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BilalKid
12-11-2015, 07:48 PM
meaning of actual word merry christmas?

^o)
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HappyMuslimaa
12-11-2015, 09:45 PM
For Christians this is a religious phrase per how they celebrate the holiday and what it means to them. They being Christians worship 'the christ' who they believe is Jesus or Isa, and mark this day as his birthday which is why it's called CHRISTmas.( My family is Christian )
To many others who are non-christian or non-religious it can have a secular meaning just in the spirit of happiness and celebration of giving gifts and families and so forth. In it's place one could also say Happy Holidays which refers to the season wholly without reference to a singled religious holding
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HappyMuslimaa
12-11-2015, 09:48 PM
Whether it is permissible for believers, itis not appropriate. Though views may differ.
This is a link to a similar thread discussing the permissibility of the phrase: http://www.islamicboard.com/general/...christmas.html
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sister herb
12-11-2015, 10:12 PM
merry (adj.)

Old English myrge "pleasing, agreeable, pleasant, sweet; pleasantly, melodiously," from Proto-Germanic *murgijaz, which probably originally meant "short-lasting," (compare Old High German murg "short," Gothic gamaurgjan "to shorten"), from PIE *mreghu- "short" (see brief (adj.)). The only exact cognate for meaning outside English was Middle Dutch mergelijc "joyful."

Connection to "pleasure" is likely via notion of "making time fly, that which makes the time seem to pass quickly" (compare German Kurzweil "pastime," literally "a short time;" Old Norse skemta "to amuse, entertain, amuse oneself," from skamt, neuter of skammr "short"). There also was a verbal form in Old English, myrgan "be merry, rejoice."

Bot vchon enle we wolde were fyf, þe mo þe myryer. [c. 1300]

The word had much wider senses in Middle English, such as "pleasant-sounding" (of animal voices), "fine" (of weather), "handsome" (of dress), "pleasant-tasting" (of herbs). Merry-bout "an incident of sexual intercourse" was low slang from 1780. Merry-begot "illegitimate" (adj.), "*******" (n.) is from 1785. Merrie England (now frequently satirical or ironic) is 14c. meri ingland, originally in a broader sense of "bountiful, prosperous." Merry Monday was a 16c. term for "the Monday before Shrove Tuesday" (Mardi Gras).

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?...wed_in_frame=0


Christmas (n.)

late Old English Cristes mæsse, from Christ (and retaining the original vowel sound) + mass (n.2).

Written as one word from mid-14c. As a verb from 1590s. Father Christmas first attested in a carol attributed to Richard Smart, Rector of Plymtree (Devon) from 1435-77. Christmas tree in modern sense first attested 1835 in American English, from German Weihnachtsbaum. Christmas cards first designed 1843, popular by 1860s. Christmas Eve is Middle English Cristenmesse Even (c. 1300).

Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?...wed_in_frame=0


The first reference I can find in the OED to "Merry Christmas" is from 1534. This date very roughly corresponds with the English Reformation and Henry VIII's breach with Rome.

From that time the idea of a "Merry Christmas" seems to take off with several entries in the 17th century. But it cannot, surely, have been protestants, let alone puritans, who promoted the idea of a 'Merry Christmas', since the word merry suggests at least mild intoxication.

Charles II (1630–1685) was known as the Merry Monarch, a reference to his lifestyle, many mistresses, and his annulment of the puritan laws instituted by Cromwell.

Source: http://english.stackexchange.com/que...erry-christmas
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Pygoscelis
12-12-2015, 12:32 AM
"Merry Christmas" doesn't bother me any more than "Oh My God", "By Jove" or "Holy Cow!"

These sayings have taken on a secular meaning that goes beyond the religious one they may also hold for others.

I tend to wish people "Happy Holidays" because it covers a number of holidays, but I am in no way insulted or demeaned when people wish me a "Merry Christmas".
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TMGuide
12-12-2015, 01:37 AM
In America I hear that it is politically correct to say happy holidays, can't remember the exact reason but I had always heard poeple say merry Christmas everywhere else.
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Moshy
12-12-2015, 07:44 AM
Merry means joyful, happy and pleasant.

Christmas: the annual Christian festival celebrating Christ's birth, held on 25 December in the Western Church.

It is not permissible to wish non-Muslims during their festivals.

" The non-Muslims display acts of Kufr during their festivals. To wish them in their festivals is a sign of complacency to Kufr.

and Allah Ta'ala Knows Best"
-Mufti Ebrahim Desai

Some say Muslims cant say it, some say Muslims can.

If you ask me, im not so comfortable in saying it.
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sister herb
12-12-2015, 08:28 AM
Originally Posted by TMGuide
In America I hear that it is politically correct to say happy holidays, can't remember the exact reason but I had always heard poeple say merry Christmas everywhere else.
In old English still has some alternative meanings for the word "merry" as "tipsy" or "drunk".

The alternative "Happy Christmas" gained wide usage in the late 19th century, and is still common in the United Kingdom and Ireland. One reason may be the alternative meaning, still current there, of "merry" as "tipsy" or "drunk." Queen Elizabeth II is said to prefer "Happy Christmas" for this reason. In American poet Clement Moore's "A Visit from St. Nicholas" (1823), the final line, originally written as "Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night," has been changed in many editions to "Merry Christmas to all", perhaps indicating the relative popularity of the phrases in the United States.
Saying "happy" might also refer to other greeting as "Happy Holidays", which includes also all other holidays near of the Christmas time like Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, the December solstice, Christmas and the New Year.

http://askville.amazon.com/start-Mer...questId=428207

Yep, saying as "be happy at Christmas" sounds much more politically correct than saying "be drunk at Christmas". ;D
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DanEdge
12-12-2015, 10:16 AM
Greetings,

I prefer "Happy Holidays." Many religions and cultures celebrate holidays during the traditional season changes: springs, summer, fall, winter. Christmas falls on the winter solstice, as do countless holidays for countless religions in the history of the world.

Here in America, Christmas is mostly about family, friends, presents, and a few days off from work than anything about Christ. We can all celebrate, no matter our beliefs. I don't really like saying "Merry Christmas," but it doesn't offend me when people say it to me. I know what they mean.

--Dan Edge
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Walter
12-15-2015, 02:12 PM
Hi All:

In countries with a history of Christianity, giving and receiving the greeting is simply being polite. If you reside in a location where the greeting is common, then you should participate in order to be a polite resident.

If by participating your conscience offends you, then perhaps you should not say it. Instead, you should investigate why you are offended. The problem may lie within you, or with what you have been taught.

Before I read the Qur'an, I was taught that it was a book of the devil, and I read it with much trepidation. Now I know better. Therefore, the problem was not with the book, but with me and what I was taught. Similarly, if you feel offended, then that should prompt you to honestly investigate why. Honest investigations mean that you consider both sides of an argument.

Best regards.
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M.I.A.
12-15-2015, 04:03 PM
...I think our apprehension around the subject differs for any of us.

At the most extreme end are those that question the actual practices of Christmas.. Those that say it has paganistic origins which are not grounded within Christianity.

In the middle are those that get kinda upset about the middle ground practices, alcohol and excess that sort of thing.

And I guess then there are the merry Christmas brigade.... That realise how fickle the majority are..and don't wish to incite a "good will to all" kinda response.

But I think most of the above should remember that Jesus AS is a prophet of Allah swt, in case we are incited to forget.

Should be easier this time round to see how religion changes over time, unless the internet goes down.
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Walter
12-16-2015, 12:07 AM
Dear MIA:

I also have heard the same range of views expressed. But the remedy remains - if one feels offended, then the one who wants to grow will investigate the reason for the offense.

1. Pagan Origins

The origin is the celebration of Jesus's birth. The justification for celebrating is that the angels celebrated, singing: "Glory to God in the highest and on earth, peace, goodwill toward men." (Luke 2:14).

The problem arose because some questioned the accuracy of the birth date and the date's alignment with Roman pagan activities. However, whether the date is similar by coincidence or by design, it does not diminish the fact that the origin is the celebration of Jesus' birth.

2. Alcohol and other excesses

Some people will use any opportunity to have a party, and many may be offended at the excesses. However, the abuse of the celebration is more a reflection of the abuser and not the celebration. For the sake of peace, I will tolerate my neighbour's excesses ... up to a point. If my neighbour insists on loud music after midnight, and will not reduce the volume, then I can call the police, not to make any arrests, but to adjudicate the reasonableness of my neighbour's actions.

Best regards.
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lonewolf007
12-16-2015, 12:15 AM
just stick with saying happy holidays or happy season greetings, that sounds about right right? :)
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Walter
12-16-2015, 01:40 AM
Perhaps, but it is neither accurate nor logical. The celebration is called Christmas and it is a public holiday. It is as ludicrous as stating "Happy Holidays" instead of "Happy Thanksgiving" or "Happy Independence Day" or "Happy" any other celebration that happens to be a public holiday. Why the discrimination against Christmas?

Best regards.
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Search
12-16-2015, 02:06 AM
:bism:

Hi, Walter!

I have been reading some of your posts and have found them really thoughtful.

That said, I am of the same mind as Pygoscelis and DanEdge, and therefore I think I'd like to put forward one of the many reason many people do like to say "Happy Holidays" instead of "Merry Christmas." Honestly, I think we as Americans generally tend to shy away from discussing religion in public spheres like the workplace wherein our work and attitude towards our work is considered part of how we exhibit our professionalism. Also, wishing someone "Happy Holidays" is probably the most polite and courteous way of showing our well-wishing without making a presumption about an individual's religion or lack thereof. I don't see it as discrimination against Christmas but a way of sharing in the spirit of generosity and caring that characterizes the holiday without actually singling person(s) out for what we think might be their religion in a way that might cause inadvertent umbrage in a more sensitive person. For example, I don't presume that so-and-so person is a Christian as he/she may well be an atheist or even a Jew or a Hindu or a Christian who chooses not to celebrate Christmas; information like this is not within the realm of my or anyone's personal knowledge unless a colleague takes the initiative to share that information with the person in question.

Hope that helps. Thanks.

Originally Posted by Walter
Perhaps, but it is neither accurate nor logical. The celebration is called Christmas and it is a public holiday. It is as ludicrous as stating "Happy Holidays" instead of "Happy Thanksgiving" or "Happy Independence Day" or "Happy" any other celebration that happens to be a public holiday. Why the discrimination against Christmas?

Best regards.
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sister herb
12-16-2015, 08:37 AM
I don´t see it´s right to wish this holiday to others, also not answer to it if they do it the first. It´s like I would accept and agree with them all this stuff what the Christianity teaches - like being son of the God. Of my mind it´s insult against the prophet of Islam, prophet Isa (or Jesus to some others). If someone says me this greeting (most of my friends don´t as I have told them before this is not my holiday and they respect me), I usually greet them just Have a nice day to you. And smile kindly.
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Saqib Zaid
12-16-2015, 09:43 AM
Islam teaches his followers to play a positive , polite and gentle role in their societies. saying happy Christmas or saying merry Christmas , It depends on intention.
As a Muslim we believe that Jesus is a creature of God, He is true messenger . However neither he is son of God nor God has any relative or partner in any sense .
Islam does not forbid to wish anyone unless such wishing are against the basic teaching of Quran.
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Walter
12-16-2015, 11:12 PM
Dear Search:

Thank you for your kind words.

My personal opinion is that if you live in a country where a celebration has been made a public holiday, then the polite thing to do is to mention that holiday by name.

Some countries are founded on Christian traditions, some on Hindu, some on Islamic, etc. I am currently working in Trinidad where most of the population is either Christian, Muslim or Hindu. The major celebrations of all three religions have been made public holidays. As a Christian, I accept the greetings of all with a polite “thank-you”, but only give greetings that celebrate the Christian holidays.

Best regards.
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Walter
12-16-2015, 11:14 PM
Dear Sister Herb & Saqib:

As previously mentioned, if persons feel offended by something, it is beneficial for them to investigate why.

Please be advised that the Bible does not appear to support the teaching that Jesus is God, and the Qur’anic concept of Son of God is entirely different to the Biblical concept. You may wish to review the evidence on prior posts since it is an issue that has unnecessarily kept Christians and Muslims apart for the past 1,300 years.

Best regards.
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sister herb
12-16-2015, 11:33 PM
Hello

That´s a good advice and I made search about greeting the holidays. All sources said the same: "It is not permissible to wish non-Muslims Merry Christmas." So as I wrote, it´s needed to looking for some other ways to be polite to others.

Have a nice day to you. :D
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ardianto
12-17-2015, 01:01 AM
Originally Posted by Walter
Perhaps, but it is neither accurate nor logical. The celebration is called Christmas and it is a public holiday. It is as ludicrous as stating "Happy Holidays" instead of "Happy Thanksgiving" or "Happy Independence Day" or "Happy" any other celebration that happens to be a public holiday. Why the discrimination against Christmas?

Best regards.
Dear Walter.

How if I tell you "Congratulation to you who are celebrating Christmas"?.

:)
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umairlooms
12-17-2015, 09:22 AM
i wish it because I want to be polite. We are Muslims and I believe we should be an example of politeness.
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Linkdeutscher
12-17-2015, 05:40 PM
Saying Merry Christmas is kufr, since you are essentially saying have a merry time celebrating the birthday of the son of god. Extremely dangerous statement.
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Walter
12-17-2015, 10:23 PM
Dear All:

My suggestion is to politely accept the greeting. You do not have to give the greeting, and you should not if it offends you. However, if you want to participate in wishing others well, then simply say that. Say something like: “Season’s greetings”, or “I wish you well for the season”, or “Enjoy the holiday” of any similar sentiment.

My only point is that once you start the greeting with “Happy”, then what follows should be the name of the holiday.

I wish you all good health, financial prosperity, peace in your households, and a closer relationship with God “For God did take Abraham for a friend." (4:125)

Best regards.
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Saqib Zaid
12-18-2015, 06:47 AM
Originally Posted by Walter
Dear Sister Herb & Saqib:


Please be advised that the Bible does not appear to support the teaching that Jesus is God,
I appreciate your thinking , no doubt Jesus is creation like whole universe. God is free from son, wife or partners etc.
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sister herb
12-18-2015, 08:52 AM
Here is no problem to be kind and politely to those whose greet something like this. No need to answer by the same way. Unfortunately sometimes situations might be awkward to both.

Few years ago in my job where I was, some days before the christmas vacation, we had a good discussion with my boss and co-workers and I, as the only one there who didn´t spend the christian holidays, explained to others that I don´t spend their holiday (C thing), why I don´t and that I wish others would respect my values and don´t greet me anything, neither give me gifts or cards. I told this is same with every non-Islamic holidays. Everybody understood and said they don´t and they will respect me and my belief.

Then at the last day before the holiday started, our boss wanted to give a gift and a card to everyone, including to me. I refused to take it and asked, why she does this, why she didn´t want to respect my wish and belief. "But it´s just a little gift - it doesn´t matter. Nobody knows if you take it."

I: :facepalm:

Well, Allah knows.

Finally I didn´t take a gift, a card and didn´t greet her merry C. She was hurt and I was too.

So, the both parties should try to remember to respect each others. Yes we talked about it after the C vacation and it looked like she understood me well. But try to guess what happened just before the Easter vacation...

:facepalm:
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sister herb
12-18-2015, 10:55 AM
So, the respect should to be mutual - or it doesn´t work at all. :hmm:
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Pygoscelis
12-18-2015, 09:36 PM
Somewhat similar....

Is it permissible for non-muslims to say "Bismillah" before eating a meal if in a Muslim place? A local restaurant I go to for some really good biryani has a little business card and on the opposite side it has a little blurb about how to eat properly the Islamic way. I figure it is a little help sheet for people who are either lapsed Muslims or non-Muslims to show the proper respect to those around them. In such a place I would not strike up a conversation with a woman sitting alone or offer to shake my left hand with somebody, for example. but the sheet also says to say "Bismillah" before eating. I think means "for God"? Is it rude, disrespectful, or blasphemous for me to say that when I don't believe such a God exists? Is there something else I should say? Or is it best to just say nothing and eat?
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sister herb
12-18-2015, 10:18 PM
Originally Posted by Pygoscelis
Somewhat similar....

Is it permissible for non-muslims to say "Bismillah" before eating a meal if in a Muslim place? A local restaurant I go to for some really good biryani has a little business card and on the opposite side it has a little blurb about how to eat properly the Islamic way. I figure it is a little help sheet for people who are either lapsed Muslims or non-Muslims to show the proper respect to those around them. In such a place I would not strike up a conversation with a woman sitting alone or offer to shake my left hand with somebody, for example. but the sheet also says to say "Bismillah" before eating. I think means "for God"? Is it rude, disrespectful, or blasphemous for me to say that when I don't believe such a God exists? Is there something else I should say? Or is it best to just say nothing and eat?
It´s ok to say bismillah (it means "in the name of the God"), specially if there is advice to say it. Maybe they like to keep the atmosphere in this restaurant "Islamic".

If you go to the restaurant and others there don´t know you (they don´t know are you Muslim or not, atheist or believer), there is no way how they could think it would to be anything rude or disrespectful. Anyways, if they would know you are not Muslim, most likely they just would think you try to be polite.

Also, hopely you will enjoy your biryani. :statisfie
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ardianto
12-18-2015, 10:24 PM
Originally Posted by Pygoscelis
Somewhat similar....

Is it permissible for non-muslims to say "Bismillah" before eating a meal if in a Muslim place? A local restaurant I go to for some really good biryani has a little business card and on the opposite side it has a little blurb about how to eat properly the Islamic way. I figure it is a little help sheet for people who are either lapsed Muslims or non-Muslims to show the proper respect to those around them. In such a place I would not strike up a conversation with a woman sitting alone or offer to shake my left hand with somebody, for example. but the sheet also says to say "Bismillah" before eating. I think means "for God"? Is it rude, disrespectful, or blasphemous for me to say that when I don't believe such a God exists? Is there something else I should say? Or is it best to just say nothing and eat?
I don't mind if a non-Muslim says "Bismillah", but I never ask non-Muslim to say it because probably he feel uncomfortable, probably his religion forbid it. How if you eat in a place and there is a sheet that says to say "Bismillah" before eating?. You don't need to say anything because that sheet actually addressed only to Muslims. Not different than if you visited a Muslim's home and you found sticker "Say Assalamualaikum", you could say "Hello" or "Good noon". And the home owner would understand that you are not a Muslim.
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M.I.A.
12-18-2015, 11:05 PM
...forever shouting right hand use your right hand in public.

although i dont know if it translates as right hand or correct hand.

o_o
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Muhammad
12-19-2015, 09:06 PM
:salamext:

Originally Posted by umairlooms
i wish it because I want to be polite. We are Muslims and I believe we should be an example of politeness.
We should be kind towards the non-Muslims. However, in our endeavour we should carry out our responsibilities as witnesses unto mankind. This does not require that we begin to compromise key and fundamental concepts of our religion. Most Christians will understand the Muslim's perspective when explained to them properly. If a Muslim behaves in a good manner with them throughout his stay with them, they would certainly know that he is not rude and he is not a person of bad character even if he does not congratulate them on the day of their celebration. Indeed, being rude is when one disobeys Allah. Pleasing Allah takes priority over pleasing His creation, and whoever pleases people by ensuing the wrath of Allah, Allah will be angry with him and He will make people be angry with him.

Many scholars stated it is not permitted for Muslims to participate in the festivals of non-Muslims because it is a kind of cooperation in their disobedience of Allah :swt:.

{…Help you one another in Al-Birr and At-Taqwa (virtue, righteousness and piety); but do not help one another in sin and transgression….} [Quran 5:2].

The Prophet said: "Whoever imitates a nation is but one of them." [Abu Daawood]

Scholars stated that a Muslim is neither allowed to celebrate such festivals nor is he allowed to congratulate non-Muslims for their feasts because congratulating them for their feasts is synonymous of accepting their wrongdoing and disbelief in Allah. It is also accepting their rites and rituals, which are nothing but disbelief.

Imaam Ibn Al-Qayyim reported the consensus of all scholars that congratulate non-Muslims for their religious occasions is forbidden. He said: “As for congratulating the unbelievers for their rituals, it is forbidden according to the agreement of all scholars like congratulating them for their feasts and fast by expressing good wishes: happy feast or enjoy your feast… etc. If the Muslim who says this does not become a disbeliever himself, he, at least, commits a sin as this is the same as congratulating him (a non Muslim) for his belief in the Trinity, which is a greater sin and much more disliked by Almighty Allah than congratulating him for drinking alcohol or killing a soul or committing fornication or adultery…etc.”

[Christmas] is not an innocent festival based on regional customs, but an ideological celebration based on the theological beliefs of Christians and pagans, and used by capitalists to exploit unaware citizens. Allāh the Most High states,

And those who do not witness falsehood, and if they pass by some evil play or evil talk, they pass it by with dignity.18

We as Muslims should pass this festival by with dignity, refraining from the office parties’, Christmas celebrations, the exchange of gifts, and even exchanging Christmas greetings. There are a number of reasons for this; firstly, to become involved in a festival is to sanction the beliefs behind such a festival and as Muslims we are forbidden to sanction anything other than Islām. Just as we as Muslims distance ourselves from celebrations such as Diwali (Hinduism) and Hanukkah (Judaism), we must also do so with Christmas. By celebrating Christmas, not only do we sanction pagan and Christian practices, but we imply that the festival of polytheism is pleasing to us, although Allāh states,

This day have I perfected your religion for you, completed My favour upon you, and have chosen for you Islām as your religion.19

Secondly, Allāh describes Christians as “those who went astray” in the opening chapter of the Qur’ān, thus to celebrate something that is not even sanctioned in their religion is to imply that their straying is of no consequence. Thirdly, to take part in their festivities or to give greetings such as ‘merry/happy Christmas’ is to encourage and congratulate them in their actions instead of censuring them for their falsehood. This is in opposition to Qur’anic teachings whereby Allāh states,

They believe in Allāh and the Last Day; they enjoin what is right, and forbid what is wrong; and they hasten (in emulation) in (all) good works: They are in the ranks of the righteous.20
Help ye one another in righteousness and piety, but help ye not one another in sin and rancour. Fear Allāh, for Allāh is strict in punishment.
21

http://www.islam21c.com/theology/173...-christianity/

We need to consider the practice of the Prophet :saws: and his Companions, whether any of them congratulated non-Muslims on their festivals. Abdullaah Ibn Amr Ibn al-'Aas is reported to have said: “Whoever celebrates the Persian New Year's Day or their carnival and imitates them till his death he will be resurrected with them on the Day Judgment.”

Anas reported: "The Prophet came to Madeenah while they had two days they celebrated. The Prophet asked, "What are these two days?" They said, 'These are two days we used to celebrate in our pre Islamic era. The Prophet said: "Allaah has replaced them with two better days: 'Eed Al-Adh-Haa and 'Eed Al- Fitr."


A person came to the Prophet and said: "I have taken a vow to sacrifice a camel at Buwaanah.” The Prophet asked: “Did the place contain any idol worshipped in Jaahiliyyah (pre-Islamic times)?” They (the people) said: “No.” He asked: “Was any pre-Islamic festival observed there?” They replied: “No.” The Prophet said: “Fulfil your vow, for a vow to do an act of disobedience to Allah must not be fulfilled, neither must one do something over which a human being has no control." [Sunan Abi Dawud 3313]


In light of the guidelines in the Qur'an and Sunnah and the stern warnings given by numerous scholars based upon such teachings, we should do what is safer for our deen and akhirah. We should not feel pressurised to compromise this for the sake of being polite or integrating amongst others.

And Allaah :swt: knows best.
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Eric H
12-22-2015, 12:03 AM
Greetings and peace be with you HappyMuslimaa;

To many others who are non-christian or non-religious it can have a secular meaning just in the spirit of happiness and celebration of giving gifts and families and so forth.
Sadly, this seems to be the message of Christmas, every shop that has the Christmas message, is only after your money, this has nothing to do with Christ. Most Christmas cards and presents have no real religeous meaning. Christmas parties, have little to do with Christ.

In the spirit of praying to One God

Eric
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Walter
12-22-2015, 01:38 AM
The wisdom of Muhammad is evident in his post. I agree that we should not compromise key and fundamental concepts of our religion. By doing this, one side will feel the victor and the other the vanquished. Is it possible that both paths can be correct? Let us review the evidence.

The Israelites strayed from Abraham’s traditions. Therefore, God sent His prophet Moses to the Israelites and established a covenant with them. He also used the Israelites to execute His judgement on the surrounding nations whose ‘cup of iniquity’ had overflowed after centuries of oppression. Unfortunately, the Israelites kept straying from God’s path despite God sending them several other prophets to call them back to the right way.

God then sent the Messiah Jesus and established a new covenant, not only for the Israelites, but for all nations. Church history shows that many Christians strayed from Jesus’ teachings, but that does not make the teachings invalid. Those who follow His teachings will benefit significantly.

The Ishmaelites also strayed from Abraham’s traditions. I believe that He sent prophet Mohammed to call them back to a relationship with Him. I believe that He also used the Muslims to execute His judgement on surrounding nations who had oppressed others for centuries.

The history of nations reveals one certainty. God hears the cries of the oppressed, and a fearful judgement awaits the oppressor. The Bible teaches that God used the Israelites to execute His judgement on the oppressive Canaanites. He then used the Babylonians to execute His judgement on the oppressive Israelites. Then the Persians to execute His judgement on the oppressive Babylonians. Then the Greeks on the Persians. Then the Romans on the Greeks. It appears that He then used the Muslims (Ishmaelites) to execute His judgement on the oppressive Romans.

There are two very important lessons to be learnt. The first is that the judgement, or Holy War, is always relatively short (less than a generation). The second is that we should always ensure that we are not on the side of the oppressor.

So what has this to do with Christmas? Christmas is not a teaching of Jesus. Instead, it is a tradition of Christianity. Therefore, you will not be obeying or disobeying Jesus’ teachings whether you celebrate Christmas or do not celebrate it. Christmas is simply a celebration of Jesus’ birth. Some justify the celebration because of the angels’ song, the shepherds’ proclamations, and the wise men’s gifts.

The celebration does not result in the oppression of others. Instead, it results in meaningful assistance for some of the most desperate persons. Christians have strayed from important parts of Jesus’ message. However, His teachings of helping those in desperate need appears to be obeyed frequently during the Christmas season. That should be encouraged.

Best regards.
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M.I.A.
12-22-2015, 02:16 AM
Originally Posted by Walter
one side will feel the victor and the other the vanquished
...died for your sins thing?

although i found the rest of the post profound.


the "celebration" is like a straw.. it is much the same as any other piece of straw.

there is a middle path.

with extremes at either end.


maybe carrying less straws is sometimes not a bad idea.

especially if there are people who would beat you about the head with there own straw.


...people be like merry christmas and then reading quran in private.



all paths on monotheism.. Abrahamic AS faiths can be correct.. but its a pretty long piece of string.
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sister herb
12-22-2015, 08:45 AM
Originally Posted by Eric H
Greetings and peace be with you HappyMuslimaa;



Sadly, this seems to be the message of Christmas, every shop that has the Christmas message, is only after your money, this has nothing to do with Christ. Most Christmas cards and presents have no real religeous meaning. Christmas parties, have little to do with Christ.

In the spirit of praying to One God

Eric
This same is unfortunately danger to happen to Islamic holidays (eids) too - people add to them everything what doesn´t belongs to them. :hmm: I afraid it has partly happened already.
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