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greenhill
05-14-2014, 03:49 AM
Salaams to all.

I’ve not posted since the upgrading works were carried out. While I was away, I have had time to reflect on many points and topics discussed over the year I have been a member. One topic in particular left a ‘hole’ in the explanations but I was not able to pin down as I was brought up with the same brief explanation.

However, with the same thing being repeated in this forum it made me think further and over the last weeks something crept into my conscious thoughts that I would like to ‘share’ with fellow IB members and get feedback on this…

Here goes-

When a person asks about Islam and what it takes to be a muslim, often I hear people reciting the 5 pillars of Islam and the 6 pillars of faith. In essence the pillars of faith is about accepting that the message came from one source from the beginning (from Adam pbuh) all the way through to the last prophet (Muhammad saw). The pillars of Islam is then to confirm that we accept the faith and that we will follow the preaching that was conveyed through prophet Muhammad saw and hence our covenant to follow his basic example as spelt out in the 5 pillars. Meaning to say that we cannot accept Islam and follow the teachings of other prophets aside from prophet Muhammad saw.

All well and good up to here… then when I look in detail at what the 5 and 6 pillars signify (not sure if this is the correct word to use) is our obligation to Allah with the exception of the zakat, where the benefit is felt by human beings.

Now here is where it gets a bit tricky…

In the Quran it says many, many times “Yaa ayyuhal lazi na aamanuu wa amilus solihati….” Which roughly translates to “oh those who believe (of faith) and do righteous deeds…..”

There are 2 distinct points here. Those who believe relates directly to the 5 and 6 pillars. What about the second point of righteous deeds?

If we are to take the 5 and 6 pillars as the introduction to Islam then we are focusing on the ‘”yaa ayyuhal lazi na aamanu…” – “Oh those who believe” and we omit the “solihati” part and the importance of performing “righteous deeds” as an integral of being a muslim.

(Get my point so far?)

Apart from our obligation to Allah to as defined in the 5 pillars, we are also given a code of conduct with regards to our interaction with the world we live in. Biggest priority for us is our treatment of our parents. We are also obligated to protect the weak (orphans etc), to be fair to all, honest in trade, charitable, to list a few. For example, I may perform all the 5 pillars and totally believe in the 6 pillars but for some reason I prefer to be charitable to some far off places where the need is real but neglect my own sibling who has too many times fallen on hard times. Or to give an example often quoted to me about a sinner (in the story related to me she was a prostitute) who arrived at a well to drink and found a dog unable to get to the water. Knowing that the dog will surely die of thirst, she retrieved water for it. This act alone absolved her sins and was given paradise. (Not sure of the authenticity of this story).

However, this story goes to show the importance of our contribution to the world we live in aside from our prayer obligation to Allah alone. It has to be a combination of both.

So in a nutshell, we should be telling people who are interested to know more about Islam that it is the 5 and 6 pillars as well as performance of righteous deeds. (5,6&7?)

And to cap it all, it must all be done with sincerity and patience.

Just my thoughts on the matter….not looking to create any arguments.


Peace.

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syed_z
05-14-2014, 11:01 AM
Salaam,

Agreed. One's belief can only be translated in to one's righteous actions, thats is why Iman (Faith) and Amilasualihat (Righteous Deeds) go together hand in hand. The code of conduct is the chore of Islam and the Prophet Muhammad (saw) himself said in one of his traditions that "I have come not but to perfect the character/good manners."

Btw the story is authentic tradition.
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ardianto
05-14-2014, 02:57 PM
:sl:

If we accept Rukn Islam as the pillar of Islam, and we believe in Rukn Iman, then we become a Muslim. However, we are still Muslims in the lowest grade. And if we want to increase our grade, we have to do righteous deeds and avoid evil deeds.

Are there 2 distinct point in "Yaa ayyuhal lazi na aamanuu wa amilus solihati….”?. No!. This sentence is show the true characteristic of Muslims. We cannot say we are true Muslim is we just believe in Islam but we never do what we must do as Muslims in ibadah and in muamalah.

Seem like you put "Yaa ayyuhal lazi na aamanuu" into area of relationship between human and Allah (habluminallah) and "amilus solihati" into area of relationship between human and human (habluminanas).

Habluminallah and habluminanas are two things that cannot be separated. We cannot say we are good Muslims if we are good in ibadah but we let our neighbour in hungry while we have enough foods. We also cannot say we are good Muslims if we are good in helping needy people but we do not perform salah or fasting.

We need to make a balance in amal salih in habluminallah and habluminanas.


By the way, welcome back pakcik Greenhill. Big hug for you. :)
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greenhill
05-16-2014, 08:10 AM
Thank br syed_z for the info on the 'authentic tradition'. :statisfie

Br. Ardianto, exactly what I believe. As you put 'habluminallah and habluminanas' (first time I am hearing this term) as being an inseparable conduct of a true muslim. But sad that it is not often expressed when introducing islam in the beginning. Many focus on just the habluminallah aspect.

A big hug to you too! :p


:peace:
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ardianto
05-17-2014, 04:39 PM
Originally Posted by greenhill;n2232101

Br. Ardianto, exactly what I believe. As you put 'habluminallah and habluminanas' (first time I am hearing this term) as being an inseparable conduct of a true muslim. But sad that it is not often expressed when introducing islam in the beginning. Many focus on just the habluminallah aspect.

A big hug to you too! :p


:peace:
When the kids start to learn Islam, indeed, the first lessons that they receive are recite Qur'an, salah, shaum, which included in Habluminallah area. But then ustadz must be will teach them about how to follow sunnah in relationship with other people which included in Habluminanas area.

My statement that Muslims cannot let their neighbor in hungry while they have enough food is based on a Hadith. My ustadz taught it to me when I learned Islam when I was kid.
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Muhammad
05-17-2014, 06:00 PM
:wasalamex

It is nice to see you posting again brother greenhill. :)

Regarding eemaan, remember that belief in the six pillars is only one aspect of this. Eemaan also comprises speech and action. The following hadith is an example of how eemaan includes action:

Narrated by Abu Hurairah (radiallaahu ‘anhu): The Messenger of Allaah (salallaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam) said, “Eeman has sixty or seventy-odd branches. The least of them is to remove something harmful from the road, and the most lofty of them is the saying: ‘Laa illaha il Allaah‘ (none has the right to be worshipped except Allaah). And modesty is a branch of Eeman.” [Agreed Upon]

In the Qur'an, Allaah :swt: even called prayer eemaan in the ayah (interpretation of the meaning): “And Allaah would never make your faith [eemaan] (prayers) to be lost (i.e. your prayers offered towards Jerusalem). Truly, Allaah is full of kindness, the Most Merciful towards mankind” [al-Baqarah 2:143]
The mufassireen said: “your faith (eemaan)” means your prayers towards Bayt al-Maqdis (Jerusalem), because the Sahaabah used to pray towards al-Masjid al-Aqsaa before they were commanded to face the Ka’bah in their prayers. [source]


Another interesting point to note is that many of the early surahs to be revealed contain teachings relating to societal matters and not only about aqeedah, illustrating that emphasis needs to be placed on social conduct too. We can also learn from this that eemaan must manifest itself in our actions and we are encouraged to do those actions befitting the people of eemaan. And Allaah :swt: knows best.
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greenhill
05-21-2014, 06:27 AM
Thank brother Muhammad.

Yes I believe in the eemaan aspects as you put it, not at all questioning it in anyway. It's just I'm trying to 'tap' into the brains in the forum to try simplify as much as I can basic criteria that encapsulates the faith (eemaan) that can be understood and appreciated without being convoluted and confusing to the listener.... so I open it to the members of the forum to give feedback... :shade:
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Nur Student
05-22-2014, 02:48 AM
There are two sorts of amal-us-salihat. The first includes our duties towards Allah, which is worship and is called 'hukukullah' (rights of Allah on us). The second sort is our duties towards the human beings and other creatures, which is justice and called 'hukuk al-i'bad' (rights of the worshipers of Allah on us).
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greenhill
05-23-2014, 03:33 AM
Thank you Nur Student,

'hukukullah' (rights of Allah on us) and 'hukuk al-i'bad' (rights of the worshipers of Allah on us).

This can also be referred to 'habluminallah' and 'habluminanas', (as what br. Ardianto was saying above) or are they slightly different?

From this I'm already learning these two terms which I have not really come across before this (although I am born a muslim), and the importance of our relationship with Allah and the rest of His creatures (humans included). Although I knew this already, but it was never put forward categorically how important it is for the day of reckoning, when we will be judged, that it would not be entirely based on 'habluminallah' or 'hukukullah' aspects but also on the 'habluminallah' and 'hukuk al-i'bad'.

Peace
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ardianto
05-23-2014, 05:12 PM
Originally Posted by greenhill;n2232264
Thank you Nur Student,

'hukukullah' (rights of Allah on us) and 'hukuk al-i'bad' (rights of the worshipers of Allah on us).

This can also be referred to 'habluminallah' and 'habluminanas', (as what br. Ardianto was saying above) or are they slightly different?
Huquq Allah is Allah rights toward us which implemented by us with our duties toward Allah such as perform salah, fasting in ramadan, etc. This is part of relationship between human and Allah (Habluminallah).

Huquq Al-I'bad is other worshiper rights toward us which implemented by us with our duties toward the other like treat them well, etc. This is part of relationship between human and human (Habluminanas)

Huquq itself is translated into Malay/Indonesian language as "hak". Example: Huquq al-Insan (human rights)
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