PDA

View Full Version : Before / After experiences of female converts/reverts



Bhabha
04-17-2016, 06:32 AM
:sl:

Salam my lovely sisters,

I would like to know what has been your experience before / after accepting Islam. In particular, whether you have felt a difference in how people both Muslims / Non-Muslims treat you.

Is there something particular that stood out after you began to wear the hijab?

How were you perceived by strangers? by friends? by family?

((I apologize for focusing on the girls, but male converts I think have a different experience than us girls because of the hijab)) ;D
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
farhan
04-17-2016, 12:32 PM
Walaikum salam,

Let me tag some relevant sisters: @Smile :) @Lanie Vinther @sister herb @rebekka0002 @basamasmile @CarolBell @ayaanaa @crochetchick30 @revertgirl
Reply

Ummshareef
04-17-2016, 01:15 PM
:wa:

Alhamdulillah I was guided to Islam and took my shahada many years ago now, although in some ways it seems like only yesterday! I would say that I have been treated differently by almost everybody, much of it in a positive way, but some negative.

As far as other Muslims are concerned, I have been very fortunate to meet many lovely sisters, and the whole sisterhood thing has been really heartwarming. I have never really felt any hostility from fellow Muslims although just occasionally I do feel a bit left out when culture comes to the fore.

With regard to my old non-Muslim friends, I decided early on to gradually become more distant from them, as I wanted to find new Muslimah friends who could help me with my Deen. I still try to be polite when they contact me, but we don't really have many shared interests any more. When we occasionally meet up we mostly talk about our kids and stuff. They sometimes say nice things about my hijab and at least seem to understand the concept of modesty. May Allah guide them to Islam.

My family just couldn't understand my decision at all at first, but at least now they are more accepting and polite and take an interest in the kids. I went through a terrible stage where they could not understand why I covered in black and were not best pleased when I married my DH with his big bushy beard, although they always wanted me to marry a doctor! At least now, they are more understanding about things like why I need to go away and pray five times daily.

As far as strangers are concerned, I would probably say that I am shown more respect as a Muslim woman - people seem to hold doors open and used to help me with the pram when the kids were small mashallah. Of course I do get a few stares, especially as I have blue eyes, and have heard the odd rude comment in the street, but they are very few and far between.
Reply

sister herb
04-17-2016, 01:28 PM
^ Quite same with my case too. Few times unfriendly words on the streets, some were staring at suspicious or confused ways, some funny questions about my hijab. Several times people think I am a nun and ask in which monastery I stay. That´s maybe because of my blue eyes and pale skin, as they think that all Muslims are immigrants. Mostly people are kind and polite. In my work places mostly nobody cares about my hijab. In general, people are thinking here that person´s religion is his/hers private matter and that´s why it´s quite rare people ever start to talk about it. Some ask but usually they at first apology that they are curious.

It took years before my mom accepted my hijab but after 10 years she stopped to argue about using it in public.
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
'Abd-al Latif
04-17-2016, 01:38 PM
:salamext:

I have some questions for revert sisters who have been a Muslim for longer than a year. Why did you convert to Islam? Do you feel your reasons for accepting Islam are still relevant today? Do you feel these reasons still inspire you today to become a better Muslim?
Reply

sister herb
04-17-2016, 02:07 PM
I reverted 21 years ago. Basic reasons were to looking for information what Islam really means and the peace to my mind. I haven´t regret my reverting any single moment and I can say I would do the same again any time. Now I feels that the more I have learnt about Islam, it inspiring me to looking more information and knowledge and it increases my inner peace.

:statisfie

My story:

http://www.islamicboard.com/new-musl...s-post-33.html
Reply

IrfanUllahKhan
04-17-2016, 11:29 PM
Masha Allah! INspiring!
Reply

Bhabha
04-19-2016, 09:16 PM
Originally Posted by 'Abd-al Latif
:salamext:

I have some questions for revert sisters who have been a Muslim for longer than a year. Why did you convert to Islam? Do you feel your reasons for accepting Islam are still relevant today? Do you feel these reasons still inspire you today to become a better Muslim?
وعليكم السلام

I converted to Islam because I had felt a void deep in my heart for the longest time. When I was younger. Around 10 years, I constantly searched and searched for religions and examined them. I was born a Catholic because my father is a Catholic, my mother is Christian (weird huh) but I was never raised Christian, nor Catholic for that matter. I felt this kind of void that just lingered.

I remember the event that actually made me look deeper into my void. Ironically it was the imagine of the twin towers burning up as they kept playing over and over again like some kind of indoctrination in our schools. I remember going to school and being asked to wear plastic backpacks so people could see. And then I kept asking myself, what will happen to me if I suddenly die? That questioned went really into my mind. So I went to a church and I listened to sermons and read the bible. I went to synagogues and listened to the rabbi. I read the Torah. I even cleansed my body off animals when I became interested in Buddhism and later Hinduism. I found each to be interesting. To have things that were good, but I didn't find either / or to be complete. To be fulfilling.

My family moved to Canada from the US so that it would be easier to get a higher education at university. The costs for Ivy League schools in the USA are tremendous and Canada has an amazing schooling system for less than that. So I came here. I had Muslim friends and I remember constantly trying to convert them to being Christian. I always talked about Jesus as being the son. But i could never fully elaborate on the justification. It felt like a weak argument that I was just spinning on its head. Unfortunately I was not convinced by Muslims around the school that their religion was right either ways. It wasn't until I traveled overseas to Qatar that I heard it. The athan. For the first time I started to feel a relief in my gut. Like I had found that missing and horrible void in my stomach, like the good food that you know is worth it.

It also helped that I had made friends with a woman who was so kind and sweet. ما شاء الله‎
Her attitude and her generosity and treatment of her guest (me) made me feel like I was her family member, like a sister. I started to wear the hijab before I became Muslim. I liked the way she wore it. She had the full niqab and although I didn't use the niqab, I used the abaya everywhere. I enjoyed that feeling of being able to walk without feeling conscious of myself. It was there that I noticed the subtle and yet dominating male glaze to which had been oblivious most of my life.

I became Muslim in Qatar, before I had to come back to Canada to finish my studies. I applied Islam in everything and I felt it had given me confidence, strength and assurance of myself. Before being Muslim, I was rather vapid, I was obsessed with the way I looked, what my friends thought, I wanted to be liked for my beauty and this resulted in me constantly trying to fill the void other religions couldn't fulfill with an obsession with modelling. Although I was a self professed Christian who tried to convert my friends. I failed to follow the verses of modesty clearly inscribed in the bible. I memorized the bible, but I disregarded some of its commandments and tried to accommodate that void with modelling and acting.

Islam changed me entirely. I became the person I was actually meant to be since I was younger. Lover of books, knowledge and justice. I changed my degree and coordinated it entirely to be about Islam in a political context. My grades and my achievements الحَمْد لله‎ have been because of my submission to اللهُ.

I do not regret my decision to accept Islam. I do regret the stupid things I did before I became Muslim and the time wasted trying to fill a void with meaningless things. But اللهُ has a reason for guiding me the way I was guided and for allowing me to experience the things I experienced before accepting Islam.
Reply

noraina
04-19-2016, 09:32 PM
SubhanAllah, beautifully written sis. And honestly do not regret what you did in the past, it was a part of your journey to Islam, everyone's path is different but the destination is one. JazakAllah khayr for sharing this. :Emoji2:
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-04-2015, 06:19 PM
  2. Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-18-2007, 09:27 AM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-26-2007, 05:31 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-04-2006, 01:55 AM
  5. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 03-20-2006, 05:21 AM

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!