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greenhill
07-22-2014, 05:34 AM
This year has been slightly different but most other years I will find myself breaking my fast outside on occasion. Apart from if it was already booked in advance (friends invitation etc) if we were to walk in to a restaurant for iftar, I would find that most of the space to be taken up by non muslims.

I mean, they can eat an hour earlier, half an hour earlier, half an hour later, an hour later, why is it that they still queue and compete for the tables and chairs when they know there are people who are waiting to break their fast. Just plain inconsiderate.

It is a bit like if I enter a public transport and I have a seat and I see someone in more need of the seat, I would give it up no matter how far my journey is from that point. Likewise if I see people in a queue to break their fast (and I am not fasting), I would give up my spot for them...

Just ranting :raging:

:D
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drac16
07-22-2014, 09:19 PM
It bothers me when non-muslims treat me differently on account of my fasting. If I'm in a room where a non-muslim is eating and it's during the day, they'll make subtle hints that they want me to leave, without actually saying it. They'll be like "Oh, I feel bad for eating in front of you. I can eat later if you want", even though, countless times, I have assured them that this doesn't bother me whatsoever. I've watched cooking shows while fasting and it didn't have any negative affect on me (psychologically, physically or emotionally).

No matter how many times I insiste that I don't care if they eat in front of me, they make these hints. "Oh, I'm sorry I mentioned food. I forgot you were fasting"... you know what I mean? if I was just not hungry, they wouldn't be pestering me like this, but because I'm fasting, they think they're being nice by always telling me to, in essence, go away.
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Chase
07-23-2014, 01:58 AM
I understand where you're coming from, maybe next time when they try to be nice like that you don't tell them that you don't care in a nice way. Some people need to be yelled at in order to get a simple message.
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Scimitar
07-23-2014, 02:04 AM
iftar time sure is a very testing time for some, for others - it's a time of quiet contemplation of their Lord.

greenhill, maybe you should take some dates and a bottle of water and keep them with you, so you break your fast on time. That way, you don't have to rant in any sense...

...less than a week left now. Patience :)
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greenhill
07-23-2014, 03:45 AM
Originally Posted by Scimitar
greenhill, maybe you should take some dates and a bottle of water and keep them with you, so you break your fast on time.
A ha ha... That's the thing... it is all unplanned... Go out with the best of intentions, all prepared but never thought that I would be neither here nor there when it comes to breaking fast and a rush to find a suitable place. Then there is a queue. In the past I used to even break fast by lighting a cigarette.... yucks!

Peace
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greenhill
07-23-2014, 03:48 AM
Originally Posted by drac16
It bothers me when non-muslims treat me differently on account of my fasting.
That's interesting... it does not bother me as much as it bother the person who is eating.. I suppose it is those who are suppose to fast that probably is the most bothered! ;D
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ardianto
07-23-2014, 03:37 PM
Originally Posted by drac16
It bothers me when non-muslims treat me differently on account of my fasting. If I'm in a room where a non-muslim is eating and it's during the day, they'll make subtle hints that they want me to leave, without actually saying it. They'll be like "Oh, I feel bad for eating in front of you. I can eat later if you want", even though, countless times, I have assured them that this doesn't bother me whatsoever. I've watched cooking shows while fasting and it didn't have any negative affect on me (psychologically, physically or emotionally).

No matter how many times I insiste that I don't care if they eat in front of me, they make these hints. "Oh, I'm sorry I mentioned food. I forgot you were fasting"... you know what I mean? if I was just not hungry, they wouldn't be pestering me like this, but because I'm fasting, they think they're being nice by always telling me to, in essence, go away.
I have no problem if non-Muslim eat in front of me during Ramadan day, as long as they are not provocative. Some people in my mother family are non-Muslims. Few years ago my non-Muslim relatives visited my home and stayed for few days during Ramadan, and I served them with food and drink.

I have no problem too if Muslim eat in front of me during Ramdan day, as long as they have valid reason to not fast such as sick or other valid reasons. My country have two main schedule of Ramadan, one is govt schedule, the other is Muhammadiyah schedule which usually one day earlier in start and end Ramadan. Few years ago my relatives from Muhammadiyah visited my home. They already in Eid day in that time while I was still in the last day of ramadan. And I served them with drink and cookies.
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ardianto
07-23-2014, 03:44 PM
Originally Posted by greenhill
This year has been slightly different but most other years I will find myself breaking my fast outside on occasion. Apart from if it was already booked in advance (friends invitation etc) if we were to walk in to a restaurant for iftar, I would find that most of the space to be taken up by non muslims.
Some restaurants in my place implement special rule during Ramadan which they do not serve dine in before maghrib. So if non-Muslims want to dine there they must wait until maghrib. Of course they will take space and wait there.

Do restaurants in your place implement this rule too?.
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Marina-Aisha
07-23-2014, 06:18 PM
at first when first first started convert my mates would joke say mmmmm yummy crips yummy wotever there eating doesnt bother me nw tho but some people think we r weak like make fun of us but they dont get the whole point of ramadan not just bout the fasting its bout getting close to allah. so forget those idiots and move on.and always bring food like bananna or date so u can break u fast u never know wot u might b when iftar comes!
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aflawedbeing
07-23-2014, 09:41 PM
Originally Posted by drac16
It bothers me when non-muslims treat me differently on account of my fasting. If I'm in a room where a non-muslim is eating and it's during the day, they'll make subtle hints that they want me to leave, without actually saying it. They'll be like "Oh, I feel bad for eating in front of you. I can eat later if you want", even though, countless times, I have assured them that this doesn't bother me whatsoever. I've watched cooking shows while fasting and it didn't have any negative affect on me (psychologically, physically or emotionally).

No matter how many times I insiste that I don't care if they eat in front of me, they make these hints. "Oh, I'm sorry I mentioned food. I forgot you were fasting"... you know what I mean? if I was just not hungry, they wouldn't be pestering me like this, but because I'm fasting, they think they're being nice by always telling me to, in essence, go away.
I get this too, but I never take it as though they are hinting for me to 'leave' per se.
I just see that they are genuinely a bit uncomfortable with the idea.

I always tell them, before you feel bad, fast just one day (I leave Ramadan as being food or drinking, for arguments sake, in this case) and realise it's actually very easy.
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hisnameiszzz
07-23-2014, 11:26 PM
Originally Posted by aflawedbeing
I get this too, but I never take it as though they are hinting for me to 'leave' per se.
I just see that they are genuinely a bit uncomfortable with the idea.

I always tell them, before you feel bad, fast just one day (I leave Ramadan as being food or drinking, for arguments sake, in this case) and realise it's actually very easy.
I am with you on this. When work colleagues apologise when they are eating in front of me, I get the impression they feel bad about it but are too lazy to move away. It makes no difference to me. They are normally eating piggy sandwiches and the thought of eating one of those would make me want to throw up for a week, so it's all good.

To be fair, it's not Ramadhan for them, so they can't know they should not be eating in front of you unless you have a banner on your head saying "I am fasting".
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greenhill
07-24-2014, 04:08 AM
Originally Posted by ardianto
Do restaurants in your place implement this rule too?.
No. Anyone (non muslims) can eat anytime. So too muslims, (just don't get caught :p). But some muslim restaurants closes during the day (as their customer are mainly local muslims) and non would be eating anyway.

Peace
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greenhill
07-24-2014, 04:14 AM
Originally Posted by Marina-Aisha
my mates would joke say mmmmm yummy crips yummy wotever
used to get that a lot... a bit like a smoker trying to give up and his mates are always teasing.. ^o)
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