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BilalKid
03-27-2016, 12:44 AM
sound like music?? ^o)



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farhan
03-27-2016, 04:24 PM
:sl:

Love the lyrics! I will make another thread with the lyrics soon :ia:.

On the start it does say "No Musical Instruments used."

Someone I know will ask Sheikh Abu Abdisalam, hope he can shed some light on this :).
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farhan
03-27-2016, 05:00 PM
Okay he replied.

"I spoke to shaykh Abu abdissalam he said it's fine. Just make people aware it's definitely beat boxing."
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Souljette
03-28-2016, 11:05 AM
MashAllah his nasheeds are amazing
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Kiro
03-28-2016, 11:58 AM
Originally Posted by farhan
:sl:

Love the lyrics! I will make another thread with the lyrics soon :ia:.

On the start it does say "No Musical Instruments used."

Someone I know will ask Sheikh Abu Abdisalam, hope he can shed some light on this :).
who is Sheikh Dad?
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farhan
03-28-2016, 02:35 PM
Originally Posted by Kiro
who is Sheikh Dad?
(Lol don't call me Dad).

Here is a short Bio of the Sheikh :).

Abu Abdissalam was born in Coventry and was raised in London. Graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from the City University in London, his zeal for knowledge led him to give up a subsequently lucrative career in the computer industry to join Dār Al-Ḥadīth Al-Khayriyyah in the blessed city of Makkah where he obtained a degree in Islamic Studies, specialising in Ḥadīth and it's Sciences.

During his time there, he has studied under many of the prominent scholars of our time. He has completed a degree at the Dār al-Ḥadīth, Makkah.

In the course of his studies he has acquired ijāzas for all of the six major books of Ḥadīth (al-Bukhārī, Muslim, al-Tirmidhī, Abū Dāwūd, al-Nasāʾī and Ibn Mājah). In addition to this, he has obtained ijāzas for the Sharḥ of ʿAqīdah Ṭaḥāwiyyah of Ibn ʿAbd al-ʿIzz al-Ḥanafi, Shaykh Muḥammmad Amīn al-Harari's Sharḥ of the Muqadimmah of Muslim and Nuzhat al-Naẓr Sharḥ Nukhbat al-Fikr of Ibn Ḥajar.

Abu Abdissalam has translated a number of Islamic texts from Arabic into English for the benefit of the English speaking Muslims around the world.

Abu Abdissalam also appears regularly on Islam Channel, a UK-based satellite channel which is currently broadcasting two of his series: 'Heavenly Pearls' and 'Stories of the Prophets'.
https://www.alkauthar.org/instructor.php?id=7
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~Zaria~
03-28-2016, 02:47 PM
Question

Is BeatBoxing Halal in Islam?

Answer
In the Name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful.
As-salāmu ‘alaykum wa-rahmatullāhi wa-barakātuh.

Beatboxing [1](also beatbox, beat box or b-box) is a form of vocal percussion primarily involving the art of producing drum beats, rhythm, and musical sounds using one's mouth, lips, tongue, and voice. It may also involve singing, vocal imitation of turntablism, and the simulation of horns, strings, and other musical instruments.
Beatboxing is not permissible as it involves music.[2]

And Allah Ta’āla Knows Best
Saleem Ibn Sajawal Khan
Bradford, UK
Student Darul Iftaa


Checked and Approved by,
Mufti Ebrahim Desai.


[1] Beatboxing today is connected with hip-hop culture, being one of "the elements", although it is not limited to hip-hop music. The term "beatboxing" is sometimes used to refer to vocal percussion in general (see vocal percussion for details).


[2] This is also a type of music, and is used in place of musical instruments. Musical instruments are impermissible primarily due to the sound emanating from them and not merely because of the instruments themselves. Therefore, beatboxing is also impermissible as it is the same rhythmic sound that emanates although not from an instrument. Therefore this will fall in the category of music.

Music is harmful for us and for society as a whole. It affects one’s emotions, creates arousal, passion and excitement, and also leads to various physiological changes in a person. It is a psychologically proven fact that music has an effect in arousing the human sexual desire.

Nabi (Sallahu Alaihi Wasallam) has mentioned:

"الغناء ينبت النفاق في القلب"

Translation: “Music cultivates hypocrisy in the heart” [Sunan Abu Dawud vol. 4 pg. 282, Hadith: 4927]

http://askimam.org/public/question_detail/28967
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Kiro
03-28-2016, 02:47 PM
Originally Posted by farhan
(Lol don't call me Dad).

Here is a short Bio of the Sheikh :).


https://www.alkauthar.org/instructor.php?id=7
I meant Sheikh Abu as Sheikh dad
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~Zaria~
03-28-2016, 02:52 PM
Scientists are amazed by how good beat boxers can be


Julia Calderone

Jul. 2, 2015, 2:42 PM





As any amateur rapper knows, simulating the beat of a drum or the scratch of a turntable with nothing other than the lips, voice, mouth, and tongue takes skill.


When done properly, a master can trick an audience into believing that a whole repertoire of instruments is creating a beat. When done poorly, well, he or she probably isn't going to be the next Doug E. Fresh.


For years scientists have struggled to identify and classify the intricate sounds that emanate from a beatboxer's mouth. But a recent analysis has shown — quite literally— just how incredible the human body is at producing sophisticated noises.


After putting a beatboxing man into a real-time MRI machine — an imaging technique that allows scientists to "film" a person's insides while they are performing an action, beatboxing in this case — they recorded the man while he performed a concoction of voice-activated sounds: rapping, singing, beats, freestyling. What they saw was one of the most detailed looks at beatboxing yet.


The study subject, who spoke English, was able to produce some of the same sounds that are spread across the world's distinct language systems, Inside Science reports.


"It is absolutely amazing that a person can make these sounds — that a person has such control over the timing of various parts of the speech apparatus," phonetician Donna Erickson at the Showa University of Music and Sophia University told Inside Science.


Specifically, the sounds he made sounded similar to "clicks seen in African languages such as Xhosa from South Africa, Khoekhoe from Botswana, and !Xóõ from Namibia, as well as ejective consonants — bursts of air generated by closing the vocal cords — seen in Nuxálk from British Columbia, Chechen from Chechnya and Hausa from Nigeria and other countries in Africa," Inside Science reports.


This is cool because it shows that the sounds an artist uses to create music are the same sounds humans use for speech. The study also highlights the astonishing control beatboxers have over the unique movements of the tongue and lips, which can be useful for informing novel speech therapies....


Complete article here:http://www.businessinsider.com/how-d...-sounds-2015-7
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~Zaria~
03-28-2016, 03:01 PM
Wallahi, we are living in very deceptive times.

May Allah (subhanawat'aala) keep us all on siraatul mustaqeem and away from falsehood.

:wa:
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farhan
03-28-2016, 03:06 PM
:jz: for sharing the links Sis @~Zaria~

Interesting discussion here:

I turned to Dr. Wikipedia for a definition on beatboxing and came out with the following:

"Beatboxing is a form of vocal percussion which primarily involves the art of producing drum beats, rhythm, and musical sounds using one's mouth, lips, tongue, voice, and more. It may also involve singing, vocal imitation of turntablism, the simulation of horns, strings, and other musical instruments. Beatboxing is connected with hip hop culture although it is not limited to hip hop music."

Although my first exposure to beatboxing came in my years of listening to hip-hop, it's re-introduction into my life came after viewing the following video:



Before that, it hadn't occurred to me that it was a viable means of “music” since it was “voice-only”. I didn't see any discussion or disagreement with the video, and I assumed beatboxing must be good-to-go, otherwise someone would stand up and say something, right?

Not quite. I realized later that the more intelligent students of knowledge shy away from giving fatwas and prefer to give practical advice on new issues, as a fatwa cannot and should not be given lightly (as an aside, if you want to know when your teacher is avoiding giving you a fatwa, pay attention to the language – if they say, “You should stay away,” or “I'd avoid it,” thank Allah you've been gifted with a teacher who fears dispensing fataawa and don't ask again after that – it's a lot of pressure).

To make a long story short, over the years I had heard hints of disagreement from students and teachers alike, as well as some suggestions for different ways to make the videos, particularly after the following video was released at ISNA 2009:

As far as how it affected me personally, I found a nasheed artist named Shaheed alKawn who records tracks of himself making various beats and sound effects with voice only, then synchronizes them and sings to those beats (about Islam, his conversion, etc). He prefaced one of his CDs by stating, “What you are about to hear is the product of human voice – no musical instruments were used to create these soundscapes.”

His work can be sampled at the following link (audio quality is really poor):

http://www.thenasheedshop.com/shaheed_alkawn.php

Source: http://muslimmatters.org/2009/10/19/...h-is-too-much/
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~Zaria~
03-28-2016, 03:36 PM
JazakAllahu khair for the response @farhan .


There is noticeable trend of younger scholars (e.g. those of Al Kauthar, Al Maghrib Institute, to name a few) adopting a much more lenient approach (e.g. in regards to this topic, as well as others) - than ulema of the past.

With regards to beat-boxing - If the above fatwa (approved by a highly respected and trusted aalim) is chosen to be ignored, then perhaps we should also ask ourselves:

1. Can we imagine our beloved Nabi (sallahu alaihi wasalam) in the above video (naoo'dhobillah)?

2. Can we imagine the above nasheed being played/ performed in the House of Allah?

Truly, where is our Islam going to ?
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farhan
03-28-2016, 07:05 PM
:jz: @~Zaria~

Just to clarify the article shared does not reflect my views, just some food for thought :).

Ameen to all duas.
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Souljette
03-28-2016, 07:27 PM
Asalamualaykum I thought beat boxing was allowed as it was voice only I had stopped listening to music long time back and hip hop was what I listened to I stopped and only sometimes listened to nasheeds. I did not know beat boxing wasn't allowed as all the bros use it. I first heard Faisal Salah doing a charity video and liked it but wow ok JazakIllahu khair sis
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Simply_Logical
03-28-2016, 08:18 PM
:salam:

i intially posted this nasheed and i edited my thread by getting rid of the link due to the imitating factor and havent listened to it since then...
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farhan
03-29-2016, 12:08 AM
:sl:

Sis @Souljette

Check this one out. No beat boxing used:).

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Souljette
04-02-2016, 12:45 AM
Jazakillahu khair bro @farhan I actually listened to this and liked it. They both are prettying good mashAllah
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