PDA

View Full Version : Why more American Muslims are celebrating Christmas this year



rabiaanum
12-11-2016, 11:14 AM
There was a time when just saying “Merry Christmas” would provoke fire and brimstone sermons from Muslims around me. I wasn’t exempt: I also believed Muslims shouldn’t celebrate holidays that weren’t explicitly Islamic, least of all arguably the biggest Christian holiday of the year.My own positions have changed, considerably. But as Christmas approached, I wondered if only I had changed, or if something more was afoot in American Islam?What I found surprised me and challenged me. Though there are many Muslims who do not celebrate Christmas (including me), I’ve come to believe that more and more Muslims will take the seasonal plunge. Except on their own, Muslim terms.How we got hereFor many Muslims, Christmas activates all kinds of anxieties. A religious holiday that challenges the Muslim interpretation of Jesus, it’s also a secular celebration—almost impossible to avoid—which is far more influential than any Muslim celebration in the West.
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
Amirzen
12-11-2016, 11:30 AM
Oh my god,its bad
Reply

sister herb
12-11-2016, 12:42 PM
That´s nothing new; it´s typical that the faith changes more and more lame when people live in different culture longer time. I have seen that for example here in Europe, the second or the third generation of immigrants adopt easier the habiths and thoughts of the western lifestyle. Nowadays the religion means less to the Westeners themselves and by this (as sad as it is) it will means less also to those Muslim generations whose have lived amongst of the Westerners longer time. For a long time the Christmas too haven´t been anything else to the original inhabitants (the western Christians) than a commercial holiday.

Well, that´s only my opinion.
Reply

Amirzen
12-11-2016, 12:51 PM
Originally Posted by sister herb
That´s nothing new; it´s typical that the faith changes more and more lame when people live in different culture longer time. I have seen that for example here in Europe, the second or the third generation of immigrants adopt easier the habiths and thoughts of the western lifestyle. Nowadays the religion means less to the Westeners themselves and by this (as sad as it is) it will means less also to those Muslim generations whose have lived amongst of the Westerners longer time. For a long time the Christmas too haven´t been anything else to the original inhabitants (the western Christians) than a commercial holiday.

Well, that´s only my opinion.
Yes i agree
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
Scimitar
12-11-2016, 02:45 PM
Afraid of being Trumped? more than fearing their Lord?

I know American Moozlums who think McDonalds is zabiha lol

Scimi
Reply

Born_Believer
12-13-2016, 09:21 PM
Maybe afraid of not integrating?

I doubt it's the majority of Muslims anyway.
Reply

crimsontide06
12-15-2016, 01:26 AM
A lot of it is societal pressure to conform to a societal norm. Their kids get nothing, while they see all their classmates get presents...etc.
Reply

ruglifeTX
12-15-2016, 11:32 PM
It's not even that. For instance my family (wife , myself, and children) do not celebrate it as a family but we do go to our extended families house for dinner that day because in our family it has always been a day for all the family to get together. It was never religious. But my family also is very accepting of us being Muslim and raising our children Muslim. A lot of times it is more of a family gathering. At least in our extended family.
Reply

Search
12-15-2016, 11:52 PM
:bism: (In the Name of God, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful)

:sl: (Peace be upon you)

Originally Posted by Born_Believer
I doubt it's the majority of Muslims anyway.
I too doubt it's the majority of Muslims, though that's what it sounds like erroneously from the original poster's words. I myself have enough interactions within the American Muslim community that I would know if something like this was happening on a large scale, and it isn't. In any case, we have Alhamdhullilah (thanks, credit, and praise to God) our own two Eid festivals, the start of the Islamic calendar year with the first day of Muharram, fasting in Dhul-Hijjah including the Day of Arafat, and then the feasts in Shahru Ramadan, and Mawlid in Rabbil-Al-Awwal and throughout the year should someone wish to celebrate Prophet :saws: (peace and blessings be upon him) arriving in the world and bringing with him :saws: the light of Islam, that I do not see the necessity of incorporating non-Muslim traditions and celebrations as well even if there hadn't been fatwas (rulings) against doing so which there have been.

Also, while I respect other faiths and other traditions, I do not think it would be respectful of my own faith to celebrate something which I do not believe and which might have religious connotations for people who do celebrate it beyond the secular meanings that have today attached to it; I do wish people to have a good time with their families in their holidays; however, beyond that, it is only a time as any other in the way that we see people doing what is dear to them.

Also, what I do know is that many Muslims do engage in get-together or have weddings this time of the year in December but not because it's the time of Christmas but because most people conveniently have time off from work to be able to travel in this time for the purpose of visiting or other such things.

:wa: (And peace be upon you)
Reply

Cherub786
12-16-2016, 03:00 AM
Well it is quite sad that it is becoming increasingly difficult for our Muslims to set themselves apart and resist social pressure. No one is forced to celebrate Christmas, but if we can't even handle a bit of social pressure, then how pitiable is that? We have to internalize the fact that going against the grain is a good thing
Reply

Born_Believer
12-16-2016, 11:53 PM
Originally Posted by Search
:bism: (In the Name of God, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful)

:sl: (Peace be upon you)



I too doubt it's the majority of Muslims, though that's what it sounds like erroneously from the original poster's words. I myself have enough interactions within the American Muslim community that I would know if something like this was happening on a large scale, and it isn't. In any case, we have Alhamdhullilah (thanks, credit, and praise to God) our own two Eid festivals, the start of the Islamic calendar year with the first day of Muharram, fasting in Dhul-Hijjah including the Day of Arafat, and then the feasts in Shahru Ramadan, and Mawlid in Rabbil-Al-Awwal and throughout the year should someone wish to celebrate Prophet :saws: (peace and blessings be upon him) arriving in the world and bringing with him :saws: the light of Islam, that I do not see the necessity of incorporating non-Muslim traditions and celebrations as well even if there hadn't been fatwas (rulings) against doing so which there have been.

Also, while I respect other faiths and other traditions, I do not think it would be respectful of my own faith to celebrate something which I do not believe and which might have religious connotations for people who do celebrate it beyond the secular meanings that have today attached to it; I do wish people to have a good time with their families in their holidays; however, beyond that, it is only a time as any other in the way that we see people doing what is dear to them.

Also, what I do know is that many Muslims do engage in get-together or have weddings this time of the year in December but not because it's the time of Christmas but because most people conveniently have time off from work to be able to travel in this time for the purpose of visiting or other such things.

:wa: (And peace be upon you)
Walaikum Salam Search and yeah, I agree with what you have posted. I can't add more to it.
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-14-2015, 12:23 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-01-2014, 02:39 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-25-2012, 06:44 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-04-2006, 11:11 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-04-2006, 11:11 PM

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!