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Plutonium
02-12-2014, 09:06 PM
Hi, this is my first post and the reason I registered.
There is a paradox that is unexplainable, please read FULLY and give your thuoghts and give citations if quoting Quran:

Part I
Why is life unfair? Some people have a lot while some people have a little. Good things happen to bad people and bad things to good people. How come I have less then some people and more than others? That is unfair

Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again
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'Abd-al Latif
02-12-2014, 09:31 PM
I wish I had the time to respond. I really do. But I'll have to leave it to someone else to answer this question as I have to go. But one thing you must understand is that Allah is never unfair. It's our lack of insight, knowledge of Allah's decree and understanding of His justice that we arrive at the wrong conclusion that Allah is unjust.

In the meantime consider and contemplate over this little comic strip below, the message which ironically isn't comical but perfectly illustrates how people think Allah's decree is unfair:

Reply

جوري
02-12-2014, 09:39 PM
The deeper your faith the more you're tested... there are gradations of paradise and for that people should aspire. Furthermore, if you're tested and you pass your test and it draws you closer to God then it is a good thing, if drives you away then it is a bad thing... so your response to strife is telling of your relationship with God.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 09:47 PM
Originally Posted by 'Abd-al Latif
I wish I had the time to respond. I really do. But I'll have to leave it to someone else to answer this question as I have to go.
Thank you. InshAllah when you get time you will return to explain it with more detail.

But one thing you must understand is that Allah is never unfair. It's our lack of insight, knowledge of Allah's decree and understanding of His justice that we arrive at the wrong conclusion that Allah is unjust.
In the meantime consider and contemplate over this little comic strip below, the message which ironically isn't comical but perfectly illustrates how people think Allah's decree is unfair:
The picture however, just goes to further the paradox.
Reply

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M.I.A.
02-12-2014, 09:48 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Hi, this is my first post and the reason I registered.
There is a paradox that is unexplainable, please read FULLY and give your thuoghts and give citations if quoting Quran:

Part I
Why is life unfair? Some people have a lot while some people have a little. Good things happen to bad people and bad things to good people. How come I have less then some people and more than others? That is unfair

Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again
depends on what you love.

i would rather have had fancy cars for other people to play with.

but allah swt knows best.


i feel like taking very little from anything after a certain time of struggle.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 09:54 PM
Originally Posted by جوري
The deeper your faith the more you're tested... there are gradations of paradise and for that people should aspire. Furthermore, if you're tested and you pass your test and it draws you closer to God then it is a good thing, if drives you away then it is a bad thing... so your response to strife is telling of your relationship with God.
Thank you. While what you have written is a response, it is not an answer to the question posted, but an answer to another question which was not asked.
Reply

جوري
02-12-2014, 09:56 PM
I don't think your first question is answerable. Simply it is subjective and everyone whether rich or poor has their private hell to live. Some people are given all their dues in this life, thus they're owed nothing in the here after.
Al-Imran [3:178]
وَلاَ يَحْسَبَنَّ الَّذِينَ كَفَرُواْ أَنَّمَا نُمْلِي لَهُمْ خَيْرٌ لِّأَنفُسِهِمْ إِنَّمَا نُمْلِي لَهُمْ لِيَزْدَادُواْ إِثْمًا وَلَهْمُ عَذَابٌ مُّهِينٌ

Wala yahsabanna allatheena kafaroo annama numlee lahum khayrun lianfusihim innama numlee lahum liyazdadoo ithman walahum AAathabun muheenun
3:178 Let not the Unbelievers think that our respite to them is good for themselves: We grant them respite that they may grow in their iniquity: But they will have a shameful punishment.
Reply

syed_z
02-12-2014, 09:56 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again

The Earth even though it seems like an unfair place where everything is going wrong, but if you really look at it, is the best testing ground of Allah for mankind.

For a believer everything that happened in this world is tied to the hereafter. The child example is best.

The Prophet (saw) Said If a man and a wife loose their child in this world then that Child on the day of Judgment will beg Allah (Swt) to let them enter paradise with him, and will not let them go till Allah (swt) allows him to take them along to Paradise.

So what seems unfair is actually Mercy..... Mercy in the hereafter for Parents who might have a lot of sins on them and would have to pay, had there not been a child whom Allah (swt) had taken the life of, through whom Allah (Swt) will forgive them.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 09:56 PM
Originally Posted by M.I.A.
depends on what you love.

i would rather have had fancy cars for other people to play with.

but allah swt knows best.


i feel like taking very little from anything after a certain time of struggle.
Thank you, but please eloborate with how this connects to the question so that we can share your thoughts.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:02 PM
Originally Posted by syed_z
The Earth even though it seems like an unfair place where everything is going wrong, but if you really look at it, is the best testing ground of Allah for mankind.

For a believer everything that happened in this world is tied to the hereafter. The child example is best.

The Prophet (saw) Said If a man and a wife loose their child in this world then that Child on the day of Judgment will beg Allah (Swt) to let them enter paradise with him, and will not let them go till Allah (swt) allows him to take them along to Paradise.

So what seems unfair is actually Mercy..... Mercy in the hereafter for Parents who might have a lot of sins on them and would have to pay, had there not been a child whom Allah (swt) had taken the life of, through whom Allah (Swt) will forgive them.
Thank you, however this example us one that highlights how unfair it is: The child does not get a test (how come?) while the parent who have sinned get a free pass to go to heaven becuase their child vouches for them (Unfair again).
Reply

syed_z
02-12-2014, 10:16 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Thank you, however this example us one that highlights how unfair it is: The child does not get a test (how come?) while the parent who have sinned get a free pass to go to heaven becuase their child vouches for them (Unfair again).

No its actually a Mercy....


The Child did not get a test and the parents got a test, might seem unfair.... maybe... but Test does not only mean difficulties, it means falling in to temptations (enjoying the wolrd and following your desires as opposed to Allah's commandments) and then getting punished in the hereafter for it, not necessarily in this world....but in the hereafter Allah (swt) lets them go...


but that not only what it looks like...there is another way of looking at this, for example the Quran mentions in Surah Kahf... a Child is killed but the consequences are different....


So they set out, until when they met a boy, al-Khidhr killed him. [Moses] said, "Have you killed a pure soul for other than [having killed] a soul? You have certainly done a deplorable thing." (18:74)

And as for the boy, his parents were believers, and we feared that he would overburden them by transgression and disbelief. So we intended that their Lord should substitute for them one better than him in purity and nearer to mercy. (18:80-81)



In this case the boy was going to be a disbeliever and his parents in love of their child (A test) would have succumbed to his wishes thus falling in to disbelief as well.... and so Allah (swt) saved the child from punishment in the here after....then Allah (swt) would give them a child who would be pure in belief and who would serve them .....this way the parents get good in this world and due to their 1st child passing away get easy pass to paradise as well.

So its just how you look at it. There is Mercy of Allah (swt) in everything, one has to be pateint to realize it.
Reply

drk
02-12-2014, 10:27 PM
Great topic !!!:rolleyes:

I personally think, that's us people we can not possibly understand God in terms of our way of thinking.
I don't think, for us is to figure Him out, but rather get to know Him and follow His teachings and apply these teachings in our personal life. When we do this, then our life will be serene, peaceful..etc. that what He guarantee to us and we will have God in our hearts and on whats in our heart we will act upon in our daily acts of life and that will be a proof to other people.
I will give you an example of Mother Teresa of Kolkata, India. Do you think what she did she needed to become a Christian? the answer is No !!! Any body could or would of done it, so why she did it?!
She showed the entire whole world that it is possible for a person to act upon of what is God all about: by becoming a loving, compassionate, merciful, forgiving person towards others without judging of that others.
There are good people out there and there are bad people out there, I think its is all about personal choice and how we deal with those choice in our daily life.
I don't want to bring Christian teaching to this topic but I think you might get general idea of what I am trying to say.
Reply

Scimitar
02-12-2014, 10:28 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Hi, this is my first post and the reason I registered.
There is a paradox that is unexplainable, please read FULLY and give your thuoghts and give citations if quoting Quran:

Part I
Why is life unfair? Some people have a lot while some people have a little. Good things happen to bad people and bad things to good people. How come I have less then some people and more than others? That is unfair

Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again
That paradox, is part and parcel of the Law of Duality - it exists in every creation, in order to prove one thing - Only Allah is Singular!

The theology is deep, so is the philosophy behind it. I'd advice reading some Al Ghazali in order to expand your philosophical horizons.

Scimi
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:33 PM
Originally Posted by syed_z
No its actually a Mercy....


The Child did not get a test and the parents got a test, might seem unfair.... maybe... but Test does not only mean difficulties, it means falling in to temptations and then getting punished in the hereafter for it, not necessarily in this world....but in the hereafter Allah (swt) let them go...


but that not only what it looks like...there is another way of looking at this, for example the Quran mentions in Surah Kahf... a Child is killed but the consequences are different....


So they set out, until when they met a boy, al-Khidhr killed him. [Moses] said, "Have you killed a pure soul for other than [having killed] a soul? You have certainly done a deplorable thing." (18:74)

And as for the boy, his parents were believers, and we feared that he would overburden them by transgression and disbelief. So we intended that their Lord should substitute for them one better than him in purity and nearer to mercy. (18:80-81)



In this case the boy was going to be a disbeliever and his parents in love of their child (A test) would have succumbed to his wishes thus falling in to disbelief as well.... and so Allah (swt) saved the child from punishment in the here after....then Allah (swt) would give them a child who would be pure in belief and who would serve them .....this way the parents get good in this world and due to their 1st child passing away get easy pass to paradise as well.

So its just how you look at it. There is Mercy of Allah (swt) in everything, one has to be pateint to realize it.
Thank you for your efforts but what you have written is again an example of being unfair:
1. The child was saved from punishment... how come God doesn't save us all? Unfair.
2. The parents were saved... Again, they were saved from the child who would make them disbelievers so god didn't give them that test otherwise they would've failed it. Unfair.
3. "God gives mercy to some" = This is a definition of unfair when some people get mercy (especially the child) and others don't.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:36 PM
Originally Posted by Scimitar
That paradox, is part and parcel of the Law of Duality - it exists in every creation, in order to prove one thing - Only Allah is Singular!

The theology is deep, so is the philosophy behind it. I'd advice reading some Al Ghazali in order to expand your philosophical horizons.

Scimi
Thank you for your advice, but it would be appreciated if you share your thoughts (since you have read the book) rather than not answer yourself.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:39 PM
Originally Posted by drk
Great topic !!!:rolleyes:

I personally think, that's us people we can not possibly understand God in terms of our way of thinking.
I don't think, for us is to figure Him out, but rather get to know Him and follow His teachings and apply these teachings in our personal life. When we do this, then our life will be serene, peaceful..etc. that what He guarantee to us and we will have God in our hearts and on whats in our heart we will act upon in our daily acts of life and that will be a proof to other people.
I will give you an example of Mother Teresa of Kolkata, India. Do you think what she did she needed to become a Christian? the answer is No !!! Any body could or would of done it, so why she did it?!
She showed the entire whole world that it is possible for a person to act upon of what is God all about: by becoming a loving, compassionate, merciful, forgiving person towards others without judging of that others.
There are good people out there and there are bad people out there, I think its is all about personal choice and how we deal with those choice in our daily life.
I don't want to bring Christian teaching to this topic but I think you might get general idea of what I am trying to say.
Thank you for your response. If you have some time, please elaborate some more specifically to the question asked so that I can share your comments and thoughts more accurately because I am not seeing the connection. But thank you.
Reply

M.I.A.
02-12-2014, 10:39 PM
i actually dont have the words to elaborate. for once.

im a speck of sand on the earth.


i could easily give all i earned if it kept the things i cared about safe..

and stupidly sometimes i have.


i guess allah swt knows even if nobody else does...


i dont know about fairness.
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'Abd-al Latif
02-12-2014, 10:45 PM
Define the word 'unfair'.
Reply

M.I.A.
02-12-2014, 10:48 PM
Originally Posted by 'Abd-al Latif
Define the word 'unfair'.
having to play football when your feet belong to someone else.

...would not make a difference if you didnt own them yesterday.

...or didnt know any better.
Reply

'Abd-al Latif
02-12-2014, 10:49 PM
Originally Posted by M.I.A.
having to play football when your feet belong to someone else.

...would not make a difference if you didnt own them yesterday.
That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

I was actually asking Plutonium. The question he asked was about Allah being unfair and the simple answer is that Allah decrees different things for different people the attempt to raise people to a greater decree of righteousness.

If he's not satisfied with this answer then he has a different issue, completely unrelated to decree being unfair because his question has been answered.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:51 PM
Originally Posted by 'Abd-al Latif
Define the word 'unfair'.
Thank you for your question, insh-Allah it will lead to a better understanding.
Unfair: Not Equal.
Reply

ardianto
02-12-2014, 10:51 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again
I was very young in that time, around 8, when I gathered with few friends on my house terrace. Then one of my friends said "Kids like us are still free from sins. If we die now, we would go to heaven".

But, no one of us wanted to commit suicide just because want to to go heaven without passing the hereafter trial process. All of us had dreams about the future and expect to reach our dreams.

So bro, how can you say "it's fair" if a kid die without he ever get a chance to growing older and reach his dream of future?.

Try to look at life through a wider perspective.
Reply

Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:52 PM
Originally Posted by M.I.A.
having to play football when your feet belong to someone else.

...would not make a difference if you didnt own them yesterday.

...or didnt know any better.
Thank you but I do not follow. Please explain better
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Plutonium
02-12-2014, 10:55 PM
Originally Posted by ardianto
I was very young in that time, around 8, when I gathered with few friends on my house terrace. Then one of my friends said "Kids like us are still free from sins. If we die now, we would go to heaven".
Thank you for your answer but suicide is haram and would give you sin.

But, no one of us wanted to commit suicide just because want to to go heaven without passing the hereafter trial process. All of us had dreams about the future and expect to reach our dreams.

So bro, how can you say "it's fair" if a kid die without he ever get a chance to growing older and reach his dream of future?.

Try to look at life through a wider perspective.
Im not following what you mean there.
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'Abd-al Latif
02-12-2014, 10:59 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Thank you for your question, insh-Allah it will lead to a better understanding.
Unfair: Not Equal.
The simple answer is that everyone's different. Allah makes some people rich while others He makes poor because He decided to do so, for wisdoms sometimes known only to Allah.

The trial of a rich person is to see how he/she will use his wealth to benefit others for Allah's pleasure. The trial of a poor person is to be content, thankful and grateful with what Allah has decreed for him. It could be the case that if Allah gives wealth to a poor person it could spoil him and vise versa for Allah taking the wealth away from a rich man.

Everyone's different so what Allah decrees for each of us is the greatest degree of fairness and correctness. The different ways in which Allah created people highlights His perfection. By creating all of us different He is able to test all of us to see who will be the most obedient and righteous.

The comic I posted earlier wasn't trying to show unfairness but it was illustrating how people wrongly preceive Allah's decree as unfair.

The man in the picture really wanted to board the ship. Right at the end of the comic we find out that the ship was actually the Titanic which sank, killing all the people on board. The wisdom of Allah denying the man the means to get onboard the Titanic? To save his life. While those who were on the ship Allah had decreed their lives to come to an end, just like every single thing in this universe will one day come to an end.

There is no unfairness in either scenario. It was Allah's decree and all what Allah decrees is always good.

Sometimes Allah delays sending his blessings to a righteous person because He wants the person in difficulty to be raised in the eyes of people before Allah sends down His blessing.

Sometimes Allah delays punishing a wrongdoer to give him time to repent and change his ways. If the wrongdoer persists then Allah will save up his due of punishments in the hereafter.

There is no unfairness in either scenario. It is Allah's decree and all what Allah decrees is always good.
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M.I.A.
02-12-2014, 11:02 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Thank you but I do not follow. Please explain better
its a joke, the paradox of freewill and believing in allah swt.

...i was alright while i had free will.

il quit while im behind.
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Plutonium
02-12-2014, 11:10 PM
Originally Posted by 'Abd-al Latif
The simple answer is that everyone's different. Allah making someone rich is His decree, for wisdoms known to Allah. Sometimes we can see these wisdoms but other times we cannot. The trial of a rich person is to see how he/she will use his wealth to benefit others for Allah's pleasure.

The trial of a poor person is to be content, thankful and grateful with what Allah has decreed for him and to be because wealth could have spoilt him. Everyone's different so what Allah decrees for each of us is the greatest degree of fairness and correctness.
Thank you for your response. Lets build on it.
What is the trial of a child that dies at birth? Do they not have a trial? If this is so, then one might believe that taking infants lives will grant them immediate pass to paradise, and in turn they may be shown mercy for their intentions.
Thus the reasoning does not hold.
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'Abd-al Latif
02-12-2014, 11:14 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Thank you for your response. Lets build on it.
What is the trial of a child that dies at birth? Do they not have a trial? If this is so, then one might believe that taking infants lives will grant them immediate pass to paradise, and in turn they may be shown mercy for their intentions.
Thus the reasoning does not hold.
There is no trial for a child who dies at birth as that child will enter into paradise. It is Allah who gives life and causes death. When He does so is His decree. It makes no sense to ask this question because everyone will eventually die and age is no factor in it.

The trial is for the parents and significant others either for a wrong that they have done or to raise them in the ranks of righteousness.
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Plutonium
02-12-2014, 11:20 PM
Originally Posted by 'Abd-al Latif
There is no trial for a child who dies at birth as that child will enter into paradise. It is Allah who gives life and causes death. When He does so is His decree. It makes no sense to ask this question because I can ask everyone will eventually die.

The trial is for the parents and significant others either for a wrong that they have done or to raise them in the ranks of righteousness.
And that is the paradox: The child does not have a trial yet the parents do? Why is the child guaranteed paradise without a test like the rest of us.
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'Abd-al Latif
02-12-2014, 11:23 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
And that is the paradox: The child does not have a trial yet the parents do? Why is the child guaranteed paradise without a test like the rest of us.
I completely fail to see the paradox.

The child is guaranteed paradise because he or she has not reached the age of understanding to be held to account for one's actions. That would be unfair: holding a new born to account. No?

You and I are held to account because we are old enough to understand right from wrong. We make a conscious decision when we make a choice. We are not children or the insane who have no capacity to determine right from wrong.
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Eric H
02-12-2014, 11:23 PM
Greetings and peace be with you Plutonium; welcome to the forum, you certainly come with a challenge,

If Allah was fair and just, we would probably all deserve hell, we all disobey Allah in some way. My only hope for salvation, would be if Allah is merciful towards me, and I am a Christian, If Allah is merciful to me, I hope and pray that he will be merciful to all people; despite our differences.

If there is no God to put humanity's mess right, then all suffering, is very unfair.

Only if God exists, can there be fairness and mercy.

In the spirit of praying to a just and merciful God,

Eric
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M.I.A.
02-12-2014, 11:23 PM
as a parent i could not accept such a thing, i treat other peoples children like my own.

as a child i would not want to see my elders pass away.. i guess that is selfishness.


and how i approach life, if you were a doctor.. you would oppose ill health.

if you were an architect.. you would oppose earthquakes.

if you were a rich man.. you would oppose famine.

and if you had an army.. they would know the value of life.



but if i had known how a person can be stricken with fear, i probably would have denied myself everything.

and then what good would i be?


allah swt knows the secrets of hearts and minds, so i hope he makes our test bearable for us.

mine really are naive views.
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Scimitar
02-12-2014, 11:35 PM
Part 0: I could not possibly do the book any justice in a post my friend.

One to read would be The Incoherence of the Philosophers, by Al Ghazali.

But as for my opinion, well, I put it quite simply. Your questions are grounded in philosophy.

Part I
Why is life unfair? Some people have a lot while some people have a little. Good things happen to bad people and bad things to good people. How come I have less then some people and more than others? That is unfair
what yard stick are you using to measure by? material? deeds for the here after? which? have you even considered there are people use who deeds as a measure too? Try to just think on that, and forget the material aspects of life.

take me for example, almost 40, still not married, and Allah knows it not from lack of trying. If it is not in my destiny, Allah knows, if it is - Allah knows. I've come to terms with it, and guess what? true submission is actually blissful, and though I may sound a little haughty here, i'd say Islam really is my opiate.


Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again
Is it? How can you encompass what fairness really is and all you've known is this life? And that - so far? Sure, there are tragedies in life, some people are born disabled, others die giving birth etc, and a whole host of other tragedies should the new born be granted a life in this world.... but to date - I have not met a rich man who is actually happy, and they always have this aura of stress around them... sure, there's the exception to the rule, and even that is by Allah's decree.

Point I am making is, if you really want answers, then you won't find them thru debate with average Muslims, like me. You need to read the books, and learn the knowledge that the greats have recorded for people like you - people who have the questions. Of course, the Quran would be the primary point of address.

Scimi
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ardianto
02-13-2014, 12:00 AM
I think everyone know that if a woman is beautiful, she would be easy to get a man although her personality is not good. In another side, if a woman is not beautiful, she would be harder to get a man although her personality is very good.

This is a reality in life which make some people are questioning "Why is Allah unfair with create some people beautiful and the others are not?". They ask question like this because they see the life seem unfair for the women who are not beautiful.

However, if we see this case through a wider perspective, then we would see that this unfairness happen not because Allah, but because the habit of men that see women only on physical beauty. The men can easily tolerate women who have bad behaviour but physically beautiful, but the men are hard to accept women who have good behaviour just because these women are not beautiful.

Human are the source and the cause of unfairness in the world. Look around, you can see people treat the others differently just because difference in race, ethnic, social class, etc.

I know that life is unfair for some people, but I also realize that these unfairness are caused by people themselves. So, rather than asking "Why is Allah unfair?" I prefer to ask myself "Can I be fair to the others?".

:)
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greenhill
02-13-2014, 02:24 AM
Another eternal question.... (and I will try from a different perspective).

Usually things can appear unfair when we generally fail to see the reasoning behind them. So the first thing is to realize that we will never be able to understand/comprehend everything however much we try. Hence the main reason to 'submit' to the Will of Allah.

The reason for most of our failure to understand many things can be drawn from the introduction of the creation of Adam a.s in surah Al Baqarah (lines 30 - 38 or thereabouts) where Allah stated that he is aware of all that is 'revealed' and all that is 'concealed'. So there are things concealed from us.

There was a response that stated the test we face are in accordance to our 'status' or capabilities or something like that. Just like responsibilities of people working, the higher up in the hierarchy we go (like knowledge in faith) the more our decisions affect those below and by right we should be very concern with regards to the welfare of people with the decisions that we make. However, in this day an age, the main reason for rising up the ladder is to use the position of power to gain an advantage over others. Likewise with knowledge or material possession, we will be tested according to it.

Another reason for dissatisfaction, as I see it, is due to us deciding what, we feel, we deserve and get hung up on the idea that it is unfair because we tend to compare our fate with that of others, often to those in a better position than us rather than to count our blessings by looking at those worse off than us.

This is kind of related to the thread 'Burn in Hell' for the unbelievers. At the end of the day, we have to remember that it is us, individually, responsible for our own destiny. We decide where we go. No matter what anyone else does, it does not affect our final destination one bit. So what we should be concentrating on really is how we are going about securing a better place for our final destination. It used to really bother me that my best friend, a non muslim, was destined for the hell fire. That was really unfair, I thought/believe/feel and almost to the point of distraction.

Lucky I have come to realize that the destiny of others is not in my hands, only my own. The holy prophet wanted his uncle to accept islam but he never did. The choice was his uncle's to make, not the prophet's pbuh.

Do you think our beloved prophet's sufferings in the cause of Allah was fair? He was the beloved of Allah, yet he had a tough life with very little support and facing schemers at every turn, still he persevered with patience leaving it up to the Al Mighty to judge.


:peace:
Reply

Signor
02-13-2014, 07:48 AM
@OP:Pick a cup of Coffee,hot Chocolate or Tea,loads of text is coming your way


Understanding the Difference Between the Apparent and the Reality


An individual once asked Sayyid Mawdudi about why many people, despite being good and pious, or apparently innocent, suffer severe tribulations in this worldly life. What wrong could a minor child or an infant, for example, commit so that he or she should have to suffer a fatal disease or even be murdered? Why do we see many good people suffering severe afflictions and calamities that they apparently do not deserve? Mawdudi asked him to consider a beautiful, well-kept garden and its gardener. The garden has many kinds of plants, each requiring various types of resources and care. It is well kept and healthy since the gardener meticulously takes care of it. He often clears the weeds and unnecessary plants that are harmful for the good plants. He trims branches and leaves to maintain their good health. He waters his garden when needed, or withholds water when that is harmful. It is because of such good care that his garden remains beautiful and healthy. The weeds or plants that he removes or the leaves and branches that he trims suffer much and complains. Their instincts are reactive to their own physical needs and they have little or no understanding about their surroundings, let alone the rest of the garden. They complain about their immediate needs and sufferings and do not know what is ultimately good for even themselves, much less the entire garden. Mawdudi then asked him to compare the garden with the universe and the gardener with Allah (swt). The point was well made. The analogy, however, is simplistic, for Allah’s knowledge and wisdom is infinite compared to the finite knowledge of a gardener, and His domain is infinitely wider and more complex than a garden. In this universe where an infinite number of laws, events, variables and factors are at work, each affecting others in complex ways, it is impossible for us to comprehend the full wisdom and purpose behind what we apparently observe. Parables are sometimes used in the Qur’an to make a point understood. Often, when intellect fails to comprehend a matter, a simple parable can get it across.

The Qur’an mentions an interesting story about Moses in chapter al-Kahf. In this story, Moses met a person named Khidr[1], whom Allah had given “special knowledge”, at a place where “two rivers meet”[2]. Moses asked him for permission to accompany him in his travel. Khidr replied, “You will surely not be able to bear with me. For how can you patiently bear with something you cannot encompass in your knowledge?” After Moses insisted that he would be patient, Khidr allowed him to come with him on condition that he must not question him about anything unless he himself explains it to him. They came to a place and found a boat. Khidr damaged the boat by making a hole in it. Moses immediately objected saying, “Have you made a hole in it so as to drown the people in the boat? You have certainly done an awful thing.” Khidr replied, “Did I not tell you that you will not be able to patiently bear with me?” Moses pleaded with him, saying that he forgot the promise. Moving on, they next came to a place where they met a boy, and Khidr killed him. Utterly shocked, Moses exclaimed, “What! Have you slain an innocent person without his having slain anyone? Surely you have done a horrible thing.” Khidr replied, “Did I not tell you that you will not be able to patiently bear with me?” Moses pleaded again, saying that if he ever questioned him again about anything, then he would be fully justified in discarding him. Moving further on, they came to a town where they found a wall that was broken and falling apart. Khidr repaired the wall to prevent it from disintegrating. Unable to hold his curiosity, Moses told Khidr that if he wished, he could have gotten a payment for it. Perhaps he was hoping that Khidr would explain the matter to him without him asking a question. That final comment made Khidr discard Moses. “This brings me and you to parting of ways”, he said. “Now I shall explain to you the true meaning of things about which you could not remain patient.” About the boat, he explained, it belonged to some poor people who earned their livelihood from the river. Nearby, there was an oppressive king who was seizing all boats by force. He damaged the boat so that the king will ignore it. About the boy, his parents were righteous whereas this boy was growing up to be a violent man who would have oppressed them. It was hoped that Allah would now provide them with a righteous son. Lastly, about the wall, there was some buried treasure in there for two orphan boys left behind by their righteous father. By fixing the wall and preventing it from falling apart and thus exposing the treasure, he gained time for the boys to grow up and recover their property. Before leaving, Khidr made his final comment that none of these was done by his own wish, meaning that he was simply executing Allah’s commands. There is much debate and analysis by Islamic scholars about whether Khidr was a man or a prophet. Sayyid Mawdudi provides an excellent analysis on this subject and argues that Khidr was most likely an angel. For, it is strictly unlawful for a human being – much less a prophet whose task is to teach people laws and order - to kill an innocent person or damage one’s property. Only after one commits a crime and it is proven in a court of law, can he be subject to punishment by the proper authority. On the other hand, angels are taking people’s lives and causing destructions every moment as they execute Allah’s orders[3]. While no man can see the angels and observe their activities, Allah (swt) privileged Moses to witness the wisdom behind these events so that he can develop an unshakable belief in the works of Allah and His wisdom and realize that what we see on the surface does not always represent the reality. Mawdudi writes:


The narration of Moses’ story here is meant to draw both the unbelievers’ and the believers’ attention to an important fact. Those who are concerned with the external aspects of things are liable to draw false conclusions from their observations. This happens because man is not aware of the wisdom underlying the events that take place under God’s dispensation. One frequently witnesses that the wrong-doers prosper whereas the innocent suffer hardships; those who disobey God and commit transgression live in great affluence whereas those who obey God face adversities, and that the wicked enjoy the pleasures of worldly life whereas the virtuous live in misery. Such spectacles are quite common. Not knowing why such things happen, doubts arise in people’s minds, leading them, on occasion, to have totally false perception of things. Those who consciously disbelieve and are immersed in the perpetration of injustice and oppression are led to conclude that they live in a disordered and chaotic world, a world which has either no sovereign, or if there is any, one who must have become senseless or unjust. Hence, they conclude that people may go about doing what they please, without fearing that they will be called to account. On the other hand, those who believe in God are heart-broken by what they see around them. It also often happens that when such believers are faced with sever tests, their faith is shaken to the core. It was in order to enable Moses to comprehend the wisdom underlying those events which generally baffle one’s understanding that God slightly lifts the curtain from the reality which governs the working of the world. In this way, Moses was able to appreciate that appearances are quite different from the reality.[4]


These two stories above – one a parable and the other a real story – brings out a fact that is central to understanding the Islamic perspectives on trials and tribulations, and that is: trials and tribulations is not an end on itself. It is a temporal event and a part of a process beyond which lies the reality of something good and desirable. Unlike Moses for whom the curtain was briefly lifted, a believer cannot see that reality immediately with his mortal eyes, but his faith and knowledge makes him fully confident of that reality. With that understanding borne in mind, we will now discuss some of the aspects of trials and tribulations from an Islamic perspective.

Allah is in Full Control of the Universe and Fully Aware of All Events

Nothing happens in this world except through the leave of Allah (swt). Therefore, a person who has been suffering from distress should know that Allah (swt) is fully aware of all that has happened or been happening to him. It is not a chaotic world where pain and suffering happens at random, nor is it a lawless universe without a ruler and watcher where the strong – be that a person or a nation – can do whatever it wishes to the weak without a consequence. The believer should know that Allah (swt) is aware of every little details of everything that happens, so much so that not even a leaf falls from a tree without Allah (swt) being aware of it:

He knoweth whatever there is on the earth and in the sea. Not a leaf doth fall but with His knowledge: there is not a grain in the darkness (or depths) of the earth nor anything fresh or dry (green or withered) but is (inscribed) in a Record Clear (to those who can read). (6:59) No misfortune can happen on earth or in your souls but is recorded in a decree before We bring it into existence: that is truly easy for Allah: in order that ye may not despair over matters that pass you by … (57:22-23)

Therefore, the believer should take relief and comfort from the fact that Allah (swt) is fully and intimately aware of his situations. Any harm or injustice that he has been subjected to by anyone, will not go without a consequence. Or if he is suffering from distress and difficulties, then his suffering is constantly being watched by One who is the Most Kind, the Most Merciful.


Goodness is From Allah, Evil is From Ourselves
A believer must have firm conviction that any good that happens to us comes from Allah (swt) and any calamity that befalls us is the result of our own making:

Whatever misfortune happens to you is because of the things your hands have wrought and for many (of them) He grants forgiveness. (42:30) No affliction great or small afflicts a man but for a sin, but there are more which Allah forgives. (Tirmidhi)

This does not mean that one will suffer, in the form of calamities in this world, the consequences of every sin or mistake he commits. As the Prophet (p) said, Allah (swt) forgives much more sins than the ones from which one suffers or will suffer in the Hereafter. But the important point to understand is that Allah (swt) does not cause injustice to anyone by putting him or her to undue suffering. Our own experience and observations often point to this fact. When an individuals sits down and reflects upon his difficulties and makes an objective analysis of the events and actions leading to his situations, he will almost always identify some things he did that he should not have done or he did not that he should have done, which led to that situation. For example, for parents who suffer from their rebellious and disobedient teenaged child, it will be found, almost without exception, that they did not arrange his proper Islamic education and a good environment, and did not give it an enough priority to engage themselves with his upbringing. Indifference or inaction can be as serious as committing a sin or making a bad decision, which can lead to grave consequences. If a man, for another example, lives in an oppressive land where he suffers and cannot practice Islam, then he should be proactive and migrate from that place. Staying passive and continuing to suffer there will be considered acts of injustice that he commits against his own self, which can even lead him to Hell. Allah (swt) says about such persons:

When angels take the souls of those who die in sin against their souls they say: “In what (plight) were ye?” They reply: “Weak and oppressed were we in the earth.” They say: “Was not the earth of Allah spacious enough for you to move yourselves away (from evil)?” Such men will find their abode in Hell - what an evil refuge! (4:97)

Now, a god-fearing and righteous believer who has been afflicted with a terrible calamity or injustice may wonder: “What have I done for which I have to suffer as such?” This is a question that probably comes to the minds of many believers afflicted with suffering and distress. First and foremost, let us be reminded about the fundamental lesson learned from the story of Moses above, which is: there is a reality behind the apparent which can be far different, if not the opposite, from what we observe on the surface. How many times, in our human condition, have we suffered an obstacle or calamity which turned out to be a blessing days, months, or years later? Perhaps we then find ourselves a bit ashamed in front of Allah (swt) for not being patient and thus loosing the opportunity of earning Allah’s good pleasure. Indeed, that is the test from Allah (swt), which some fail, some pass, and a few come out with superb success. Secondly, even when a righteous believer finds no apparent reason for his calamity, self-scrutiny and objective analysis can point out some mistakes or some incorrect decisions made in the past leading to the situation. If, for example, a righteous and pious person with a very high moral character and conduct marries a person without looking for proper Islamic character and conduct in him or her, and subsequently suffers from a bad marriage and from the actions of that unrighteous spouse, than who else should be blamed other than that pious individual himself/herself? Life is a trust from Allah (swt) which must be utilized to the fullest possible use by every believer and cannot be wasted. Therefore, a righteous believer must be patient until he/she finds a righteous person to marry. Allah (swt) says in the Qur’an:

Corrupt women are for corrupt men, and corrupt men for corrupt women; good women are for good men, and good men for good women. (24:26)

It is the Righteous Believers Who are Tested With Calamities
Though calamities may hit a believer as a surprise, the reality is that by virtue of being a believer one is supposed to suffer. If a believer understands the Islamic philosophy that this life is a testing ground, then he should realize that this philosophy will be implemented for him in practice while he lives in this testing ground, and not after he dies. Tests are not just limited to see whether one performs the rituals or not. His belief and commitments to Allah (swt), and his focus in the Hereafter will be fully and thoroughly tested with calamities and afflictions to gauge the depth of his faith in his heart. Achieving Paradise will not be easy. It will come only with unshakable faith and trust in Allah (swt). Allah, may He be glorified, says:

Ye shall certainly be tried and tested in your possessions and in your personal selves. (3:186)
Do men think that they will be left alone on saying “We believe” and that they will not be tested?(29:2)
Be sure We shall test you with something of fear and hunger, some loss in goods or lives or the fruits (of your toil); but give glad tidings to those who patiently persevere. (2:155)

Ah! To how many believers these verses come out as relief and solace! How many hearts of believers, with wild storms and waves in there, have calm down when remembering these verses! Day in and day out, these verses have brought the believers to tranquility and provided them with strength. Their souls then speak out: “Yea, we are tested because we are righteous believers.” To have that feeling of being a righteous believer is very comforting indeed. Do our eyes not always witness the fact that it is the righteous people who always suffer with pain, loss, and calamities one after another while the unrighteous always seem to prosper?

Trials are a Sign of Love By Allah

One individual once told another one who was going through tribulations that Allah (swt) was displeased with him, and hence his difficulties. This man lacked wisdom, for his comment was offensive to the person who was already distressed. More importantly, his understanding was incorrect from an Islamic perspective. The one who received the comment was a gentleman and also knowledgeable in Islam. Thus, it was not surprising that he decided to digest his remark and refrained from giving a response. There are people who do maintain that incorrect understanding. Whenever they see a believer who is suffering from some calamity or disease, they think that this is a reflection of Allah (swt)’s wrath on him. They should remember about the Companions of the Prophet (p) who were severely persecuted or even killed after becoming Muslim, an event that wipes out all past sins. Even the prophets of Allah, the best of all people who ever walked on the face of the earth, were persecuted by their community without exception. Was Joseph not thrown into a well, sold as a slave, and then thrown back into a prison? Did Job not face severest of trials one after another, and was eventually left out by all except his wife? In fact, the Qur’an tells us that many prophets were brutally killed by the unbelievers. These examples should establish the fact that trials and tribulations are not a sign of Allah’s displeasure on someone. Quite the contrary, it is rather a sign of Allah’s love on someone. The Prophet (p) said:

When Allah who is Great and Glorious loves people He afflicts them [with trials]. (Tirmidhi) Anyone for whom Allah intends good, He makes him suffer from some affliction. (Bukhari) When Allah intends good for His slave, He punishes him in this world, but when He intends an evil for His slave, He does not hasten to take him to task but calls him to account on the Day of Resurrection. (Tirmidhi)

The punishment in the Hereafter is much severe – in fact unimaginable from our worldly perspective – than any affliction one can face in this world. Therefore, when Allah (swt) loves someone and intends for him or her to go to Paradise, He wipes out his sins and mistakes and rewards him highly by putting him to afflictions in this world.

Allah Never Gives a Trial That is Too Great to Bear

Human beings are created weak (4:28). When a sudden calamity or distress befalls us, we easily become overwhelmed and often cry out, “O Allah! This is too much for me to bear!” It never is. The believers should know it for fact that Allah (swt) never puts any burden on a soul that is beyond its ability to bear. Perhaps because we often lose sight of this fact that Allah (swt) mentions this in several places in the Qur’an:

On no soul doth Allah place a burden greater than it can bear. (2:286) On no soul do We place a burden greater than it can bear: before Us is a record which clearly shows the truth: they will never be wronged. (23:62) No burden do We place on any soul but that which it can bear. (6:152) And those who believe and do good – We do not impose upon any of them a burden beyond his capacity. (7:42)

This fundamental truth is actually obvious to a believer who reflects. For, if the point is to test one’s level of faith and commitment to Allah (swt), then it would be an injustice to put a burden on a soul that it will surely fail, and Allah (swt) never commits injustice against anyone:

… nor is thy Lord ever unjust (in the least) to His servants. (41:46) Verily Allah will not deal unjustly with man in aught: it is man that wrongs his own soul. (10:44)

Therefore, no matter how difficult one’s situation is or how sever his sufferings, he should have absolutely no doubt in his mind he has the ability to deal with the trial. Allah (swt) is Just, and every affliction that He tests his faithful servant with, there is always two viable outcome for him: passing the test with success and thus earning Allah’s good pleasure, or failing it.

The Stronger the Faith, the Harder the Test, and the Greater the Reward

A believer afflicted with a severe calamity should take comfort from the fact that those who have strong faith are given the harder trials. This is established by the Prophet (p). When asked about who suffers the greatest afflictions, he replied:

The prophets, then those who come next to them, then those who come next to them. A man is afflicted in keeping his religion. If he is firm in his religion his trial is severe, but if there is weakness in his religion it is made light for him, and it continues like that till he walks on the earth having no sin. (Tirmidhi)

Why is it, one may ask, that people who are faithful and righteous should have to suffer? To get an answer, we should ask ourselves: is there any achievement without an effort or any fruit without labor? The obvious pattern that we see in our human experience is that those who work hard and go through the process of struggle are rewarded with success in this materialistic world. The greatest reward of everything that one can imagine is Paradise. In fact, the bliss and happiness in Paradise is so great that one cannot even imagine it (32:17). How can then one expect that he will achieve this greatest success without him being thoroughly tested to see if he qualifies for it? One should not think that following the rituals, such as making salat five times a day, is enough test for him. The external rituals that we do and the laws of the shari’a that we observe returns immediate benefit to us as they bring peace and happiness to our families and provide us with a healthy social and moral society in which to live and prosper. Thus, one should not expect that observing Allah’s commandments and reaping these benefits in turn is the only tests. The real test is the test of the heart where faith lives, and that is tested with affliction and hardship to check if the faith and trust in Allah is firm and well-rooted or is it weak and superficial:

Do men think that they will be left alone on saying “We believe” and that they will not be tested? We did test those before them and Allah will certainly know those who are true from those who are false. (29:2-3)

Each believer, therefore, must expect to be tested. The stronger his faith, the harder will be the test, and the greater his reward will be if he remains patient having unshakable faith and trust in Allah (swt). The Prophet (p) said:

The magnitude of the reward goes along with the magnitude of the affliction. (Tirmidhi)

And the believers will continue to go through trials and tribulations in their life until their sins are wiped and they die and meet Allah (swt) free from all sins:

The believing man or woman continues to have affliction in person, property and children so that they may finally meet Allah, free from sin. (Tirmidhi)

That is so because Allah (swt), in His Mercy and Generosity, not only rewards one when he is patient through his trials, but also sheds his sins for the pains and sufferings that he or she goes through. No matter how small the trial or how insignificant the discomfort, Allah (swt) will reward him for that and eliminate some sins. Said the Prophet (p):

No calamity befalls a Muslim but that Allah expiates some of his sins because of it, even though it were the prick he receives from a thorn. (Bukhari)

The question one should ask himself is: “What is my reflex when I do get a prick of a thorn, or stumble on the street and hurt my toe, or my computer suddenly crashes making me loose some work? Does some uncomely word slips through the mouth to release anger and frustration, or do I stay in control and remain calm, patient, and thankful to Allah?”[5]

Believers Must Always Be Prepared to Face Trials
The above discussions should make it clear that believers will be tried with calamities, afflictions, and distress, and these trials will continue to occur during their lifetime until they meet their Lord. That being the reality, a believer should remain mentally prepared to face any calamity or affliction, although he or she should never seek one. If he is not mentally prepared to face any difficulties in life and then suddenly is afflicted with one, then he may not be able to deal with it properly as he should. It is, therefore, wise that a believer solidify himself with knowledge from the Qur’an and the Sunnah regarding how to deal with trials and tribulations and then be prepared to face difficulties of life, but without seeking or hoping for any trial. This will help him remain calm and patient and pass the test when it comes, insha Allah. Below, we discuss some of the common forms of trials and tribulations:

Sickness

All living creatures will die to pass the inheritance of this world to the next generations, and with the exception of a few cases, death will come through one sickness or another. This is a reality that all have to accept. No matter how virtuous one is, he is not exempted form sickens and disease. We know the examples of many Prophets who suffered from sickness, such as Prophet Job who suffered from severe skin disorder for years. Prophet Muhammad (p) himself suffered from sickness. 'Aisha, one of his wives, said: “I never saw anybody suffering so much from sickness as Allah's Apostle.”[6] For a believer, suffering from sickness is not just a reality but also a philosophy that comes with blessings. He knows that Allah (swt) in His mercy will expiate some of his sins if he remains patient through it. The Prophet (p) said:

No Muslim is afflicted with harm because of sickness or some other inconvenience, but that Allah will remove his sins for him as a tree sheds its leaves. (Bukhari)

When afflicted with illness and pain, the believer should remind himself, like Prophet Job did, of all the years when Allah (swt) blessed him with good health. He should remain patient and ask Allah (swt) for his Mercy, and that can earn him Paradise. One day, a woman who was suffering from epilepsy came to the Prophet and asked him to make supplication for her. The Prophet (p) replied, “Do you wish that you may endure it and be rewarded with Paradise, or do you wish that I shall make supplication to Allah to cure you?” She said, “I shall endure it.” This woman later became known as one from the people of Paradise.[7] In a hadith qudsi, Allah (swt) says:

When I affect my slave in his two dear things (i.e., his eyes), and he endures patiently, I shall compensate him for that with Paradise. (Bukhari)

When one suffers through a serious disease which brings prolonged physical pain and discomfort or even the prospect of death[8], only he (or she) can feel the full extent of the pain and distress. No one else can possibly come close to appreciating what he goes through physically and mentally. Yet, let him be reminded that it is perhaps through this sickness and suffering that Allah (swt) intends to bless him with Paradise. There cannot be any reward or success greater than that. So let his or her heart continue to beat with zikr (remembrance) of Allah through this suffering, and his face become radiant with His love. Let the visitors who come to see him be blazed with his unshakable faith and spirit. Let him teach others, even through his sickness, faith and trust in Allah! Aminah Assilmi, a convert to Islam, mentioned about a person who died of cancer. He was only 20 years old, and yet she was dazzled by this young man’s faith and love of Allah in the midst of suffering. She wrote:

Shortly before he died, he told me that Allah was truly Merciful. This man was in unbelievable anguish and was radiating with Allah’s love. He said: “Allah intends that I should enter heaven with a clean book.” His death experience gave me something to think about. He taught me of Allah’s love and mercy.[9]

Death of Beloved Ones
If one suffers death of someone whom he dearly loved, then he should remember that our children, spouses, parents, friends, and other family members are but trusts from Allah (swt). A wife is a trust to her husband while her husband is a trust to her. A child is a trust to his/her parents while the parents are a trust to the child. As these trusts provide us with comfort and support, Allah (swt) tests us to see how we deal with them and how we take care of these trusts. He reserves the right to take back these trusts, and He does so when the term He sets for a trust expires. The Prophet (p) consoled his daughter when her baby was sick as saying:

Whatever Allah takes away or gives, belongs to Him, and everything has a fixed term (in this world). (Bukhari and Muslim)

Therefore, one should not show despair or displeasure at Allah (swt) but remain calm and patient even at the death of his or her dearest one. Imam Muslim narrates a hadith about a female Companion of the Prophet that is a paramount example of patience and faith. To reproduce the hadith briefly, her name was Umm Sulaim. One of her sons was very sick while her husband, Abu Talha, was away in business. The son eventually died, and she told her family members not to tell this to her husband when he returns until she breaks this to him herself. When Abu Talha returned, she presented the supper before him and he ate. She then beautified herself in the best way like she never did before. After they had intercourse and Abu Talha was satisfied, she told him, “O Abu Talha! If some people borrow something from another family who then ask for that to be returned, should they refuse to give it back?” He replied, “No”. “Then”, she said, “hope reward for your son”. Abu Talha immediately understood that their son was dead. After burring his son in the morning, he went to the Prophet and told him the matter. The Prophet (p) said, “May Allah bless the night you spent together.” It turned out that she conceived that night. When the child was born, the Prophet (p) blessed him and named him “Abdullah”. Bukhari’s version of the hadith says that Abdullah had nine sons, each of whom memorized the entire Qur’an. When a mother suffers the death of her child, there is no one in this world who can come close to feeling her grief and sorrow. And yet, this otherwise unknown Companion of the Prophet (p) remained patient with Allah as she correctly understood the philosophy of life and death. The reward for such patience with Allah (swt) at the death of a beloved one is Paradise. Allah (swt) says in a hadith qudsi:

I have no reward other than paradise for a believing slave of mine who remains patient for My sake when I take away his beloved one from among the inhabitants of the world.[10](Bukhari)

Loss of Wealth and Property
In many places in the Qur’an, Allah (swt) uses the phrase “out of what we have given” when He asks the believers to spend in the way of Allah, such as:

Those who rehearse the Book of Allah, establish regular Prayer and spend (in Charity) out of what We have provided for them secretly and openly hope for a Commerce that will never fail. (35:29) Those … who spend out of what We bestow on them for Sustenance. (42:38) They spend (in charity) out of the sustenance which We have bestowed on them. (32:16)

As Allah (swt) asks the believers to pay zakat and charity, He reminds them that all the wealth and property that they have actually belongs to Allah (swt) anyway. All righteous believers are cognizant of this simple and obvious truth. For even if we set aside the fact that everything in this universe are created by and therefore belongs to Allah, there is no wealth or property that one can claim that it is the result of his own exclusive effort. In this context, we wrote:

If one thinks that his wealth and fortune is a result of his own labor and talent, then that reflects a serious lack of understanding and insight on his or her part. While there is no denial that one should put efforts towards achieving his goal as Islam requires and as the Prophet (p) himself did, but to think that utilization of one’s talent and exerting his labor alone earned him his wealth is to deny both facts as well as to betray common sense observation. There are many around us who with grater talents and more efforts fail to “succeed” in life and reach “financial security”. And there are those who within moments loose their vast fortunes, or suddenly become rich, due to market fluctuation, calamity, unforeseen business deals, or otherwise. And finally, there are always these basic questions to ask: Who is the One Who provided him with his talents and abilities? Who has provided him with that particular set of resources that he successfully utilized and which others were not provided with? Who controls the events that occur in our day to day life and Who provided those particular chances and deals that contributed to his fortune? Wise people know the answers to these questions and, consequently, humble themselves and thank Allah (swt) for His favor.[11]

About such people who think that it is because of their talent or enterprise that they had become wealthy, Allah (swt) says:

… When We bestow a favor upon him as from Ourselves he says, “This has been given to me because of a certain knowledge (I have)!” Nay, this is but a trial. But most of them understand not. (39:49)

Righteous believers, therefore, are always conscious about this true ownership of wealth and property that is at their disposal. Therefore, when a calamity befalls that results in the loss of that property or wealth, they do not break down but remind themselves with this: “This property and wealth belonged to Allah and He has taken it back”.[12]

Suffering Wrong and Injustice
For a believer who has been a victim of wrong or injustice by others, the greatest comfort is that a day will come when he will receive full justice from Allah (swt). No matter how insignificant or how grievous the harm is, the offending parties will be called to account for their actions. No matter to whom an injustice was done, and no matter how long ago that aggression was committed, the matter will be kept on records until it is addressed. Even if everyone forgets the incident, Allah (swt) will not. For example, the infants who were buried alive during Jahiliyyah (Age of Darkness before Islam) will not be forgotten. Allah (swt) will ask them about what their crime was for which they were buried alive:

When the female (infant) buried alive is questioned: for what crime she was killed; when the Scrolls are laid open; when the World on High is unveiled: when the Blazing Fire is kindled to fierce heat; and when the Garden is brought near; (Then) shall each soul know what it has put forward. (81:8-14)

In Islam, injustice is not necessarily limited to physical and material harm. Violating a person’s honor and dignity is also an act of injustice. Therefore, a Muslim should not speak ill of another person or make any negative comment about any individual in his absence regardless of whether that person has done something wrong or not. This is called gibah, which Islam forbids except only in a few cases.[13] A person who has done any injustice against another, be that even a negative comment made about him in his absence, will have to pay back to the victim in the Hereafter out of his own good deeds (unless the victim forgives him before he dies). If he runs out of his good deeds and still owes him, then he must take over equivalent amount of bad deeds from the victim. The Prophet (p) said:

He who has done a wrong affecting his brother’s honor or anything else, must ask his forgiveness for it today before the time (i.e., the Day of Judgment) when he will have neither a dinar nor a dirham. If he has done some good deeds, a portion equal to his wrong doings will be subtracted from them; but if he has no good deeds, he will be burdened with the evil deeds of the one he had wronged in the same proportion. (Bukhari)

This is so far as compensating the victim is concerned. He will still be liable to face punishment from Allah (swt) for committing the act of injustice and thus violating Allah’s commandments, unless both Allah (swt) and the victim forgive him.[14] The believer, therefore, should be patient having full assurance that Allah (swt) watches everything and will deliver justice:

We have made some of you as a trial for others: will ye have patience? For Allah is One Who sees (all things). (25:20) Truly the reward of the Hereafter will be greater if they only realize (this)! (They are) those who persevere in patience and put their trust on their Lord. (16:41-42)

That is the ultimate comfort that a believer can have who has been wronged or oppressed by others. For there is a Judge higher than all other judges and an Authority above all other authorities. Unlike the judges in this world, this Judge never makes a mistake. For He is intimately aware of all things that occur and renders justice based on actual facts, and not on the presentation and performance of lawyers. This discussion points out a theme that is at the core of Islam, namely justice. In fact, Islam is considered to be synonymous with justice (adl). The purpose of the shari`a (Divine Law) is justice and welfare of the people. In this religion, injustice, no matter how small, is completely forbidden. Allah (swt) says in a hadith qudsi:

O My servants, I have forbidden injustice for Myself and have made it forbidden amongst you, so do not commit acts of injustice against one another.

Learning from the Example of Prophet Job
Those afflicted with calamities and distress should remember the story of Prophet Job (Qur’an calls him Aiyub). Ah! What a heart-melting story of pain and suffering, of patience and forbearance, of faith and gratitude, and ultimately of reward and success! Ibn Kathir, a ninth century scholar, mentioned this story in detail in his Qisas al-Anbia (“Stories of the Prophets”). We reproduce the story[15] below with some abridgment since no discussion on trials and tribulations can be considered completed without drawing lessons from this servant of Allah, who was truly a paragon of patience and faith.[16] Prophet Job (p) was a very wealthy man having many animals, lands, slaves, and children. He was a very patient man and was never arrogant or selfish. He worshipped Allah and was always humble and grateful to him. From his riches, he would help the poor and the needy with food and clothes. He would buy slaves and set them free. When he helped people, he made them feel as if they are favoring him by accepting his gifts. Such a noble person was he that one day the angels were discussing about him and praising him as a model servant of Allah. Satan overheard their comments and became annoyed. He tried to seduce him with evil thoughts and distract him from prayers and worshipping Allah. But Job was firm in his faith and did not let the whispers of Satan tempt him. Failing in his attempts to seduce Job, Satan complained to Allah about Job saying that although he was continuously glorifying Allah, he was not doing so out of his sincerity but to satisfy Allah so that his wealth should not be taken away. It was all a show, all out of greed. “If You remove his wealth then You will find that his tongue will no longer mention Your name and his praying will stop.” Allah told Satan that Job was one of His most sincere devotees, and to prove this to him, Allah allowed him to do whatever he and his helpers wished with Job's wealth. Happy with this authority, Satan gathered his helpers and set about destroying Job's cattle, servants, and farms until he was left with no possessions. He then appeared before Job in the guise of a wise old man and said to him:


“All your wealth is lost. Some people say that it is because you gave too much charity and that you are wasting your time with your continuous prayers to Allah. Others say that Allah has bought this upon you in order to please your enemies. If Allah had the capacity to prevent harm, then He would have protected your wealth.”

True to his belief, Job replied:

“What Allah has taken away from me belongs to Him. I was only its trustee for a while. He gives to whom He wills and withholds from whom He wills.”

With these words, Job went to prostration out of his humbleness and gratitude to Allah (swt). Seeing this, Satan was frustrated. He again complained to Allah:

“I have stripped Job of all his possessions, but he still remains grateful to You. However, he is only hiding his disappointments, for he places great store by his many children. The real test of a parent is through his children. You will then see how Job will reject You.”

Allah granted Satan authority, but warned him that it would not reduce Job's faith in his Lord nor his patience. Satan gathered his helpers and shook the foundation of the house in which Job's children were living and sent the building crashing, killing all of them. Then he went to Job disguised as a man who had come to sympathize with him. In a comforting tone he said to Job:

“The circumstances under which your children died were sad. Surely, your Lord is not rewarding you properly for all your prayers.”

Job, firm in his faith, replied:

“Allah sometimes gives and sometimes takes. He is sometimes pleased and sometimes displeased with our deeds. Whether a thing is beneficial or harmful to me, I will remain firm in my belief and remain thankful to my Creator.”

He then prostrated again to his Lord. At this Satan was extremely vexed. He again called on Allah:

“O my Lord, Job's wealth is gone, his children are dead, but he is still healthy in body, and as long as he enjoys good health he will continue to worship You in the hope of regaining his wealth and producing more children. Grant me authority over his body so that I may weaken it. He will surely neglect worshipping You and thus become disobedient.”

Allah wanted to teach Satan a lesson that Job was a devoted servant of Him, and so He granted Satan his third request but placed a condition:

“I give you authority over his body but not over his soul, intellect, or heart, for in these places reside the knowledge of Me and My religion.”

Armed with this new authority, Satan began to take revenge on Job's body and filled it with disease until it was reduced to mere skin and bone, making him suffer severe pain. But through all the suffering Job remained strong in his faith, patiently bearing all the hardships without complaining. He did not despair, nor did he turn to others for help but remained hopeful of Allah's Mercy. Even close relatives and friends deserted him. Only his kind loving wife stayed with him who remained his sole companion and comforter through many years of his suffering. In desperation, Satan went to Job's wife in the form of a man, and asked, “Where is your husband?” She pointed to an almost lifeless form crumpled on the bed and said: “There he is, suspended between life and death.” Satan reminded her of the days when Job had good health, wealth and children. Suddenly, the painful memory of yeas of hardship overcame her, and she burst into tears. She said to Job:

“How long are you going to bear this torture from our Lord? Are we to remain without wealth, children or friends forever? Why don't you call upon Allah to remove this suffering?”

Job sighed, and in a soft voice replied, “Satan must have whispered to you and made you dissatisfied. Tell me, how long did I enjoy good health and riches?” She replied, “For eighty years.” Then Job asked, “How long am I suffering like this?” She said, “For seven years.” Then Job told her, “In that case I am ashamed to call on my Lord to remove the hardship, for I have not suffered longer than the years of good health and plenty. It seems that your faith has weakened and you are dissatisfied with the fate of Allah. If I ever regain health, I swear I will punish you with a hundred strokes! From this day onward, I forbid myself to eat or drink anything from your hand. Leave me alone and let my Lord do with me as He pleases.” Crying bitterly and with a heavy heart, she had no choice but to leave him and seek shelter elsewhere. In his helpless state, Job turned to Allah, not to complain but to seek His mercy:

Verily, distress has seized me, and You are the Most Merciful of all those who show Mercy. (21:83)

What a man of patience, faith, and self-respect! Even in this miserable condition, he did not ask Allah to remove his affliction but merely stated that He is the Most Merciful of all who have mercy! Can there be any trial more difficult and painful then what Job went through one after another? He lost all his wealth and property, all of his children were killed when the roof collapsed, his friends and people left him, and he suffered from a sever skin disorder for years. Yet, he did not complained to Allah nor was he dissatisfied with Him throughout these extremely difficult trials. The result of his patience and faith in Allah was this: he came out of all these trials with superb success. He asked for Allah’s Mercy, and rushing down it came:

So We answered his call, and We removed the distress that was on him, and We restored his family to him (that he had lost) and the like thereof along with them - as a mercy from Ourselves and a Reminder for all who worship Us. (21:84)

Allah (swt) praised him in the Qur’an, saying:

Truly We found him full of patience and constancy, how excellent in Our service! Ever did he turn (to Us)! (38:44)

And He rewarded him with more than what he had:

And We gave him (back) his people and doubled their number as a Grace from Ourselves and a thing for commemoration for all who have understanding. (38:43)

The verse above significantly ends with “for all who have understanding.” Indeed, for people of understanding, there are lessons to be learned from the example of Job, a mortal human being who left behind immortal lessons for patience, forbearance, and faith in Allah (swt) that will continue to inspire believers generations after generations.

Some Practical Guidelines in Dealing With Trials

The above discussions will hopefully help one understand the Islamic philosophy behind trials and tribulations and prepare his or her heart for tests. Below, we describe some practical guidelines, drawn from the Qur’an and the Sunnah, about dealing with trials.

Seek Refuge From Trials
One should not solicit trials from Allah (swt). No matter how pious one might be, he or she should not be proud of having unshakable faith but always remain humble and ask Allah (swt) to guide him and to keep him on the right path. Indeed, if it was not for the mercy and guidance of Allah (swt), he could not have remained a believer and a practicing Muslim. Therefore, he should often ask for forgiveness from Allah for sins and mistakes committed so that He does not take him to task for those mistakes. In the Qur’an, Allah (swt) teaches the believers to make the following supplication:

Our Lord! Take us not to task if we forget or commit mistakes. Our Lord! Lay not on us a burden such as You laid on those gone before us. Our Lord! Lay not on us burdens which we do not have the power to bear. And overlook our faults, and forgive us, and have mercy upon us. (2:286)

The Prophet (p), the most pious and faithful of all believers, frequently used to make the following supplication:

O Allah, I seek refuge in Thee from the punishment of the grave; I seek refuge in Thee from the trial of the Antichrist; I seek refuge in Thee from the trial of life and the trial of death; O Allah, I seek refuge in Thee from sin and debt. (Muslim)

Giving sadaqa (charity) often can prevent calamity for a believer. The Prophet (p) said:

Give the sadaqa without delay, for it stands in the way of calamity. (Tirmidhi)

Be Ready For Trials
While a believer should seek refuge in Allah from trials, he should, at the same time, be always ready for trials. His supplications for forgiveness might save him from some trials, but there will still be trials that he will face for sure. Therefore, a believer should always be mentally prepared for afflictions and calamities so that he can pass the tests with success. See above for detailed discussions on this topic.

Always Have Focus on the Hereafter
If one is afflicted with a calamity, he should remember that our life is short and our ultimate destination is the Hereafter. Therefore, he should remain patient, ask Allah (swt) for help, and remember that he will be meeting Him soon:

Who say when afflicted with calamity: “To Allah we belong and to Him is our return.” They are those on whom (descend) blessings from Allah and Mercy and they are the ones that receive guidance. (2:156-157)

The Prophet (p) said:

If any Muslim who suffers some calamity says that which Allah has commanded him: “ ‘We belong to Allah and to Him shall we return’: O Allah, reward me for my affliction and give me something better in exchange for it”, Allah will give him something better than it in exchange. (Muslim)

The Prophet (p) once grabbed Abdullah ibn ‘Umar by his shoulders and said:

Be in the world as if you were a stranger or a wayfarer. (Bukhari)

When a believer always keeps the Hereafter in focus, he remains calm and in control at whatever calamity he faces. For him, dunya (this world) is not the end of everything, and thus he does not breakdown but stays calm and deals with all crisis with faith and trust in Allah (swt).

Be Patient at the First Stroke
The mettle of a person is proven when he remains calm and in control even at a sudden and unforeseen calamity or difficulty. The Prophet (p) said:

Patience is only at the first (stroke) of grief. (Bukhari and Muslim)

When Calamity Befalls, Remember That It Is a Test.
Any affliction that a believer suffers is a test from Allah (swt). If he does not recognize the test, then he may feel despair and thus fail the test. The believer should particularly keep in mind the following verses from the Qur’an that remind that every single believer will be tested:

We shall try you until We test those among you who strive their utmost and persevere in patience; and we shall try your reported (mettle). (47:31) Ye shall certainly be tried and tested in your possessions and in your personal selves. (3:186) Do men think that they will be left alone on saying “We believe” and that they will not be tested? (29:2)

Ask Allah (swt) For Forgiveness
When calamity strikes a believer, he should take all steps necessary to remedy the situation. Having faith and trust in Allah never means inaction or complacency with difficulties. This has been made quite clear in both the Qur’an and the examples of the Prophet (p). From a spiritual perspective, the very first thing that the believer should do is turn to Allah (swt) for forgiveness. One of the most beautiful and effective supplications that he can make is the supplication made by Prophet Jonah (called Yunus in the Qur’an). When the people of Nineveh rejected the message of Jonah to worship Allah alone, Jonah left the city out of despair, expecting that Allah’s punishment on them was imminent. That was a mistake, for a Prophet can never forsake his mission and leave without the consent of Allah. This was only a mistake in judgment, and not a rebellious action. Nevertheless, for a Prophet or a man of piety, even a minor mistake comes out to be significant in contrast to the faith and piety that Allah has blessed him or her with. Jonah was soon consumed by a whale. It was a dark night, and he was in the dark stomach in the dark bottom of the sea. Stricken with this calamity, Jonah realized his mistake and immediately turned to Allah for forgiveness. He made a supplication that was simple and short. Nevertheless, its words carry so much significance that this small supplication is considered to be the “Mother of all supplications”. From the darkest chamber of the whale’s stomach, he cried out to Allah:

There is no God but You! Glory be to You! I have done wrong. (21:87)

This short supplication has three important components. First, Jonah recognized that there is no other authority or power worthy of worship except Allah. Besides Him, he can turn to no one for help – no king, no judge, and no personal attorney. If there is anyone who is capable of forgiveness and help, that is only Allah, the Supreme Authority of the entire universe. Second, he declared that Allah is above all blames and shortcomings. Allah (swt) is not to be blamed for his situations, for He never commits a wrong against anyone. He is above and beyond all faults and shortcomings. Lastly, he admitted that he has committed a mistake. This admittance and recognition of one’s own fault is perhaps the most important element in seeking forgiveness. For Jonah, this admission did not merely come out from his lips but also from the bottom of his heart. This short supplication was so heavy in weight that Allah (swt) turned to him in forgiveness and delivered him from these three layers of darkness.[17] Sincere admittance of mistakes and repentance, thus, is a necessary condition for supplications to be heard. Allah (swt) is indeed the Most Merciful and He is quick to forgive His slaves.

Ask for Help With Patience and Salat
After faith and trust in Allah, the most import quality that a believer needs during calamity and affliction is patience. Patience is such a virtue that it is frequently mentioned both in the Qur’an and the hadith. Indeed, the Prophet (p) said that it is the best gift that one can receive from Allah:

No one is granted a gift better and more comprehensive than patience. (Bukhari and Muslim)

In many places in the Qur’an, Allah (swt) asks the believer to seek His help with patience and salat, such as:

O ye who believe! seek help with patient perseverance and prayer: for Allah is with those who patiently persevere. (2:153) Seek (Allah's) help with patient perseverance and prayer. (2:45)

One of the best times to offer salat is late night before the time for fajr starts. Called the tahajjud prayer, there are many excellences for this prayer. The believer should try to make as much tahajjud prayer as possible and ask Allah (swt) for help and forgiveness, as this is one the best times to make prayers and supplications:

And for part of the night also praise Him, and at the retreat of the stars! (52:49)
And during part of the night (also) celebrate His praises and (so likewise) after the postures of adoration. (50:40)
And part of the night prostrate thyself to Him; and glorify Him a long night through. (76:26)

When people and all other creatures around are deep in sleep, it is only the believer who keeps awake and is immersed in worshipping Allah (swt). In that still silence of the dead of the night, it is, as if, only two are engaged in a private conversation: one who begs for help and mercy, and the Other Who listens to his prayers.

Avoid the Two Pitfalls
Truly man was created very impatient: fretful when evil touches him, and niggardly when good reaches him. (70:19-21)

There are two categories of people that a righteous believer should not slip into. The first kinds are those who desperately seek Allah’s help and forgiveness when in calamity or peril. Then when Allah (swt) delivers them from their calamity, they forget Allah and go back to their usual life of indifference to Allah and the Hereafter. About these people, Allah (swt) says:

When trouble touches a man he cries unto Us (in all postures) lying down on his side or sitting or standing. But when We have solved his trouble he passes on his way as if he had never cried to Us for a trouble that touched him! Thus do the deeds of transgressors seem fair in their eyes! (10:12)

The second kinds are those who worship Allah and follow his commandments so long as they enjoy a comfortable or trouble-free life. Then when calamities strike them, they break down and become indifferent to Allah and his commandments out of anger and frustration. It is, as if, they deserve a comfortable life in return for their worshipping of Allah (swt). About them, says Allah (swt):

Among men is he who worships Allah, while remaining on the borderline; if any good befalls him, he is satisfied; but if a trial afflicts him, he utterly turns away. He will incur loss both of this world and the Hereafter. That indeed is a clear loss. (21:11)

Falling into one these two categories is an utter failure. A true believer is one who always worships Allah (swt) – whether in calamity or in good fortune. When in calamity, he remains patient and pleased with Allah, and when something good happens to him, he thanks Allah. Thus he always earns rewards and Allah’s good pleasure while he lives in this world. The Prophet (p) said:

How wonderful is the case of a believer! There is good for him in everything, and this is not the case with anyone except a believer. If prosperity attends him, he expresses gratitude to Allah and that is good for him; and if adversity befalls him, he endures it patiently and that is better for him. (Muslim)

Keep in Mind the Eventual Success
Verily with every difficulty, there is relief. (94:6)

It is a source of great comfort for a believer to know that his or her afflictions will one day come to an end and there will be relief for him. Therefore, he should keep this eventuality in mind and go through his trial with patience, forbearance, and faith in Allah. There will be a day – whether in this world or the Next – when he will come out victorious and successful for passing the test. For a believer in affliction, that is the ultimate success that awaits him. Says Allah (swt):

Verily, the Hereafter will be better for thee than the present. (93:4)

Show Kindness to Those Who are Afflicted
If someone is afflicted with a calamity, other believers should often visit or call him or her and inquire about his (or her) welfare. One should never demoralize an afflicted believer by saying that Allah is displeased with him or that he has committed some sin for which he is being punished. Instead, believers should tell him good words that will uplift his spirit. They should tell him about the fact that Allah tests those whom He loves, and that it is the righteous believers who suffer the most in this life so that they can get Paradise in the Hereafter. The believers should sympathize with him and offer their help. The Prophet (p), out of his sympathy for the afflicted, said:

If you were to sell fruits to your brother and these are stricken with calamity, it is not permissible for you to get anything from him. (Muslim)

Remember Past Trials and Benefit From Them
A wise person always takes lessons from hardships and afflictions and tries to improve his or her situation. A believer who has come out of an affliction should be self-critical and objectively analyze the possible causes for his affliction, and make corrections accordingly. For example, if he has been involved in a serious road accident while driving and Allah (swt) spared his life, then he should be more careful in driving, follow all traffic laws, and drive defensively. Or if he became seriously sick due to unhealthy eating habits and he recovered, then he should control his diet and do regulars exercise to stay fit and healthy. Most important improvements of all are amending one’s character and conduct and turning to Allah (swt) in obedience. There is also spiritual benefit in remembering the past trials as that will make the believer always remain conscious of the fact that life is short with all its vicissitudes and he will soon return to Allah (swt). The Prophet (p) said that remembering past trials can even earn him reward:

If any Muslim man or woman suffers a calamity and keeps it in his memory, even if it happened a long time ago, saying each time it is remembered, 'We belong to Allah and to Him do we return,' Allah, who is Blessed and Exalted will give a fresh reward each time it is said, equivalent to the reward when it happened. (Ahmad)

Epilogue: Life is a Testing Ground
Islam is submission to the will of Allah. For one who submits, a mere declaration or display of belief will not be taken for success, but his or her heart and soul will for sure be put to test. Allah (swt) will test him to see whether he follows His commandments or his own desires; whether he lives a righteous and godly life or lives according to what his nafs (self ) dictates; whether the faith he displays is firmly rooted in his heart or is it merely on the surface and thus is knocked off at a slight wind; whether he will continue to have faith and love of Allah when in calamity as he does when in comfort; whether he will continue to remember and worship him if given bounties and comforts of life as he does when he lives a modest life. Allah (swt) will test him to see if his faith, trust, and love of Him is unconditional or is it conditioned with good health and comfortable life free from stress and anxiety. For a righteous Muslim, this life is a testing ground where he will continue to be tested until he meets Allah (swt). For him, tests will be done right here on earth while he lives, and not after he dies. He knows that as soon as death arrives and he steps into the Next World, his tests are over. There, he only receives the results of his tests, and then enjoys (or suffers) the fruits of his deeds that he committed during a short span of time called Life.

Footnotes
[1] This name comes from the hadith – the Qur’an does not mention his name.

[2] He was actually inspired by Allah to go to that place in order to meet him and learn some special “wisdom” from him. (18: 66)

[3] For complete analysis, see Sayyid Abul A'la Mawdudi, Towards Understanding the Qur’an, Vol. V, pp. 122-127, The Islamic Foundation, Leicester, 1995.

[4] ibid., pp. 116-117.

[5] One sufi was once traveling with some of his followers when his horse stumbled, making him fall and hurt his toe. He immediately said, “Alhamdulillah!”. His followers asked him in wonder, “You just got hurt and you said ‘alhamdulillah’?” He replied, “It was in my fate that this will happen to me. Now that it has come and gone, I offered my thanks to Allah.”

[6] Bukhari.

[7] See the full text of this hadith in Bukhari and Muslim.

[8] No matter how serious the disease is or how it is labeled (“terminal disease”), a believer should never loose hope for recovery. The Prophet (p) said that Allah (swt) did not create any disease for which He did not provide a cure (Abu Dawood). Regardless of what the doctors’ verdict is, the believer and his or her relatives should never allow their hearts to assume that this sickness will take him to death. In fact, believing as such will be sinful. The believer must take all medical options that are possible for him to take and continue with hope and mercy of Allah (swt) until his last breath.

[9] Mushfiqur Rahman, A Girl On A Mission: Profile of Aminah Assilmi, www.welcome-back.org/profile/aminah1.shtml.

[10] Being patient and pleased with Allah does not mean that one is not supposed to feel sorrow at the death of his or her beloved ones. Such feelings are what make us human. The prophet (p) was holding his infant son Ibrahim when he was dying. As he breathed his last, tears started to flow from the Prophet’s eyes. Abdurrahman Ibn Auf, who was with him, exclaimed, “O Allah’s Messenger, Even you are weeping!” The Prophet replied:
“O Ibn 'Auf, this is mercy.” Then he wept more and said, “The eyes are shedding tears and the heart is grieved, and we will not say except what pleases our Lord. O Ibrahim! Indeed we are grieved by your separation.” (Bukhari)
[11] Mushfiqur Rahman, Zakat Calculation, The Islamic Foundation, Leicester, 2003, p. 21.

[12] Subconsciously, we lay claim to perpetual ownership of all that is in our possession. One thinks: “This house is mine”, or “That bank balance is mine – I will use it for my needs.” Although everyone knows that he can die anytime, he is in denial of the possibility of his separation from his wealth anytime soon. The reality is that his house and wealth will remain, but their ownership will be transferred to someone else. Thus, only that much of one’s wealth can be considered as his which he has already used up or donated out. In a very profound hadith, the Prophet (p) said:
The son of Adam claims: “My wealth, my wealth.” O son of Adam! Is there anything that is your’s except what you have consumed, what you have utilized, what you have worn and it was worn out, or what you given as charity and sent it forward? (Muslim)
[13] Such as when a person is seeking justice in front of a judge and thus have to inform the judge about the aggressions committed by the offender. One might ask, why should making a negative comment about a person be prohibited even if he has committed that act? One who has such questions should be asked: what is the benefit in doing so or what purpose is served by backbiting? If one has done something wrong and he would like that to be corrected, then he should go and talk to that person in private. Speaking ill of him behind his back does no good other than harming the delicate balance of relationship between individuals. In the eyes of Allah, this is such a heinous act that He compares this with eating the flesh of one’s dead brother (49:12). Like a dead person who cannot defend himself even when bites of fleshes are taken out from his body, likewise a person who is absent cannot defend himself against the allegation made against him.
[14] Forgiving offenders, especially those who repent and feel sorry for their actions, is commendable and earns one much rewards from Allah (swt).
[15] Ibn Kathir, Stories of the Prophets, Trans. Sheikh Muhammad Mustafa Gemeiah, Islamic Book, Inc., New York, 1997, pp. 170-177.

[16] In sharp contrast to the Qur’an, the Bible portrays Job as one who is angry and frustrated at God for his conditions. He blames God for inflicting suffering on him, argues with Him, and gives vents to his frustrations with Him. He curses the day he was born and wishes that he better died after birth. He demands God to explain why he, a righteous person, was subjected to this kind of treatment. (See Book of Job, verses 3:1, 3:11, 3:23, 6:4, 6:9, 6:11, 10:1-22) One will wonder: is this the kind of character that a Prophet of God should have? Prophets are the best people who walked on earth and their character and conduct are a model for the humanity to follow. Through their example of patience and forbearance, they teach people faith and trust in God. Unfortunately, Job is only one of many Prophets whom the Bible ascribed things that are inconceivable even for a righteous person, much less a prophet. Sayyid Mawdudi attributed this to the moral degeneration of the Israelites themselves, who ascribed things to their prophets in order to justify their own conducts.

[17] Ibn Kathir narrates that Jonah was continuously repeating this supplication so much so that other marine creatures heard him, gathered around the whale and started glorifying Allah as well. See Stories of the Prophets, p. 187.

Source
Reply

greenhill
02-13-2014, 07:55 AM
Salaam to you Signor.

Wow! The King of long replies returns! :D

Read the first part... will go through the rest later..... when my eyes recovers from the scrolling down effort.:omg:


:peace:
Reply

glo
02-13-2014, 08:55 AM
God is always fair and just - but he is also merciful and gracious.

We cannot know why some people get to live what we might consider a 'good life' and others a bad one. There are very many facets to this.

One is, that certain (though of course not all) things in life are the result of our own actions or those around us. All actions have consequences.

Another is, that what we may perceive to be a 'bad life' might not actually be so. I work with adults who have learning disabilities and physical disabilities. Some of us might judge their lives to be sad, bad or meaningless. But who is to say that it is? Many of our clients/patients are happy people who enjoy their lives ... and who touch the lives of many others.

Another is, that our lives may be intended as a test or that the suffering of one helps to bring out the compassion of another.

There many be many more facets, but these are just a few which spring to mind.

Most importantly,we believe that amongst the messiness of human life, God knows and understands. He has a plan and will judge us according to our situations. God knows best!

It reminds me of a friend of mine who used to say that life is like the back of a tapestry - messy and confusing, with bits of string hanging out at wild angles.
But God sees the other side - the beautiful picture, with everything falling into place, making sense and being wonderful! :statisfie
Reply

Signor
02-13-2014, 09:56 AM
Originally Posted by greenhill
Salaam to you Signor.

Wow! The King of long replies returns!

Read the first part... will go through the rest later..... when my eyes recovers from the scrolling down effort.
Waalikum Assalaam greenhill

I admit,its a long reply and worth your time.But do you know part of what OP asked was similar to Buddha,a prince of India who is said to have given up his throne, left behind his family and his palace, and set out into the forest to seek answers to the haunting questions of suffering, disease, old age, and death.Tell me,How a question on which a whole religion is based can be answered in few lines?

Regardless,Islam has provided us all the answers.
Reply

glo
02-13-2014, 10:03 AM
I like what you said about the Buddha, Signor.

It is true that seeing injustice in this world should stir us to be better people and to seek to work towards social justice and fairness in this world.
We are called to be God's agents in this earthly life. Sitting back and doing nothing is really not an option! The Buddha knew that ...
Reply

greenhill
02-13-2014, 10:06 AM
Salaam br. Signor, to summarise what you said above,

Everything counts.

Originally Posted by Signor
He knoweth whatever there is on the earth and in the sea. Not a leaf doth fall but with His knowledge: there is not a grain in the darkness (or depths) of the earth nor anything fresh or dry (green or withered) but is (inscribed) in a Record Clear (to those who can read). (6:59) No misfortune can happen on earth or in your souls but is recorded in a decree before We bring it into existence: that is truly easy for Allah: in order that ye may not despair over matters that pass you by … (57:22-23)
Everything is recorded for judgment later on.

Originally Posted by Signor
How many times, in our human condition, have we suffered an obstacle or calamity which turned out to be a blessing days, months, or years later? Perhaps we then find ourselves a bit ashamed in front of Allah (swt) for not being patient and thus loosing the opportunity of earning Allah’s good pleasure.
Like the cartoon depiction of missing the Titanic, what is to happen in the future is still a mystery. Take the right path through the trials, you will get a better reward.

Originally Posted by Signor
On no soul doth Allah place a burden greater than it can bear. (2:286)
So in another way, a highly intelligent person will be tested more severely intellectually than a relatively 'simple' person. The greater the power, the greater the temptations.

Originally Posted by Signor
So We answered his call, and We removed the distress that was on him, and We restored his family to him (that he had lost) and the like thereof along with them - as a mercy from Ourselves and a Reminder for all who worship Us. (21:84)
The ultimate result of perseverance and faith?

Originally Posted by Signor
Who say when afflicted with calamity: “To Allah we belong and to Him is our return.” They are those on whom (descend) blessings from Allah and Mercy and they are the ones that receive guidance. (2:156-157)
How to remind ourselves in the face of these challenges.

So, really it is not about looking at other people's trials and rewards, but for our own selves.

However, I did not see the ayat in the above post that the trials we are given are not just in the calamities but also in the good times too! Most of us forget that. We feel the good times are our reward for whatever reason, and not as a test to see what we do with it.


:peace:
Reply

Muhaba
02-13-2014, 12:33 PM
Originally Posted by Signor
Understanding the Difference Between the Apparent and the Reality An individual once asked Sayyid Mawdudi about why many people, despite being good and pious, or apparently innocent, suffer severe tribulations in this worldly life. What wrong could a minor child or an infant, for example, commit so that he or she should have to suffer a fatal disease or even be murdered? Why do we see many good people suffering severe afflictions and calamities that they apparently do not deserve? Mawdudi asked him to consider a beautiful, well-kept garden and its gardener. The garden has many kinds of plants, each requiring various types of resources and care. It is well kept and healthy since the gardener meticulously takes care of it. He often clears the weeds and unnecessary plants that are harmful for the good plants. He trims branches and leaves to maintain their good health. He waters his garden when needed, or withholds water when that is harmful. It is because of such good care that his garden remains beautiful and healthy. The weeds or plants that he removes or the leaves and branches that he trims suffer much and complains. Their instincts are reactive to their own physical needs and they have little or no understanding about their surroundings, let alone the rest of the garden. They complain about their immediate needs and sufferings and do not know what is ultimately good for even themselves, much less the entire garden. Mawdudi then asked him to compare the garden with the universe and the gardener with Allah (swt). The point was well made. The analogy, however, is simplistic, for Allah’s knowledge and wisdom is infinite compared to the finite knowledge of a gardener, and His domain is infinitely wider and more complex than a garden. In this universe where an infinite number of laws, events, variables and factors are at work, each affecting others in complex ways, it is impossible for us to comprehend the full wisdom and purpose behind what we apparently observe. Parables are sometimes used in the Qur’an to make a point understood. Often, when intellect fails to comprehend a matter, a simple parable can get it across.
Jazak-Allaho khairan for this excellent post.
Reply

syed_z
02-13-2014, 01:43 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Thank you for your efforts but what you have written is again an example of being unfair:
1. The child was saved from punishment... how come God doesn't save us all? Unfair.
2. The parents were saved... Again, they were saved from the child who would make them disbelievers so god didn't give them that test otherwise they would've failed it. Unfair.
3. "God gives mercy to some" = This is a definition of unfair when some people get mercy (especially the child) and others don't.

Allah (swt) saves those who want to be saved and not those who don't. He sees what is in the hearts of His creatures....



God giving Mercy to some is just your narrow perspective. You have to make it more wider to be able to see.... why I quoted the story of Khidr and Moses (a.s) from Surah Kahf is to make you understand that what appears apparently as unfair can be and is absolutely fair.... Moses (a.s) couldn't see because he was being impatient and the impatient one's will not be able to get immediate answers through haste....


(Surah Al Ma'arij 70:19) Indeed, mankind was created anxious
Reply

InToTheRain
02-13-2014, 03:51 PM
Originally Posted by Plutonium
Part I
Why is life unfair? Some people have a lot while some people have a little. Good things happen to bad people and bad things to good people. How come I have less then some people and more than others? That is unfair

:sl:

I think ample reasons have been given already that our inability to Understand Allah Most High doesn't make Him unfair for He is the Knower of All; He knows the consequences of actions that occur and the consequences of them had they not occured. I think some great examples of how deluded our perception what is apparent can be; in the story of the Brother missing the titanic and also the Story of Musa(AS) meeting Qidr(AS). What Musa(AS) saw was injustice yet Qidr(AS) later on explained how each act were a mercy to the people involved. The hadith is provided below:

Narrated Said bin Jubair: I said to Ibn Abbas, "Nauf Al-Bukah claims that Moses, the companion of Al-Khadir was not Moses (the prophet) of the children of Israel, but some other Moses." Ibn 'Abbas said, "Allah's enemy (i.e. Nauf) has told a lie. Ubai bin Ka'b told us that the Prophet said, 'Once Moses stood up and addressed Bani Israel. He was asked who was the most learned man amongst the people. He said, 'I.' Allah admonished him as he did not attribute absolute knowledge to Him (Allah). So, Allah said to him, 'Yes, at the junction of the two seas there is a Slave of Mine who is more learned than you.' Moses said, 'O my Lord! How can I meet him?' Allah said, 'Take a fish and put it in a large basket and you will find him at the place where you will lose the fish.' Moses took a fish and put it in a basket and proceeded along with his (servant) boy, Yusha 'bin Nun, till they reached the rock where they laid their heads (i.e. lay down). Moses slept, and the fish, moving out of the basket, fell into the sea. It took its way into the sea (straight) as in a tunnel. Allah stopped the flow of water over the fish and it became like an arch (the Prophet pointed out this arch with his hands). They travelled the rest of the night, and the next day Moses said to his boy (servant), 'Give us our food, for indeed, we have suffered much fatigue in this journey of ours.' Moses did not feel tired till he crossed that place which Allah had ordered him to seek after. His boy (servant) said to him, 'Do you know that when we were sitting near that rock, I forgot the fish, and none but Satan caused me to forget to tell (you) about it, and it took its course into the sea in an amazing way?.' So there was a path for the fish and that astonished them. Moses said, 'That was what we were seeking after.' So, both of them retraced their footsteps till they reached the rock. There they saw a man Lying covered with a garment. Moses greeted him and he replied saying, 'How do people greet each other in your land?' Moses said, 'I am Moses.' The man asked, 'Moses of Bani Israel?' Moses said, 'Yes, I have come to you so that you may teach me from those things which Allah has taught you.' He said, 'O Moses! I have some of the Knowledge of Allah which Allah has taught me, and which you do not know, while you have some of the Knowledge of Allah which Allah has taught you and which I do not know.' Moses asked, 'May I follow you?' He said, 'But you will not be able to remain patient with me for how can you be patient about things which you will not be able to understand?' (Moses said, 'You will find me, if Allah so will, truly patient, and I will not disobey you in aught.') So, both of them set out walking along the sea-shore, a boat passed by them and they asked the crew of the boat to take them on board. The crew recognized Al-Khadir and so they took them on board without fare. When they were on board the boat, a sparrow came and stood on the edge of the boat and dipped its beak once or twice into the sea. Al-Khadir said to Moses, 'O Moses! My knowledge and your knowledge have not decreased Allah's Knowledge except as much as this sparrow has decreased the water of the sea with its beak.' Then suddenly Al-Khadir took an adze and plucked a plank, and Moses did not notice it till he had plucked a plank with the adze. Moses said to him, 'What have you done? They took us on board charging us nothing; yet you I have intentionally made a hole in their boat so as to drown its passengers. Verily, you have done a dreadful thing.' Al-Khadir replied, 'Did I not tell you that you would not be able to remain patient with me?' Moses replied, 'Do not blame me for what I have forgotten, and do not be hard upon me for my fault.' So the first excuse of Moses was that he had forgotten. When they had left the sea, they passed by a boy playing with other boys. Al-Khadir took hold of the boys head and plucked it with his hand like this. (Sufyan, the sub narrator pointed with his fingertips as if he was plucking some fruit.) Moses said to him, "Have you killed an innocent person who has not killed any person? You have really done a horrible thing." Al-Khadir said, "Did I not tell you that you could not remain patient with me?' Moses said "If I ask you about anything after this, don't accompany me. You have received an excuse from me.' Then both of them went on till they came to some people of a village, and they asked its inhabitant for wood but they refused to entertain them as guests. Then they saw therein a wall which was just going to collapse (and Al Khadir repaired it just by touching it with his hands). (Sufyan, the sub-narrator, pointed with his hands, illustrating how Al-Khadir passed his hands over the wall upwards.) Moses said, "These are the people whom we have called on, but they neither gave us food, nor entertained us as guests, yet you have repaired their wall. If you had wished, you could have taken wages for it." Al-Khadir said, "This is the parting between you and me, and I shall tell you the explanation of those things on which you could not remain patient." The Prophet added, "We wished that Moses could have remained patient by virtue of which Allah might have told us more about their story. (Sufyan the sub-narrator said that the Prophet said, "May Allah bestow His Mercy on Moses! If he had remained patient, we would have been told further about their case.") (Book #55, Hadith #613)


I would advise you focus on what He has given you rather then what He hasn't given you; being ungrateful to Allah Most High is detrimental to your faith. Fact is even if you were to incorrectly conclude that Allah Most High is unfair then it would still not detract His dominion over all things. You are still indedted to Him for what he has given you regardless of what He has not given you. Maybe you having less is a blessing in disguise as mentioned above and other posts. Also the wise know that being given more is great tribulation for it means we will be accountable for more. As spidermans uncle once said "with great power comes great responisbility".

Bro do you get up from sleep and complain about how bad your dream was or how unfair? The time in this life has little to no significance in comparison to the eternal life in the hereafter. Be patient and endure Insha'Allah. Here is a Hadith of a man who gets "EVERYTHING" he wants in life and a man who gets "NOTHING" he wants in life! BUT look at this example, this man forgets ALL the GOOD in his life after been dipped in hell and the other forgets all his tribulations after been dipped in Heaven. SUBAHANALLAH! HOW insiginificant the time and tribulations of this life will appear in the hereafter that it is forgetten so easily!

It was narrated that Anas ibn Maalik said: The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The most affluent of the people in this world, of those who will go to Hell, will be brought on the Day of Resurrection and dipped once in the Fire. Then it will be said: O son of Adam, did you ever see anything good? Did you ever have any pleasure? He will say: No, by Allaah, O Lord. Then the most destitute of the people in this world, of those who will enter Paradise, will be brought and dipped once in Paradise, and it will be said to him: O son of Adam, did you ever see anything bad? Did you ever experience any hardship? He will say: No, by Allaah, O Lord. I never saw anything bad and I never experienced any hardship.”
Narrated by Muslim (2807)

(Unfortunately I couldn't find the long version of this hadith on google were it is mentioned that the person in tribulation gets nothing he desires in this life to the extent he asks for water before death but does not even get that; sheikh google isn't coperating, if anyone knows it please link)
If the whole of mankind were to reject Almighty Allah then it would detract nothing from Him and we would be the losers. Men can be superior to Angels as we do not see Allah Most High like they do and we have Nafs (desires) which shayan inflames but using our congnitions we long for and love Allah Most Merciful


Originally Posted by Plutonium
Part II:
A response is that life on this earth is a test; fitnah.
But then that proves to be even more unfair and the paradox starts to emerge: Do some people have easier tests than others- For example, A child killed in an earth earthquake at a very young age has an easier test than others... unfair again
It's not only children who are granted paradise; also adults who haven't the ability to infer and make judgements such as the mentally incapable are also not accountable; even those who are not Muslim will not be accountable for not following Islam if they have not heard of TRUE Islam and the ISLAM I am reffering to is not the Islam portrayed by mainstream media represented by extremists. It falls in line with the explanation above that if you have more then you are accountable for more; be it physically, financially or intelectually. So how can Allah Most High be unfair?

But there is no pleasing certain people. If they are saved from punishment by death as children then they will say Allah Most High was unfair for not giving them longevity to prove themselves later and have a chance in acquiring higher abodes in paradise. And if they are not saved from punishment by death as children they will say Allah Most High is unfair for not killing them before they reached that stage of deviating from the Path.

It's quite saddening to see this line of questioning, questioning the decree and questioning Allah Most High. Surely shaytan likes to confuse the children of Adam(AS) by whispering into them regarding matters only Allah Most High only has knowledge of.

The greatest Blessing is knowledge which helps one draw closer to Allah Most High and the greatest wealth is contentment.
Reply

Nájlá
02-13-2014, 05:11 PM
:salam:

Can everyone save their posts from this thread before they get deleted while the forum is updating. Some great posts I want to read later on to reflect on.
Reply

Plutonium
02-14-2014, 06:09 AM
Incredible responses since the last time I loged in... thank you all and on behalf of anyone that will find this when in time of thought. These will all be read thoroughly and insha-Allah I will respond to each one.
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glo
02-14-2014, 08:05 AM
Thanks for asking a very interesting question, Plutonium.
It is always good to question our faith and stretch our understanding.
The question of suffering is one which human beings have grappled with for as long as they have existed.
Reply

greenhill
02-14-2014, 10:20 AM
Originally Posted by glo
The question of suffering is one which human beings have grappled with for as long as they have existed.
As I have quite recently learnt, that is because it is part of the formula for us humans to grow. We need reason (the ability to), choice and suffering. Without any one of it, we cease to grow in intellect.

It us just that we 'hate' having to suffer, so we reject it and say it is unfair. ^o)



:peace:
Reply

Signor
09-28-2014, 06:40 PM
Comes to me as a great reminder,thought I should share.

You Will Find Me, if Allah so Wills, Among Those Who Are Patient

“And when he reached with him [the age of] exertion, he said, “O my son, indeed I have seen in a dream that I [must] sacrifice you, so see what you think.” He said, “O my father, do as you are commanded. You will find me, if Allah wills, of the steadfast.” And when they had both submitted and he put him down upon his forehead, We called to him, “O Abraham, You have fulfilled the vision.” Indeed, We thus reward the doers of good. Indeed, this was the clear trial.” (Qur’an 37:102-106)

Above is the conversation between Ibrahim `alayhi sallatu wasallam (may God send His peace and blessings on him) and one of his sons. Here we see that Allah subhanahu wa ta’ala (exalted is He) asks Ibrahim (as) to make the most difficult of sacrifices. There are many kinds of tribulations in this world that leave us at utter loss and dismay, but one of the most painful tribulations for a parent is to lose his or her child. Yet, in the verses above we see a very different reaction from Ibrahim (as), and more so from his son. Allah (swt) makes it very clear at the end that it was obviously a trial for them. So what exactly makes these people different from us as to how we react to a test from Allah (swt)? A growing epidemic among Muslims today is the absolute impatience with the decree of Allah (swt). Oftentimes we see negativity in everything that unexpectedly happens to us; we completely lose our cool when afflicted with tribulation. And why do we react this way so often? Perhaps because our priorities are skewed and we trust ourselves more than we trust our Lord (swt).

Ibrahim (as) and his son were in a complete state of submission to their Lord—they had an undeniable certainly that their Lord, Al Lateef (the Gentle, the Subtle), would never hurt them, that they were in the good hands of Al Waali (the Protecter). To make it clearer, Imam al Ghazali (may God have mercy on him) said that it does not matter what situation you are in, what matters is what you make out of that situation. This means that we need to realize and be confident in what really matters. Our priority is to be successful in terms of the akhira (afterlife). Our priority is to be in obedience to Allah (swt) in every living condition possible.

Allah (swt) Exists when we are unwell and when we are well. He (swt) Exists when we are poor and when we are rich, when we are sad and when we are happy. So what difference does our state make when, in every state, Al Hay (the Living God) is ever-present with us? Can’t a poor person be more beloved to Allah (swt) than a rich person because of his mindfulness of Allah? Can’t a person with cancer be more beloved to Allah than a healthy person because of her love for Allah (swt)? We don’t have knowledge of the unseen. We don’t know what His plans for us are. But the knowledge that Allah (swt) did convey to us through His messengers is that the only thing that has any value in His sight is our taqwa (mindfulness of God). And the moment we internalize this, our problems of dunya (this life) will begin to look insignificant. How can outward and arbitrary tribulations be tribulations when we know that these events, by no means, can take us away from His obedience?

Some may ask, well if Allah has already decreed everything for us, then what’s the point of life anyway? Yes, whatever Allah (swt) has decreed will come to pass, but the point is not what Allah has decreed, the point is our reaction and response to whatever Allah (swt) decreed for us. Let us consider the example of Aasiya (may God be pleased with her): it was decreed that she would marry Pharaoh, but her forbearance and absolute conviction in the hereafter brought her so close to Allah (swt) that Allah showed her her house in Paradise. So next time we face a dead end in life, let’s remember that the situation at hand is not important. The importance actually lies in the fact that Allah (swt) has given you a chance to prove your love for Him.

And why should our priority be the akhira and not the dunya? Because whether good or bad, our life will come to an end very soon, but the hereafter is eternal. After 50 years it won’t matter if you got accepted to Yale or not. What’s going to matter for eternity is our relationship with our Lord. We all want to go to Jannah (Paradise), but the even the thought of death makes us uncomfortable. Perhaps that is because deep inside we know that we are not serious enough about our permanent abode. Most of us get worried out of our wits when we can’t hand in an assignment on time, but we couldn’t care less about the call of the adhaan (the call to prayer) five times a day. We log onto Facebook every day, but we forget to open the book of Allah as often. Allah (swt) is not being unfair to us, we are being unfair to ourselves by mixing up our priorities.

Our Prophet ﷺ was never disquieted or agitated in a moment of tribulation. Even in the most difficult day of his life, he ended his prayer by telling Allah, “So long as You are not angry with me, I don’t care.” Agitation at the tribulations around us is inconsistent with the characteristic of believers.
“It is He who sent down tranquillity into the hearts of the believers that they would increase in faith along with their [present] faith. And to Allah belong the soldiers of the heavens and the earth, and ever is Allah Knowing and Wise.” (Qur’an 48:4)

We need to internalize the fact that we come from Allah (swt) and we will return to Allah (swt). We have to remember that we are in good hands. It’s strange that we love and trust our parents so much, yet we do not fully trust Allah’s plans for us— whose plan it was in the first place to send us to these safe hands. We know with utter conviction that these two temporary guardians (our mum and dad) will take care of us, yet we don’t believe our real and eternal Guardian will take care of us. He took care of us before we had our parents. He took care of us when we were in the wombs. He (swt) took care of us when we couldn’t even ask for anything. If He took care of us through all this, how can we think He will forsake us now and not give us what is best for us? Brothers and sisters in Islam, let us be mindful of our Lord and straighten our affairs with Him. The result to this will be that He (swt) will straighten the rest of our affairs for us, perhaps in ways we’re not going to quite understand.

“O you who have believed, seek help through patience and prayer. Indeed, Allah is with the patient.” – (Qur’an 2:153)
Reply

hisnameiszzz
09-28-2014, 09:09 PM
This is an awesome topic. Thanks so much to the OP for bringing it up.

Great responses from everyone else too.
Reply

MuslimInshallah
04-19-2015, 09:25 PM
Originally Posted by Signor


Learning from the Example of Prophet Job

Job sighed, and in a soft voice replied, “Satan must have whispered to you and made you dissatisfied. Tell me, how long did I enjoy good health and riches?” She replied, “For eighty years.” Then Job asked, “How long am I suffering like this?” She said, “For seven years.” Then Job told her, “In that case I am ashamed to call on my Lord to remove the hardship, for I have not suffered longer than the years of good health and plenty. It seems that your faith has weakened and you are dissatisfied with the fate of Allah. If I ever regain health, I swear I will punish you with a hundred strokes! From this day onward, I forbid myself to eat or drink anything from your hand. Leave me alone and let my Lord do with me as He pleases.” Crying bitterly and with a heavy heart, she had no choice but to leave him and seek shelter elsewhere. In his helpless state, Job turned to Allah, not to complain but to seek His mercy:

Verily, distress has seized me, and You are the Most Merciful of all those who show Mercy. (21:83)


Source
Assalaamu alaikum,

(smile) This was a very long post, but worth the read. However, I felt that the story of Ayyub (AS) was left a little incomplete, and that someone who did not know it might think that he was unkind and unfair to his wife. After all, she also had lost all her wealth and children (Oh gosh! I don't know that I could cope as well as she if my children all died!), and she had had to care for her husband during his sickness. And it can be harder on the caregiver than on the sick person, sometimes. She also had to do menial work to support them both. She must have been pretty exhausted and at the end of her tether when she spoke. And so must Ayyub (AS) when he spoke.

So I wanted to add this little addendum, to show what beautiful people they both were (May Allah Bless them).

God restored Ayyub’s health almost immediately. Ayyub’s wife could not bear to be parted from her beloved husband for very long so she returned and was amazed when she saw his recovery. She cried out her thanks to God, and on hearing her words, Ayyub became worried. He had taken an oath to beat his wife but he had no desire to hurt her for he loved her dearly. God wanted to ease the heart of his devoted, patient servant so he advised him to “take in your hand a bundle of thin grass and strike therewith your wife, and break not your oath”. (Quran 38:44)

Source: http://aboutislamworld.blogspot.ca/2...-ayyub-as.html


Ayyub (AS) had sworn an oath to beat her with a hundred strokes. So Allah Gave him a way to fulfil his oath, but in an equitable manner. Namely, to take a bunch of grass, and tap her with it. (smile) And then they both were able to enjoy the bounties that Allah rained upon them thereafter.


May Allah, the Guide to the Right Path, Help us to be fair and kind in our dealings with others, no matter what the circumstances. And if we fail…May He Forgive us, and Help us find ways to to set right any errors we may have committed.
Reply

sister herb
04-19-2015, 09:33 PM
Salam alaykum

I don´t think that Allah is unfair. We people should learn to follow His teachings and we should learn to share what we have with others.
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ardianto
04-19-2015, 10:09 PM
He : "Why is Allah unfair?".
You: "Astaghfirullah!, why you say like that?"
He : "Because Allah made me born with poverty"
You: "Poverty is a test. Just like wealth is a test too for wealthy people"
He: "But why don't Allah test me with wealth too like other people?"

Okay, bro, sis, what would you say if you got question like this?.

So, do not just 'entertain' the poor people with sweet words, but give your concern to the poor people and do the real action to help them. Help them to make them able to leave their poverty.
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M.I.A.
04-21-2015, 01:49 PM
I never felt anything was unfair until I tried to change myself.

...seems like most people do not think twice about the way they act or interact.

My actions are not fair seeming to me and niether are there's.

Shieks be like, your book is your own.

Maybe one day things will be as I remember them to have been.
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