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View Full Version : TED TALK: Why are Young People Joining ISIS? Appx. 15 Mins.



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09-04-2016, 05:24 PM
:bism: (In the Name of God, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful)



Really great video! Informative. Helpful. Constructive. :)
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Abz2000
09-04-2016, 09:59 PM
Watched it through - or suffered through it to be more accurate.

Firstly, the video above came across as more of a twisted propaganda piece than an objective scholarly research presentation in that the speaker totally neglected the reasons why people are slowly starting to seek change and are willing to play an active part, which in the current context as in times gone by has been heavily intensified and sped up by the oppression, injustice and falsehood that people are forced to endure as a side-effect of the actions of the corrupt in their unjust and criminal methods of concentrating domination and resources.
The humiliation of the Muslims in Al Quds, the first gulf war, the false flag (new pearl harbour) event of 9/11 and the consequent massacres of millions, coupled with the dehumanizing vilification of Muslims around the globe in any country in which anyone cares to pick up a newspaper or switch on the secular government controlled tv are certainly real issues which play a part in people wanting positive change and seeking out the truth, and the truth becomes a little easier to accept when one has become accustomed to having their intelligence insulted with blatant lies. Makes me think of the imprinted image in my mind of my four year old daughter staring upwards indignantly with her mouth wide open at my son five years her senior who had just snatched something she was happily playing with straight out of her hands just because he thought he could because he was stronger.
Well he was reminded without words that that i was stronger and i explained that God was even stronger and is just and requires us to be just.

Throwing words and absolutely synthetic labels such as "extremist", "terrorist", and "illegal" at a void will only compound the realisation of those who have learned to see and think past propaganda narratives.

When speaking of "isis" one must remember that we live in very confusing times and that those claiming to be against "isis" are confusing the situation further, what is clear however is that sunni Muslims didn't just decide to get up and start fighting spontaneously but were forced to do so after the American government lied about them, supported puppets over them, constrained them with sanctions in which the united nations group is a guilty party, invaded their localities in the name of removing the ex-puppets who had refused to be puppets, murdered them without right or reason, and then set up sectarian squabbles and false flag sectarian attacks to begin a process of chaos and destabilization, there is no justification whatsoever in setting up totally manufactured enemy images, and then applying such images to anybody who desires and works for positive change as if slapping on adhesive labels (emmanuel goldstein comes to mind).

I recall sitting in a cafe in Al 'Azeeziah in Makkah on my last visit and talking with the driver of a snazzy lexus who had invited me for a cuppa (i was intrigued that i'd suddenly received a phone call from a local who knew my family and wanted to speak with me as the verses of surah Al Mumtahinah had seared the hearts), we touched on various points and i was surprised that he saw jihad as a thing of the past despite having grown up in makkah listening to the Quran blaring off loudspeakers in his own language, when i asked him if it didn't apply to the people of Iraaq who had been unlawfully invaded and who's families had been murdered? He became contemplative and agreed that it did (like he had a choice), i began to see that an element of psychological manipulation has also affected even those nearest to the roots of Islam, t.v is a powerful tool. We continued to converse and i asked him how i could find an Islamic group who was working to establish khilaafah, he replied something along the lines of: "al-qadeda do have people seeking recruits, but if they see amjad is smoking cigarettes, they'll never approach him because they'll assume he's not a strict Muslim", i was amazed that he had quickly chosen the most vilified name in current day media to associate with my pursuit rather than continue along the given description and began to worry if i was being set up lol, we finished coffee and said our hearty goodbyes and i came to bangladesh through medina with a heavy heart.
The psychological game of slander and labelling is something we need to see through.

That dude on tedx used the term illegal despite all of us knowing full well that every single country on the planet like the anarchist bedouin tribes of pre-Islamic Arabia (jaahiliyyah) have a different and usually false definition of "illegal" just like the term "al qaeda" in saudi arabia.
Illegal by who's standards?
Illegal by what standards?
More confusion.

Loads of humanitarian work for him in iraq, afghanistan, libya, syria, somalia and loads of other countries now that the american government has killed millions of people, maimed millions more, created even more millions of orphans, and done away with billions of people's means of dignified livelihood, but hey, they've managed to sell lots of weapons and gotten more excuses to increase their weapons stockpiles - which they'll make a loss on if not sold.
Maybe he should do a piece on why people are stupid enough to join a secular government army or a more enlightening one would be one on the zionists - using similar objectivity lacking tactics would obviously get him accused as being an extremist fundamentalist evil kenievel conspiracy theorist, medieval, dark age loving, terrorist loving "freedom" hater though, and his college would probably report him to the "authorities".

The story of pat tillman did come to mind when he described a young man with his life ahead of him.......

Here's a more truthful lecture:




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