oven, the weather, how big you piped your macs, etc. At the oven temperature I use (300F), baking time ranges from about 10 to 20 minutes. The best thing you can do is to start checking them for doneness around 10 minutes, and keep a close eye on them after that. Macarons are done baking when the feet are formed, the top feels firm (but is not browned), and the insides are set. When they’re cooked all the way, they should easily come off parchment paper or a silicone baking sheet once they’re cooled (you can just peel them off or use a thin metal spatula), and the bottoms of the cookies should be flat.
  9. Aging: Like most things, macarons get better over time (in this case, after a little aging in the fridge). (Aging not only helps the flavors develop and mesh, but if you happened to overbake your macs a teensy bit, the moisture from the filling will soak into the cookies, helping you end up with perfectly chewy macs.) Aging them is easy: line an airtight lidded container with parchment paper, carefully arrange the macarons inside, and let them sit in the fridge for a day or two (or up to a couple weeks) before eating. Let the cookies sit at room temperature for about 45 minutes before serving.

The last resource I want to offer you before I leave you with my recipe is an article that I found extremely helpful in my quest for the perfect macaron, called Macarons: Tips, Tricks and How to Macaronnage by Bake it Off.
Happy Macaron-Making, Everyone!
Pistachio Macarons with Rose Buttercream
(Yield: About 20 filled macarons)
Macarons:
2 1/2 oz (70.9 gm or about 2 large) egg whites (ounces measured by weight, not volume)
4 oz (113.4 gm or 1 cup) powdered sugar (also called confectioner’s, icing, or 10X sugar)
2 oz (56.7 gm or 1/2 cup) almond meal/flour*
Pinch fine salt
1/4 teaspoon pure pistachio extract (use almond extract if you can’t find this)
About 5 drops liquid green food color
1 1/2 oz (42.5 gm or 3 tablespoons) superfine (castor) sugar
Equipment (for macarons):
Handheld electric mixer
Rubber spatula
Piping bag fitted with 1/2-inch round tip
Baking pans
Parchment paper or silpat liners
Buttercream:
1 large egg white
2 3/4 oz (77.962 gm or 1/3 cup) sugar
Pinch salt
1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 teaspoon rose water
3-5 drops liquid red food color
Equipment (for buttercream):
Double boiler
Whisk
Stand mixer
Instructions for Macarons:
Step 1: Line 2 half sheet pans with parchment paper or silpat liners.
Step 2: Fill a bowl with hot water from the faucet (it should be about 105F); put the eggs in the water and let them sit until they come to room temperature. (Check them and turn them over every few minutes so they can come up to temperature on both sides. They’re ready when they don’t feel hot or cold to the touch. You may need to add more hot water if they’re not warming up fast enough.) Once the eggs are the right temperature, remove them from the water and dry them off. Separate the yolks from the whites, measuring 2 1/2 oz egg whites for this recipe (you don’t need the yolks for this recipe).
Step 3: In a medium bowl, whisk or sift together the powdered sugar, almond meal, and salt (or you can pulse it together a few times in a food processor).
Step 4: Put the egg whites in a medium bowl and use a handheld electric mixer to whip. When the egg whites are foamy (this should only take a few seconds), gradually add the superfine sugar while still beating. When you have stiff, glossy peaks, beat in the pistachio extract and green food color.
Step 5: Use a rubber spatula to gently fold the almond meal mixture into the egg whites. Only fold the batter in one direction by sliding the spatula into the center of the batter, then lifting it up and letting the batter fall back onto itself. It generally takes about 50 strokes to work the batter, but this number isn’t as important as how the batter looks. The batter is ready to pipe when it has a smooth, shiny surface and flows like lava in one large ribbon off the spatula. Here is an easy way to see if the batter is ready: use a rubber spatula to lift and drop the batter onto itself; if the ribbon gradually disappears into the batter within 30 seconds, it’s ready to go.
Step 6: Pour the batter into a pastry bag fitted with a round tip (1/2 inch in diameter); hold the piping bag straight (i.e., at a 90 degree angle) above baking sheet and pipe 1-inch circles onto the prepared sheet. (You should get about 40 macarons.) Leave about 1 inch between each macaron. Tap each tray a couple times on the countertop to help flatten out the macarons and get rid of any air bubbles. The macarons should not have points on top.
Step 7: Let the macarons sit at room temperature until they form a shell that’s dry to the touch (this could take anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours or more, depending on the weather).
Step 8: Once the macarons are dry to the touch, preheat oven to 300F; once up to temperature, bake both trays at the same time for 10 to 20 minutes, rotating trays once. Let the macarons cool completely on parchment paper or silpat liner before removing.
Step 9: To fill the macarons, pair up similar sized cookies. Pipe filling onto the bottom of one macaron, then place the matching macaron on top of filling.
Step 10: Line an airtight lidded container with parchment paper and carefully arrange the macarons inside; let them sit in the fridge for a day or 2 (or up to a couple weeks) before eating. Let the cookies sit at room temperature for about 45 minutes before serving.
Instructions for Buttercream: In a double boiler, whisk together the egg whites and sugar. Heat until the sugar is dissolved and the mixture is warm (about 140F), about 3 to 5 minutes, whisking frequently. Transfer the egg white/sugar mixture to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Add the salt and beat on high speed until the mixture is thick and glossy, about 5 to 7 minutes. Gradually add the butter piece by piece while beating, then beat in the rose water and red food color; stop beating when the buttercream is thick and smooth.
*For this recipe I used almond meal because I couldn’t find pistachio meal (and I’ve learned from past mistakes not to try to grind my own nut meal/flour at home :) ). If you have access to pistachio meal/flour and would like to try it in this recipe, let me know how it turns out!
Processed Powdered Sugar, Almond Meal, & Salt Foamy Egg Whites
Lovely Stiff Peaks
Mixing, Mixing, Mixing…
Flowing Like Lava in One Large Ribbon off the Spatula
Here is an easy way to see if the batter is ready: use a rubber spatula to lift and drop the batter onto itself; if the ribbon gradually disappears into the batter within 30 seconds, it’s ready to go.
Easiest Way to Fill a Pastry Bag
Pretty Little Piped Circles
Some Gorgeous Feet!
http://www.anediblemosaic.com/?p=4223

Reply

جوري
11-13-2012, 10:10 PM
look what I found:

Eid Mubarak & My Macaron Story

Eid Mubarak! I want to wish everyone a very happy Eid al-Adha! You might remember that for Eid al-Fitr (which is the Eid celebration at the end of Ramadan) I made Syrian Ice Cream, which was flavored with lovely things like pistachio and rose. As a play on those lovely flavors I wanted to remake them into another dessert, Pistachio Macarons with Rose Buttercream. I chose macarons because they’re special and very celebratory, and besides, with all my failed attempts and macaron-making woes, I thought it was high time I mastered the recipe. Without further ado, I give you my macaron story.
* * *
I’ve gone and mentioned the unmentionable. Made the unmakeable (at least for me!). Macarons, those little fear and lust-inciting bites of heaven are indeed the topic I’m tackling today. Since they’re no longer my nemesis, I feel like I can speak freely of them. Share my knowledge on the topic, in hopes of helping someone out there who, like myself, had been beaten by them on several occasions prior.
You see, the first time I made them (which was just over a year ago) I tried grinding my own almond meal. It turned into nut butter and I (ever the optimist) still continued onward with the recipe. As you can probably guess, it wasn’t pretty. The second time I made them (which was during the summer) was on a hot and humid day but I thought that since I was making them in a climate-controlled environment the weather wouldn’t be an issue. Turns out, it was. The third time I made them I didn’t quite work the batter enough to achieve macronnage (what a taunting word that is!). I was getting closer though, at least they had feet! I continued on in this way a few more times, each time failing but learning something. (You might be wondering why I persisted in my macaron experimentation for over a year. Maybe the simultaneous best and worst thing about me (definitely my Achilles’ heel anyway) is that when I set my mind on mastering something there really isn’t any way I can be dissuaded. And I refused to let a cookie beat me, lol!) And now I present you with my masterpiece, which has produced consistently beautiful results on three separate occasions.
When I first started looking for a macaron recipe to make I was blown away by the sheer volume of recipes out there. I finally decided to start with Martha Stewart’s recipe for Parisian Macaroons (I figure she didn’t get to be the domestic goddess she is by having non-workable recipes, right?). Sadly, the recipe didn’t work for me. I ended up making so many alterations and tweaks throughout my experimentation process that my masterpiece no longer looks anything like Martha’s original recipe. The other thing that completely frustrated me when I was looking for a macaron recipe is the fact that most recipes only give ingredient amounts in grams, ounces, or cups, but never all three (when you’re playing around with a recipe, this is really helpful information to have)! This is why for my masterpiece I list amounts in grams, ounces, and cups.
The trickiest thing about making macarons is that there are so many variables that affect the end result. Here are some tips I’ve discovered during my macaron project:

  1. Weather: Don’t make macarons on a day that’s too hot or humid.
  2. Baking Pan: Choose your baking pan carefully. Since I don’t have special insulated macaron pans, I like to use heavy-duty half sheet pans.
  3. Almonds: Don’t try to grind your own almonds. I was ambitious enough to think that my food processor was capable of a fine grind…of course I ended up with almond butter before I had a grind that was fine enough.
  4. Eggs: I don’t bother with old eggs or room temperature eggs or special eggs that have been laid from super chickens; instead, I use a pretty fool-proof method. I put the eggs in a small bowl and fill it with hot water from the faucet (about 105F). Once the eggs don’t feel hot or cold to the touch, they’re ready to use.
  5. Macronnage: This crucial step is where macarons are truly made. The batter is finicky in that it needs to be worked enough so that the feet develop and there are no points on top, but not worked too much, which will result in the macarons being flat or cracked. It’s a fine line, my friends. Here is an easy way to see if the batter is ready: use a rubber spatula to lift and drop the batter onto itself; if the ribbon gradually disappears into the batter within 30 seconds, it’s ready to go. If this step is done correctly, you will not end up with points on top of the macarons; by the time you’re done piping the first row, the points will have disappeared. (In the past, I’ve used a damp finger to push the points down; granted, this does get rid of the points, however it doesn’t fix the underlying problem, which is that the batter wasn’t worked long enough).
  6. Piping: Start off by fitting a pastry bag with a round 1/2 inch tip. Put the bag in a tall glass and pour the batter in. You’re ready to pipe. Hold the bag straight above the tray (this gives you the most control of how fast the batter comes out) and gently apply pressure to squeeze out 1-inch circles. Speaking from experience, you will get much better at this with practice.
  7. The Shell: Let the macarons sit at room temperature before baking until they form a shell that’s dry to the touch. How long this takes depends on the temperature, humidity level, and how fickle the macaron batter is feeling that day. In general, this can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours or more.
  8. Baking Time: Determining when macarons are done baking can be somewhat tricky, as baking time can vary based on several factors, including your oven, the weather, how big you piped your macs, etc. At the oven temperature I use (300F), baking time ranges from about 10 to 20 minutes. The best thing you can do is to start checking them for doneness around 10 minutes, and keep a close eye on them after that. Macarons are done baking when the feet are formed, the top feels firm (but is not browned), and the insides are set. When they’re cooked all the way, they should easily come off parchment paper or a silicone baking sheet once they’re cooled (you can just peel them off or use a thin metal spatula), and the bottoms of the cookies should be flat.
  9. Aging: Like most things, macarons get better over time (in this case, after a little aging in the fridge). (Aging not only helps the flavors develop and mesh, but if you happened to overbake your macs a teensy bit, the moisture from the filling will soak into the cookies, helping you end up with perfectly chewy macs.) Aging them is easy: line an airtight lidded container with parchment paper, carefully arrange the macarons inside, and let them sit in the fridge for a day or two (or up to a couple weeks) before eating. Let the cookies sit at room temperature for about 45 minutes before serving.

The last resource I want to offer you before I leave you with my recipe is an article that I found extremely helpful in my quest for the perfect macaron, called Macarons: Tips, Tricks and How to Macaronnage by Bake it Off.
Happy Macaron-Making, Everyone!
Pistachio Macarons with Rose Buttercream
(Yield: About 20 filled macarons)
Macarons:
2 1/2 oz (70.9 gm or about 2 large) egg whites (ounces measured by weight, not volume)
4 oz (113.4 gm or 1 cup) powdered sugar (also called confectioner’s, icing, or 10X sugar)
2 oz (56.7 gm or 1/2 cup) almond meal/flour*
Pinch fine salt
1/4 teaspoon pure pistachio extract (use almond extract if you can’t find this)
About 5 drops liquid green food color
1 1/2 oz (42.5 gm or 3 tablespoons) superfine (castor) sugar
Equipment (for macarons):
Handheld electric mixer
Rubber spatula
Piping bag fitted with 1/2-inch round tip
Baking pans
Parchment paper or silpat liners
Buttercream:
1 large egg white
2 3/4 oz (77.962 gm or 1/3 cup) sugar
Pinch salt
1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 teaspoon rose water
3-5 drops liquid red food color
Equipment (for buttercream):
Double boiler
Whisk
Stand mixer
Instructions for Macarons:
Step 1: Line 2 half sheet pans with parchment paper or silpat liners.
Step 2: Fill a bowl with hot water from the faucet (it should be about 105F); put the eggs in the water and let them sit until they come to room temperature. (Check them and turn them over every few minutes so they can come up to temperature on both sides. They’re ready when they don’t feel hot or cold to the touch. You may need to add more hot water if they’re not warming up fast enough.) Once the eggs are the right temperature, remove them from the water and dry them off. Separate the yolks from the whites, measuring 2 1/2 oz egg whites for this recipe (you don’t need the yolks for this recipe).
Step 3: In a medium bowl, whisk or sift together the powdered sugar, almond meal, and salt (or you can pulse it together a few times in a food processor).
Step 4: Put the egg whites in a medium bowl and use a handheld electric mixer to whip. When the egg whites are foamy (this should only take a few seconds), gradually add the superfine sugar while still beating. When you have stiff, glossy peaks, beat in the pistachio extract and green food color.
Step 5: Use a rubber spatula to gently fold the almond meal mixture into the egg whites. Only fold the batter in one direction by sliding the spatula into the center of the batter, then lifting it up and letting the batter fall back onto itself. It generally takes about 50 strokes to work the batter, but this number isn’t as important as how the batter looks. The batter is ready to pipe when it has a smooth, shiny surface and flows like lava in one large ribbon off the spatula. Here is an easy way to see if the batter is ready: use a rubber spatula to lift and drop the batter onto itself; if the ribbon gradually disappears into the batter within 30 seconds, it’s ready to go.
Step 6: Pour the batter into a pastry bag fitted with a round tip (1/2 inch in diameter); hold the piping bag straight (i.e., at a 90 degree angle) above baking sheet and pipe 1-inch circles onto the prepared sheet. (You should get about 40 macarons.) Leave about 1 inch between each macaron. Tap each tray a couple times on the countertop to help flatten out the macarons and get rid of any air bubbles. The macarons should not have points on top.
Step 7: Let the macarons sit at room temperature until they form a shell that’s dry to the touch (this could take anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours or more, depending on the weather).
Step 8: Once the macarons are dry to the touch, preheat oven to 300F; once up to temperature, bake both trays at the same time for 10 to 20 minutes, rotating trays once. Let the macarons cool completely on parchment paper or silpat liner before removing.
Step 9: To fill the macarons, pair up similar sized cookies. Pipe filling onto the bottom of one macaron, then place the matching macaron on top of filling.
Step 10: Line an airtight lidded container with parchment paper and carefully arrange the macarons inside; let them sit in the fridge for a day or 2 (or up to a couple weeks) before eating. Let the cookies sit at room temperature for about 45 minutes before serving.
Instructions for Buttercream: In a double boiler, whisk together the egg whites and sugar. Heat until the sugar is dissolved and the mixture is warm (about 140F), about 3 to 5 minutes, whisking frequently. Transfer the egg white/sugar mixture to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Add the salt and beat on high speed until the mixture is thick and glossy, about 5 to 7 minutes. Gradually add the butter piece by piece while beating, then beat in the rose water and red food color; stop beating when the buttercream is thick and smooth.
*For this recipe I used almond meal because I couldn’t find pistachio meal (and I’ve learned from past mistakes not to try to grind my own nut meal/flour at home :) ). If you have access to pistachio meal/flour and would like to try it in this recipe, let me know how it turns out!
Processed Powdered Sugar, Almond Meal, & Salt Foamy Egg Whites
Lovely Stiff Peaks
Mixing, Mixing, Mixing…
Flowing Like Lava in One Large Ribbon off the Spatula
Here is an easy way to see if the batter is ready: use a rubber spatula to lift and drop the batter onto itself; if the ribbon gradually disappears into the batter within 30 seconds, it’s ready to go.
Easiest Way to Fill a Pastry Bag
Pretty Little Piped Circles
Some Gorgeous Feet!
http://www.anediblemosaic.com/?p=4223

Reply

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