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dianan
12-22-2013, 07:00 AM
Hi there,

I'm starting out producing a meat-free salami-style sausage commercially. Because no animals are harmed in the making of the salami, and it's peacefully produced, I would like to call the product "Salaam." My question is whether calling a food product like this "Salaam" could be offensive to Muslims. If anyone could help me out with this question, it would be most appreciated.

Thanks

D
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ardianto
12-22-2013, 08:39 AM
Hello dianan

Salaam means "peace". It's okay, no Muslim will be offended if you use Salaam as your product brand.

:)
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Futuwwa
12-22-2013, 10:36 AM
Well, it would not be directly offensive as such, but possibly misleading. Maybe instead call it "Salaami" ?
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Muhammad
12-22-2013, 12:15 PM
Hello,

My personal view is that I would not like the names Salaam and salami to be linked with each other (especially as would happen if the product was called Salaami) because for Muslims, 'salaam' is a very beautiful and respected action of greeting one another with God's mercy and blessings. It is also attached to other great meanings. Using it in this way could be construed as demeaning the term or even mocking it. But if there won't be a connection with those terms then as a brand name it may be acceptable.

But another aspect is, as it is an Arabic term, Muslims may assume the product is being made by Muslims and might lend it more trust in terms of being Halal (allowed to eat), so this would be misleading. Although it is meat-free, there are other ingredients they need to look out for.

I hope you can decide on a suitable name for your product and that it is successful.
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M.I.A.
12-22-2013, 01:17 PM
salaam basmati is already a branded form of rice.

..popular aswell.


but as a play on words salaam salami may or may not work.. salaami is still pretty funneh
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ardianto
12-22-2013, 01:57 PM
Originally Posted by M.I.A.
salaam basmati is already a branded form of rice.
Not only for basmati rice, salaam/salam is already used as name for various products. Even there is Salaam football club.
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Muhaba
12-22-2013, 04:01 PM
You may want to target your marketing to vegetarians and therefore use a name that will appeal to vegetarians instead of giving it a name related to Muslims. Muslims don't have to refrain from eating meat so a meatless salami isn't special for them.
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Scimitar
12-22-2013, 04:49 PM
personally i believe the best type of endorsement is putting your name to a product... it shows you are proud enough of your product to put your name to it.

Don't do a Harun Yahya and hide behind a veil of anonymity - if your name is Ahmad Idris, call your product "Ahmed Idris' Vegetarian Salami"

same way Captain Birdseye makes fish fingers :) nom nom nom

Scimi
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Muhaba
12-22-2013, 04:53 PM
Brand names are used as marketing techniques. The name can affect sales and popularity. Ahmad Idrees may not be as effective as Harun Yahya! However, the name is only one part of effective marketing. Sales practices and customer service are also very important. If the name is great but everything else sucks, the brand won't be successful for long.
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tearose
12-22-2013, 06:18 PM
Hello,
I also think you should avoid this name, but it is good that you checked about it. I hope you find a suitable name God willing.
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Scimitar
12-22-2013, 07:01 PM
Originally Posted by Dreamin
Brand names are used as marketing techniques. The name can affect sales and popularity. Ahmad Idrees may not be as effective as Harun Yahya! However, the name is only one part of effective marketing. Sales practices and customer service are also very important. If the name is great but everything else sucks, the brand won't be successful for long.
I believe he already knows this - the purpose of his question was to find out if using the word Salaam would be appropriate for a vegetarian line of products - another member already replied in relation to this, my advice was to give his name as an endorsement to his products.

As for marketing, that's down to the budget he can afford, and the strategy he wants to implement.

As for customer service, that hardly has anything to do with a brand name - its to do with service.

As for everything else, its all good.

I wish him the best.

Scimi
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Urban Turban
12-24-2013, 05:15 PM
:sl:

First and foremost, I invite sister dianan to Islam.
And its very good of you to ask regarding the matter.

And I agree with what brother Muhammad said, also remember 'Salaam' is also one of Allah's names (see Asma ul Husna) which means peace, tranquility.
Also you could put the question to Scholars well versed in Islamic jurisprudence..visit http://www.ilmhub.com


:wa:
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muslimah bird
12-26-2013, 01:38 PM
Nothing wrong with the brand name .can go ahead and use it
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tearose
12-26-2013, 02:20 PM
Originally Posted by Urban Turban
And I agree with what brother Muhammad said, also remember 'Salaam' is also one of Allah's names (see Asma ul Husna) which means peace, tranquility.
As-salaamu 3laikum,

Definitely we should not use one of the names of Allah (subhanahu wa taala) for advertising products
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Insaanah
12-26-2013, 02:51 PM
Greetings Dianan and welcome to the forum.

Thank you for thinking to ask about this issue.

Salami originally is a product forbidden for Muslims, as traditionally it would contain beef, pork, and wine. Certain products, such as sausages, salami, ham, bacon, if they are "imitation" products made from halal meat, or vegetarian, will still be avoided by many Muslims, simply because of the name or product association, it's appearance, the fact that they are highly processed and have other added ingredients not found in fresh meat, and that it imitates an originally and predominantly haram product. A name such as salaam, a word familiar to Muslims, may give the impression that the product has some kind of halal certification, or that it is produced by Muslims who would take care with regards to cross contamination in machinery, utensils etc, and with regards to the halalness of other added ingredients, and thus could be potentially misleading.
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