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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-24-2016, 06:50 PM
Some members requested that - since the recipes and pictures of various foods which I posted look so tantalising and they don't want those precious pictures/recipes being lost (because they're eager to try it out and taste it) - I should post them here instead.
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Aaqib
08-24-2016, 06:53 PM
Go!!!
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Umm Abed
08-24-2016, 07:00 PM
The thread is even called 'all good food' :skeleton:
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noraina
08-24-2016, 07:45 PM
Can't wait for brother Huzaifah's strange and wonderful recipes, lol.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-24-2016, 11:12 PM
How to eat a Smiley:





Grinning. (That's why it's called a "Smiley".)


Some eyes for dessert:



Eye-Pudding.
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Regrets1
08-24-2016, 11:19 PM
Oh man.. :Emoji60: :Emoji38:
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Aaqib
08-24-2016, 11:21 PM
XD lol I love the reactions
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Aaqib
08-24-2016, 11:22 PM
My mom is disgusted by this xD
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-24-2016, 11:26 PM
RECIPE Deer eyeball Tempura
For the dipping sauce:
1/2 cup vegetable stock
4 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp sweet chili sauce
2 tbsp dry sherry
1 inch ginger root, grated
Sprigs of cilantro, to garnish
For the tempura:
Vegetable oil
4 tbsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp salt
3 large egg whites
1 lb mixed vegetables; spinach leaves, halved mushrooms, sliced sweet potato, squash, eggplant, red pepper
deer eyes fresh and cleaned
To make the dipping sauce place the stock, soy sauce, chili sauce, sherry, and ginger in a large pan and bring to a boil. Simmer for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat 1 1/2 inches of oil in a wok.

Mix together the cornstarch and salt. Whisk together the egg whites and 4 tbsp of very cold water until light and frothy. Dust the vegetable pieces and eyes with the cornstarch, then dip in the frothy egg; deep-fry in batches for 4 minutes until golden.

Drain on paper towels.

Pour the sauce into small bowls.

Pile the vegetables onto serving plates and serve with the dipping sauce.

-----------------------

An Unusual Recipe from Colombia: Cow’s Eye Soup


Teach English as a Foreign Language Abroad

One of the benefits of teaching English as a foreign language abroad or living abroad in general, is the ability to prepare or at least try out some unusual recipes and foreign dishes you might never experience at home. Why else would one venture thousands of miles from home, brave storms, earthquakes, the elements and lord-only-knows-what else to teach English as a foreign language abroad? Okay, maybe for love (more than one English language teacher has married a foreign national or a stent), money or experience in one way or another. Nonetheless, you’ll still need to eat though, right?

Not in Colombia? How to Get Cow’s Eyes

First, truck your bunnies over to your local butcher and request from two to four cow’s eyes. I seriously doubt your supermarket ever carries them but a good butcher can get them for you if they are not readily available at a farmer’s market.

From these Colombian cooks can whip up a savory stew or soup dish for an unforgettable lunch.

Here’s a recipe on how you might go about it yourself:

Colombian Recipe for Cow’s Eye Soup

First, rinse the fresh cow’s eyes under running cold water

Then, place them in a pot or pressure cooker with lightly salted water

Next, add chopped onion, oregano and spices or your preferred spice bundle to taste as desired

After that, pressure cook for about 30 minutes or until the eyes are well softened

Finally, take out the cooked cow’s eyes when done

Colombia: Cow’s Eye Soup Stock Recipe

Add two or three diced yellow potatoes, two large white potatoes, one grated or chopped carrot and fined minced or grated arracacha to the cow’s eye liquid stock
Add in a coarsely diced Yucca as well, if available
Simmer the stock for about twenty more minutes or until vegetables are cooked and soft.

In a Separate Pan

In a separate pan, sautee together a small chopped onion, a whole scallion, 2 cloves of crushed garlic and a large chopped or grated tomato in a little oil until softened

Now dice the cooked cow’s eyes and add these to the sautéed mixture
Sautee for an additional few minutes until flavors are melded together
Everything should now be ready to serve

The final dish is often served with white rice, freshly made fruit juice and the enriched cow’s eye stock in a bowl on the side.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-24-2016, 11:28 PM


Chicken Biltong.

Tastes very nice.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-24-2016, 11:31 PM
The Gatsby:



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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-24-2016, 11:36 PM
Whole Lamb Roasted on a Spit:







Looks more like a dinosaur than a lamb.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 05:20 AM
It doesnt get any better, isnt there somewhere you can hide this thread?:nervous::hiding::Emoji58:
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 05:21 AM
Originally Posted by noraina
Can't wait for brother Huzaifah's strange and wonderful recipes, lol.
There you have it!

Ready to taste?;D
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noraina
08-25-2016, 09:38 AM
Eyeball pudding? Like is that for real?

The only one I would be ready to taste is the Gatsby.

I've just discovered a side of the human appetite I'd rather not know. :D
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naveedsubhani
08-25-2016, 12:47 PM
Try to post much better than previous
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:26 PM
Originally Posted by naveedsubhani
Try to post much better than previous
It wil not get any better, brother, this thread is meant for this type of stuff:facepalm:
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:35 PM
Originally Posted by naveedsubhani
Try to post much better than previous
It's for people with big hearts.

Which reminds me:
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:37 PM
Heart Roast

May 21, 2012 in Categories: AIP, AIP Recipes, Main Dishes by ThePaleoMom

This method of cooking heart meat was inspired by a quick internet search looking for cooking temperatures for rump roast. It suddenly occurred to me that this might be a good way to cook heart, since it also can be fairly tough. Well, it was an epiphany. The roast was tender with an amazing flavorful (that rich steaky flavor that heart meat should have and not that almost liver-like flavor that it can have at times). My 2.5 year old even snuck around the table and ate all of my 5-year old’s meat when she wasn’t looking! Good thing there was more! This will likely become a weekly staple in our house from now on. Heart is definitely my favorite organ meat. I buy mine from a local farmer, but both US Wellness Meats and GrassFed Traditions sells them. The heart I used was on the small side for a beef heart, but I am confident that this would work up to about a 3-4 pound heart size. If the heart you want to roast is on the 4-6 pound side, I think you can make this even more simply by putting the roast in a pan (make sure it’s one that can handle high temperature cooking) and putting it into a 500F oven for 20 minutes. Then reduce the temperature to 275F (open the door so the oven cools down to 275 quickly), add the onion, cabbage and broth to the pan and cook for 20 minutes per pound for rare (I have done this successfully with a 4 1/2 pound roast). This would work beautifully with lamb heart as well.

Ingredients:



1. Trim any vessels or tough sliverskin off the heart meat. This is easiest with a very sharp boning knife. Hearts are typically cut open already (part of the USDA inspection before you can buy it). If not completely open, finish the cut so the meat can lie flat.
2. Prepare some lengths of butcher twine. You’ll want 1 to go the length of the heart and then 1 per inch around the width of the heart.
3. Coast the inside of the heart with crushed garlic, salt and pepper. Roll the heart up into a roast shape with the seasonings on the inside (I found it easier to cut the heart in half lengthwise, and rotate one half around so that my roast didn’t have a fat side and a skinny side). Tie the lengthwise truss first. Then start tying the widthwise trusses every inch or so down the length of the heart, tucking in any bits as you go. This does take some practice, so don’t worry if it’s not perfect your first time (plus you can always cut a truss and redo it if you need to). When your heart is trussed, sprinkle more salt and pepper around the outside.
4. Slice onion into ¼” thick semicircles. Preheat oven to 275F.
5. Heat an oven-safe skillet, roasting pan or shallow pot over medium-high heat (I used a cast iron frying pan). Add tallow to the pan.
6. Place heart in pan and sear on each side, rotating every minute or slightly less with tongs until all sides browned. Once browned, remove from the pan and set aside.
7. Add onion to the frying pan and cook, stirring frequently, until starting to brown, about 5 minutes. Add cabbage to pan and stir, until wilted, about 1 minute.
8. Pour broth into the pan. Lay the roast on top of the cabbage and onion. Place in the oven and bake for 20 minutes per pound for rare (25 minutes per pound for medium-rare).
9. Remove from the oven and let rest 10 minutes. Remove the trusses, slice and enjoy! Serve with cabbage and onions. Also, the broth from the pan can be thickened to make gravy or poured au jus style over mashed cauliflower or turnips.


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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:38 PM
How to Cook Lamb Heart

by MICHELLE KERNS How to Cook Lamb Heart Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaOrgan meats like hearts are some of the most underrated cuts available, notes cookbook author and "The New York Times" columnist Mark Bittman. A February 1993 article in "The Independent" supports this fact, noting that lamb heart is inexpensive, economical and easy to prepare. It is also rich in protein and essential vitamins and minerals like vitamin B-12, iron, copper, selenium, zinc and riboflavin. Use a low-fat method like broiling to prepare lamb heart and consume it only occasionally and in moderation, especially if you have high cholesterol or heart disease, as a 3-ounce serving of cooked lamb heart is high in saturated fat and cholesterol.
Step 1

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaUse kitchen scissors or a sharp knife to remove as much fat and connective tissue from the surface of the lamb heart as possible. Rinse the heart and place it in a bowl of cold water mixed with a pinch of salt.

Step 2

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaPreheat the broiler. Lightly coat a broiler pan with non-stick cooking spray.


Step 3

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaRemove the lamb heart from the salted water and gently pat it dry with paper towels. Place it on the prepared broiler pan.
Step 4

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaBrush the lamb heart lightly with a 50-50 mixture of olive oil and your choice of vinegar. Season it with salt and pepper.
Step 5

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaArrange the broiler pan so that the lamb heart is 3 to 4 inches from the heating element. Broil, allowing about 3 minutes for a heart that weighs approximately 4 ounces raw.
Step 6

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaTurn the lamb heart over with a pancake turner. Baste with the oil and vinegar mixture and broil for an equal amount of time as the initial side.
Step 7

Photo Credit Santy Gibson/Demand MediaUse a meat thermometer to ensure that the lamb heart has reached an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove the lamb heart from the broiler pan and allow it to rest for at least 3 minutes before serving.
Warnings

  • Avoid cooking lamb heart too long, says Bittman. The meat is best served medium-rare.

Tips

  • A cooked lamb heart yields one serving. If you're cooking for a group, plan on one lamb heart per person.

Things You'll Need

  • Kitchen scissors or sharp knife
  • Cutting board
  • Lamb heart
  • Large bowl
  • Salt
  • Broiler pan
  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • Paper towels
  • Pastry brush
  • Olive oil
  • Vinegar, any type
  • Pepper
  • Pancake turner
  • Meat thermometer
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:39 PM
Hearty food.

Heart warming.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:40 PM
For people with big hearts, noraina, are you willing to try, since you 'liked' the eyeball one:D
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:44 PM
It just gets more graphic by the day+o(

Ever ate heart, brother Huzaifah?
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:44 PM
It's on my to-do list.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:48 PM
I've eaten the other parts, like liver, kidneys, tongue, trotters, tripe, etc.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:49 PM
Ox tongue is quite big.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:49 PM
Chicken livers are nice, fried in ghee, with salt and pepper.
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Regrets1
08-25-2016, 01:50 PM
:facepalm: brother u really do eat such food?? I mean reallyyy??? :o
Tongue?? WOW...
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:50 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Ox tongue is quite big.
No thanks, I prefer oxtail.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:51 PM
I'm certain a Dhabb would also be nice when fried in ghee, with salt and pepper.
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 01:52 PM
@Umm Abed Couldn't resist following this thread too hey[emoji14] [emoji13] [emoji38]
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:52 PM
Originally Posted by Regrets1
:facepalm: brother u really do eat such food?? I mean reallyyy??? :o
Tongue?? WOW...
Indeed I have. The regular chops, cutlets, ribs, wors, etc. is much nicer, though.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:52 PM
Originally Posted by Regrets1
:facepalm: brother u really do eat such food?? I mean reallyyy??? :o
Tongue?? WOW...
I dont think so,:heated:
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 01:53 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Indeed I have. The regular chops, cutlets, ribs, wors, etc. is much nicer, though.
Does the tongue taste like liver?
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 01:54 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
@Umm Abed Couldn't resist following this thread too hey[emoji14] [emoji13] [emoji38]
Just wanted to see how far it gets, but, Im not liking any of those.:skeleton:
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:55 PM
I need to roast a whole lamb over a braai, then I can try out everything one time.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 01:55 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Does the tongue taste like liver?
No, it has a...unique taste.

It's very slimy, though.
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 01:58 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
I need to roast a whole lamb over a braai, then I can try out everything one time.
The heat probably has to be medium to low or else you might end up with a raw heart or brain[emoji23]
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 02:00 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Just wanted to see how far it gets, but, Im not liking any of those.:skeleton:
I wouldn't try it out either but generally I am a fussy eater. I don't eat spinach, green beans etc. So I eat what I prefer and leave what I don't. [emoji85]
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:03 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
I wouldn't try it out either but generally I am a fussy eater. I don't eat spinach, green beans etc. So I eat what I prefer and leave what I don't. [emoji85]
You dont eat such nice veggies I think I eat almost all vegetables even though I myself am a very fussy eater lol, its good for you.:p
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:04 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
I need to roast a whole lamb over a braai, then I can try out everything one time.
With out the head I guess.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:05 PM
No! The head must be on. It's a must.

The whole lamb is incomplete without the Smiley.

And the brain inside.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:08 PM
Oh no, I think I had enough for the day:phew.
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 02:09 PM
When I was young, in school I was called 'smiley' if not 'Jackie Chan' [emoji28]
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:12 PM
We should do a research on what makes people want to eat strange foods lol.

Smileys took a new meaning, zahraa:D
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 02:16 PM
Hehe it surely did and I've left behind that nickname too. Fortunately!
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:29 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
When I was young, in school I was called 'smiley' if not 'Jackie Chan' [emoji28]
How come?
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:31 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
We should do a research on what makes people want to eat strange foods lol.
It's like, eating the whole animal up. Not wasting anything.

Like, eating an entire apple. Not leaving the core behind or anything. That's what I always do (eat up the entire apple: core, seeds and everything), but apparently doing so is unhealthy. I don't know how that is.
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noraina
08-25-2016, 02:31 PM
@Umm Abed , sis, I'm not sure if I'd rather eat an eyeball or a heart or a brain or a smiley...I had some chips for lunch, I'm happy with potatoes and veggies.

And speaking of smilies, I can't even use one like this :) now without having some graphic pictures come to mind, I don't think I can ever look at them the same way now, lol.
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noraina
08-25-2016, 02:34 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
No, it has a...unique taste.

It's very slimy, though
Oh yes, slimy tongues. Why am I not surprised by that?
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:34 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
@Umm Abed, sis, I'm not sure if I'd rather eat an eyeball or a heart or a brain or a smiley...I had some chips for lunch, I'm happy with potatoes and veggies.

And speaking of smilies, I can't even use one like this :) now without having some graphic pictures come to mind, I don't think I can ever look at them the same way now, lol.
You can take it step-by-step: First eat chops, cutlets, ribs, wors, legs, etc. Then move on to trotters. Then move on to liver, kidneys, tripe, etc. Then move on to tongue. Then move on to Smileys. Then to brains. And then lastly, you can go for the eyeballs if you like.

A gradual process.

One thing at a time.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:36 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
@Umm Abed, sis, I'm not sure if I'd rather eat an eyeball or a heart or a brain or a smiley...I had some chips for lunch, I'm happy with potatoes and veggies.

And speaking of smilies, I can't even use one like this :) now without having some graphic pictures come to mind, I don't think I can ever look at them the same way now, lol.
Me too, sis, Im not brave enough to taste any of those, not that they look appetizing in the least even when presented cooked, dw about the smileys lol, you'l forget it soon:D.
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 02:38 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
How come?
"Smiley" because my surname is Ismail and most people pronounce it as 'e-smile'
"Jackie Chan" because I had a bit of Chinese-looking eyes and pitch black hair.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:39 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
It's like, eating the whole animal up. Not wasting anything.

Like, eating an entire apple. Not leaving the core behind or anything. That's what I always do (eat up the entire apple: core, seeds and everything), but apparently doing so is unhealthy. I don't know how that is.
Now who eats a core and seeds of an apple, btw, I think apple seeds are poisonous hence the bitterness, so its not good for you after all.


Another strange food is sushi. Its made out of raw fish, if Im not mistaken..
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:39 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
you'l forget it soon:D.



(Just helping to cement the image.)
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:41 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
"Smiley" because my surname is Ismail and most people pronounce it as 'e-smile'
"Jackie Chan" because I had a bit of Chinese-looking eyes and pitch black hair.
They should have used someone else's name besides Jackie Chan. Anyone else.
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noraina
08-25-2016, 02:42 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
You can take it step-by-step: First eat chops, cutlets, ribs, wors, legs, etc. Then move on to trotters. Then move on to liver, kidneys, tripe, etc. Then move on to tongue. Then move on to Smileys. Then to brains. And then lastly, you can go for the eyeballs if you like.

A gradual process.
Did I mention I have a little flock of chickens? Over the years I have hatched eggs in incubators, fed them, given them medication, even done minor medical procedures, let them live until old age....

I have a vivid imagination, I think if I ate a brain I'd think of all the memories in it, or all of the sights the eyeball has seen, or all of the feelings that little heart has felt, or all the places those feet walked over. I don't think any amount of persuasion will work on me akhi.

But tell us how a heart and eyeball tastes, we'll wait for your reviews inshaAllah.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:43 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Now who eats a core and seeds of an apple, btw, I think apple seeds are poisonous hence the bitterness, so its not good for you after all.


Another strange food is sushi. Its made out of raw fish, if Im not mistaken..
Raw fish eaten with wasabi sauce.
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 02:43 PM
@Huzaifah ibn Adam
Does your family have the same interest as yourself in eating such foods?
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:44 PM
There, noraina:o,

trying to forget smileys is a lost cause+o(
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 02:46 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
They should have used someone else's name besides Jackie Chan. Anyone else.
They shouldn't have teased me at all! I didn't know what "Jackie Chan" was until the last year of my school!
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noraina
08-25-2016, 02:47 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam



(Just helping to cement the image.)
That's not a nice thing to do to your sisters, lol.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:49 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Did I mention I have a little flock of chickens? Over the years I have hatched eggs in incubators, fed them, given them medication, even done minor medical procedures, let them live until old age....

I have a vivid imagination, I think if I ate a brain I'd think of all the memories in it, or all of the sights the eyeball has seen, or all of the feelings that little heart has felt, or all the places those feet walked over. I don't think any amount of persuasion will work on me akhi.

But tell us how a heart and eyeball tastes, we'll wait for your reviews inshaAllah.

Some people believe that if you eat eyes, your eyesight will improve. Likewise if you eat brains, your brains will improve. And stomach, from eating tripe. They believe you absorb the powers from the animal you've eaten.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:51 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
@Huzaifah ibn Adam
Does your family have the same interest as yourself in eating such foods?
No. I've worked in the fields of slaughtering, skinning animals, selling meat products, etc., so maybe that's why.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:51 PM
Eating trotters could help with bones, ...not sure about the other stuff..
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noraina
08-25-2016, 02:52 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
They shouldn't have teased me at all! I didn't know what "Jackie Chan" was until the last year of my school!
Honestly, I don't know what kids take joy our of spiting others, it's usually out of jealousy.

I find especially with the 'fancy' Arabic names we have, we get teased a lot at school for them. Too many times I was humiliated when the teacher forgot how to pronounce my name.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:52 PM
Generally, the kind of people who've worked in a butchery will eat any kind of meat.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:55 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Eating trotters could help with bones, ...not sure about the other stuff..
That's a good idea.

I usually clean the trotters and tripe myself, because it's difficult to find someone who'll do it.
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noraina
08-25-2016, 02:55 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Some people believe that if you eat eyes, your eyesight will improve. Likewise if you eat brains, your brains will improve. And stomach, from eating tripe. They believe you absorb the powers from the animal you've eaten.
I can't think if I'd want the kind of powers a cow or chicken has.

Maybe a lizard.....
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 02:56 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
I can't think if I'd want the kind of powers a cow or chicken has.

Maybe a lizard.....
There's always the Dhabb.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:57 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
That's a good idea.

I usually clean the trotters and tripe myself, because it's difficult to find someone who'll do it.
I actually like both.

Cleaning is a task, though.
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Umm Abed
08-25-2016, 02:58 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
I can't think if I'd want the kind of powers a cow or chicken has.

Maybe a lizard.....
It has to be chicken. Your chickens will be thankful for that;D
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noraina
08-25-2016, 03:01 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
It has to be chicken. Your chickens will be thankful for that;D
I've been trying to think of what chicken powers I'd want.

I mean my chickens are such a heavy breed they can't even fly. :D

They have a third eyelid, but what would I do with that? Except creep people out, lol.
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 03:03 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
I've been trying to think of what chicken powers I'd want.

I mean my chickens are such a heavy breed they can't even fly. :D

They have a third eyelid, but what would I do with that? Except creep people out, lol.
You are part of the best creation.. No need for any of those[emoji2]
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noraina
08-25-2016, 03:06 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
You are part of the best creation.. No need for any of those[emoji2]
Alhamdulillah sis, what greater honour is there than being a human, and a Muslim? :)
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 03:07 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Honestly, I don't know what kids take joy our of spiting others, it's usually out of jealousy.

I find especially with the 'fancy' Arabic names we have, we get teased a lot at school for them. Too many times I was humiliated when the teacher forgot how to pronounce my name.
Small things amuse small minds. Insha Allah I will instil in my children that they should never hurt others by teasing them about that which they have no control over or about anything for that matter. [emoji4]
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Regrets1
08-25-2016, 03:09 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
There's always the Dhabb.
Never knew we can eat dhab..I mean not like I want to. I only have fish, chicken and lamb meat loll the rest just "looks haram" :embarrass
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زهراء
08-25-2016, 03:12 PM
Thinking about these types of "unusual" foods- We don't eat it because we have a choice. If people in severe poverty were given an animal they would savour every single part of it.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 03:16 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Thinking about these types of "unusual" foods- We don't eat it because we have a choice. If people in severe poverty were given an animal they would savour every single part of it.
That's very true.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 03:17 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Small things amuse small minds. Insha Allah I will instil in my children that they should never hurt others by teasing them about that which they have no control over or about anything for that matter. [emoji4]
They were jealous of you, that's why they said those things.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 03:20 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
I actually like both.

Cleaning is a task, though.
Trotters can be cleaned using a scalpel (the kind surgeons use).



I find that works fine.

A scalpel is much sharper than a knife.
Reply

aaj
08-25-2016, 03:47 PM
while there is no research or indication of any sort that you gain the powers of the organ you eat, there is a mention of characteristics of the animals we eat.

Eating brains won't give you bran power, might give you mad cow disease. how do you think they got it?

But there is a hadith that says that you take on the traits of the type of animals you eat, therefore predatory animals are forbidden to eat.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 03:55 PM
https://islamqa.info/en/126343
Reply

زهراء
08-25-2016, 04:07 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
In speaking about 'that which is cut-off while the animal is alive'- Would we not exclude the musk pouch of a deer and the musk?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 04:29 PM
Yes. Those aren't eaten.

Now that you mention it:

Musk was the perfume most used by Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم.

عن محمد بن علي قال سألت عائشة أكان رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم يتطيب قالت نعم بذكارة الطيب المسك والعنبر

Muhammad ibn `Ali narrates, "I asked `Aa'ishah رضي الله عنها, 'Did Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم use perfume?' She said, 'Yes - the manliest of perfumes: Musk and Ambergris." [Narrated in Sunan an-Nasaa'i.]
Reply

زهراء
08-25-2016, 04:41 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Yes. Those aren't eaten.

Now that you mention it:

Musk was the perfume most used by Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم.

عن محمد بن علي قال سألت عائشة أكان رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم يتطيب قالت نعم بذكارة الطيب المسك والعنبر

Muhammad ibn `Ali narrates, "I asked `Aa'ishah رضي الله عنها, 'Did Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم use perfume?' She said, 'Yes - the manliest of perfumes: Musk and Ambergris." [Narrated in Sunan an-Nasaa'i.]
Hmm doen't Sheikh Hasan bin Ali AshShuranbulaliرحمه الله mention:
? "نافجة المسك طاهرة كلمسك و أكله حلال"
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 06:54 PM
That text in Arabic is from Noor-ul-Eedhaah, and means, "The pouch containing the musk of the animal is Taahir (pure) as is the musk itself, and is permissible to eat." [Noor-ul-Eedhaah wa Najaat-ul-Arwaah, Kitaab-ut-Tahaarah.]

If it's cut off while the animal is still alive, then it will not be permissible to consume.

والله أعلم
Reply

زهراء
08-25-2016, 07:04 PM
So it can't be eaten if the animal is alive but to use it is permissible?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 11:01 PM
Yes, In Shaa Allaah.

Wallaahu A`lam.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 11:13 PM
Hadeeth Regarding the Dhabb:

عن عبد الله بن عباس عن خالد بن الوليد : أنه دخل مع رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم بيت ميمونة فأتي بضب محنوذ فأهوى إليه رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم بيده ، فقال بعض النسوة أخبروا رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم بما يريد أن يأكل ، فقالوا : هو ضب يا رسول الله ، فرفع يده ، فقلت : أحرام هو يا رسول الله ؟ قال : " لا ولكن لم يكن بأرض قومي فأجدني أعافه " ، قال خالد : فاجتررته فأكلته ورسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم ينظر

Hadhrat Khaalid ibn al-Waleed رضي الله عنه narrates that he visited the house of Hadhrat Maymoonah رضي الله عنها along with Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم. A roasted Dhabb was presented. Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم stretched out his hand to eat it, but some of the women (in the house) said, "Inform Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم what it is he intends to eat." So they said, "Yaa Rasoolallaah صلى الله عليه وسلم, it is a Dhabb." So he lifted his hand (i.e. he did not partake of it). I asked, 'Is it Haraam, Yaa Rasoolallaah صلى الله عليه وسلم?' He said, 'No, but it is not from the land of my people, and I find that I would avoid it.' So I chewed it and ate it while Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم was looking on (i.e. he did not forbid it)." [Narrated in Saheeh al-Bukhaari.]
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-25-2016, 11:19 PM
Originally Posted by Regrets1
Never knew we can eat dhab..I mean not like I want to. I only have fish, chicken and lamb meat loll the rest just "looks haram" :embarrass
http://www.islamicboard.com/general/...ml#post2923234
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-27-2016, 03:59 PM
The Real "Bunny Chow":

Braai'd Rabbit with Coal Roasted Creamy Mash & Veg Skewers
(30 Nov 2012)

Braai'd Rabbit with Coal Roasted Creamy Mash & Veg Skewers

RabbitIngredients:
  • 1 butchered & portioned rabbit
  • 100g Rosemary chopped
  • 100g thyme chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves finely diced
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • salt & pepper to taste

Method:1. In a large bowl, mix together your thyme, rosemary, garlic, smoked paprika, light olive oil, salt & pepper. Taste the marinade & adjust the seasoning to your liking.
2. Rub in the marinade on the rabbit portions & leave to marinate at room temperature whilst you prepare your braai fire.
3. Once the coals are hot without flames, divide your braai into two sections with one half of it with no coals & the other packed with coals. This is great for heat control.
4. Remove your rabbit meat from the marinade with no excessive oil & sear it on the side packed with hot coals for that lovely crispy skin on the outside, colour & to seal-in the juices as well, then move them to the other half to cook slowly over indirect heat.
5. When done, place in a tray & cover with foil to keep from drying out. One has the option of brushing it with our beloved Mrs balls chutney glaze before removing from the heat for that sticky icky wild rabbit experience!!

MashIngredients:
  • 4 large potatoes
  • 125ml cream
  • 50g butter
  • 100g Green Peas

Method:1. Rub your clean potatoes with oil & sprinkle salt & pepper.
2. Wrap each potato in foil & place on the braai slightly indirectly over the coals so as to roast in the foil slowly for just about 45min to an hour whilst turning consistently.
3. When soft to the touch, let them cool off, then peel off the skin.
4. In a bowl, add your butter and mash and mix whilst gently adding cream till it’s a smooth & creamy consistency with a lovely creamy colour.
5. Season to taste & mix in your blanched green peas or add them raw to let them steam through.

Veg skewersIngredients:
  • 1 large Red onion
  • 2 red & yellow peppers
  • 2 courgettes

Method:
1. Cut your onions into quarters, peppers into bite size pieces & courgettes.
2. Slide your onion down the skewer, followed by your courgette, pepper, onion & courgette again.
3. Once you have 5 to six portions, drizzle olive oil & season lightly with salt & pepper & whack that on the braai bru till charred lightly.

Enjoy!
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-27-2016, 04:01 PM



Reply

Umm Abed
08-29-2016, 02:01 PM
The rabbit doesnt look nice on the braai or in the pot.+o(

Why do they cook it whole? It seems like the more graphic it looks the more they like it:nervous:
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 05:51 PM
It's nicer if it's cooked whole. Same like with a chicken. Chickens are nicest when roasted whole, and then you just slice off pieces and eat.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 05:52 PM
The rabbit on the braai looks like a chicken. It will probably taste like a chicken, too.

It's just that people are not used to rabbits being eaten, so when they see it, they get put off. But in places where it is eaten regularly and by everyone, no one will see it that way. They'll see braaing a rabbit exactly the same as braaing a chicken.

Some people eat pigeons as well.
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noraina
08-29-2016, 06:06 PM
I'm not sure about South Africa, but in England rabbits are very popular pets so it's hard seeing them as food.

I prefer my food to be as vague as possible about where it came from.....when it's whole like that I can imagine it jumping off the braai...
Reply

Umm Abed
08-29-2016, 06:24 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
The rabbit on the braai looks like a chicken. It will probably taste like a chicken, too.

It's just that people are not used to rabbits being eaten, so when they see it, they get put off. But in places where it is eaten regularly and by everyone, no one will see it that way. They'll see braaing a rabbit exactly the same as braaing a chicken.


Some people eat pigeons as well.
Why whole? I dont like the looks of it, rather cut it up, its even easier to serve that way. I dont even like whole roasted chicken, prefer it in portions. The further it looks from its real shape the better, otherwise it is unpalatable.+o(

Rabbit must be as delicate as chicken. Pigeon must be very tender meat, although Id think there's barely any meat on pigeon.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 06:25 PM
People don't generally keep rabbits as pets in South Africa. Some do, but it's not common.
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Umm Abed
08-29-2016, 06:26 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
I'm not sure about South Africa, but in England rabbits are very popular pets so it's hard seeing them as food.

I prefer my food to be as vague as possible about where it came from.....when it's whole like that I can imagine it jumping off the braai...
You do get meat rabbits farmed for eating purposes though, they're found in different countries.

Yeah I know, it must look vague lol.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 06:29 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Why whole? I dont like the looks of it, rather cut it up, its even easier to serve that way. I dont even like whole roasted chicken, prefer it in portions. The further it looks from its real shape the better, otherwise it is unpalatable.+o(

Rabbit must be as delicate as chicken. Pigeon must be very tender meat, although Id think there's barely any meat on pigeon.
It's quicker to braai it whole one time. And when cutting it up, some parts might get wasted. When it's whole, on the other hand, people can just cut off whichever piece they want. Some people like the neck. Someone else might want the head.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 06:30 PM







Fresh dates in Saudi Arabia.
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Umm Abed
08-29-2016, 06:32 PM
Head wasnt even in mind:facepalm:.


Dates looking good.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 07:38 PM








Arab Coffee.

The nicest coffee in the world. It's usually served with dates.
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Umm Abed
08-29-2016, 07:46 PM
So nice. And the crockery used makes it even more special.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 09:54 PM
Arab crockery is the nicest, in my opinion.
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Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 09:58 PM
Kabsah:




SAUDI ARABIAN KABSA {CHICKEN AND RICE**

AMANDA MOUTTAKI JULY 8, 2015 CHICKEN, GLUTEN-FREE, MAIN DISH, SAUDI ARABIA 8 COMMENTS 11632 VIEWS

Today’s post is from Aysh of WordsnNeedles. She currently lives in Saudi Arabia and shares all about her multicultural life and crafting passions on her site. Her story of learning this recipe reminded me a lot of my first experiences with Moroccan cooking. While the ingredient list and multiple steps in this kabsa recipe might look intimidating they lead to a tasty and impressive result. You can follow Aysh on her website, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Enjoy!
Hi! I am Aysh from WordsnNeedles. I am an Indian expat living in Saudi Arabia. Today, I am sharing with you Kabsa, a traditional Saudi dish. Kabsa is a chicken and rice main course dish that is popular not just in Saudi Arabia but across the Arab world.
When I first moved to Riyadh in 2005, I was just married and knew nobody there except my sister in law. Coincidently, it was Ramadan then too. We would often go to the Salam Park in the evening to break our fast and play badmintin before Iftaar. Kabsa is one of those dishes that I learnt then. This recipe that I am sharing is how my sister in law taught me and it is by far the tastiest Kabsa I have tasted.

Kabsa is made of chicken that is slowly simmered in a spicy broth of tomatoes and spices. This chicken is then removed and either fried or grilled while the broth is used to cook the rice. The result is a mouth-watering aromatic dish which smells lemony and spicy. The rice absorbs the juices from the chicken and vegetables and is moist. The chicken is cooked till just tenderness and then steamed with the rice so it is all in one with the rice when you serve it out.
This is a kind of dish that you can make when you want something special. It tastes great when it is steaming hot and usually you will find it served at most Saudi occassions. It is like the Arab version of Biryani and much similar to Mandi, a Yemeni mutton dish. Mandi is made in a vessel that is half buried like an earthen oven in the ground. Kabsa in made on a stove in the kitchen.
My family loves Kabsa. My seven year old has tried it a few times and he often remarks that he can eat it every day! Since I don’t add too much chilli, my two year old and one year old eat it too. I have found that they eat quite well actually. It is a fantastic way to sneak in the veggies.
There are quite a few variations to how Kabsa is made. Most Arab ladies have their own family recipe. This recipe that I am sharing today is how my sister in law makes it. She learnt it from a Saudi neighbour. I like the taste of fresh lemon compared to the dried lime or Lomi (as it is locally called). Lomi has a different taste and smell. I also like the chicken to be steamed with the rice rather than placed on top of a bed of rice.
Ingredients

  • 1 chicken with skin, cut into 4-8 pieces.
  • 3 cups of rice
  • 2 onions chopped finely
  • 2 fresh tomatoes blended with skin
  • 1 tsp of tomato paste
  • 1tsp garlic paste
  • 1 tsp ginger paste
  • 1 grated medium sized carrot
  • Half a lemon cut into thick slices
  • 1 tsp of coriander powder
  • 1/2 tsp of cumin powder
  • 1/2 tsp of garam masala powder(all spice)
  • 1/4 tsp of black pepper powder
  • 1/2 tsp of red chilli powder(or to taste)
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 3 cardamom pods
  • 5 black pepper
  • 5 cloves
  • A few raisins and pine nuts for garnishing
  • A cup of oil
  • 4 cups of water or more

Instructions

Please Note: The chicken will be cooked with the skin on to keep it moist. You can removed the skin before steaming with the rice. If you choose to grill or fry the chicken pieces then the skin helps give it a crispy outer layer.
You can wash and make slits in the chicken before hand. Rub in a little salt and garlic-ginger paste too. This helps the chicken absorb the juices well.

You will need to use a large pot that can accommodate the chicken pieces well.

  • Start by heating the oil in the pan. Add the whole spices (cinnamon, cardamom, black pepper and cloves) and let them splutter before you add the onions.
  • Fry the onions on medium high till they are golden.
  • Add the ginger and garlic paste and fry a little before you add the tomatoes and the powdered spices. Keep stirring and fry till the tomatoes are all mushy and the oil starts to separate.



  • Add the chicken pieces and some salt.
  • Saute the chicken on high heat till the oil separates again.
  • Add 4 cups of water and reduce heat when it starts to simmer.
  • Reduce heat and let this cook till the chicken pieces are tender.
  • Usually it takes about 15-20 minutes on medium low heat.

Wash and soak the rice while the chicken cooks.

  • Once the chicken is done, with a slotted spoon remove the chicken pieces on to a dish and cover with foil.
  • Measure the broth. For every cup of rice that you are using, you will need one and a half cup of water. If the broth is not enough then you can add some water to make it equal to what you need.



  • Start the heat again. Add the grated carrots and sliced lemon to the broth.
  • When the water starts to boil, add the drained rice to it. Check and adjust the salt.
  • Let it cook on medium high till the water reduces and it becomes difficult to stir. If you want the chicken in the rice then now is the time to add them.
  • Remove the skin first and then drop them in to the rice and stir it.
  • Close the lid tighly, reduce the heat to the lowest and let it steam for 15-20 minutes.
  • If you are not adding the chicken to the rice but would like it grilled or fried then you can proceed to steaming without the chicken.

To grill the chicken, just brush it will oil and place it in the oven for 5- 10 minutes. You can fry it hot oil too to get a golden crispy texture to it too.
Once the rice is cooked, slowly tilt the lid slightly to let the steam escape. (Be careful the steam will escape fast!)
You can fry the raisins and pinenuts in a little butter and oil in the meanwhile and pour this on the rice for garnishing. After the steam escapes, you can serve the rice with the chicken.
You can serve it as it is with a fresh salad or with a bowl of hot fresh tomato sauce (tomato and green chillies blended). Enjoy!

Reply

noraina
08-29-2016, 10:33 PM
I could just eat dates everyday, unfortunately they're very seasonal around here - you find them mainly during Ramadan.

The Arab crockery sets are just beautiful ma'sha'Allah, I'm not a coffee fan but I wouldn't mind drinking coffee from a set like that lol, although the cups are so small, maybe just two or three sips. Do you just keep on refilling it until you are done, or are you only meant to have a small amount?

Although in Arabic 'qahwa' means coffee, but in Urdu/Persian 'qahwa' means green-tea.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-29-2016, 10:52 PM
I like both Coffee and Tea equally. Both are equally nice.

When drinking with the Arabs, they'll keep filling your cup until you're done. Some prefer to keep the coffee sugarless, while others make it very sweet. Very strong and very sweet.
Reply

Umm Abed
08-30-2016, 07:04 AM
Yes both tea and coffee are equally nice but with milk and sugar added.

I notice the kabsah rice dish has very little amount of spices, as for chillie powder, very little, its more on the bland side. Not so spicy like our food.
Reply

noraina
08-30-2016, 09:31 AM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Yes both tea and coffee are equally nice but with milk and sugar added.

I notice the kabsah rice dish has very little amount of spices, as for chillie powder, very little, its more on the bland side. Not so spicy like our food.
I don't drink either tea or coffee, I've never had a taste for it.

That dish reminds me a little of Kabuli Pilaf, a classic Afghan dish made a lot in my house. It usually just has salt, cardamom powder and garam masala, but it's delicious. I actually prefer it to Biryani :D.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-30-2016, 09:34 AM
Yes. That's because Arabs generally don't go in much for spices. Unlike Indians and Pakistanis (or basically everyone from the Indian Subcontinent), they don't like hot or spicy food. It gives them heartburn. So, their foods are generally much more bland as compared to the foods of India.

To each his own, as they say.

But personally, I like all kinds of cuisine. I would not restrict myself to just one.
Reply

Umm Abed
08-30-2016, 11:02 AM
The funny thing is even when some of them Indians/Pakistanis get heartburn due to overly spiced food they still will not eat less spice its because they've become accustomed to spicy food, so spoilt, but bland is good; I like balancing it with some bland some spicy food, in that way its not too excess.

@noraina the fragrant spices I know, that goes with pulau. I like it too but it must have some potato in, but still I prefer biryani the best:D
Reply

noraina
08-30-2016, 02:36 PM
In the Indian subcontinent they love their fiery, hot flavours, I find Afghan/Arab dishes focus on quite delicate, fragrant flavours and they allow the natural flavours to come through. I can't say I prefer one to the other.

Speaking of Arabic cuisine, I want to try each one of the desserts listed here. I felt like eating the screen, lol!

http://egyptianstreets.com/2014/06/2...-this-ramadan/
Reply

Umm Abed
08-30-2016, 03:03 PM
Those pics look so yum, some of them look really difficult to make though :)
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-30-2016, 06:33 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Speaking of Arabic cuisine, I want to try each one of the desserts listed here. I felt like eating the screen, lol!

http://egyptianstreets.com/2014/06/2...-this-ramadan/
The Baklava mentioned in that website actually comes from Turkey, though. It was invented by the Turks. I've tasted it. It's quite nice. The Maamool I've tasted as well. Delicious biscuits. Also, the Layaali Lubnaan.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
08-30-2016, 09:55 PM
Ful Mudammas:





Spicy Ful Mudammas (Fava Beans) With Olive Oil and Chili Recipe
2


[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

  • YIELD:serves 3 to 4
  • ACTIVE TIME:10 minutes
  • TOTAL TIME:10 minutes
  • RATED:



Ful mudammas, stewed fava beans, is a staple dish all over the Levant. Some versions are mild-mannered and comforting. This one, loaded with olive oil, lemon, garlic, cumin, and a kick of chili flakes, is anything but. Serve it as a bean stew or mash up the beans and use it as a high octane dip.
Why this recipe works:


  • Toasting cumin seeds, then mashing them with garlic and chili flakes in a mortar and pestle releases maximum flavor.
  • Replacing some of the bean broth with olive oil makes for an intense grassy and pungent base for an abundance of spices and garlic.


INGREDIENTS


  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin seeds, freshly toasted
  • 2 teaspoons chili flakes
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 (15-ounce) cans fava beans
  • 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons lemon juice from 2 lemons, or more to taste

DIRECTIONS


  • 1.
    Put garlic cloves, cumin seeds, chili flakes, and a pinch of salt in a mortar and pestle and crush until seeds are cracked and garlic is in small, flimsy chunks. If you don't have a mortar and pestle, mince garlic very fine.
  • 2.
    Empty one can of fava beans (with liquid) into a medium saucepan; drain second can and add additional beans, garlic paste, olive oil, and tahini. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until liquid retains some brothiness but turns thick and sauce-like, about 5 minutes.
  • 3.
    Add lemon juice and salt to taste. If desired, mash one third of beans with a potato masher for a thicker stew, or mash all beans for a rich dip. Serve with additional olive oil at the table.



Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 03:14 PM
Diner food:



Burger and fries, with a "Frankie's Olde Style Cinnamon Cola - Bringing you the taste of yesteryear."
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 03:32 PM
Looking like sugar beans...maybe it is, nice.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 03:34 PM
It's actually fava beans in a spicy sauce. It's a very famous dish in Egypt. It's known as "Ful" (pronounced as "Fool").
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 03:38 PM
I actually prefer a pink milkshake with a burger, better than fizzy drinks or anything else.
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 03:41 PM
At last, my type of meal! I may try this inshaAllah.

And who can resist burgers and fries? Thank goodness I don't have too many halal takeaways where I live.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 03:44 PM
Yeah thats nice, burgers is always a fave, at least you can make your own, sis, just mix up the mince with your own spices and there you have it, easy :D
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 05:02 PM
The problem is, when you order it from a takeaway you can't see all the unhealthy ingredients they pile in which makes it delicious, but when you make them yourself you try and make it healthy and it doesn't taste as nice :p. Ignorance is bliss in this case.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 05:12 PM
Who all has tasted Root Beer?
Reply

TDWT
09-01-2016, 05:44 PM
Me, root beer is good
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 05:49 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Who all has tasted Root Beer?
Ginger beer is my fave, Im guessing that is root beer?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 05:51 PM
Root Beer contains methyl salicylate which is used in ointments (called "virsterksalf" in Afrikaans) to treat muscular pains. The story goes that in the old wars, the soldiers used to drink Root Beer because of the methyl salicylate inside of it which would provide relief for muscular aches and pains.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 05:56 PM
That makes sense...so its not ginger beer although ginger is a root.

I read it as 'virstik' lol, is that a word even,?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 05:56 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Ginger beer is my fave, Im guessing that is root beer?
No, the two are different.
Reply

TDWT
09-01-2016, 06:00 PM
both taste great
Reply

TDWT
09-01-2016, 06:00 PM
I prefer root though
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:00 PM














Root Beer has the same colour as Pepsi and Coke, whereas Ginger Beer has a greyish colour.
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 06:01 PM
I've never tried root nor ginger beer - I don't mind a strong ginger flavour tho, it's quite nice.

In my community these concepts are still alien, I can imagine the horror if the 'aunties' ever caught me drinking anything so much as called 'beer'. :D Still remember the long justifications I had to make when I let it slip I like putting apple cider vinegar on my chips.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:04 PM
I only like ginger beer, not root beer.
Reply

TDWT
09-01-2016, 06:07 PM
BOTH ARE GOOD
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:09 PM
Balsamic Vinegar is actually made from wine. That's why it's called "Wine Vinegar".
Reply

Serinity
09-01-2016, 06:12 PM
:salam:

Is it allowed / halal / permissible in Islam to oil a chicken, etc? I like sour and sweet sauce! I like sour and sweet sauce very much!!!!!!

Allah :swt: knows best.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:13 PM
Originally Posted by TDWT
BOTH ARE GOOD
Root beer is not intoxicating, right?
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:15 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
The problem is, when you order it from a takeaway you can't see all the unhealthy ingredients they pile in which makes it delicious, but when you make them yourself you try and make it healthy and it doesn't taste as nice :p. Ignorance is bliss in this case.
If you're lucky enough you may get a nice recipe for burgers on here :D
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:16 PM
According to the Hanafi Madh-hab, it is permissible to transform wine into vinegar. The Shaafi`ee and Hanbali Madhaahib say that it is not permissible. One view within the Maaliki Madh-hab is in conformity with the Hanafi Madh-hab, and another view is in conformity with the other two Madhaahib.

According to the Ahnaaf, certain things can be added to wine to transform it into vinegar. Once this has been done, it is no longer "wine". It has undergone what is known as "Tabdeel-ul-Maahiyyah". Meaning, the very nature of it has changed to something else. It no longer has anything to do with Khamr.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:18 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Root beer is not intoxicating, right?
No, it is not intoxicating.

When you make real Ginger Beer, though, it gets left to ferment. You stop the fermentation process just before it becomes actual beer. Therefore it has to be drunk without delaying for too many days, because if left too long it will turn into Khamr.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:19 PM
:jz: for that explanation, brother Huzaifah.
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:20 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
That makes sense...so its not ginger beer although ginger is a root.

I read it as 'virstik' lol, is that a word even,?
virsterksalf!
Lol it is not said like "virstik"..Say" fir-stare-r-k-saa-lf"[emoji6] [emoji13]
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:20 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
No, it is not intoxicating.

When you make real Ginger Beer, though, it gets left to ferment. You stop the fermentation process just before it becomes actual beer. Therefore it has to be drunk without delaying for two many days, because if left too long it will turn into Khamr.
Hmm, interesting.

Im assuming ginger beer will not ferment if left to stand in the fridge in the making process. In that way it will not 'ferment'. Is it true?
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:21 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
virsterksalf!
Lol it is not said like "virstik"..Say" fir-stare-r-k-saa-lf"[emoji6] [emoji13]
Haha, that was indeed funny :D
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:24 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
virsterksalf!
Lol it is not said like "virstik"..Say" fir-stare-r-k-saa-lf"[emoji6] [emoji13]
Yes, there's an emphasis on the Rs.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:29 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Hmm, interesting.

Im assuming ginger beer will not ferment if left to stand in the fridge in the making process. In that way it will not 'ferment'. Is it true?
It continues to ferment in the fridge, just slower.

It's not advised to leave the "real" Ginger Beer in glass bottles, because there is a high risk of it exploding due to the pressure inside building up. Not plastic either. Wood is best. Like this:





Nothing better than a keg when it comes to storing Ginger Beer.
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:31 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Yes, there's an emphasis on the Rs.
Meaning?
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 06:31 PM
Exploding? Like properly?
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:34 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Exploding? Like properly?
It would be similar to shaking a bottle of pepsi and then opening it right after that
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:36 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Meaning?
The Rs are pronounced, in other words. Like for example, in English, you don't pronounce the "R" in "other". The "R" in "Strong" is pronounced, though.

So in "ViRsteRksalf", each of the Rs are properly pronounced.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:37 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Meaning?
Like, RRRRRrrroar;D
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:37 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Exploding? Like properly?
Yes, because of the buildup of pressure.
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 06:38 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
It would be similar to shaking a bottle of pepsi and then opening it right after that
Oh, I had a more dramatic image in mind of shattering glass, lol ;)
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:38 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Like, RRRRRrrroar;D
Not unless one is a lion[emoji13]
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:39 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Oh, I had a more dramatic image in mind of shattering glass, lol ;)
Thats true:/ it can happen and has happened before:p
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:40 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
The Rs are pronounced, in other words. Like for example, in English, you don't pronounce the "R" in "other". The "R" in "Strong" is pronounced, though.

So in "ViRsteRksalf", each of the Rs are properly pronounced.
Ohh yes..I read it as R-S and since they appear next to each other in that word, I didn't quite understand how it was to be emphasised [emoji85]
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:41 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Oh, I had a more dramatic image in mind of shattering glass, lol ;)
Don't think you would appreciate that in your fridge[emoji38]
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 06:42 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Thats true:/ it can happen and has happened before:p
Like putting an egg in the microwave....or setting a tea cloth on fire...or dropping an entire packet of flour.

All the explosions I have caused in the kitchen, no wonder my mum doesn't quite trust me there alone. :skeleton:
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:43 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Don't think you would appreciate that in your fridge[emoji38]
Less likely to happen if kept in the fridge:Emoji49:
Reply

Umm Abed
09-01-2016, 06:46 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Like putting an egg in the microwave....or setting a tea cloth on fire...or dropping an entire packet of flour.

All the explosions I have caused in the kitchen, no wonder my mum doesn't quite trust me there alone. :skeleton:
I hope its not a plan to stay out of the kitchen lol! joking:p
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:47 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Like putting an egg in the microwave....or setting a tea cloth on fire...or dropping an entire packet of flour.

All the explosions I have caused in the kitchen, no wonder my mum doesn't quite trust me there alone. :skeleton:
Speaking about eggs. My little brother(he's about 8 years old) wanted to fry his own egg. After a while, I heard a splutter. So I asked him if everything was okay and he just shook his head. Meanwhile, the entire egg was on the stove plate.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:47 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
Oh, I had a more dramatic image in mind of shattering glass, lol ;)
Yes, that is what can happen. The glass bottle itself can explode. That's why people are warned not to use glass bottles when making Ginger Beer.
Reply

زهراء
09-01-2016, 06:50 PM
I've never liked the taste of Ginger Beer or any fizzy drink for some reason. It has too much of gas.
Reply

noraina
09-01-2016, 06:53 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
I've never liked the taste of Ginger Beer or any fizzy drink for some reason. It has too much of gas.
I'm not too fond of very carbonated, airy drinks myself.

I prefer fruit juices, but sometimes a cool glass of water is just bliss alhamdulillah.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-01-2016, 06:55 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Speaking about eggs. My little brother(he's about 8 years old) wanted to fry his own egg. After a while, I heard a splutter. So I asked him if everything was okay and he just shook his head. Meanwhile, the entire egg was on the stove plate.
That's a unique way of frying an egg. Maybe he'll become a chef later on, Jamie Oliver style.
Reply

colinberry1
09-01-2016, 11:14 PM
I would sooner a good fish curry, Yum Yum, not that partial to hearts.
Reply

Aay1K0
09-02-2016, 09:40 AM
Strange recipes.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-02-2016, 06:32 PM
Strange is good.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-02-2016, 06:34 PM
Reply

Umm Abed
09-02-2016, 07:30 PM
They say ginger beer is good for nausea too;)
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-02-2016, 07:32 PM
Beef Tongue



"
BEEF TONGUE PART 2: HOW TO COOK TONGUE IN 5 EASY STEPS

MARCH 11, 2013 BY MARILLYN BEARD · | · 30 COMMENTS · | · AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE

After sharing our top 4 favorite tongue recipes, I had a few friends request that I share a simple step by step guide on how to cook tongue.

It is so easy that you might find yourself cooking up tongue more often then not!

Remember, you can’t say this is gross if you’ve never tried it. Try it once and then you can truly say you like it or hate it.

After you’ve done these 5 simple steps… try the Taco de Lengua or Italian Drip Beef Tongue. Both are sure to please anybody. Just don’t say that it is tongue until everybody has licked their plates clean… really, its just beef and that’s not lying!


Preparing the Beef Tongue
0) Look at it and convince yourself that it’s just meat.
I am half serious and half joking. For some people, it really does take some mental strength to get over the “ick-factor” of touching, preparing and eating tongue.

Now, give yourself a mental pep talk…


“that is beef. a muscle. just like any other beef cut. don’t think of the ‘t’ word. its just beef. a delicacy in other countries. higher in protein and b-12. really good for me to eat. that’s beef“


deeeeep breath.


Ready?


Still with me? Good… read on!

1) Rinse off the tongue.
It is a good idea to wash off the tongue. If you really can’t handle touching it… wear some gloves or ask someone to do it for you.

Wash the tongue under running water until the water runs clear and there’s no blood.


2) Cut glands off at the base of the tongue.
This step is really optional. Some like to cut it off, others leave it on.

I’ve done both and found that the glands are really soft & fatty when cooked. If that doesn’t sound appealing to you, cut it off before cooking.


3) Cook the tongue.
When properly cooked… tongue is delicious.

Honestly.

Here are three important notes to remember when cooking the tongue…

1) You can cook the tongue in two ways… let it cook slowly in your crock pot or simmer in your stock pot. Both ways will give you soft and tender beef that is versatile and yummy.

2) For the liquid base, use either beef stock or water. I’ve done both and prefer the stock for a richer flavor.

3) It is important to add in a mixture of savory & sweet veggies and spices to enhance the flavor. I like to use onions, carrots, garlic, peppercorn, bay leaves and sea salt.

Beef Stock Method:
Whenever I am making a large batch of beef stock (I let it simmer for up to 3 days!), I like to throw in the tongues and let it simmer overnight. In the picture below, I was making a small batch of beef broth and threw in a tongue to cook overnight.

If you already have beef stock made… put the tongue in your choice of crock pot or stockpot, cover with stock, add in veggies & spices and cook until done.

Water Method:
Put your tongue in a small stock pot or crock pot, cover with enough water, add in the above suggested veggies & spices and cook until done.

For a chopped tongue… cook it for 3-4 hours. For a shredded tongue… cook for 6-8 hours or overnight.

Wondering what to do with the leftover broth? You can toss it out, but I like to save it and use it in my spaghetti sauce, homemade chili or soup.


4) Peel the skin off.
When the tongue is done. Pull it out and let it cool.

When cooled enough to touch. Take a small sharp knife and cut through the skin at the base. Then you should be able to simply peel the skin off in chunks.

If you have dogs, give them the skin. They will gobble it up! If you don’t have dogs, just throw it away.



5) Chop or shred up the tongue.
To shred it, take two forks and start pulling the meat apart. You might have to cut some parts, but it should pull apart easily.

If you want to chop your tongue… let it cool completely. You can stick it in the fridge for a little while. It will firm up and be easy to chop.


There you go! You now have chopped or shredded tongue ready to be used however you want. You can make tacos, sandwiches, egg bake, empanadas, stews, soups, chili or whatever… it is a very versatile meat!!"
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-02-2016, 07:34 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
They say ginger beer is good for nausea too;)
It's good for a lot of things. It's very good for clearing the throat, also. I know of one Qaari who used to add salt to his ginger beer and drink it before reciting. He used to say it clears his throat up. I don't know what the salt was for.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-02-2016, 07:37 PM
Yes it does make sense, must be giving a clear voice too.
Reply

زهراء
09-02-2016, 07:40 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
It's good for a lot of things. It's very good for clearing the throat, also. I know of one Qaari who used to add salt to his ginger beer and drink it before reciting. He used to say it clears his throat up. I don't know what the salt was for.
Salt decreases the gas. Like some people like to drink "flat" pepsi etc.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-02-2016, 07:40 PM
That recipe^o), Im not prepared to try it:p, and so graphic too.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-02-2016, 07:42 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Salt decreases the gas. Like some people like to drink "flat" pepsi etc.
Oh so possibly for that reason salt is added, or salt is good for the throat...maybe.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-02-2016, 10:10 PM
Ginger ale is nice as well.

Best cooldrinks:

1) Ginger Beer.

2) Root Beer.

3) Ginger Ale.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-02-2016, 11:08 PM
Chicken Chow Mein







TOTAL TIME:30 min
Prep:20 min
Inactive Prep:--
Cook:10 min

YIELD:
2 servings

LEVEL:
Easy



INGREDIENTS




  • 2 tablespoons groundnut oil (peanut)
  • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and finely sliced
  • 5 ounces bean sprouts
  • 1 large spring onion (green), sliced lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • Freshly ground black pepper, finely ground
  • *Can be found at specialty Asian markets.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 12:35 PM
Wait, is ginger beer and ginger ale not the same thing?

Recipe looking good, more on the normal side:Emoji57:.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 01:31 PM
No, the two are different. This is Ginger Ale:







Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 01:37 PM
Vetkoek (Sounds like "Fat Cook")

Vetkoek – which literally means ‘fat cake’ in Afrikaans – is a proudly South African pastry. The ‘vet’ part of its name probably comes from the fact that it’s deep-fried in cooking oil (‘fat’).
Vetkoek is a dough which is light and crisp on the outside, whilst soft and bread-like on the inside. It can be served with deliciously cooked mince (ground beef)…or turned it into a dessert with wallops of syrup, honey or jam and cheese.
In this version I have added chilli and chives. Feel free to make it plain and serve with mince, chicken or vegetables.
Enjoy!

PRINT
VETKOEK

Author: Fazila Olla-Logday
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: South African



Serves: 4


INGREDIENTS

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 10gr pkt instant dry yeast
  • 1 tbles sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp oil
  • 2-21/2 cups warm water
  • 1 tsp red chilli flakes
  • 1 tbles dried chives
  • Oil for deep frying



INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Sieve flour and combine all the dry ingredients in a big bowl.
  2. Add the oil and then water bit by bit until you get the consistency of a soft bread dough. The mixture must still be quite sticky.
  3. Place the dough on a floured surface and gently knead for 5-10 minutes. You may need to add a little more flour to the dough to prevent it sticking to your fingers.
  4. Place the dough in a clean bowl and cover with a cloth and set aside in a warm spot until the dough is double in size.
  5. Divide dough into portions and mould into balls.
  6. Deep fry a few vetkoek at a time until golden brown over a medium/low heat.

Serve with Mince Curry














This one's another original South African food.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 01:44 PM
This one's for @Kiro :


Boeber


Ramadan recipe: Beautiful boeber

2014-07-20 15:00






Boeber is a sugary, warm, milk drink well suited for a sweet tooth and mellow enough for a sensitive stomach during fast.
This decadent dish is usually served on the 15th night of the holy month of Ramadan to celebrate the middle of the fast.
We like the Cape Malay version of the dish. Try it at home and you will *understand why.
Ingredients

.?100g butter
.?75ml sago
.?200ml water to soak the sago
.?250ml extra-fine vermicelli
.?3 cinnamon sticks
.?50g sultanas
.?2l milk
.?100ml condensed milk
.?15ml rose water or ?10ml vanilla
essence
.?150ml white sugar
.?50g blanched almonds
Method
Soak the sago in the water for about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan.
When it has melted, add the vermicelli and toss it so that the butter covers it and it starts to go golden brown.
Add the cardamom, cinnamon and the sultanas.
Stir before pouring the milk into the pan.
Bring to the boil before adding the presoaked sago and simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring constantly otherwise it will stick.
The sago should become transparent.
Mix in the condensed milk, the rose water, sugar and almonds, and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes or so.
Serve hot.


-----------------------------

Another recipe for Boeber:

BOEBER
Usually served on the fifteenth night of Ramadan to celebrate the middle of the fast. The more sago you use, the thicker the boeber will be. On the other hand, the less sago you add the more liquid it will be.
Ingredients:
100 g butter
75 ml sago
200 ml water to soak the sago
250 ml vermicelli
3 cinnamon sticks
5 cardamoms
50 g sultanas
2 litres milk
15 ml rose water (optional)
150 – 200ml white sugar (depending on your taste buds)
50 g blanched almonds
Method:
Soak the sago in the water for about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan.
When it has melted, add the vermicelli and toss it so that the butter covers it and it starts to go golden brown.
Add the cardamom, cinnamon and the sultanas.
Stir before pouring the milk into the pan.
Bring to the boil before adding the pre-soaked sago and then simmer for about 30 minutes stirring constantly otherwise it will stick. The sago should become transparent.
Add the rose water (if using), sugar and almonds and continue to simmer for another 10 minutes or so. Serve hot and enjoy!!!

------------------------










Boeber is a traditional South African Cape Malay milk drink.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 02:06 PM
Awesome, both are my favourites, they will go well together.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 02:34 PM
You've tasted Vetkoek and Boeber?
Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 02:53 PM
Yes I tried both, but my own recipes so slight variations.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 03:28 PM
Samp & Beans

Samp & Beans (Umngqusho) Recipe
12:24 PM | Publish by Thandie Dowery


Samp and Beans is a traditional dish of the Nguni people of South Africa. Referred to as isistambu by the Zulu people and umngqusho by the Xhosa people – the biggest Nguni groups – the dish is made from slowly cooked sugar beans and samp (crushed corn kernels).
It is beleived that the word 'samp' comes from the Native American word naussamp which the English called "samp". Seeing that South Africa was also once a British colony, it is likely that the word travelled to the country's shores in due time.
In today's South Africa, Samp and Beans is a popular staple food and is sold pre-packed and already mixed for easier preparation. Samp and Beans is also a favourite of former South African president Nelson Mandela, so fans of the icon might take an interest in sampling this recipe.
Normally served as a side dish to a main course, there are several ways to prepare and serve Samp and Beans. It can be made with chillies or curry, for those who prefer a hot kick. Or, it can be kept simple and be prepared with no spice at all. Some serve Samp and Beans with meat and gravy, or if flavourful enough, it can be enjoyed on its own. Here is a basic recipe.
SAMP AND BEANS (UMNGQUSHO OR ISITAMBU) RECIPE
Serves 10
Ingredients
500g samp (substitute: hominy) – rinsed and soaked overnight
500g sugar beans (substitute: black eyed peas) – rinsed and soaked overnight
salt to taste
oil
1 onion
2-3 tsp curry powder
2 cloves garlic, crushed (optional)
1-2 tomatoes
1 vegetable stock cube
2 potatoes
50 ml butter (optional)
Directions
Mix the samp and beans together and soak overnight.
Drain the water after soaking and place the samp and bean mix in a large pot. Add 5-6 cups of water and allow to simmer slowly, allowing most of the water to evaporate. Cook until the samp and the beans start to get soft. If not soft enough, add more water. Season with salt to taste.
While the samp and beans cook, sauté the onion in a little oil until translucent. Add the garlic and curry powder. Allow to cook for a 1 -2 minutes to get flavor out. Add the tomato, vegetable stock , ½ cup of water, and potatoes. Allow to simmer until potatoes are slightly soft.
Drain the slightly soft samp and beans and add to the mixture. Allow to cook slowly until the potatoes, samp and beans are soft.
Stir in the butter. Serve hot with a main course of choice.



Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 03:35 PM
Nice. Mine look like the bottom one.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 03:38 PM
One thing I havent tried is dumplings.

Anyone made, or tasted?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 03:46 PM
Samp & Beans is high in protein, so good for everyone wanting to build muscles.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 03:47 PM
I haven't tasted dumplings yet.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 03:51 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Samp & Beans is high in protein, so good for everyone wanting to build muscles.
Thats good. I dont bother putting meat in, its nice to eat simple sometimes.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 04:43 PM
I like mine with lots of meat inside.

No dish is complete without meat.
Reply

Kiro
09-03-2016, 04:50 PM
@
Huzaifah ibn Adam

OMD HUzzy, YOu're NOT BLACK!? jk jk jk

Sweet, now time to add some strawberry and sugar to that
Reply

Kiro
09-03-2016, 04:52 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Samp & Beans

Samp & Beans (Umngqusho) Recipe
12:24 PM | Publish by Thandie Dowery


Samp and Beans is a traditional dish of the Nguni people of South Africa. Referred to as isistambu by the Zulu people and umngqusho by the Xhosa people – the biggest Nguni groups – the dish is made from slowly cooked sugar beans and samp (crushed corn kernels).
It is beleived that the word 'samp' comes from the Native American word naussamp which the English called "samp". Seeing that South Africa was also once a British colony, it is likely that the word travelled to the country's shores in due time.
In today's South Africa, Samp and Beans is a popular staple food and is sold pre-packed and already mixed for easier preparation. Samp and Beans is also a favourite of former South African president Nelson Mandela, so fans of the icon might take an interest in sampling this recipe.
Normally served as a side dish to a main course, there are several ways to prepare and serve Samp and Beans. It can be made with chillies or curry, for those who prefer a hot kick. Or, it can be kept simple and be prepared with no spice at all. Some serve Samp and Beans with meat and gravy, or if flavourful enough, it can be enjoyed on its own. Here is a basic recipe.
SAMP AND BEANS (UMNGQUSHO OR ISITAMBU) RECIPE
Serves 10
Ingredients
500g samp (substitute: hominy) – rinsed and soaked overnight
500g sugar beans (substitute: black eyed peas) – rinsed and soaked overnight
salt to taste
oil
1 onion
2-3 tsp curry powder
2 cloves garlic, crushed (optional)
1-2 tomatoes
1 vegetable stock cube
2 potatoes
50 ml butter (optional)
Directions
Mix the samp and beans together and soak overnight.
Drain the water after soaking and place the samp and bean mix in a large pot. Add 5-6 cups of water and allow to simmer slowly, allowing most of the water to evaporate. Cook until the samp and the beans start to get soft. If not soft enough, add more water. Season with salt to taste.
While the samp and beans cook, sauté the onion in a little oil until translucent. Add the garlic and curry powder. Allow to cook for a 1 -2 minutes to get flavor out. Add the tomato, vegetable stock , ½ cup of water, and potatoes. Allow to simmer until potatoes are slightly soft.
Drain the slightly soft samp and beans and add to the mixture. Allow to cook slowly until the potatoes, samp and beans are soft.
Stir in the butter. Serve hot with a main course of choice.



second one looks like a bunch of retro rainbow sweets put into sauce
Reply

Umm Abed
09-03-2016, 05:16 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
I like mine with lots of meat inside.

No dish is complete without meat.
Maybe some of that strange meat will do!
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 05:59 PM
Originally Posted by Kiro
@
Huzaifah ibn Adam

OMD HUzzy, YOu're NOT BLACK!? jk jk jk

How do you know?

Uma ukhuluma nomuntu ngolimi aluqondayo, uyakuzwa. Uma ukhuluma naye ngolimi lwakhe, lokho kugxila enhliziyweni yakhe.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 06:02 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Maybe some of that strange meat will do!
Very good idea. I should try it with Dhabb (spiny-lizard) meat.
Reply

زهراء
09-03-2016, 06:05 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
How do you know?

Uma ukhuluma nomuntu ngolimi aluqondayo, uyakuzwa. Uma ukhuluma naye ngolimi lwakhe, lokho kugxila enhliziyweni yakhe.
Eenee wena khuluma?

لا أفهم كثير من هذه اللغات [emoji23]
I'm thinking you live in the Zulu Land[emoji6]
Reply

noraina
09-03-2016, 06:33 PM
I'll try out the noodle recipe, I eat so much noodles my whole family is sick of them apart from me.

I found a halal South African takeaway - your thread has persuaded me to order something from them, I just need to confirm it's nothing such as beef tongue or sheeps brain :p.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 07:23 PM
Originally Posted by noraina
I'll try out the noodle recipe, I eat so much noodles my whole family is sick of them apart from me.

I found a halal South African takeaway - your thread has persuaded me to order something from them, I just need to confirm it's nothing such as beef tongue or sheeps brain :p.
Be sure to post pictures here of whatever you buy.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-03-2016, 07:25 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
Eenee wena khuluma?

لا أفهم كثير من هذه اللغات [emoji23]
I'm thinking you live in the Zulu Land[emoji6]
No, I'm not in the KZN side.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-04-2016, 06:37 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Very good idea. I should try it with Dhabb (spiny-lizard) meat.
Not at all.:skeleton:

Shank pieces would do. I dont know if chicken is nice in it, or just mutton.
Reply

noraina
09-04-2016, 11:07 AM
Paneer (a type of cheese used a lot in Afghani/Pakistani cuisine) tastes really good as a replacement for meat, mainly red meats like beef or mutton or goat. It goes really well with most dishes meant to be for meat.

I'm just putting it out there ;) (no, I'm not starting a veggie rebellion on brother Huzaifah's thread).

I'm sure paneer would taste nice on a braai too.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 01:33 PM
Cheese?? To replace meat??? That's like trying to replace the sun with a halogen light, or the moon with an LED pilot light from a China store...

Imaam ash-Shaafi`ee رحمة الله عليه used to say, "There are four things that strengthen the body:


  1. Eating meat
  2. Using perfume
  3. Wearing cotton garments
  4. Bathing


And there are four things that weaken the body and shortens one's life:


  1. Depression
  2. Drinking water repeatedly while the stomach is empty
  3. Eating sour foods
  4. Sexual intercourse [So what if it shortens the life, though. It's worth it.]
Reply

Umm Abed
09-04-2016, 01:45 PM
So the bottom line is, eat, live and be healthy :D

Red meat is often said to be unhealthy on medical grounds but yet eating meat is sunnah.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 01:47 PM
"Eat what you want and die happy."

I follow that.

I'm not going to give up meat for a raw or steamed vegetable.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-04-2016, 01:55 PM
Just eat your meat with the vegetables and you have a healthy, balanced meal.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 02:40 PM
Biggest Pizza in the World




Reply

Umm Abed
09-04-2016, 03:50 PM
A land of pizza!

Wonder how did they reach all over to put the topping on? Walk on it? :uuh:Was the whole thing even eaten..
Reply

noraina
09-04-2016, 03:53 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Cheese?? To replace meat??? That's like trying to replace the sun with a halogen light, or the moon with an LED pilot light from a China store...
That almost sounds like poetry... altho paneer isn't like normal cheese. It's very chewy and dense, almost *almost* like meat.


Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
"Eat what you want and die happy."

I follow that.

I'm not going to give up meat for a raw or steamed vegetable.
My dad says exactly this, lol.

I certainly won't argue with that, I do eat red meat occasionally - and on Eid it's a must. I think I'd say the same if someone told me to quit chocolate (if they dared to).


Originally Posted by Umm Abed
Just eat your meat with the vegetables and you have a healthy, balanced meal.
It's all about balance, us sisters have it right alhamdulillah. :D
Reply

noraina
09-04-2016, 03:55 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Biggest Pizza in the World




131 feet??? And I thought they couldn't get larger than the monstrous pizzas the local takeaway churns out.

Although if it's a cheese pizza covered with olives I'll take it. ;)
Reply

زهراء
09-04-2016, 05:45 PM
How did they manage to bake it? Perhaps over a fire[emoji53]
Reply

Aaqib
09-04-2016, 06:28 PM
I hope someone ate that...
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 06:35 PM
Originally Posted by Aaqib
I hope someone ate that...
If not, we can always ask them to send some for you.
Reply

Umm Abed
09-04-2016, 07:37 PM
Originally Posted by زهراء
How did they manage to bake it? Perhaps over a fire[emoji53]
It seems like it was baked on the spot.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 10:01 PM
This is a nice one:




Largest Roti in the world. Weighs 64kg.

Now all you need is a massive pot of curry.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 10:09 PM
What do you know, here's the curry:



Largest curry in the world, weighing 5,100kg.

Yes. Now you can eat lekker...

Reply

Kiro
09-04-2016, 10:24 PM
Does anyone here know how to bake?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 10:42 PM
Sisters Umm Abed, Noraina and زهراء all know how to bake, of course.

Even I know how to bake...
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 10:44 PM
"Almonds are a source of vitamin E, copper, magnesium, and high-quality protein; they also contain high levels of healthy unsaturated fatty acids along with high levels of bioactive molecules (such as fiber, phytosterols, vitamins, other minerals, and antioxidants) which can help prevent cardiovascular heart diseases."
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 10:47 PM
Almond benefits from "draxe.com":

Almonds have been prized since ancient times as one of humankind’s most beloved nuts. They were popular in the diets of ancient Egyptians and Indian populations. Ancient Indian Ayurvedic practitioners even believed that almonds were capable of increasing brain capacity, intellectual ability and longevity.

Today, almonds nutrition benefits are praised around the world, and they are used in numerous different ways: eaten raw as a healthy snack; as the base ingredient in almond butter, almond milk or almond flour; and even in many body lotions and fragrances.
Cholesterol reduction is the most celebrated health benefit of almonds, but there are many other vital health benefits of almonds nutrition. Almonds are low in saturated fatty acids, rich in unsaturated fatty acids, and contain filling fiber, unique and protective phytosterolantioxidants as well as plant protein.
And don’t fear the fat in almonds — almonds are actually beneficial when it comes to losing weight, despite their higher calorie content. One study even found that almonds consumed as snacks reduce hunger and desire to eat later in the day, and when dieters eat almonds daily they reduce their overall calorie intake. (1)

Almonds Nutrition: The Facts Behind the Benefits

Botanically, almonds (scientifically termed Prunus dulcis) are actually very small stone fruits in the Amygdalus family and related to other fruits that contain hard pits, including cherries, plums and peaches. Almonds are a type of drupe nut, which means along with other nuts like macadamias, pecans and walnuts, they have multiple layers that enclose a single, hard seed in the center.
Almonds are considered dry drupes so they first must be extracted (which is called “shelling”) before being sold and eaten, which is why you might see the description “shelled almonds” when you purchase ready-to-eat almonds.
In the medical world, almonds nutrition is most praised due to the presence of monounsaturated fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamins like riboflavin, and trace minerals such as magnesium. (2)
Although almonds are high in calories and considered “energy-dense” (as all nuts are), they provide a whole range of critical nutrients and chemical compounds that often lack in the standard American diet (sometimes called “SAD”).
¼ cup of almonds nutrition provides about: (3)

  • 207 calories
  • 5 grams of protein
  • 5 grams fiber
  • 7 grams of carbohydrates
  • 5 grams of sugar
  • 16 milligrams vitamin E (61 percent DV)
  • 0.4 milligrams riboflavin (44 percent DV)
  • 0.8 milligrams manganese (44 percent DV)
  • 97 milligrams magnesium (36 percent DV)
  • 172 milligrams phosphorus (29 percent DV)
  • 96 milligrams calcium (9.5 percent DV)
  • 33 milligrams iron (4 percent DV)





9 Proven Health Benefits of Almonds

1. Help Prevent Heart Disease and Heart Attacks

Two of the star chemical compounds of almonds nutrition are healthy monounsaturated fatty acids (abbreviated as MUFAs, the same kind of beneficial fat found in olive oil) and antioxidants that support heart health and prevent factors of cardiovascular disease. Almonds specifically supply antioxidant flavonoids, plant-based compounds present in the skin of almonds that work with vitamin E to improve artery health and reduce inflammation.
Almonds nutrition also holds key nutrients to heart health, including arginine, magnesium, copper, manganese, calcium and potassium. Studies show almonds have a consistent “bad” LDL cholesterol-lowering effect, especially in individuals with high cholesterol and diabetes. (4)
Almonds help prevent damage from forming within artery walls and protect against dangerous plaque buildup. Almonds nutrition benefits also make them a great food to support healthy cholesterol and blood pressure levels, in addition to fighting weight gain and obesity — three of the biggest risk factors associated with heart attacks and stroke.
2. Support Healthy Brain Function

Almonds are often considered one of the best brain foods. Almonds nutrition is somewhat unique in that almonds contain riboflavin and L-carnitine, two key nutrients capable of positively affecting neurological activity and preventing cognitive decline. This is one reason why adults, especially the elderly, are encouraged to eat nuts several times per week — since they are associated with a reduction in the risk for inflammation that can cause brain disorders including dementia andAlzheimer’s disease.
3. Maintain Skin Health

Almonds are a great source of vitamin E and other antioxidants that nourish the skin and reduce signs of aging. Research finds that almonds nutrition contains high concentrations of catechin, epicatechin and flavonol antioxidants, including quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin — compounds that fight skin cancer and damage by reversing oxidative stress from a poor diet, pollution and UV light exposure. (5) Almonds’ healthy fats, plus their ability to improve circulation, also help keep skin hydrated and better able to heal wounds.
4. Help Control Blood Sugar Levels and Prevent Diabetes

Almonds’ rich supply of MUFAs helps slow the rate at which glucose (sugar) is released into the bloodstream. In addition to managing blood sugar and preventing insulin resistance (which can occur over time when the body becomes less reactive to insulin, the sugar-controlling hormone), almonds nutrition benefits include the ability to lower other common diabetes risks: unhealthy body weight, inflammation and high levels of oxidative stress.
5. Help With Weight Loss and Prevent Overeating

Healthy fats and dietary fiber aid in weight loss because they help you feel full, which curbs overeating and unhealthy snacking. Although nuts are high in fat and calories, they prolong the feeling of satisfaction after you eat and keep your blood sugar more stable than low-fat meals do. Thus, you’re less likely to experience a roller-coaster of energy dips and food cravings.
Studies, such as the Nurses’ Health Study, even show that almonds support a healthy metabolism. Also, people who frequently eat almonds and other nuts retain healthier body weights and lower rates of obesity over time compared to those who avoid nuts. Other studies show that when dieters eat almonds daily, they are less likely to overconsume carbohydrates and more likely to reach and maintain a healthier body weight. (6)
For example, one 2003 article published in the International Journal of Obesity found that when women consumed almonds over a six-month period, compared to other women who didn’t eat almonds, they experienced greater reductions in weight/BMI, waist circumference, fat mass and systolic blood pressure.



6. Increase Nutrient Absorption

The body needs adequate amounts of fat in the diet in order to properly absorb “fat-soluble” nutrients, like vitamins A and D. Almonds are also considered one of the only nuts that help alkalize the digestive tract, reducing acid buildup and balancing the body’s pH. A healthy pH levelis crucial for proper digestion, immunity and disease prevention. Additionally, the nutrients present in almonds may help regulate digestive enzymes that are involved in nutrient extraction, cholesterol synthesis and bile acid production.
7. Increase Digestive Health

In addition to healthy fats and alkaline-forming molecules, almonds (especially the skin of almonds) contain probiotic components that help with digestion, detoxification and healthy bacterial growth within the gut flora — a key to actually utilizing nutrients from food and preventing nutrient deficiencies.
Studies suggest that almonds and almond skins may lead to an improvement in the “intestinal microbiota profile,” meaning the intestine’s bacterial activities improve and promote numerous health benefits due to the presence of prebiotic properties, the precursors for probiotics.
A 2014 study by the Institute of Food Science & Technology in China found that when women ate a daily dose of 56 grams of almonds over an eight-week period, significant increases in the populations of healthy bacteria called Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus were observed. (7)
8. Can Help Fight Cancer and Inflammation

Almonds contain gamma-tocopherol, a type of vitamin E that acts as a powerful antioxidant, fighting free radical damage and oxidative stress that are linked to cancer. Many studies find a link between nut consumption and cancer prevention, including a reduced risk for colon, prostate and breast cancers. (8)
9. Help Maintain Dental and Bone Health

Almonds are a good source of trace minerals, including magnesium and phosphorus, which is a crucial nutrient for building and maintaining strong teeth and bones. Almonds nutrition benefits include the ability to help prevent tooth decay, fight cavities, lower the risk for bone fractures and fight osteoporosis.
Reply

Kiro
09-04-2016, 11:19 PM
Huzzy, is there anything that give you naturally straight hair?
Reply

Kiro
09-04-2016, 11:22 PM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Sisters Umm Abed, Noraina and زهراء all know how to bake, of course.

Even I know how to bake...
But... are any of you War bakers?
Reply

mission2succeed
09-04-2016, 11:36 PM
:sl:

I am sorry but I do not like the look of that at all. It actually looks very disturbing.+o(
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 11:49 PM
Originally Posted by mission2succeed
:sl:

I am sorry but I do not like the look of that at all. It actually looks very disturbing.+o(

وعليكم السلام ورحمة الله وبركاته

Which? The heads, or the brains, or the hearts, or the lizards, or the eyeballs, or something else entirely?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 11:50 PM
Originally Posted by Kiro
Huzzy, is there anything that give you naturally straight hair?
Why do you want naturally straight hair? Is this another Japanese/Manga thing?

Slightly wavy hair is better.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-04-2016, 11:51 PM
Originally Posted by Kiro
But... are any of you War bakers?
War bakers?
Reply

Kiro
09-05-2016, 12:05 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Why do you want naturally straight hair? Is this another Japanese/Manga thing?

Slightly wavy hair is better.
Do you know the pains of a slightly wavy haired person?

Also I like straighter hair more, easier imo and I also like straight fringes

Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
War bakers?
Bakers born out of... I was trying to give a cool name/rank of reverence
Reply

mission2succeed
09-05-2016, 12:08 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam

وعليكم السلام ورحمة الله وبركاته

Which? The heads, or the brains, or the hearts, or the lizards, or the eyeballs, or something else entirely?
Seriously l think that covers it all yuck!
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:09 AM
Originally Posted by Kiro
Do you know the pains of a slightly wavy haired person?

Also I like straighter hair more, easier imo and I also like straight fringes
You can't use something to get "naturally straight hair". Naturally straight hair is, by definition, "natural" and not as a result of any cosmetics or hair straighteners.

On the other hand, if you just want straight hair, then you can try those hair straightening brushes. Why you'd want to do that, though, is beyond me.

Use olive oil. It's Sunnah.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:10 AM
Originally Posted by mission2succeed
Seriously l think that covers it all yuck!
Some people like those things..."One man's junk is another man's treasure."

That's why, in reality, they're all "good food". Heads are a delicacy in the Arab world and among the African people. Even eyeballs. And lizards. Brains too, of course, because the head is eaten with everything inside.
Reply

Kiro
09-05-2016, 12:11 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
You can't use something to get "naturally straight hair". Naturally straight hair is, by definition, "natural" and not as a result of any cosmetics or hair straighteners.

On the other hand, if you just want straight hair, then you can try those hair straightening brushes. Why you'd want to do that, though, is beyond me.

Use olive oil. It's Sunnah.
Nothing, that gives straight hair?

You also don't know why I want straight hair?
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:13 AM
Originally Posted by Kiro
You also don't know why I want straight hair?
No idea.
Reply

mission2succeed
09-05-2016, 12:18 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Some people like those things..."One man's junk is another man's treasure."

That's why, in reality, they're all "good food". Heads are a delicacy in the Arab world and among the African people. Even eyeballs. And lizards. Brains too, of course, because the head is eaten with everything inside.
Agreed! I don't mean to come across negative but l just find it difficult to look at such food items and to eat them well let's not go there.[emoji19]
Reply

Kiro
09-05-2016, 12:20 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
No idea.
Listen:

Wavy hair gives me a bushy afro. My hair gets dry quite easily or is dry. My hair is a victim for and of the wind. I have to brush the hair more often. After the shower, my becomes quite poofy. Also I like to have fringes below my forehead and my natural hair is kinda stubborn, when I have straight hair, it's a lot more easier and listens to me. I don't need to brush my hair. Also, oil for my hair or hairstyle isn't my friend and I ain't interested in slicking it backwards.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:25 AM
Originally Posted by Kiro
Also I like to have fringes below my forehead
Aha. I knew it was to do with that Japanese/Anime things. They all like that straight hair and fringes over the eyes, etc. It's some kind of Japanese/Korean thing.
Reply

Kiro
09-05-2016, 12:28 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
Aha. I knew it was to do with that Japanese/Anime things. They all like that straight hair and fringes over the eyes, etc. It's some kind of Japanese/Korean thing.
Probably.

Though I have been like this since I was a child before I knew of anime/manga or was aware Japanese culture.

Might be something Allah put in me.

I Just like those hairstyles. :D
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:31 AM
That pin straight hair suits women more than men.
Reply

Kiro
09-05-2016, 12:34 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
That pin straight hair suits women more than men.
What's pin hair? Besides most women part their hair :p

Do you know any food that gives GLOWING RED EYES??? ;D
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:37 AM
Originally Posted by Kiro
What's pin hair? Besides most women part their hair :p

Do you know any food that gives GLOWING RED EYES??? ;D
If you eat food that's too spicy, you'll have red eyes. Especially if you throw very hot sauce over it as well. You know, that dynamite kind of chili sauce.
Reply

Kiro
09-05-2016, 12:38 AM
Originally Posted by Huzaifah ibn Adam
If you eat food that's too spicy, you'll have red eyes. Especially if you throw very hot sauce over it as well. You know, that dynamite kind of chili sauce.
But bro, I can't handle spice

How do I learn the ways of the Mexican?
Reply

Umm Abed
09-05-2016, 08:23 AM
Originally Posted by Kiro
What's pin hair? Besides most women part their hair :p

Do you know any food that gives GLOWING RED EYES??? ;D
Pin straight is a description for very straight hair, hair as straight as a pin, use a hair iron:p slight wavy is nice.

Now, enough of the anime and into the kitchen, if brother Huzaifah can cook and bake so well you should try too:hiding:
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 10:22 AM
Originally Posted by Kiro
But bro, I can't handle spice

How do I learn the ways of the Mexican?
Even I don't go in for food that's too spicy or strong. I eat more the Arab style.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 11:30 AM
Tandoori Chicken (and the boneless version, "chicken tikka") is still the nicest kind of chicken, though:












It's especially good with chips, rolls, cooldrinks and Aloo Paratha:






Tandoori Chicken is called that because it's made in a clay oven called a "Tandoor".
Reply

colinberry1
09-05-2016, 12:02 PM
I had a friend that used to sell South African food at the Notting Hill Carnival, she used to bring back some wonderful spices from South Africa, curry powder that you could smell all around the house, not like this crap you buy nowadays in the supermarket.
Reply

Huzaifah ibn Adam
09-05-2016, 12:06 PM
That's right. SA has some of the best food you can find anywhere. The thing is that South Africa has food from all around the world. A person can go to SA and, no matter what kind of cuisine he's looking for, he'll find it there.
Reply

noraina
09-05-2016, 12:11 PM
For the most part, slightly wavy or even curly hair is actually quite nice, not everyone has it and I think it has more personality and charisma to it - it's been given a negative rep as being 'wild' or 'untidy'. But if you do want to straighten it in a natural way, I read coconut milk is quite good for that (I was told egg works too but I didn't like the thought of egg in your hair).
Reply

noraina
09-05-2016, 12:14 PM
Originally Posted by colinberry1
I had a friend that used to sell South African food at the Notting Hill Carnival, she used to bring back some wonderful spices from South Africa, curry powder that you could smell all around the house, not like this crap you buy nowadays in the supermarket.
I don't like the spice mix boxes or ready-mixed powders you find in store, they're okay, but if you want those intense fragrant flavours to come through you need to mix them yourself, or at least know what's been put into the powders.

You wouldn't think it would, but it makes a world of difference to the cooking.
Reply

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