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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 01:59 PM
بِسم الله الرَّحْمَن الرَّحِيم
برنامج التأصيل العلمي
A Program on the Foundations of Knowledge
The program is spilt into two sections
علوم الغاية والمقصدThescience of the goals and intentions-
علوم الآلة والوسيلةThe science of the devices and the tools-
With this program there are four levels each levels has a Text or Texts to study or memorise along with an explanation of text, texts or books for extra reading. Most programs have three levels anintroduction (beginner’s) level, a good student’s level and a scholar’s level.
المرحلة الأولىFirstLevel -
المرحلة الثانيةSecondLevel -
المرحلة الثالثةThirdLevel -
المرحلة الرابعةFourthLevel –

علوم الغاية والمقصدThescience of the goal and intention -
This has five topics:
القرانالكريمYou daily memorising of the Quran -
التفسيرReading to explanation of the Quran –
الحديثStudying the narrations -
العقيدةStudying the creed -
الفقهStudying the Islamic Jurisprudence –

علوم الآلة والوسيلةThe science of the devices and the tools -
علومالقرانScience of the Quran–
التجويدThe Correct Reading of the Quran –
مصطلحالحديث Science of the Narrations–
أصولالفقهFoundations of Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence–
القواعدالفقهيةPrinciples the Jurisprudence –
الفرائضInheritance (science)–
البلاغةeloquence (expressive language) –
الصرفTheScience of Morphology –
الأدبManners –
Note: The tools are studied to achieve the goal. The tools are best studied in the Arabic language. There are translations but these topics tend to be weak compared to the Arabic equivalent.

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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 02:00 PM
A Program on the Foundations of Knowledge

easy readable and downloadable in doc and pdf version
http://carryonummah.blogspot.co.uk/2...knowledge.html
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crimsontide06
05-28-2016, 02:53 PM
Can someone translate the Arabic text....please.
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 03:21 PM
The above is the important bits of the Arabic text.
They are recommended books so I didn't translated them.
There will be second topic to follow.
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 08:09 PM
بِسم الله الرَّحْمَن الرَّحِيم
الجامع للمتون العلمية
أولا: مبادئ التفسير والتجويد
ثانيا: العقيدة
ثالثا: الحديث وعلومه
رابعا: أصول الفقه
خامسا: الفقه
سادسا: الوصايا والحكم والآداب
سابعا: السيرة النبوية والتاريخ
ثامنا: النحو والصرف
I took these sections from a book called ‘The Collections of Knowledgeable Texts’.
There are steps and ways to learn the Islamic Religion. These are the topics that should be studied along with the Arabic language.
First: The Explanation of the Quran and the correct reading of the Quran.
Second: The (Correct) Creed.
Third: Narrations and its Science.
Fourth: Foundations of Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence).
Fifth: Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence).
Sixth: Advice, Wisdom and Manners.
Seventh: Biography of the Prophet and History.
Eighth: The Science of Grammar Rules and the Science of Morphology.
* * *
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 08:09 PM
Note: All or most of these topics should be studied in the Arabic language first to be a true studier of knowledge. The translations here will help you to understand Islam in both languages with a solid base not to just go from one recommended book to another without a clear study path to move from one level to another.
Date: 09/10/2015
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 08:10 PM

بِسم الله الرَّحْمَن الرَّحِيم
الجامع للمتون العلمية
(Translated) = [T]

أولا: مبادئ التفسير والتجويد
مقدمة في أصول التفسير لشيخ الإسلام أحمد بن عبدالحليم بن تيمية=[ [T
المقدمة في ما على قارىء القرآن أن يعلمه الجزرية لمحمد بن محمد الجزري =[ [T
تحفة الأطفال لسليمان الجمزوري =[ [T
ثانيا: العقيدة
العقيدة الطحاوية لأبي جعفر الطحاوي =[ [T
لمعة الإعتقاد لابن قدامة المقدسي =[ [T
العقيدة الواسطية لشيخ الإسلام أحمد بن عبدالحليم بن تيمية =[ [T
كتاب التوحيد لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب =[ [T
مسائل الجاهلية لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب =[ [T
كشف الشبهات لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب =[ [T
الأصول الثلاثة لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب =[ [T
القواعد الأربع لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب =[ [T
القصيدة اللامية لشيخ الإسلام أحمد بن عبدالحليم بن تيمية =[ [T
الدرة المضية في عقد الفرقة المرضية للشيخ العلامة أحمد بن محمد بن سالم السفاريني
ثالثا: الحديث وعلومه
نخبة الفكر في مصطلح أهل الأثر لابن حجر العسقلاني =[ [T
الأربعون النووية للإمام النووي =[ [T
منظومة البيقوني لطه أو عمر بن محمد البيــقــونــي =[ [T
قصب السكر نظم نخبة الفكر لمحمد بن إسماعيل الصنعاني
قصيدة غزلية في ألقاب الحديث لشهاب الدين أحمد بن فرج الإشبيلي
رابعا: أصول الفقه
الورقات لعبد الملك الجويني =[ [T
تسهيل الطرقات في نظم الورقات للعمريطي =[ [T
نظم القواعد الفقهية للعلامة عبد الرحمن السعدي
خامسا: الفقه
شروط الصلاة وأركانها وواجباتها لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب =[ [T
آداب المشي إلى الصلاة لشيخ الإسلام محمد بن عبد الوهاب
بغية الباحث عن جمل الموارث الرَّحْبِيَّة لمحمد بن علي الرحبي
سادسا: الوصايا والحكم والآداب
الوصية الصغرى لشيخ الإسلام أحمد بن عبدالحليم بن تيمية
قصيدة عنوان الحكم النونية لأبي الفتح البستي
قصيدة أبي إسحاق الألبيري لأبي إسحاق الألبيري
القصيدة الميمية للإمام ابن القيم
سابعا: السيرة النبوية والتاريخ
مختصر سيرة النبي وسيرة أصحابه العشرة لعبد الغني المقدسي
ثامنا: النحو والصرف
المقدمة الآجرومية لابن آجروم =[ [T
الدرة البهية في نظم الآجرومية للعمريطي
لامية الأفعال لابن مالك الأندلسي
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 08:11 PM
‘The Collections of Knowledgeable Texts’.
http://carryonummah.blogspot.co.uk/2...ok-called.html
download pdf/doc
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 08:44 PM
Mu’awiyah (RAA) narrated that the Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said:
“When Allah wishes good for anyone, He bestows upon him the Fiqh (comprehension) of the religion.” Agreed upon.

http://sunnah.com/urn/2118400
http://sunnah.com/search/?q=%D9%85%D...8A%D9%86%D9%90
https://islamqa.info/ar/214625
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 09:02 PM
So from this it is evidence that if Allah did not want for a person good he would not give him understanding of deen.
So he maybe Kaafir Mushrik مُشْرِكٌ كَافِرٌ not on Quran and Sunnah/ reject Allah names and attributes/ a rejecter of hadith / a rejecter of hadith for a mathab/imam of mosque etc etc....then Allah did not want for a person good.
So if you say I am a layman then do something about it.
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 11:00 PM
Which of the four Madhhabs is most correct? I just want to add this here as it seems that the forum does not have a fiqh section

23280: Imitation (taqleed), following the evidence (daleel) – and was Ibn Hazm a Hanbali?
________________________________________
How can a person not make taqleed and still at the same time follow the teachings of one of the imams hanafi, maaliki, shaafi and ahmad bin hanbal(may allah(s.w) have mercy on them all). i am asking this because after reading a summary of the biography of bin baaz( may allah(s.w) have mercy on him)that he followed the school of ahmad bin hanbal(may allah(s.w) have mercy on him) but didnt do taqleed. please explain this to me because im confused .

Praise be to Allaah.
Firstly:
The followers of the madhhabs are not all the same. Some of them are mujtahids within their madhhab, and some are followers (muqallids) who do not go against their madhhabs in any regard.
Al-Buwayti, al-Muzani, al-Nawawi and Ibn Hajr were followers of Imam al-Shaafa’i, but they were also mujtahids in their own right and differed with their imam when they had evidence. Similarly Ibn ‘Abd al-Barr was a Maaliki but he differed with Maalik if the correct view was held by someone else. The same may be said of the Hanafi imams such as Abu Yoosuf and Muhammad al-Shaybaani, and the Hanbali imams such as Ibn Qudaamah, Ibn Muflih and others.
The fact that a student studied with a madhhab does not mean that he cannot go beyond it if he finds sound evidence elsewhere; the only one who stubbornly clings to a particular madhhab (regardless of the evidence) is one who lacking in religious commitment and intellect, or he is doing that because of partisan attachment to his madhhab.
The advice of the leading imams is that students should acquire knowledge from where they acquired it, and they should ignore the words of their imams if they go against the hadeeth of the Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).


Abu Haneefah said: “This is my opinion, but if there comes someone whose opinion is better than mine, then accept that.” Maalik said: “I am only human, I may be right or I may be wrong, so measure my words by the Qur’aan and Sunnah.” Al-Shaafa’i said: “If the hadeeth is saheeh, then ignore my words. If you see well established evidence, then this is my view.” Imam Ahmad said: “Do not follow me blindly, and do not follow Maalik or al-Shaafa’i or al-Thawri blindly. Learn as we have learned.” And he said, “Do not follow men blindly with regard to your religion, for they can never be safe from error.”
No one has the right to follow an imam blindly and never accept anything but his words. Rather what he must do is accept that which is in accordance with the truth, whether it is from his imam or anyone else.

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah said:
No one has to blindly follow any particular man in all that he enjoins or forbids or recommends, apart from the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). The Muslims should always refer their questions to the Muslim scholars, following this one sometimes and that one sometimes. If the follower decides to follow the view of an imam with regard to a particular matter which he thinks is better for his religious commitment or is more correct etc, that is permissible according to the majority of Muslim scholars, and neither Abu Haneefah, Maalik, al-Shaafa’i or Ahmad said that this was forbidden.
Majmoo’ al-Fataawa, 23/382.


Shaykh Sulaymaan ibn ‘Abd-Allaah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:
Rather what the believer must do, if the Book of Allaah and the Sunnah of His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) have reached him and he understands them with regard to any matter, is to act in accordance with them, no matter who he may be disagreeing with.This is what our Lord and our Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) have enjoined upon us, and all the scholars are unanimously agreed on that, apart from the ignorant blind followers and the hard-hearted. Such people are not scholars.
Tayseer al-‘Azeez al-Hameed, p. 546

Based on this, there is nothing wrong with a Muslim being a follower of a certain madhhab, but if it becomes clear to him that the truth (concerning a given matter) is different from the view of his madhhab, then he must follow the truth.


With regard to Ibn Hazm, he was an imam and a mujtahid, and he regarded blind following as haraam. He was not a follower of any of the imams, neither Imam Ahmad nor any other imam. Rather he was the imam of ahl al-zaahir (the Zaahiris or literalists) during his own time and until now. Perhaps the view that he was a follower of Imam Ahmad (if this report is true) has to do with matters of aqeedah and Tawheed, even though he held different opinions and reckless views with regard to issues pertaining to the divine names and attributes.
See his biography in Siyar A’laam al-Nubala’, 18/184-212
And Allaah knows best.
https://islamqa.info/en/23280
Reply

startingarabic
05-28-2016, 11:01 PM
21420: Is it obligatory to follow a particular madhhab?
________________________________________
Is it mandatory for a muslim to follow a specific madhab (maliki, hanafi, hanbali,etc)?
If it is so, what madhab is the best? Is it true that Abou Hanifa's madhab is the most followed in the muslim world?.


Praise be to Allaah.
It is not obligatory for a Muslim to follow any particular madhhab among these four. People vary in their level of understanding and ability to derive rulings from the evidence. There are some for whom it is permissible to follow (taqleed), and indeed it may be obligatory in their case. There are others who can only follow the shar’i evidence. In Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah this question was answered in a detailed manner, which is worth quoting here in full.


Question:
What is the ruling on following one of the four madhhabs in all cases and situations?
The Committee replied:


Praise be to Allaah, and blessings and peace be upon His Messenger and his family and companions.
Firstly: the four madhhabs are named after the four imams – Imam Abu Haneefah, Imam Maalik, Imam al-Shaafa’i and Imam Ahmad.

Secondly: These imams learned fiqh (jurisprudence) from the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and they are mujtahideen in this regard. The mujtahid either gets it right, in which case he will have two rewards, the reward for his ijtihaad and the reward for getting it right, or he will get it wrong, in which case he will be rewarded for his ijtihaad and will be forgiven for his mistake.

Thirdly: the one who is able to derive rulings from the Qur’aan and Sunnah should take from them like those who came before him; it is not right for him to follow blindly (taqleed) when he is believes that the truth lies elsewhere. Rather he should follow that which he believes is the truth. It is permissible for him to follow in matters in which he is unable to come to a conclusion based on the Qur’aan and Sunnah and he needs guidelines concerning a particular issue.

Fourthly: Whoever does not have the ability to derive rulings himself is permitted to follow one whom he feels comfortable following. If he is not comfortable following him then he should ask until he finds someone with whom he is comfortable.

Fifthly: From the above it is clear that we should not follow their opinions in all situations and at all times, because they may make mistakes, but we may follow their views that are sound and are based on the evidence.
Fataawa al-Lajnah, 5/28

It says in Fataawa al-Lajnah, no. 3323:

Whoever is qualified to derive rulings from the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and has strong knowledge in that regard, even if that is with the help of the legacy of fiqh that we have inherited from earlier scholars of Islam, has the right to do that, so he can act upon it himself and explain it in disputes and issue fatwas to those who consult him. Whoever is not qualified to do that has to ask trustworthy people who so that he may learn the rulings from their books and act upon that, without limiting his asking or his reading to one of the scholars of the four madhhabs. Rather people refer to the four imams because they are so well known and their books are well written and widely available.

Whoever says that it is obligatory for the learned people to follow the scholars blindly in all cases is making a mistake and being inflexible, and is thinking that these learned people are inadequate, and he is restricting something that is broad in scope.

Whoever says that we should limit following to the four madhhabs is also mistaken, because he is restricting something that is broad in scope with no evidence for doing so. With regard to the common (i.e., uneducated) man there is no difference between the four imams and others such as al-Layth ibn Sa’d, al-Awzaa’i and other fuqaha’.
Fataawa al-Lajnah, 5/41

It says in Fatwa no. 1591:
None of them called people to follow his madhhab, or was partisan in following it, or obliged anyone else to act in accordance with it or with a specific madhhab. Rather they used to call people to follow the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and they would comment on the texts of Islam, and explain its basic principles and discuss minor issues according to general guidelines, and issue fatwas concerning what people asked about, without obliging any of their students or anyone else to follow their views. Rather they criticized those who did that and said that their opinions should be cast aside if they went against a saheeh hadeeth. One of them said: “If the hadeeth is saheeh then that is my madhhab.” May Allaah have mercy on them all.

It is not obligatory for anyone to follow a particular madhhab, rather we should strive to learn the truth if possible, or to seek the help of Allaah in doing so, then to rely on the legacy that the earlier Muslim scholars left behind for those who came after them, thus making it easier for them to understand and apply the texts. Whoever cannot derive rulings from the texts etc for some reason that prevents him from doing so should ask trustworthy scholars for whatever rulings of sharee’ah he needs, because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“So ask the people of the Reminder [Scriptures — the Tawraat (Torah), the Injeel (Gospel)] if you do not know”
[al-Anbiya’ 21:7]

So he has to strive to ask one whom he trusts among those who are well known for their knowledge, virtue, piety and righteousness.
Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah, 5/56

The madhhab of Abu Haneefah (may Allaah have mercy on him) is the most widespread madhhab among the Muslims, and perhaps one of the reasons for that is that the Ottoman caliphs followed this madhhab and they ruled the Muslim lands for more than six centuries. That does not mean that the madhhab of Abu Haneefah is the most sound madhhab or that every ijtihaad in it is correct, rather like other madhhabs it contains some things that are correct and some that are incorrect. What the believer must do is to follow the truth and what is correct, regardless of who says it.
And Allaah knows best.
https://islamqa.info/en/21420
Reply

startingarabic
05-28-2016, 11:05 PM
5523: Which of the four Madhhabs is most correct?
________________________________________
people believe 4 imam
my confusion is which one is right path and about (Jamat-al-muslimeen)
Published Date: 1999-11-19

Praise be to Allaah.
Allaah has made our worship based on His Book and the Sunnah of His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). The right way is to understand the texts of sharee’ah as they were understood by the Companions of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and their followers among the scholars who are qualified and prominent mujtahids. This includes the imaams whose sincerity, fairness and leadership in religion, knowledge, virtue, goodness and righteousness is a matter of record. The four imaams and founders of the schools of Islamic fiqh (Imaam Abu Haneefah, Imaam Maalik, Imaam al-Shaafa’i and Imaam Ahmad) – may Allaah have mercy on them all – all followed the texts of the Sharee’ah and their efforts were all focused on teaching and spreading sound Islamic knowledge. All of them were on the right path, and all were devoted followers of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). If mistakes happened, then the Sahaabah made mistakes too. The things to be followed in Sharee’ah are those for which evidence (daleel) is established. In some cases, some scholars may not have known of daleel whilst others did, but this does not mean that their knowledge and ability is to be discredited. All of them were seeking to find and propagate the truth. If a person wants to follow one of the Imaams and adopt his madhhab, then he should follow him in matters for which there is clear, sound daleel, for this is what is required in Islam, but he should not develop partisan or sectarian feelings towards anybody. It is not permissible for the Muslim to believe that he has to follow anybody in all that he says except the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).

The person who is suitably qualified can examine what the scholars said and see what is supported by sound daleel. The “rank and file” Muslim who does not know how to examine the evidence and weigh it up should follow a scholar whose religious commitment and knowledge he trusts, and act according to his fatwas. And Allaah knows best.

https://islamqa.info/en/5523
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startingarabic
05-28-2016, 11:06 PM
5459: Does a madhhab take priority over a hadeeth?
________________________________________
I have a question pertaining to the Hadith and Sunnah Nabi(s.a.w.) and the Madhhab. My country follows the teachings of Madhhab Imam Shafiee and therefore so too the people. There are instances where the teachings of the madhhab took precedent over the hadith and sunnah of the Nabi (s.a.w.). Which should I follow. eg. In Madhhab Imam Shafiee, the wudho is broken if a male purposely or accidentally touch a female either muhrim or not. I have come across a Sunnah Nabi(s.a.w.), who used to move Aishah's (r.a.) leg while performing the fajr prayers. eg. Muslims in my country are thougt that during the Haj, their niat for wudho to switch from the Madhhab Shafiee to that of Madhaab Hambali and perform the wudho as followers of Madhhad Hambali do. The reason for this is as stated in the example above. Is this right, switching from one Madhhab to another during performing the Haj. eg. In Madhhab Shafiee, its is sunat muakad to recite the Doa Qunut during Fajr prayers. Did the Nabi(s.a.w.) recite the Doa Qunut during His Fajr prayers. What is the hukum for ones that do not recite the Doa Qunut.

Praise be to Allaah.
What is obligatory is to follow that which is indicated by the evidence (daleel) of the Qur’aan and Sunnah, even if it differs from what the madhhab says. But it is essential to understand the Qur’aan and Sunnah as they were understood by the Salaf, and not only by our understanding of them. What is meant by the Salaf is the Sahaabah and the Taabi’een.

Concerning the example which you gave, touching a woman does not break wudoo’ at all, whether it is done with desire or not – because of the hadeeth that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) kissed one of his wives and then went out to pray, and he did not repeat his wudoo’. But if a man emits something (madhiy) because of desire, then he has to do wudoo’ – not because of the act of touching, but because something came out from him.
With regard to the aayah (interpretation of the meaning): “…or you have been in contact with [lit. touched] women…” [al-Maa’idah 5:6] – this is referring to sexual intercourse, according to the correct view.

2- There is no need to move from one madhhab to another. The obligatory duties of hajj should be performed as the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) performed them, because he (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Take your rituals from me.”
The correct view concerning Qunoot in Fajr prayer is that it is Sunnah at times of calamity only, i.e., if a disaster has befallen the Muslims or some of them, then it is mustahabb to do Qunoot and to pray to Allaah to grant them relief. But under normal circumstances, the correct view is that this is not mustahabb, and this is what the daleel (evidence) refers to. So whoever does not do Qunoot, his prayer is still valid, even according to the Shaafa’is, may Allaah have mercy on them.
And Allaah knows best.
https://islamqa.info/en/5459
Reply

startingarabic
05-28-2016, 11:08 PM
26269: Adhering to a madhhab when one knows that other madhhabs have stronger evidence

What is the ruling on adhering to a madhhab when it is clear that other madhhabs have stronger evidence)?
Published Date: 2009-05-17

Praise be to Allaah.
If a person adheres to a particular madhhab, then he finds out that it is likely that another madhhab has stronger evidence, this is a serious error. It is not permissible to do that. This is included in what is mentioned in the aayah (interpretation of the meaning):

“They (Jews and Christians) took their rabbis and their monks to be their lords besides Allaah (by obeying them in things which they made lawful or unlawful according to their own desires without being ordered by Allaah), and (they also took as their Lord) Messiah, son of Maryam (Mary), while they (Jews and Christians) were commanded [in the Tawraat (Torah) and the Injeel (Gospel)] to worship none but One Ilaah (God — Allaah) Laa ilaaha illa Huwa (none has the right to be worshipped but He). Praise and glory be to Him (far above is He) from having the partners they associate (with Him)”
[al-Tawbah 9:31]

This implies turning away from the guidance of Allaah and the Sunnah of His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).

https://islamqa.info/en/26269
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najimuddin
05-29-2016, 08:08 AM
This is a good resource that provides tools necessary to become knowledgeable in Islam. May Allah allow us to gain benefit from it.

As I think we all can agree on: Becoming qualified as a scholar takes time, effort, and most important of all – Allah’s help and guidance. With our zeal for knowledge and intent to help the Ummah, we must make sure that we maintain the proper perspective. There are some things that I believe need to be clarified for this perspective to be maintained.

On page 10 of his work Fiqh Al-Imam, Mufti Abdur Rahman bin Yusuf writes:



With that said, let's take a look at some of these concerning issues.

Originally Posted by startingarabic
The fact that a student studied with a madhhab does not mean that he cannot go beyond it if he finds sound evidence elsewhere; the only one who stubbornly clings to a particular madhhab (regardless of the evidence) is one who lacking in religious commitment and intellect, or he is doing that because of partisan attachment to his madhhab.
The author of these statements is implying that he is an expert of all the Madhaaib. He is also implying that he understands what sound evidence is. There doesn't seem to be room for differences of opinion. Furthermore, he doesn't express the fact here that his statements are his own interpretations of evidence.

It is also sad to see that he labels Ulama who don't accept his interpretations as either partisan or lacking in religious commitment and intellect.

Originally Posted by startingarabic
Abu Haneefah said: “This is my opinion, but if there comes someone whose opinion is better than mine, then accept that.” Maalik said: “I am only human, I may be right or I may be wrong, so measure my words by the Qur’aan and Sunnah.” Al-Shaafa’i said: “If the hadeeth is saheeh, then ignore my words. If you see well established evidence, then this is my view.” Imam Ahmad said: “Do not follow me blindly, and do not follow Maalik or al-Shaafa’i or al-Thawri blindly. Learn as we have learned.” And he said, “Do not follow men blindly with regard to your religion, for they can never be safe from error.”
Of course. These trustworthy Ulama of the Golden Age of Islam always knew that Allah Knows Best in all affairs. The Salf-i-Saliheen had a high level of taqwa. Allah has raised their status' in the Ummah accordingly.

Far from that, these new psuedo-Salafis instead are saying that they know how to evaluate evidence better than the actual Salf-i-Saliheen - "I know better because they said they were human and could make mistakes". We'll have a quote on this below.

The proponents of this following blindly thing are, in reality, severely deficient in their knowledge of the Madhaaib.

For example:

From my experience with the Hanafi Ulama, I am aware that there is leeway to accept the ruling(s) of another Madhab. This acceptance is contingent on the exhaustion of all avenues within the precedent rulings and Usool of the Hanafi Madhab – which is rare.

Mufti Abdur Rahman bin Yusuf writes in relation to this on pages xv - xvi of Fiqh Al-Imam:




Originally Posted by startingarabic
No one has the right to follow an imam blindly and never accept anything but his words. Rather what he must do is accept that which is in accordance with the truth, whether it is from his imam or anyone else.
Albeit I believe unintentional but nevertheless, these are severely misleading statements that contradict the legality of laypeople to follow trustworthy Ulama.

Originally Posted by startingarabic
Shaykh Sulaymaan ibn ‘Abd-Allaah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:
Rather what the believer must do, if the Book of Allaah and the Sunnah of His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) have reached him and he understands them with regard to any matter, is to act in accordance with them, no matter who he may be disagreeing with.This is what our Lord and our Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) have enjoined upon us, and all the scholars are unanimously agreed on that, apart from the ignorant blind followers and the hard-hearted. Such people are not scholars.
Tayseer al-‘Azeez al-Hameed, p. 546
Among other things, the statements in red have major implications in relation to a person's arrogance. This makes it clear that the author is not fully acquainted with the robust nature of the Madhaaib. There is definitely no room for differences of opinion with him either. If a person chooses to follow these statements, he or she is actually blindly following this scholar's opinion.

Originally Posted by startingarabic
From the above it is clear that we should not follow their opinions in all situations and at all times, because they may make mistakes, but we may follow their views that are sound and are based on the evidence.
Fataawa al-Lajnah, 5/28
The author of this statement is implying that he can correct the mistakes of the Salf-i-Saliheen. In reality, as mentioned earlier, it's likely he's not well versed in, at the very least, the Hanafi Madhab.

These foundations of the Madhaaib were not based on personalities of modern times – but of the Golden Age of Islam, the Khair al-Kuroon. In relation to this:


Source: Mufti Abdur Rahman bin Yusuf,Fiqh Al-Imam, p. 31

Originally Posted by startingarabic
Whoever is not qualified to do that has to ask trustworthy people who so that he may learn the rulings from their books and act upon that, without limiting his asking or his reading to one of the scholars of the four madhhabs. Rather people refer to the four imams because they are so well known and their books are well written and widely available.
Yes, whoever is not qualified have to ask trustworthy Ulama. However, the author of this statement is implying that his interpretations are just as good as the Four Imams and better than those Ulama who stick to the Usool and rulings of a particular Madhab. He doesn't even consider the latter to be Ulama - and has choice words for them.

Originally Posted by startingarabic
With regard to Ibn Hazm, he was an imam and a mujtahid, and he regarded blind following as haraam. He was not a follower of any of the imams, neither Imam Ahmad nor any other imam. Rather he was the imam of ahl al-zaahir (the Zaahiris or literalists) during his own time and until now. Perhaps the view that he was a follower of Imam Ahmad (if this report is true) has to do with matters of aqeedah and Tawheed, even though he held different opinions and reckless views with regard to issues pertaining to the divine names and attributes.
It is indeed necessary to follow the systematic approach that the Salf-i-Saliheen laid out. Not doing so opens one up to make reckless mistakes and misleading people.

When the talk about referring back to the Messenger of Allah (:saws:) arises that implies that the Mujtahid Imams didn’t do so themselves.

What proponents of this statement are doing is in fact creating another Madhab for themselves – which they believe hold better interpretations than the established Madhaaib.

One of the reasons why sincere brothers and sisters are opposed to certain established things in Islam is because of the fanaticism they've experienced. Unfortunately, there are people who have extremist views. This extremism can be related to any of a number of issues (i.e. fiqh, tasawwuf, etc.).

For example:

One of the reasons why I stay away from getting intimate with my local Tablighi Jamaat is because of a variety of different types of extremism within it. It’s important to note, however, that the actual teachings of the Tablighi Jamaat are far from extreme and something that I hold dear.

This is the same with extremists of all types (i.e. followers of other Shuyookh and Madhaaib aren't Muslims). This isn’t what the actual Shuyookh and Fuqaha teach/taught – far from it. This extremism is misrepresenting Islamic teachings and is a major put off for many people and has given rise to different types of protestant groups and interpretations. The ironic thing that happens here is that these groups are in fact creating their own Madhaaib – which I am supposed to believe are more trustworthy than the ones established during the Golden Age of Islam – the Best of Generations.

Several months ago a respected brother on this forum commented on a post I had made related to following the Madhaaib. His reply took my post out of context and missed pertinent information. When I responded and pointed out the issue, he apologized and said he had recently read a paper on Madhab fanaticism which influenced him in his response to me.

Additionally, it can be argued that those that strictly limit their quotations to a few select scholars such as Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (R.A.) and Shaykh Sulaymaan ibn ‘Abd-Allaah (may Allaah have mercy on him) are blindly following them. After all, their statements are their opinions (i.e. interpretations of evidence). They aren’t from the Khair al-Kuroon either.

Furthermore, it is evident that the proponents of this are not acquainted with the vast amount of literature and robust nature of the Madhaaib. In my experience they have developed their perceptions from literature written by authors of this persuasion who themselves aren’t experts in any of the Madhaaib. For example, Fiqh us-Sunnah seems like a kitab that presents the views of the Madhaaib in a fair and balanced way. In reality, the author presents material according to how he interprets it – which is a serious misrepresentation.

So while yes, we should study Islamic knowledge, it is imperative to have a qualified teacher. Please listen to the following 1-hour lecture by clicking on the green-titled link. It's by Shaykh Ibrahim Madani and will be worth your time.

Everyone needs a teacher

In need of duas.
Reply

startingarabic
05-29-2016, 09:53 AM
It a lot to read.
I will read it tonight. Inshallah as its very long.

But as for this.
I will not listen to any lectures in English, sorry.
I hate listening to lectures in the Language other than Arabic.

So while yes, we should study Islamic knowledge, it is imperative to have a qualified teacher. Please listen to the following 1-hour lecture by clicking on the green-titled link. It's by Shaykh Ibrahim Madani and will be worth your time.

Here is a full collection of a good study pogrom if you want to listen to lectures in Arabic.
Anything in yellow is something I have not listened to yet.

https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resi...=folder%2cdocx


Reply

startingarabic
05-29-2016, 10:08 AM
you said this najimuddin

The author of these statements is implying that he is an expert of all the Madhaaib. He is also implying that he understands what sound evidence is. There doesn't seem to be room for differences of opinion. Furthermore, he doesn't express the fact here that his statements are his own interpretations of evidence.

If you know Arabic he is here for you to find out if he is an expert of all the Mahaaib - I dont know
https://islamqa.info/ar/
here it is in English - I don't think its him here but his team of translators
https://islamqa.info/en/

Reply

startingarabic
05-29-2016, 12:18 PM
Ok. I read it really.
I not here to dissect the comments, I have better things to do.
I may disagree with some and agree with others.
I you do not have time to study thats fine.
Again go here.
https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resi...nt=file%2cdocx

Program 8 covers fiqh all books are in arabic and some are translated, indicated by [T].
They are all levelled for all 4 mathabs and the other 5th or general mathab.

8.1 is the الفقه الحنفي- العباداتالمرحلةالأولى
I havent got a watch collection as its very poorly represented in /Arabic except on Azhar TV and I keep that collection separate.

8.2 is the فقه مالكي the book collection is missing I will have to look for it.

8.3 is the الفِقْهُ الشافِعِي -العبادات المرحلة الأولى both books and watched collection his here. I have 2 books on this mathab translated on worship.

8.4 is the المذهب الحنبلي- العبادات المرحلة الأولى both books and watched collection his here. I have 1 book on this mathab translated on worship.

8.5 is the فقه عام - العبادات المرحلة الأولى watched collection his here.

6 is the foundation/Asuul of fiqu of the 4 mathabs
Reply

startingarabic
05-30-2016, 05:42 PM
http://www.islamicboard.com/aqeedah/...o-salafis.html :nervous:
Sorry guys liked this post so didn't have anywhere else to put it.

NOW BACK TO OUR 4 IMAMS
Reply

startingarabic
05-31-2016, 01:30 PM
1- THE HANAFEE MADH-HAB
The founder: Imaam Abu Haneefah (703-767CE)
This Madh-hab is named after its founding scholar, Abu Haneefah, whose actual name was Nu’maan ibn Thaabit. He was born in the year 702 CE. Kufah, (Iraq). His father was a silk merchan of Persian origin, who accepted Islaam during the reign of the Khulafaa Raashidoon (Righteous Caliphs). Abu Haneefah began his earlier studies in the field of philosophy and dialectics known as ‘Ilm al-Kalaam, but after mastering its various disciplines, he left it and went into an indepth study of Fiqh and Hadeeth. He chose as his main teacher, Hammaad ibn Zayd, who was among the greatest scholars of Hadeeth of his time. Abu Haneefah studied under him for eighteen years. During this time he became qualified to teach, but instead remained Hammad’s student until the latter died in the year 742 CE. After Hammaad’s death Abu Haneefah took up the position of teacher at the age of forty and became the most outstanding scholar in Kufah. As such, he appeared to be a valuable prize to the Umayyad caliphs of that time. They offered him the position of Qaadee (judge) of Kufah, but he refused the post in spite of being physically beaten for his refusal by the Ameer of Kufah, Yazeed ibn ‘Umar. Similarly, during the rule of the ‘Abbaasids, he also refused royal appointment, and was consequently imprisoned in Baghdad by the Caliph Abu Ja’far al-Mansoor (754-775 CE). He remained imprisoned until his death in 767 CE. Abu Haneefah was considered among the minor Taabi’oon (students of the Sahaabah), because he had met a few of the Sahaabah and had related some Hadeeths from them.

Formation of the Hanafee Madh-hab
Imaam Abu Haneefah base his teaching method on the principle of Shoorah (group discussion). He would present a legal problem to his students for debate and discussion and tell them to record its solution whenever they arrived at a unified position. Because of this interactive approach to making legal rulings, we could say that the Hanafee Madh-hab was as much a product of Abu Haneeafh’s students’ efforts as it was a product of his own efforts. They would also debate on hypothetical problems and work out solutions, based on the principle of preparing for a problem before its occurrence. Because of their leaning towards hypothetical Fiqh which often introduced an issue with the question, “what if so and so happened?”, they became known as the what-iffers or Ahl ar-Ra’i (the opinion people).

Sources of Law used by the Hanafee Madh-hab
The early jurists of this Madh-hab deduced Islamic laws from the following sources, which are listed in the order of their importance:
1. The Qur’aan
They considered the Qur’aan to be the primary unquestionable source of Islamic law. In fact it was used to determine the accuracy of the other sources. Accordingly any other source that contradicted the Qur’aan was considered inaccurate.
. The Sunnah
The Sunnah was consulted as the second most important source of Islamic law, but with some qualification as to its use. They stipulated that it was not sufficient that a Hadeeth be accurate (Saheeh), but it had to be also widely known (Mash-hoor), if it was to be used as a legal proof. This condition was laid down as a safeguard against false Hadeeths which were cropping up frequently in that region where only a few notable Sahaabah had settled (‘Alee and Ibn Mas’ood).
3. Ijmaa’ of the Sahaabah
Third in importance as a source of Islamic law was the unanimous opinion of the Sahaabah on any point of law not specified in the Qur’aan or the Sunnah. That is, Ijmaa’ of the Sahaabah on any point of law not specified in the Qur’aan or the Sunnah. That is, Ijmaa’ of the gnized the Ijmaa’ of Muslim scholars in any age as valid and binding on Muslims.
4. Individual opinion of the Sahaabah
If there were different opinions among the Sahaabah on a particular point of law and no Ijmaa’ was subsequently formed, Abu Haneefah would choose the opinion which appeared most appropriate to the case in question. In establishing this as a vital principle of his Madh-hab, Abu Haneefah again gave more weight to the opinions of the Sahaabah than to his own. However, he did apply his own reasoning in a limited sense by choosing one of their various opinions.
5. Qiyaas (Analogical deduction)
Abu Haneefah felt no obligation to accept the deductions of the students of the Sahaabah (Taabi’oon) in areas where no clear proof was available from any of the above mentioned sources. He considered himself the equal of the Taabi’oon and would make his own Ijtihaad based on the principles of Qiyaas which he and his students established.
6. Istihsaan (Preference)
Istihsaan, in short, is the preference of one proof over another proof because it appears more suitable, even though the preferred proof may be technically weaker than the one it is preferred to. This may involve the preference of a Hadeeth which is specific over a general one, or it may even involve the preference of a more suitable law over the one deduced by Qiyaas.
7. ‘Urf (Local Custom)
Local customs were given legal weight in areas where there were no binding Islamic customs available. It was through the application of this principle that various customs found in the multiplicity of cultures within the Islamic world entered the legal system and became mistakenly classified as Islamic.

Main students of the Hanafee Madh-hab
The most famous of Abu Haneefah’s students were Zufar ibn al-Hudhayl, Abu Yoosuf and Muhammad ibn al-Hasan.
Zufar ibn al-Hudhayl (732-774 CE)
Zufar was one of those who followed Abu Haneefah’s example and refused to accept appointment as Qaadee even though many attractive offers were made to him. He preferred to teach, which he did until he died at the early age of 42 in Basrah.
Abu Yoosuf Ya’qoob ibn Ibraaheem (735-795 CE)
Abu Yoosuf was born into a poor family in Kufah. He studied Hadeeth extensively until he became a noteworthy Hadeeth scholar then studied Fiqh in Kufah for nine years under Imaam Ibn Abee Lailaa (died 765 CE) whose father was a famous Sahaabee from Madeenah. Abu Yoosuf later studied under Abu Haneefah for nine years, and when Abu Haneefah died, he went to Madeenah and studied for a short period under Imaam Maalik.
Muhammad ibn al-Hasan, ash-Shaybaanee (749-805 CE)
Imaam Muhammad was born in WSasit, but grew up in Kufah. Like Abu Yoosuf, his early studies were also in Hadeeth. He studied briefly under Abu Yoosuf and later travelled to Madeenah where he studied under Imaam Maalik for three years. During this period he became one of the main narrators of Maalik’s Hadeeth book al-Muwatta’ Imaam Shaafi’ee was among the many scholars who later studied uner Muhammad ibn al-Hasan in Baghdad.
Muhammad ibn al-Hasan also accepted appointment as Qadee during the reign of Caliph Haroon ar-Rasheed, but soon gave it up because of the many compromises which it demanded, and returned to his teaching post in Baghdad.

Followers of the Hanafee Madh-hab
Those who now follow the Hanafee Madh-hab are found mostly in India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Guyana, Trinidad, and Surinam and to some extent Egypt. When the ottoman rulers codified Islamic law according to the Hanafee Madh-hab in the nineteenth century CE and made it state law, any scholar who aspired to be a judge was obliged to learn it. As a result, the Madhhab spread throughout the Ottoman Islamic State during the last Part of the nineteenth century.
http://carryonummah.blogspot.co.uk/2016/05/1-hanafee-madh-hab.html

Reply

najimuddin
05-31-2016, 05:40 PM
Originally Posted by startingarabic
http://www.islamicboard.com/aqeedah/...o-salafis.html :nervous:
Sorry guys liked this post so didn't have anywhere else to put it.

NOW BACK TO OUR 4 IMAMS

The respected Shaykh (may Allah have mercy on him) is warning against extremists in this pseudo-Salafi movement. That’s why he included the term Salafi in his initial list of deviant groups. He does not disprove of the movement itself.

@1:36 the respected Shaykh (may Allah have mercy on him) states:

The Salafi brothers are the closest sect to that which is right, no doubt

Because of this, it is my opinion that the title of the video is somewhat misleading.

Moving on:

Among other things, to use the term Salafi to identify this misinformed protestant movement is misleading – albeit unintentional but nevertheless misinformed. It implies that those that adhere to one of the 4 Madhaaib aren’t – at the very least – true followers of the Salf-i-Saliheen.

In fact, the 4 Madhabs were formulated during the first three generations by actual Salafis. Therefore, adherents of the 4 Madhabs are true followers of the Salf-i-Saliheen. This was covered in a previous post of mine in this thread.
Reply

najimuddin
05-31-2016, 05:57 PM
:sl:

Please cite your sources. I am going to pick one thing out of your post and comment on it to highlight the necessity of doing this.
Originally Posted by startingarabic
5. Qiyaas (Analogical deduction)
Abu Haneefah felt no obligation to accept the deductions of the students of the Sahaabah (Taabi’oon) in areas where no clear proof was available from any of the above mentioned sources. He considered himself the equal of the Taabi’oon and would make his own Ijtihaad based on the principles of Qiyaas which he and his students established.
These statements are misleading and slander upon Imam Abu Hanifa :rh:. It has likely come from none other than this new movement of misinformed protestant preachers that believe they are better than the actual Salf-i-Saliheen. Due to their own misguidance, among many things they are – in these statements – subtly accusing Imam Abu Hanifa :rh: of arrogance.

To focus on one aspect of this issue: Imam Abu Hanifa :rh: was a Tabi'i himself.

On pages 22 – 23 of his work Fiqh Al-Imam, Mufti Abdur Rahman ibn Yusuf writes:





This shows that Imam Abu Hanifa :rh: was indeed a Tabi’i and that the sources you are citing are misinformed.

Again, please cite your sources. That way our respected readers will be fully aware of who you are following (i.e. making taqleed of).
Reply

startingarabic
05-31-2016, 05:59 PM
2- THE MAALIKEE MADH-HAB
The Founder: Imaam Maalik (717-801 CE)
The founding scholar of this Madh-hab, Maalik ibn Anas ibn ‘Aamir, was born in Madeenah in the year 717 CE. His grandfather, ‘Aamir, was among the major Sahaabah of Madeenah. Maalik studied Hadeeth under az-Zuhree who was the greatest Hadeeth scholar of his time as well as under the great Hadeeth narrator, Naari’, the freed slave of the Sahaabee ‘Abdullah ibn ‘Umar. Maalik’s only journeys outside of Madeenah were for Hajj, and thus he largely limited himself to the knowledge available in Madeenah.
He was severely beaten in the year 764 CE by the order of the Ameer of Madeenah, because he made a legal ruling that forced divorce was invalid. This ruling opposed the ‘Abbaasid rulers’ practice of adding in the oath of allegiance given to them by the masses the clause that whoever broke the oath was automatically divorced. Maalik was tied and beaten until his arms became severely damaged to such a degree that he became unable to clasp them on his chest in Salaah and thus he began the practice of praying with his hands at his sides according to some reports.
Imaam Maalik continued to teach Hadeeth in Madeenah over a period of forty years and he managed to compile a book containing Hadeeths of the Prophet (s.w.) and Athars of the Sahaabah and their successors which he named al-Muwatta’ (the Beaten Path). He began his compilation of Hadeeths at the request of the ‘Abbaasid caliph, Abu Ja’far al-Mansoor, (754-775 CE) who wanted a comprehensive code of law based on the Prophet’s (s.w.) Sunnah which could be applied uniformly throughout his realm. But, on its completion, Maalik refused to have it forced on the people pointing out that the Sahaabah had scattered throughout the Islamic empire and had taken with them other parts of the Sunnah which also had to be considered in any laws imposed throughout the state. Caliph Haaroon arRasheed (768-809 CE) also made the same request of the Imaam, but he was also turned down. Imaam Maalik died in the city of his birth in the year 801 CE at the venerable age of 83.

Formation of the Maalikee Madh-hab
Imaam Maalik’s method of teaching was based on the narration of Hadeeths and the discussion of their meanings in the context of problems of that day. He would either narrate to his students Hadeeths and Athars (statements of the Sahaabah) on various topics of Islamic law then discuss their implications, or he would inquire about problems which had arisen in the areas from whence his students came, then narrate appropriate Hadeeths or Athars which could be used to solve them.
After Maalik completed al-Muwatta’, he used to narrate it to his students as the sum total of his Madh-hab, but would add or subtract from it slightly, whenever new information reached him. He used to strictly avoid speculation and hypothetical Fiqh and thus his school and its followers were reffered to as the people of Hadeeth (Ahl al-Hadeeth).

Sources of Law Used by the Maalikee Madh-hab
Imaam Maalik deduced Islamic law from the following sources which are listed in the order of their importance.
1. The Qur’aan
Like all the other Iaams, Maalik considered the Qur’aan to be the primary source of Islamic law and utlized it without laying any pre-conditions for its applications.
2. The Sunnah
The Sunnah was used by Imaam Maalik as the second most important source of Islamic law, but, like Abu Haneefah, he put some restrictions on its use. If a Hadeeth were contradicted by the customary practice of the Madeenites, he rejected it. He did not, however, insist that a Hadeeth be Mash-hoor (well-known) before it could be applied as Abu Haneefah did. Instead he used any Hadeeth that was narrated to him as long as none of the narrators were known liars or extremely weak memorizers.
3. ‘Amal (practices) of the Madeenites
Imaam Maalik reasoned that since many of the Madeenites were direct descendants of the Sahaabah and Madeenah was where the Prophet (s.w.) spent the last ten years of his life, practices common to all Madeenites must have been allowed, if not encouraged by the Prophet (s.w.) himself. Thus, Imaam Maalik regarded common Madeenite practices as a form of highly authentic Sunnah narrated in deeds rather than words.
4. Ijmaa’ of the Sahaabah
Maalik like Abu Haneefah considered the Ijmaa’ of the Sahaabah, as well as that of later scholars, as the third most important source of Islamic law.
5. Individual Opinion of the Sahaabah
Imaam Maalik gave full weight to the opinions of the Sahaabha, whether they were conflicting or in agreement, and included them in his book of Hadeeth, al-Muwatta’. However, the consensus of the Sahaabah was given precedence over individual opinions of the Sahaabah. Where there was no consensus, their individual opinions were given precedence over his own opinion.
6. Qiyaas
Maalik used to apply his own deductive reasoning on matters not covered by the previously mentioned sources. However, he was very cautious about doing so because of the subjectivity of such forms of reasoning.
7. Customs of the Madeenites
Imaam Maalik also gave some weight to isolated practices found among a few people of Madeenah so long as they were not in contradiction to known Hadeeths. He reasoned that such customs, though occurring only in isolated instances, must also have been handed down from earlier generations and sanctioned by the Sahaabah or even the prophet (s.w.) himself.
8. Istislaah (Welfare)
The principle of Istihsaan developed by Abu Haneefah was also applied by Maalik and his students except that they called it by the name Istislaah which means seeking that which is more suitable. It deals with things which are for human welfare but have not been specifically considered by the Sharee’ah. An exaple of Istislaah is found in Caliph ‘Alee’s ruling that a whole group of people who took part in a murder were guilty even though only one of the group had actually committed the act of murder. Another example is the right of a Muslim leader to collect taxes from the rich other than Zakaah if the interest of the state demands it, whereas in Sharee’ah only Zakaah has been specified. Imaam Maalik also applied the principle of Istislaah to deduce laws more in keeping with needs which arose from current situations than those deduced by Qiyaas.
9. ‘Urf (Custom)
Like Abu Haneefah, Maalik considered the various customs and social habits of people throughout the Muslim world as possible sources of secondary laws as long as they did not contradict either the letter or the spirit of the Sharee’ah.
According to custom in Syria, for example, the word Daabbah means a horse, whereas its general meaning in Arabic is four legged animal. Hence, a contract made in Syria requiring payment in the form of a Daabbah would legally mean a horse whereas elsewhere in the Arab world it would have to be more clearly defined as a horse.

Main students of the Maalikee Madh-hab
The most notable of Maalik’s students who did not later form their own Madh-habs were al-Qaasim and Ibn Wahb.
Abu ‘Abdur-Rahmaan ibn al-Qaasim (745-813 CE)
Al-Qaasim was born in Egypt but travelled to Madeenah where he studied under his teacher and mentor for a period of more than twenty years. He wrote an extensive book on the Fiqh of the Madh-hab, eclipsing even al-Muwatta’ of Maalik himself and called it al-Mudawwanah.
Abu ‘Abdillaah ibn Wahb (742-819 CE)
Ibn Wahb also travelled from Egypt to Madeenah in order to study under Imaam Maalik. He distinguished himself in the deduction of laws to such a degree that Maalik gave him the title of al-Muftee, which means the official expounder of Islamic law.
Ibn Wahb was offered an appointment as judge of Egypt, but turned it down in order to maintain his integrity as an independent scholar.136
Maalik had other famous students from other madh-habs. Some of them modified their own Madh-habs based on what they learnt from Maalik, for example, Muhammad ash-Shaybaanee who was among the foremost students of Abu Haneefah. There were others who developed their own Madh-habs by combining Maalik’s teachings with that of others, for example Muhammad ibn Idrees ash-Shaafi’ee who studied for many years under Imaam Maalik as well as under Abu Haneefah’s student Muhammad as-Shaybaanee.
Followers of the Maalikee Madh-hab
Today, the followers of this Madh-hab are found mostly in Upper Egypt, Sudan, North Africa (Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco), West Africa (Mali, Nigeria, Chad, etc) and the Arabian Gulf states (Kuwait, Qatar, and Bahrain).

https://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=4349496988772651283#allposts
Reply

startingarabic
05-31-2016, 06:17 PM
Originally Posted by najimuddin
:sl:

Please cite your sources. I am going to pick one thing out of your post and comment on it to highlight the necessity of doing this.

These statements are misleading and slander upon Imam Abu Hanifa :rh:. It has likely come from none other than this new movement of misinformed protestant preachers that believe they are better than the actual Salf-i-Saliheen. Due to their own misguidance, among many things they are – in these statements – subtly accusing Imam Abu Hanifa :rh: of arrogance.

To focus on one aspect of this issue: Imam Abu Hanifa :rh: was a Tabi'i himself.

This shows that Imam Abu Hanifa :rh: was indeed a Tabi’i and that the sources you are citing are misinformed.

Again, please cite your sources. That way our respected readers will be fully aware of who you are following (i.e. making taqleed of).
The Author of the book has a facebook you can write to him to tell him to change it.

I prefer this quote which is different to both English quotes (I may find a better quote than this quote as well):

المذهب الحنفي


ينسب هذا المذهب إلى الامام أبي حنيفة النعمان بن ثابت بن زوطي التيمي الكوفي ، ولد سنة 80 للهجرة بالكوفة
وهو من أتباع التابعين وقيل أنه من التابعين لأنه أدرك أربعة من الصحابة وربما لقي بعضهم
، بدأ حياته العلمية بدراسة علم الكلام ثم تعلم فقه مدرسة الكوفة على شيخه حماد بن أبي سليمان وغيره من أجلاء التابعين وأخذ الحديث عن كثيرين من العلماء ، وبلغ في الفقه منزلة لم يصل إليها أحد ممن عاصره ، وكان معروفاً بالورع وصدق المعاملة والزهد في الدنيا ، ويدل على ذلك رفضه القضاء بالكوفة ونال من ذلك بلاء شديد في عهد الأمويين وكذلك عندما عرض عليه القضاء في عهد العباسيين أصر على رفضه فحبس وعذب وضرب حتى أشرف على الهلاك ، ومن سمات النذهب الحنفي أنه كان يقوم على الشورى في الرأي بين الشيخ والتلاميذ وأن الشيخ كان حريصاً على بناء الرجال أكثر من تأليف الكتب ، ولهذا لم يؤثر عنه مؤلفات فقهية وقد دون تلاميذه فقهه ومع هذا يظل شأنه كما قال الإمام الشافعي عنه : ا
.ناس في الفقه عيال على أبي حنيفة
.
Reply

startingarabic
05-31-2016, 11:45 PM
This is more accurate than the 2 English comments and the Arabic comment I posted earlier as well. The red is important for me as well.
If I have time I will check what ibn Hajar says in Arabic.


http://library.islamweb.net/newlibra...k_no=60&flag=1

الإمام ، فقيه الملة ، عالم العراق أبو حنيفة النعمان بن ثابت بن زوطى التيمي ، الكوفي ، مولى بني تيم الله بن ثعلبة يقال : إنه من أبناء الفرس .

[ ص: 391 ] ولد سنة ثمانين في حياة صغار الصحابة ، ورأى أنس بن مالك لما قدم عليهم الكوفة . ولم يثبت له حرف عن أحد منهم
Reply

startingarabic
06-01-2016, 02:07 PM
This is very in-depth.
It says that there is a difference of opinion on the chain did Abu Hanifa :rh: or didn't he meet Anas.
Both sides give their proof.
Then did he listen from him/them as well.
This is it for now as teaching.
update
Ok it goes back to some1 in the chain who is saying he Abu Hanifa :rh: meet Anas the person in the chain is unkown.
What made me laugh was what
الرافعي في التدوين في أخبار قزوين (3/ 152) :
said he is a well know hanafi author.
كان أبو حنيفة، رضى الله عنه، من سادات التابعين، رأى أنس بن مالك، ولا يشك فيه إلا جاهل وحاسد.

http://www.ahlalhdeeth.com/vb/showthread.php?t=295563

http://www.ahlalhdeeth.com/vb/showthread.php?t=80392
Reply

startingarabic
06-02-2016, 02:09 PM
46992: Brief overview of the madhhab of Imam Abu Haneefah


We hope that you could give us a brief overview of Imam Abu Haneefah and his madhhab, because I hear some people criticizing this madhhab because he relies too much on qiyaas (analogy) and ra’y (opinion).
Published Date: 2004-03-08

Praise be to Allaah. Imam Abu Haneefah is the great faqeeh and scholar of Iraq, Abu Haneefah al-Nu’maan ibn Thaabit al-Taymi al-Kufi. He was born in the year 80 AH, during the lifetime of some of the younger Sahaabah and saw Anas ibn Maalik when he came to them in Kufa. He narrated from ‘Ata’ ibn Abi Rabaah, who was his greatest Shaykh, and from al-Shu’bi and many others.
He was concerned with seeking reports and he traveled for that purpose. With regard to fiqh and examining and analyzing reports, he was the ultimate and people depended on him in that, as Imam al-Dhahabi said: “It would take two volumes to tell the story of his life, may Allaah be pleased with him and have mercy on him.”
He was an imam who was eloquent and well spoken. His student Abu Yoosuf described him as follows: “He was the most well-spoken of the people and the most clear in expressing himself. He was pious and very protective with regard to transgression of the sacred limits of Allaah. He was offered worldly gains and a great deal of wealth, but he turned his back on it. He was whipped to force him to accept the position of judge or controller of the bayt al-maal (treasury of the Islamic state) but he refused.
Many people narrated reports from him, and he died as a martyr of dropsy in 150 AH at the age of seventy. (Siyar A’laam al-Nubala’, 6/390-403; Usool al-Deen ‘inda al-Imam Abu Haneefah, p. 63).
The Hanafi madhhab is one of the four well-known madhhabs, and it was the first of the fiqhi madhhabs. It was said that “The people are dependent on Abu Haneefah with regard to fiqh.” The origin of the Hanafi madhhab and all the other madhhabs is that these four imams – I mean Abu Haneefah, Maalik, al-Shaafa’i and Ahmad – made the effort to understand the evidence of the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and they issued fatwas to people based on the evidence that had reached them. Then the followers of these imams took their fatwas and conveyed them and issued other fatwas based on them, and derived principles from them, and they set out guidelines for understanding the texts and reaching conclusions. Thus the fiqhi madhhab was formed, and the Hanafi, Shaafa’i, Maaliki and Hanbali madhhabs, and other madhhabs such as those of al-Awzaa’i and Sufyaan, but these latter madhhabs were not destined to continue.
As you can see, what these schools of fiqh are based on is following the Qur’aan and Sunnah.
With regard to the ra’y and qiyaas adopted by Imam Abu Haneefah, what this means is not opinion based on whims and desires, rather it is an opinion based on the evidence, or analogies, or following the general principles of sharee’ah. The salaf used to describe ijtihaad in difficult issues as ra’y (lit. opinion). Many of them used to say when commenting on a verse of the Book of Allaah, “This is my opinion (my ijtihaad) concerning it,” but that does not refer to opinion based on whims and desires, as stated above.
Imam Abu Haneefah followed ra’y and qiyaas a great deal in matters other than hudood punishments, expiations and other shar’i issues, and the reason for that is that he had fewer ahaadeeth at his disposal than other imams, because he came before the other imams and was very strict about accepting ahaadeeth, as false reports were so widespread in Iraq at that time and there was a great deal of tribulation.
It should be noted that not all the opinions and views of the Hanafi madhhab that is named after Imam Abu Haneefah are the words of Abu Haneefah himself, or can be correctly attributed to him. Many of those views go against what Imam Abu Haneefah himself said, but they were regarded as part of his madhhab because they were worked out according to the guidelines of the madhhab which is derived from the other texts of the imam. Similarly the Hanafi madhhab may adopt the view of a student of the imam such as Abu Yoosuf and Muhammad, and it also includes the ijtihaad of students of the imam, which subsequently became part of the madhhab. This does not apply only to the madhhab of Abu Haneefah, rather the same may be said of all the well-known madhhabs.
If it is said: If the four madhhabs are based on the Qur’aan and Sunnah, why do we find differences of opinion between them on matters of fiqh?
The answer is: Each imam issued fatwas on the basis of the evidence that reached him. A hadeeth may have reached Imam Maalik on the basis of which he issued fatwas, that did not reach Abu Haneefah, so he issued fatwas stating something different, and vice versa. Similarly a hadeeth may have reached Abu Haneefah with a saheeh isnaad so he issued fatwas on that basis, and the same hadeeth may have reached Imam al-Shaafa’i with a different isnaad that was da’eef (weak), so he did not issue fatwas based on it, or he may have issued a fatwa saying something that went against the hadeeth based on the conclusion he reached. This is why differences arose among the scholars, but ultimately the point of reference is the Qur’aan and Sunnah.
In fact, Imam Abu Haneefah and other imams followed the texts of the Qur’aan and Sunnah, even if some of their fatwas were not based on that, the reason being that all four imams stated that if a hadeeth was saheeh, then that was their madhhab, that is what they followed, on what they based their fatwas and from what they derived their evidence.
Imam Abu Haneefah said: “If the hadeeth is saheeh then that is my madhhab.” And he said: “It is not permissible for anyone to follow what we say if they do not know where we got it from.” According to another report he said: “It is haraam for the one who does not know my evidence to issue a fatwa based on my words.” And according to another report he added: “We are human, we may say something today and retract it tomorrow.” And he said: “If I say something that goes against the Book of Allaah or the report of the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), then ignore what I say.”
Imam Maalik (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “I am only human, sometimes I make mistakes and sometimes I get things right. Look at my opinion and whatever is in accordance with the Qur’aan and Sunnah, take it, and whatever is not in accordance with the Qur’aan and Sunnah, ignore it.” And he said: “There is no one after the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) whose words cannot be taken or left, apart from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).”
Imam al-Shaafa’i (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: “There is no one who will not be unaware of some of the Sunnah of the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him). Whatever I say or whatever guidelines I establish, if there is a report from the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) which is different to what I said, then what matters is what the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said, and that is my opinion.”
Imam Ahmad said: “Do not follow me blindly and do not follow Maalik or al-Shaafa’i or al-Awzaa’i or al-Thawri blindly. Learn from where they learned.” And he said: “The opinion of al-Awzaa’i and the opinion of Maalik and the opinion of Abu Haneefah are all mere conjecture and it is all the same to me. Rather evidence is to be found in the reports – i.e., in the shar’i evidence.”
This is a brief look at Imam Abu Haneefah (may Allaah have mercy on him) and his madhhab. In conclusion, the Muslim cannot but acknowledge the status and position of these imams, but that should not lead us to give precedence to their views over the Book of Allaah and the saheeh reports from the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), because in principle we should follow the Qur’aan and Sunnah and not the opinions of men; any man’s opinion may be taken or left, except the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him),as Imam Maalik (may Allaah have mercy on him) said.
For more information please see questions no. 5523, 13189, 23280, 21420.
See also al-Madkhal ila Diraasat al-madaaris wa’l-Madhaahib al-Fiqhiyyah by ‘Umar al-Ashqar.


https://islamqa.info/en/46992
Reply

najimuddin
06-02-2016, 04:56 PM
Thank you for citing your source.

This guidance on following the Madhaaib is questionable.

People are free to follow what they want, but this disclaimer must be made. The respected Shaykh himself is not an adherent to any of the 4 Madhabs of the Salf-i-Saliheen. He is of a historically recently formed Madhab (School of Jurisprudence) that believe they have all the evidence, understand all the Madhaaib, and can give better opinions than the actual Salaf that are closer to the Qur’an and Sunnah. This “General Madhab” as some of them label it are popularly known – although wrongly – as Salafi.

They state they refer back to the Qur’an and Sunnah, implying and at times explicitly stating that the actual Salaf did not – which is a misrepresentation.

In this guidance, the respected Shaykh provides evidence as he interprets it and implies he knows all the evidence of all the Madhaaib. After doing so, he concludes by saying:

Originally Posted by startingarabic
This is a brief look at Imam Abu Haneefah (may Allaah have mercy on him) and his madhhab. In conclusion, the Muslim cannot but acknowledge the status and position of these imams, but that should not lead us to give precedence to their views over the Book of Allaah and the saheeh reports from the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), because in principle we should follow the Qur’aan and Sunnah and not the opinions of men; any man’s opinion may be taken or left, except the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him),as Imam Maalik (may Allaah have mercy on him) said.
He is treating the taqwa fearing statements of the Salaf (4 Imams) as weaknesses that he can rectify – effectively labeling these pious predecessors as “any man” (i.e. any man’s opinion). This allows him to state that the "opinions of men" (the Salf-i-Saliheen) weren't necessarily always according to the Qur'an and Sunnah. This basically suggests that he (a man of 1400s) is comparing himself as an equal and even better to the Salf-i-Saliheen – the Best of Generations. Hence the psuedo-Salafi belief: "They were men and we are men".

This is extremely misleading. And nowhere does he explicitly mention that we are to accept his opinion (make taqleed of him) over that of the Salf-i-Saliheen.

Additionally, he is subtly accusing adherents of the Madhaaib of misguidance - implying that they are prone to take the words of men over the Qur'an and Sunnah.

As I mentioned above, people are free to follow what they see fit. However, misinformation has to be highlighted.

For a comprehensive picture of this reality, it is highly advised that we receive our guidance on the Madhaaib from actual expert adherents of the respective Madhaaib.
Reply

startingarabic
06-02-2016, 05:53 PM
I am not willing to change the text.
I have gave you the information where you can verify and correct any issues you have with the Muhammad Saalih Al Munajjid.

https://islamqa.info/ar/
here it is in English - I don't think its him here but his team of translators
https://islamqa.info/en/

I do not have facebook or twitter but here you to get in-touch with him
https://www.facebook.com/almunajjid.en/
https://www.facebook.com/almunajjid/
https://twitter.com/almunajjid_en
https://twitter.com/almonajjid?lang=ar

here is his youtube
https://www.youtube.com/user/almunajjid

This book is a hanbali fiqu book.
منهج السالكين


https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZrnPGtpcw5ryKunM-XoJGuLy1DPRsodk

Reply

startingarabic
06-02-2016, 10:39 PM
3-THE SHAAFI’EE MADH-HAB
The founder: Imaam Ash-Shaafi’ee (769-820 CE)
The full name of the scholar after whom this school of legal thought has been named was Muhammad ibn Idrees ash-Shaafi’ee. He was born in the town Ghazzah on the Mediterranean coast of what was then known as Shaam in the year 796 CE, but travelled to Madeenah in his youth to study Fiqh and Hadeeth under Imaam Maalik. He succeeded in memorizing the whole of Maalik’s book, al-Muwatta’, and recited it to him from memory, word perfect.
Ash-Shaafi’ee remained under Maalik until the latter died in 801 CE. Then he went to Yemen and taught there. He remained there until he was accused of Shi’ite leanings in the year 805 CE and brought as a prisoner before the ‘Abbaasid Caliph, Haroon arRasheed (rule 786-809 CE) in Iraq. Fortunately, he was able to prove the correctness of his beliefs and was subsequently released. AshShaafi’ee remained in Iraq and studied for a while under Imaam Muhammad ibn al-Hasan, the famous student of Abu Haneefah. Later he travelled to Egypt in order to study under Imaam Muhammad ibn al-Hasan, the famous student of Abu Haneefah. Later he travelled to Egypt in order to study under Imaam al-Layth, but by the time he reached there the Imaam had passed away. However, he was able to study the Madh-hab of al-Layth from alLayth’s students. Ash-Shaafi’ee remained in Egypt until his death in the year 820 CE during the rule of the Caliph al-Mamoon (rule 813832 CE).

Formation of the Shaafi’ee Madh-hab
Imaam ash-Shaafi’ee combined the Fiqh of Hijaaz (Maalikee thought) with that of Iraq, (Hanafee thought) and created a new Madh-hab which he dictated to his students in the form of a book called al-Hujjah (The Evidence). This dictation took place in Iraq in the year 810 CE and a number of his students memorised his book and narrated it to others. This book and period of his scholarship are usually referred to as al-Madh-hab al-Qadeem (the old school of thought) to differentiate it from the second period to his scholarship which occurred after he reached Egypt. In Egypt he absorbed the Fiqh of Imaam al-Layth ibn Sa’d and dictated al-Madh-hab alJadeed (the new school of thought) to his students in the form of another book which he named al-Umm (he Essence). Because of his exposure to a completely new set of Hadeeths and legal reasoning, in al-Madh-hab al-Jadeed, he reversed many of the legal positions which he had held while in Iraq. Imaam ash-Shafi’ee holds the distinction of being the first Imaam to systematize the fundamental principles of Fiqh which he recorded in his book called ar-Risaalah.

Sources of Law Used by the Shaafi’ee Madh-hab
1. The Qur’aan
Ash-Shaafi’ee did not differ from the previously mentione Imaams, in their uncompromising stand in relation to the primacy of the Qur’aan among the sources of Islamic law. He relied on it as heavily as those before him adding only the new insights which he gained from a deep study of its meaning.
2. The Sunnah
Imaam ash-Shaafi’ee laid down only one condition for the acceptance of Hadeeths, namely that they be authentic (Saheeh). He rejected all the other conditions set by Imaams Abu Haneefah and Maalik. He was also noted for his great contributions to the science of Hadeeth criticism.
3. Ijmaa’
Although ash-Shaari’ee had serious doubts about the possibility of the Ijmaa’ in a number of cases, he conceded that in the few cases where it was known to have occurred, it should be regarded as the third most important source of Islamic law.
4. Individual Opinions of the Sahaabah
Credence was given by Imaam ash-Shaafi’ee to the individual opinions of the Sahaabah on condition that they were not at variance with each other. If there were conflicting opinions among the Sahaabah on a legal point, he like Abu Haneefah, would choose whichever opinion was the closest to the source and leave the rest.
5. Qiyaas
Qiyaas was, in the Imaam’s opinion, a valid method for deducing further laws from the previous sources. However, he placed it last in order of importance, considering his personal opinions inferior to proofs based on the opinions of the companions.
6. Istis-haab (Linking)
Both the principle Istihsaan used by Abu Haneefah and Istislaah used by Maalik were rejected by ash-Shaafi’ee and considered a form of Bid’ah (innovation), since, in his opinion, they were based mostly on human reasoning in areas where revealed laws already existed. However, in dealing with similar issues ashShaafi’ee was obliged to use a principle similar to Istihsaan and Istislaah which he called istis-haab. Istis-haab literally means seeking a link, but legally it refers to the process of deducing Fiqh laws by linking a later set of circumstances with an earlier set. It is based on the assumption that the Fiqh laws applicable to certain conditions remain valid so long as it is not certain that these conditions have altered. If, for example, on account of the long absence of someone, it is doubtful whether he is alive or dead, then by Istis-haab all rules must remain in force that would hold if one knew for certain that he was still alive.

Main students of Shaafi’ee Madh-hab
The most important of Imaam ash-Shaafi’ee’s students who continued to follow his school of thought were: al-Muzanee, arRabee’ and Yoosuf ibn Yahyaa.
Al-Muzanee (791-876 CE)
Al-Muzanee’s full name was Imaa’eel ibn Yahyaa alMuzanee. He was the constant companion of Imaam ash-Shaafi’ee throughtout his stay in Egypt. Al-Muzanee was noted for writing a book which comprehensively gathered the Fiqh of ash-Shaafi’ee. Later condensed under the title Mukhtasal al-Muzanee, it became the most widely read Fiqh book of the Shaafi’ee Madh-hab.
Ar-Rabee’ Al-Maraadee (790-873 CE)
Ar-Rabee’ was noted as the main narrator of ash-Shaafi’ee’s book al-Umm. He wrote it down during Imaam ash-Shaafi’ee’s lifetime along with ar-Rasaalah and other books.
Yoosuf ibn Yahyaa al-Buwaytee
Yoosuf ibn Yahyaa succeeded ash-Shaafi’ee as the main teacher of the Madh-hab. He was imprisoned and tortured to death in Baghdad because he rejected the officially sanctioned Mu’tazilite philosophy on the creation of the Qur’aan.
Followers of the Shafafi’ee Madh-hab
The majority of the followers of the Shaafi’ee Madh-hab are now to be found in Egypt, Southern Arabia, (Yemen, Hadramout), Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, and East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania) and Surinam in South America.
http://carryonummah.blogspot.co.uk/2...-madh-hab.html

Reply

startingarabic
06-03-2016, 09:04 PM
4- The Hambalee MADH-HAB
The Founder: Imaam Ahmad (778-855 CE)
The scholar to whom this Madh-hab is attributed is Ahmad ibn Hambal ash-Shaybaanee, who was born in Baghdad in the year 778 CE. He became one of the greatest memorizers and narrators of Hadeeth of his time. Concentrating on the study of Hadeeth, Ahmad studied Fiqh and Hadeeth science under Imaam Abu Yoosuf, the famous student of Abu Haneefah, as well as under Imaam ashShaafi’ee himself. Imaam Ahmad went through a series of persecutions under the caliphs of his time due to their adoption of Mu’tazilite philosophy. He was jailed and beaten for two years by order of Caliph al-Ma’moon (rule 813-842 CE), because of his rejection of the philosophical concept that the Qur’aan was created. Later set free, he continued teaching in Baghdad until al-Waathiq became caliph (rule 842-846 CE) and renewed the persecution. Thereupon, Imaam Ahmad stopped teaching and went into hiding for five years until Caliph al-Mutawakkil (847-862 CE) took over. Caliph al-Mutawakkil ended the inquisition permanently by expelling the Mu’tazilite scholars and officially rejecting their philosophy. Ahmad continued to teach in Baghdad until he died in the year 855 CE.

Formation of the Hamblee Madh-hab
Imaam Ahmad’s greatest concern was the collection, narration, and interpretation of Hadeeth. His teaching method consisted of dictating Hadeeths from his vast collection known as alMusnad, which contained over 30,000 Hadeeths, as well as the various opinions of the Sahaabah concerning their interpretation. He would then apply the Hadeeths or rulings to various existing problems. If he could not find a suitable Hadeeth or opinion to solve a problem, he would offer his own opinion while forbidding his students to record any of his own solutions. As a result, his Madhhab was recorded, not by his students but by their students.

Sources of Law Used by the Hambalee Madh-hab
1. The Qur’aan
There was no difference between the way Ahmad ibn Hambal approached Qur’aan and that of those who preceded him. In other words, the Qur’aan was given precedence over all else under all circumstances.
2. The Sunnah
Likewise, the Sunnah of the Prophet (s.w.) occupied the number two position among the fundamental principles used by the founder of this school in the deduction of laws. His only stipulation was that it be Marfoo’, i.e. attributed directly to the Prophet (s.w.).
3. Ijmaa’ of the Sahaabah
Imaam Ahmad recognized the consensus of opinion of the Sahaabah, and placed it in the third position among the fundamental principles. However, he discredited the claims of Ijmaa’ out side the era of the Sahaabah as being inaccurate, due to the vast number of scholars and their wide diffusion throughout the Muslim empire. In his opinion Ijmaa’ after the era of the Sahaabah was impossible.
4. Individual Opinions of the Sahaabah
If a problem arose in an area where the Shaabah had expressed conflicting opinions, Ahmad, like Maalik, would give credence to all the various individual opinions. Because of that, there developed within the Madh-hab many instances of multiple rulings for individual issues.
5. Hadeeth Da’eef (Weak Hadeeth)
For a ruling on a case where none of the previous four principes offered a ready solution, the Imaam used to prefer to use a weak Hadeeth rather than applying his own deductive reasoning (Qiyaas). However, this was on condition that the weakness of the Hadeeth was not due to the fact that one of its narrators was classified as a Faasiq (degenerate), as a Kadh-dhaab (liar).
6. Qiyaas
As a last resort, that is when no other major principle could be directly applied, Ahmad would reluctantly apply the principle of Qiyaas and deduce a solution based on one or more of the previous principles.

Main Students of the Hambalee Madh-hab
Imaam Ahmad’s main students were his own two sons, Saalih (died 873 CE) and ‘Abdullaah (died 903 CE). Imaam Bukhaaree and Muslim, compilers of the most outstanding collections of Hadeeth, were among the great scholars of Hadeeth who studied under Imaam Ahmad.

Followers of the Hambalee Madh-hab
The majority of the followers of this Madh-hab can now be found in Palestine and Saudi Arabia. Its survival in Saudi Arabia, after almost completely dying out elsewhere in the Muslim world, is due to the fact that the founder of the so called Wahhab, had studied under scholars of the Hambalee Madh-hab, and thus it unofficially became the Fiqh Madh-hab of the movement. When ‘abdul- ‘Azeez ibn Sa’oud captured most of the Arabian peninsula and established the Saudi dynasty, he made the Hambalee Madh-hab the basis of the kingdom’s legal system.
Reply

startingarabic
06-04-2016, 05:44 PM
Summary: of some of our 4 Imams saying (most of these have already been listed):
1) Abu Haneefah (rahimahullaah)
In one narration, "It is prohibited for someone who does not know my evidence to give verdicts on the basis of my words."

2) Maalik ibn Anas (rahimahullaah)
2. "Everyone after the Prophet (sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam) will have his sayings accepted and rejected - not so the Prophet (sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam)."

3) Shaafi'i (rahimahullaah)
4. "When a hadeeth is found to be saheeh, then that is my madhhab."
8. "For everything I say, if there is something authentic from the Prophet (sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam) contrary to my saying, then the hadeeth of the Prophet (sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam)

4) Ahmad ibn Hanbal (rahimahullaah)
1. "Do not follow my opinion; neither follow the opinion of Maalik, nor Shaafi'i, nor Awzaa'i, nor Thawri, but take from where they took."
3. "Whoever rejects a statement of the Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu 'alaihi wa sallam) is on the brink of destruction."
indepth
http://carryonummah.blogspot.co.uk/2...following.html
Reply

najimuddin
06-04-2016, 06:02 PM
For a further perspective on this issue, interested readers are requested to view the posts I have made in this thread.
Reply

startingarabic
06-05-2016, 09:59 AM
Here is my hanafi book collection, it in 3 levels. Beginners (which only covers topics of worship mainly, level 2 cover basic student level and level 3 which is very in-depth. As you can see its only in Arabic But [T] indicates that the book has been translated. There are other hanafi books but I like the Azhari study program recommendations. There are a few other hanafi fiqh books but I keep books that are not in Arabic separate. When I have some time I will load these books for you to download and study.
black indicates the text.
purple indicates the explanation of the Text/book.

https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resi...nt=file%2cdocx
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