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Aprender
09-19-2012, 07:32 PM


I remember when I first entered into Islam I got an overload of that's haram. This is haram. Everything just seemed haram to the point where I second guessed my conversion to Islam for a moment there. It was suffocating.
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Hulk
09-19-2012, 07:37 PM
Haha coincidentally I'm watching another video of his now from the same channel, will check it out right after!:statisfie
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IbnAbdulHakim
09-19-2012, 07:40 PM
Alhamdulillaah - what a great GREAT video! GREAT!!!!


Allaah has made islam easy !! WE MAKE IT HARD.


why do I want to fill my nafs with movies and the such when Allaah has said that everything is cursed save his remembrance. why am i making life hard for myself. may Allah grant me understanding
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Hulk
09-19-2012, 08:24 PM
Originally Posted by Aprender
I remember when I first entered into Islam I got an overload of that's haram. This is haram. Everything just seemed haram to the point where I second guessed my conversion to Islam for a moment there. It was suffocating.
Just knowing that you second guessed your conversion worries me because I'm sure there are others who might be experiencing it as well.. It's certainly true that we should inform fellow muslims if something is haram but it's important to actually be sure that it is haram and also whether scholars have differing opinions on it. If there are differing opinions, then at least include that there are differing opinions (khilaf).
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Aprender
09-19-2012, 10:04 PM
Hmm. I guess I got jerked around a bit. Had some people try to convince me to become a shia, had some people tell me haraam this haraam that until the point it almost seemed haraam to be a woman and haraam to be an American -_-

I think what helped me stick with it was staying away from most Muslims because a lot of it was cultural and spending a good amount of my time reading Quran, watching lectures and trying to increase my knowledge in this deen. I'm glad I did it because now I at least have some of the basics down enough to where I know what's OK and what's not OK for the most part.

Before it was overwhelming. And I do know a few new Muslims who find it overwhelming too and are taking it very, very slowly. Especially the sisters but sadly some end up leaving all together because others make Islam seem so difficult... I can definitely say that I felt attacked in the beginning for not instantly doing everything right.
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Ibn Abi Ahmed
09-19-2012, 10:58 PM
I love Imam Suhaib.
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~Zaria~
09-19-2012, 11:05 PM
Assalamu-alaikum,

JazakAllah khayrun ukthi, for sharing this video, as well as your struggles as a new revert to the deen of Allah.
SubhanAllah.
May Allah reward you and keep you on the siraatul mustaqeem.
Ameen.

MashaAllah, its a very good video.

I just hope that we can also realise that from a practical point of view - its not always so simple.

Sometimes, everything seems alot simpler, when we possess very little knowledge about something.
And then, as we increase in knowledge - that very thing -- appears so much more complex.

This does not mean that we must stop seeking knowledge.

But rather, it means that we need to know how to treat newly-acquired knowledge with respect.
.....and how to remain humble.
.....and to admit our faults.
.....and to accept differences of opinion.

He mentions the 'Illuminati' during his discusssion.
And while he may have passed over it in jest - perhaps willfully or perhaps he truly lacks further knowledge in this field,
--> this does not negate the information available about free-masonary and the illuminati.

Its a real issue in our world.
And I dont think it would be reasonable for us to turn a blind eye......all in the name of keeping things 'simple'.

Also, we should realise that when we know whats 'haraam' - then we know what to stay clear off.
I agree that reverts should not be bombarded with all the impermissibilities of Islam immediately.

But once we have accepted this deen as a way of life, and once we have filled our hearts with love of Allah (subhanawataƔla) and His nabi (sallalahu alaihi wasalam) - then we are ever ready to change our ways, when we realise that we are falling into something that is haraam (or even doubtful).

In fact, it becomes increasingly easy to stay away from haraam, when we know there can be no other way for us.

e.g. a steadfast believer can be surrounded by haraam meat, pork, wine, etc.......and feel no pangs of desire to even partake in it (even if he is hungry or his friends are eating it).
But for someone who is new to Islam/ someone whose imaan is still weak - he/ she may find this more challenging.

And the same can apply for things such as Facebook, Starbucks, etc.

While they may not be haraam - in and off itself - they may lead to haraam/ undesirable actions.

When we understand why we do things.....or chose not to do certain things - for the pleasure of Allah......then we can see past the 'halaal/ haraam' labels - and appreciate the wisdom behind every commandment of Allah.


:wa:
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Muwaahid
09-19-2012, 11:14 PM
Originally Posted by Hulk
Just knowing that you second guessed your conversion worries me because I'm sure there are others who might be experiencing it as well.. It's certainly true that we should inform fellow muslims if something is haram but it's important to actually be sure that it is haram and also whether scholars have differing opinions on it. If there are differing opinions, then at least include that there are differing opinions (khilaf).
Just a quick naseehah [advice]" Al-Ikhtilaaf al-Ulemah laysa bi-hujjah" The Difference of Opinions of the Ulemah [Scholars] is not a hujjah [proof]. I say this because many from amongst the Muslims of today utilize this differing as a positin to follow. Because there maybe ikhtilaaf in an issue people won't adhere to which position carries the most weight but they follow their hawwa [desires] choosing their desires over the evidences. I remember one of the Scholars from Egypt named Shaykh Muhammad Sa'eed Raslaan [hafidhahullaah] mentioning the following statement:


اياك ان ترد الحق و انت تعلم انه حق لأنه يخالف هواك و اياك ان تقبل الباطل و انت تعلم انه باطل لأنه يوافق هواك


"Beware of rejecting the truth when you know it is the truth, [you may] reject it [the truth] because it opposes your [hawwa] desires and beware of accepting the baatil [falsehood or following yor desires] while you know it is falsehood and that is because it agrees with your desires."



So this affair becomes one of Al-Amru Bil Maroof wa Nahiya Ani Munkar [Enjoining what is right and forbidding what is wrong] and not letting our desires overtake our reasoning and acceptance of the truth.
Wa Billaahi-at-Tawfeeq


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IbnAbdulHakim
09-19-2012, 11:23 PM
Al-Hafiz al-Bayhaqi in his book "al-Madkhal" and al-Zarkashi in his "Tadhkirah fi al-ahadith al-mushtaharah" relate: Imam al-Qasim ibn Muhammad ibn Abi Bakr al-Siddiq said: "The differences among the Companions of Muhammad (s) are a mercy for Allah's servants. Al-Hafiz al-`Iraqi the teacher of Ibn Hajar al-`Asqalani said: "This is a saying of al-Qasim ibn Muhammad who said: 'The difference of opinion among the Companions of Muhammad (s) is a mercy.


Bayhaqi also relates in "al-Madkhal" and Zarkashi in the "Tadhkira": Al-Layth ibn Sa`d said on the authority of Yahya ibn Sa`id: "the people of knowledge are the people of flexibility (tawsi`a). Those who give fatwas never cease to differ, and so this one permits something while that one forbids it, without one finding fault with the other when he knows of his position."

Al-Hafiz al-Suyuti says in his short treatise "Jazil al-mawahib fi ikhtilaf al-madhahib" (The Abundant Grants Concerning the Differences Among the Schools): "The hadith "Difference of opinion in my Community is a mercy for people" has many benefits among which are the fact that the Prophet (s) foretold of the differences that would arise after his time among the madhahib in the branches of the law, and this is one of his miracles because it is a foretelling of things unseen. Another benefit is his approval of these differences and his confirmation of them because he characterizes them as a mercy. Another benefit is that the legally responsible person can choose to follow whichever he likes among them." After citing the saying of `Umar ibn `Abd al-`Aziz already quoted (#3 above), Suyuti says: "This indicates that what is meant is their differences in the rulings in the branches of the law."
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Hulk
09-19-2012, 11:51 PM
Originally Posted by Muwaahid
Just a quick naseehah [advice]" Al-Ikhtilaaf al-Ulemah laysa bi-hujjah" The Difference of Opinions of the Ulemah [Scholars] is not a hujjah [proof]. I say this because many from amongst the Muslims of today utilize this differing as a positin to follow. Because there maybe ikhtilaaf in an issue people won't adhere to which position carries the most weight but they follow their hawwa [desires] choosing their desires over the evidences. I remember one of the Scholars from Egypt named Shaykh Muhammad Sa'eed Raslaan [hafidhahullaah] mentioning the following statement:
"Beware of rejecting the truth when you know it is the truth, [you may] reject it [the truth] because it opposes your [hawwa] desires and beware of accepting the baatil [falsehood or following yor desires] while you know it is falsehood and that is because it agrees with your desires."

So this affair becomes one of Al-Amru Bil Maroof wa Nahiya Ani Munkar [Enjoining what is right and forbidding what is wrong] and not letting our desires overtake our reasoning and acceptance of the truth.
Wa Billaahi-at-Tawfeeq
It's the same reason why we're not supposed to mix and match madhhabs. The purpose however of letting it be known about differences of opinion is so that people won't go "haram! haram!" when you see someone that might be doing something you didn't know scholars have different opinions on.
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CosmicPathos
09-20-2012, 12:46 AM
Originally Posted by Aprender
Hmm. I guess I got jerked around a bit. Had some people try to convince me to become a shia, had some people tell me haraam this haraam that until the point it almost seemed haraam to be a woman and haraam to be an American -_-
jazakAllah for sharing your interesting story.

I do understand that being born in America (I am assuming, please correct me), you feel an immense connection with your nation-state. But we should also keep in mind that these nation-states, which most of us so willfully pay allegiance to, we had no role to play in the drafting of its boundaries, we had no role to play in penning down its anthem, we had no role to play in designing its flag. When one thinks about that, one is left wondering how unenlightening it is to be patriotic and to be nationalistic.

That is precisely what Islam teaches us. And that is how it has been in Islamic history for most of it. Muslim state or Daar ul Islaam where a Muslim needed no passport to travel across it. When a Muslim enlisted in army of Daar-ul-Islam, he was doing it for sake of Allah, not for sake of his province, or his country, as there was no concept of nation-states.

So, as Muslims, we should all strive to get rid of the nationalistic tribalism.

We, as Muslims, should be proud of what we achieve as humans and Muslims, and not of what we are by simply being born in certain nation-state!

And yourself being a pol sci major, I am sure you understand how things really are than they seem to be.

And lastly, thanks for sharing that beneficial video.
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Muwaahid
09-20-2012, 05:02 AM
Originally Posted by Hulk
It's the same reason why we're not supposed to mix and match madhhabs. The purpose however of letting it be known about differences of is so that people won't go "haram! haram!" when you see someone that might be doing something you didn't know scholars have different opinions on.
I am not calling to any madhaahib nor did Allaah legislate for humanity to follow a madhhab blindly. Our Ittiba [following] is based upon evidence from the Kitaab and the Sunnah upon the understanding of the companions [radhia Allaahu anhum ajmaa'een] we follow texts not madhaahib. By Allaah I am not trying to argue with you akhee Hulk Im just clarifying some grey areas in your post that may open the door to misguidance. We consider our ittiba based on the kitaab and the sunnah upon the understanding of the companions and whatever madhhab posesses that evidence and is correct we follow that and we dont stick tenaciously to any personality other than the Prophet [sallallaahu alayhi wa sallam].
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