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Junon
01-30-2019, 07:21 PM
Salaam

Americans are interested in more 'regime' change'. This time in Venezuela, short video that will get you up to speed on the situation (American perspective).

Blurb

Donald Trump may be the main thing keeping Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro going...

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SintoDinto
01-30-2019, 07:46 PM
I'm hoping Donald Trump invades Venezuela and liberates the Venezuelans. Maduro needs to be stopped. The oppression, bloodshed and starvation needs to be stopped. I met someone who had Venezuelan friends who thought Maduro was a nasty dictator. I support the invasion. Bring it on, Trump! @Junon quit with the anti american crap. you Muslims always beg america to come help in places like east turkestan and syria.......but venezuela? no, they're kaafir. libya? secularist uprising. afghanistan? nah, wouldn't wanna upset the woman beating and little girl raping and education-denying taleban. (and burqa loving). somalia? wouldn't wanna upset....you know......the group who was blamed for the inside job that led to "more converts than 40 years of dawah" according to one man on ummah forum? iraq? ew....shias in power.....no khilafa....admit it, youre a terrorist sympathizer. you even added a piece about the taleban on here titled "150,000 americans couldn't beat us and quoted media backed by the turkish government, which is responsible for most of the terrorism in this world including boko haram, accoridng to wiretapped calls (i am referring to TRT world) you can't have your cake and eat it too. either join britain and be a patriotic, contributing citizen, or go home. quit being an immigration leech. and besides, do you even have a job? all i ever see is you posting on here, just like me, who also doesn't have a job, and hardly any classes. i suspect you are a troll and i know what sector of society you work for but i can't name it cause ill get my butt in trouble.
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CuriousonTruth
01-31-2019, 05:01 PM
Turkey, Russia, China are with Maduro. Maduro is going nowhere, Insha'Allah.

- - - Updated - - -

Originally Posted by SintoDinto
I'm hoping Donald Trump invades Venezuela and liberates the Venezuelans. Maduro needs to be stopped. The oppression, bloodshed and starvation needs to be stopped. I met someone who had Venezuelan friends who thought Maduro was a nasty dictator. I support the invasion. Bring it on, Trump! @Junon quit with the anti american crap. you Muslims always beg america to come help in places like east turkestan and syria.......but venezuela? no, they're kaafir. libya? secularist uprising. afghanistan? nah, wouldn't wanna upset the woman beating and little girl raping and education-denying taleban. (and burqa loving). somalia? wouldn't wanna upset....you know......the group who was blamed for the inside job that led to "more converts than 40 years of dawah" according to one man on ummah forum? iraq? ew....shias in power.....no khilafa....admit it, youre a terrorist sympathizer. you even added a piece about the taleban on here titled "150,000 americans couldn't beat us and quoted media backed by the turkish government, which is responsible for most of the terrorism in this world including boko haram, accoridng to wiretapped calls (i am referring to TRT world) you can't have your cake and eat it too. either join britain and be a patriotic, contributing citizen, or go home. quit being an immigration leech. and besides, do you even have a job? all i ever see is you posting on here, just like me, who also doesn't have a job, and hardly any classes. i suspect you are a troll and i know what sector of society you work for but i can't name it cause ill get my butt in trouble.
Brainwashed liberal detected.

Turkey funding Boko Haram? Taliban raping girls. Boy you western muslims are even more brainwashed and deluded then the Russians.
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anatolian
01-31-2019, 06:14 PM
Maduro is one of the last anti-Imperialists. I am with him too against this classic American coup.
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SintoDinto
01-31-2019, 08:46 PM
Originally Posted by anatolian
Maduro is one of the last anti-Imperialists. I am with him too against this classic American coup.
what is more important? being against imperialists or being treated fairly vs being treated like dirt and having your rights and honor violated? have you no dignity?

- - - Updated - - -

Originally Posted by CuriousonTruth
Turkey, Russia, China are with Maduro. Maduro is going nowhere, Insha'Allah.

- - - Updated - - -


Brainwashed liberal detected.

Turkey funding Boko Haram? Taliban raping girls. Boy you western muslims are even more brainwashed and deluded then the Russians.
wife beating taleban supporter detected. you supporting murdering children and marrying off little girls to old fighters and using child soldiers and selling opium to fighters. yes, turkey did fund boko haram, their intelligence officers were wiretapped, and what about all those arms shipments going from turkey to nigeria?
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alfaqir
01-31-2019, 09:03 PM
It is amazing how could these Chavezists and Maduro screw up Venezuela so much, sitting on so huge oil reserves and still failing so terribly, leading to that country to such an economic misery. So it is all on them. Regarding the regime change, i'm more or less indifferent to it, as i understand the Venezuelan society itself is extremely polarized, so i can't make justice in that from this distance if this self proclaimed "new persident" Guaido has more popular support or not.

But its world political implications are interesting, how the international actors are split around the issue.
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Junon
02-02-2019, 07:04 PM
Salaam

More comment.







Other viewpoints.









It is amazing how could these Chavezists and Maduro screw up Venezuela so much, sitting on so huge oil reserves and still failing so terribly, leading to that country to such an economic misery. So it is all on them. Regarding the regime change, i'm more or less indifferent to it, as i understand the Venezuelan society itself is extremely polarized, so i can't make justice in that from this distance if this self proclaimed "new persident" Guaido has more popular support or not.
Yes a lot of their problems are self inflicted having said that I dont think Guiado can be trusted. Seems hes like another 'Blair' 'Macron' clone. A globalist shill.

Hard choices all around :hmm:
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Junon
02-04-2019, 04:17 PM
Salaam

More comment.

The next neocon target

It's an interesting confession of neocon weakness in the aftermath of the Syrian debacle that they are presently targeting Venezuela instead of another Middle Eastern state. But, as the Saker points out, Russia is not in a position to help defend the Venezuelans as they defended the Syrians from imperial aggression:

I am getting a lot of emails suggesting that Russia might do in Venezuela what she did in Syria. Let me immediately tell you that this is not going to happen. Yes, there are a lot of Russians in Venezuela, but the “Russians are not coming”.

For one thing, I will never cease to repeat that the Russian intervention in Syria was a very small one, and that even if this small force proved formidable, it was really acting primarily as a force multiplier for the Iranians, Hezbollah and the Syrian

government forces. And yet, even the deployment of this very small force necessitated a huge logistics effort from Russia whose military (being a purely defensive one) is simply not structured for long-distance power projection. Syria is about

1000km from Russia. Venezuela is about 10 times (!) further. Yes, I know,a few Tu-160 visited the country twice now and there are Russian advisors in the country and the Venezuelans have a few pretty good Russian weapons systems. But here,

again, this is a game of numbers. Limited numbers of Russian-made combat aircraft (fixed and rotary wing), air defense missiles or even large numbers of advanced MANPADs or assault rifles won’t do the trick against a determined US-Colombian

invasion. Finally, there is no Venezuelan equivalent to Iran or Hezbollah (an outside ally and friend) which would be capable and willing to deploy real combat forces for actual, sustained combat against the invader.
I can't help but suspect that Trump has something up his sleeve here. Is he throwing the neocons into a tar baby, perhaps? Is there anyone, anywhere, who is buying the inept imperial rhetoric about the democratic legitimacy of an unelected foreign puppet?

And it is bizarre that the USA is posturing as if it is going to fix a third-world failed state when it is rapidly transforming into one itself. Apparently the plan is for a second New American Century, albeit in South America now that the Middle East plan has failed.

http://voxday.blogspot.com/2019/02/t...on-target.html


Blurb

The Trump administration is openly engaging in a blatant effort to overthrow the government of Nicolás Maduro in Venezuela. It’s a campaign aimed at regime change, and it’s being publicly promoted as an opportunity to steal Venezuelan oil for the benefit of U.S. corporations. They’re not even pretending.

But this is not some insane Twitter thought spewed by Trump after guzzling down gallons of Fox and Friends. It’s open imperialism, and it’s not just being embraced by powerful Republicans, but Democrats as well. This push for regime change in Venezuela did not appear in a vacuum. The CIA has been plotting with so-called rebels in Venezuela from the early days of the Trump administration.

As Donald Trump has cozied up to strongmen and dictators across the world — from Vladimir Putin to Mohammed bin Salman, Rodrigo Duterte, Kim Jong-un, el-Sisi of Egypt — it seems that he’s found one so-called strongman that he can’t tolerate. And that leader happens to have the largest reserves of oil of any country in the world.




A sensible approach.

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CuriousonTruth
02-04-2019, 04:54 PM
Bolton already spilled the beans in an interview that the Venezuela coup is for oil.

Venezuela is not Muslim. But I stand with anyone that is against the West.
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fschmidt
02-05-2019, 12:09 AM
Originally Posted by Junon
Is there anyone, anywhere, who is buying the inept imperial rhetoric about the democratic legitimacy of an unelected foreign puppet?
Never underestimate human stupidity. With the decline of religion and the rise of a secular education system designed to make people stupid, the American people have been transformed into evil morons. Do not blame America's government because they truly represent the depraved American people. Blame the loss of religion for the never-ending crimes against humanity committed by America.
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Junon
02-05-2019, 07:49 PM
Salaam

More comment and analysis.

Blurb

Venezuela latest news. More information on the coup in Venezuela from human intel sources as well as from a few books and globalist publications.


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Junon
02-07-2019, 10:05 PM
Salaam

Hmmmmm good analysis of why this crises is kicking off.

Why the US is interested in Venezuala

The Saker interviews Michael Hudson to learn why the USA is suddenly so interested in Venezuela, of all places:

The Saker: Could you outline the various reforms and changes introduced by Hugo Chavez? What did he do right, and what did he do wrong?


Michael Hudson:
Chavez sought to restore a mixed economy to Venezuela, using its government revenue – mainly from oil, of course – to develop infrastructure and domestic spending on health care, education, employment to raise living standards and productivity for his electoral constituency.

What he was unable to do was to clean up the embezzlement and built-in rake-off of income from the oil sector. And he was unable to stem the capital flight of the oligarchy, taking its wealth and moving it abroad – while running away themselves.

This was not “wrong”. It merely takes a long time to change an economy’s disruption – while the U.S. is using sanctions and “dirty tricks” to stop that process.

The Saker:
What are, in your opinion, the causes of the current economic crisis in Venezuela – is it primarily due to mistakes by Chavez and Maduro or is the main cause US sabotage, subversion and sanctions?

Michael Hudson:
There is no way that Chavez and Maduro could have pursued a pro-Venezuelan policy aimed at achieving economic independence without inciting fury, subversion and sanctions from the United States. American foreign policy remains as focused on oil as it was when it invaded Iraq under Dick Cheney’s regime. U.S. policy is to treat Venezuela as an extension of the U.S. economy, running a trade surplus in oil to spend in the United States or transfer its savings to U.S. banks.

By imposing sanctions that prevent Venezuela from gaining access to its U.S. bank deposits and the assets of its state-owned Citco, the United States is making it impossible for Venezuela to pay its foreign debt. This is forcing it into default, which U.S. diplomats hope to use as an excuse to foreclose on Venezuela’s oil resources and seize its foreign assets much as Paul Singer hedge fund sought to do with Argentina’s foreign assets.

Just as U.S. policy under Kissinger was to make Chile’s “economy scream,” so the U.S. is following the same path against Venezuela. It is using that country as a “demonstration effect” to warn other countries not to act in their self-interest in any way that prevents their economic surplus from being siphoned off by U.S. investors.

The Saker:
What in your opinion should Maduro do next (assuming he stays in power and the USA does not overthrow him) to rescue the Venezuelan economy?

Michael Hudson
: I cannot think of anything that President Maduro can do that he is not doing. At best, he can seek foreign support – and demonstrate to the world the need for an alternative international financial and economic system.

He already has begun to do this by trying to withdraw Venezuela’s gold from the Bank of England and Federal Reserve. This is turning into “asymmetrical warfare,” threatening to de-sanctify the dollar standard in international finance. The refusal of England and the United States to grant an elected government control of its foreign assets demonstrates to the entire world that U.S. diplomats and courts alone can and will control foreign countries as an extension of U.S. nationalism.

The price of the U.S. economic attack on Venezuela is thus to fracture the global monetary system. Maduro’s defensive move is showing other countries the need to protect themselves from becoming “another Venezuela” by finding a new safe haven and paying agent for their gold, foreign exchange reserves and foreign debt financing, away from the dollar, sterling and euro areas.

The only way that Maduro can fight successfully is on the institutional level, upping the ante to move “outside the box.” His plan – and of course it is a longer-term plan – is to help catalyze a new international economic order independent of the U.S. dollar standard. It will work in the short run only if the United States believes that it can emerge from this fight as an honest financial broker, honest banking system and supporter of democratically elected regimes. The Trump administration is destroying illusion more thoroughly than any anti-imperialist critic or economic rival could do!
In short, Venezuela is another crisis point for US financial imperialism. The inability of Venezuela to take possession of its own gold in London is yet another indication that the neo-liberal world order is increasingly unstable. It's not about the oil, it's about the debt.

It certainly doesn't help that US officials are doing incredibly stupid things, like the Secretary of State calling Juan Guaido "duly-elected" when the man has never even run for President of Venezuela! The two candidates who lost the 2018 election to Nicolás Maduro were Henri Falcón and Javier Bertucci, while Henrique Capriles was the losing candidate in the 2013 election that was also won by Maduro.

http://voxday.blogspot.com/2019/02/w...venezuala.html
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DanEdge
02-07-2019, 11:11 PM
I can only speak from personal experience about the Venezuelans I have met who live in South Carolina, USA. I have met dozens of them, and I can speak Spanish, so I have gotten to talk to them about the situation in Venezuela.

Most of them are here on work visas, but they are essentially refugees. They say that Venezuela is now essentially a lawless country. Maduro has taking the oil wealth and distributed it to high-ranking military staff in order to keep them loyal. Water literally costs more than oil.

I met one man with a law degree who could not earn enough in Caracas to feed his family. He now works 12-hour shifts 6 days a week doing hard physical labor so that he can make enough money to get his family out.

There was a demonstration in downtown Greenville, South Carolina this past weekend organized by local Venezuelans. They all want Maduro out, a transitional government put in place, and fair elections to install new leadership.

Again, I can only speak from personal experience, but I have met dozens of Venezuelans in South Carolina, and every single one of them hates Maduro and wants him out of office. Every single one of them supports Guaidó.

I hope that the United States does not get involved, but we have a large contingent of troops in Colombia, and we could defeat the loyalist forces in Venezuela in less than a week. Nobody wants this, though. The Venezuelans were one of our top allies in WW2. our military leaders you know this, and nobody wants to go in there and kill them.

What they hope will happen instead is that international pressure will mount enough that the Venezuelan military will depose Maduro and install Guaidó as transitional president.

I am no fan of Trump, but his backing of Guaidó may well be the tipping point that helps get the tyrant Maduro out of power.

Dan Edge
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CuriousonTruth
02-08-2019, 04:58 PM
Always nice to see western "Holier than thou" mentality. lol. Maduro is going nowhere.
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Junon
02-08-2019, 07:54 PM
Salaam

Originally Posted by DanEdge
I can only speak from personal experience about the Venezuelans I have met who live in South Carolina, USA. I have met dozens of them, and I can speak Spanish, so I have gotten to talk to them about the situation in Venezuela.

Most of them are here on work visas, but they are essentially refugees. They say that Venezuela is now essentially a lawless country. Maduro has taking the oil wealth and distributed it to high-ranking military staff in order to keep them loyal. Water literally costs more than oil.

I met one man with a law degree who could not earn enough in Caracas to feed his family. He now works 12-hour shifts 6 days a week doing hard physical labor so that he can make enough money to get his family out.

There was a demonstration in downtown Greenville, South Carolina this past weekend organized by local Venezuelans. They all want Maduro out, a transitional government put in place, and fair elections to install new leadership.

Again, I can only speak from personal experience, but I have met dozens of Venezuelans in South Carolina, and every single one of them hates Maduro and wants him out of office. Every single one of them supports Guaidó.

I hope that the United States does not get involved, but we have a large contingent of troops in Colombia, and we could defeat the loyalist forces in Venezuela in less than a week. Nobody wants this, though. The Venezuelans were one of our top allies in WW2. our military leaders you know this, and nobody wants to go in there and kill them.

What they hope will happen instead is that international pressure will mount enough that the Venezuelan military will depose Maduro and install Guaidó as transitional president.

I am no fan of Trump, but his backing of Guaidó may well be the tipping point that helps get the tyrant Maduro out of power.

Dan Edge
I agree its not black and white, he has governed poorly, but outside interference hasnt helped matters (American economic warfare etc). In the end its best to leave it to the people of Venezuela to solve their own problems. Judging by USAs past record in South America (in fact much of the world) I think they should mind their own business (fat chance, I know, I know).

Hah!



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Junon
02-09-2019, 10:08 PM
Salaam



More comment.

Why Israel wants to see Maduro overthrown in Venezuela

US-Israeli support for overthrowing Maduro is part of a broader regional agenda targeting Palestinian solidarity

While various important factors and elements have fuelled the dire situation in Venezuela today, Israeli meddling in Latin American affairs is one that is rarely mentioned.

After the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, his successor, Nicolas Maduro, soon faced the challenges of a capsizing economy, hyperinflation, and shortages of medicine and food fuelled by low oil prices, despite the country’s massive reserves.

Protests against the worsening socioeconomic situation have led to polarisation and a political stalemate. There are pro- and anti-government camps, with no alternative third option or any hopes for an internal reconciliation.

The emergence of self-declared interim President Juan Guaido, backed by countries including the US, Canada, Australia and Israel - even as the United Nations and Venezuela’s top court and military reject his leadership, while Maduro has called for early elections - begs the question: whose interests is he representing?

Struggle for self-determination

Venezuela’s political chaos has resulted from a combination of the country’s extreme vulnerability as a petro state and the consequences of imperialist policies and endeavours that fuel internal corruption. But the US-Israeli support for overthrowing Maduro is part of a larger agenda to cement an anti-Palestinian campaign in Latin America at the expense of the Venezuelan people.

Although most Latin American countries supported the UN Partition Plan of 1947, which officially established the state of Israel and led to the Nakba, the region has been broadly friendly to Palestinians, hosting the largest Palestinian presence outside of the Arab world.

Solidarity with the Palestinian struggle for self-determination was at its height during the Chavez years up until today, with the leadership making outspoken criticism of Israel’s flagrant violations of international law. Venezuela severed diplomatic ties with Israel in 2009 over its military campaign in Gaza.

The Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA) was founded by Venezuela and Cuba during the Chavez era. The US and Israel remain the only countries to vote against the annual UN resolution to end the more than half-century blockade against Cuba. Furthermore, the recent UN vote in favour of Palestinian statehood, along with Palestine’s broader bid for international recognition, has strong support in Latin America, including in Venezuela.

Under the Trump administration, there has been a slow and steady shift to impose anti-Palestinian policies, such as cutting US aid to the UNRWA refugee agency and to the Palestinian Authority, along with introducing the “deal of the century”, which eviscerates any hopes for Palestinian national aspirations.

Neo-conservative ideology

The Trump administration has empowered the extreme political right, spreading the neo-conservative ideology of Christian Zionism throughout Latin America. The UN vote to condemn the US embassy relocation to Jerusalem was rejected by Guatemala, Honduras and Brazil, amid regional moves to strengthen “security” ties with Israel. Countries including Chile, Brazil, Argentina, Costa Rica, Colombia, Peru, Paraguay and Ecuador have all recognised Guaido.

It is extremely telling that the Trump administration selected Elliott Abrams as the new US envoy to Venezuela, reinforcing the notion that the US and Israel see this situation as a perfect opportunity to overthrow Maduro and install a pro-Israel regime in the country.

Abrams was convicted for his role in the Iran-Contra scandal, which involved a US-Israeli plan to secretly supply Iran with weapons amid an arms embargo, in the name of freeing hostages. The ultimate purpose was to fund US-backed counterinsurgents and guerrillas fighting socialism or communism.

Abrams was also implicated in massive human rights abuses perpetrated by pro-US regimes in El Salvador and Guatemala, and the Nicaraguan Contra rebels in the 1980s, which led to tens of thousands of deaths.

Abrams was later pardoned by the Bush administration and named deputy national security adviser to promote former President George HW Bush’s strategy of “adopting democracy abroad”, which included his role in a failed coup attempt against Chavez.

Abrams is also fiercely pro-Israel and was critical of the Obama administration for deeming settlement expansion in the Palestinian territories to be illegal, making him well-suited for the anti-Palestinian agenda in Latin America.

Looking ahead

The direction in which Venezuela is heading does not look promising for the region, especially in relation to Palestinian solidarity, given the Zionist-related meddling, both historical and contemporary.

The successful takeover of Venezuela by pro-US forces will mean the cementing of anti-Palestinian politics through an interventionist policy that erases and “cleanses” Palestine from the region.

The hope lies with the people of Venezuela, civil society and grassroots movements in Latin America. Only time will tell whether they can halt this Israeli-backed project to end Palestinian solidarity on the continent.

https://www.middleeasteye.net/opinio...rown-venezuela
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CuriousonTruth
02-10-2019, 04:30 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wsxmod0TSAo

Remembering Hugo Chavez's speech against USA.

People say religious muslims can't respect non-muslims. But I have mad respect and admiration for Hugo Chavez, a true champion of his people, truth and resistance against the West.
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CuriousonTruth
02-10-2019, 08:59 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHRvxeTu-Fc

Turkey backs Maduro
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DanEdge
02-10-2019, 12:46 PM
The Evil Western Cabal did not cause hyperinflation in Venezuela. Maduro's own economic policies did that. Venezuelan currency is worth less than toilet paper, literally. And it grows worse every day.

The US recently sent food and medical supplies to Venezuela, but Maduro ordered that it all be stored in a warehouse near the border, saying that the US is trying to "shame" Venezuelans. Meanwhile, the average Venezuelan weighs 15 lbs less than they did 15 years ago. Why you think that is?

The West is not taking food away from Venezuela. They are not taking water away. They are not in control of Venezuela's economic policies. Yet Venezuelan citizens are fleeing the country by the thousands every week. They are seeking asylum in other South American countries, the US, Mexico, and Canada.

It is these refugees who paint the clearest picture of what is actually going on in Venezuela. They blame Maduro and want him out. Turkey can say whatever it wants, but I don't see them offering any humanitarian aid, or offering asylum to the refugees.

Dan Edge
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CuriousonTruth
02-10-2019, 01:12 PM
Originally Posted by DanEdge
The Evil Western Cabal did not cause hyperinflation in Venezuela. Maduro's own economic policies did that. Venezuelan currency is worth less than toilet paper, literally. And it grows worse every day.

The US recently sent food and medical supplies to Venezuela, but Maduro ordered that it all be stored in a warehouse near the border, saying that the US is trying to "shame" Venezuelans. Meanwhile, the average Venezuelan weighs 15 lbs less than they did 15 years ago. Why you think that is?

The West is not taking food away from Venezuela. They are not taking water away. They are not in control of Venezuela's economic policies. Yet Venezuelan citizens are fleeing the country by the thousands every week. They are seeking asylum in other South American countries, the US, Mexico, and Canada.

It is these refugees who paint the clearest picture of what is actually going on in Venezuela. They blame Maduro and want him out. Turkey can say whatever it wants, but I don't see them offering any humanitarian aid, or offering asylum to the refugees.

Dan Edge
I am sure the West has nothing to do with Venezuela's hyper inflation. Just like the West has nothing to do with Iran's hyperinflation, or Turkey's inflation. Or Russia's 4 year long recession.

What a coincidence that illiberal countries who oppose the West are the only ones whose economy ends up struggling. Very interesting indeed.

I wasn't born yesterday.
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DanEdge
02-10-2019, 01:57 PM
Originally Posted by CuriousonTruth
I am sure the West has nothing to do with Venezuela's hyper inflation. Just like the West has nothing to do with Iran's hyperinflation, or Turkey's inflation. Or Russia's 4 year long recession.

What a coincidence that illiberal countries who oppose the West are the only ones whose economy ends up struggling. Very interesting indeed.

I wasn't born yesterday.
I encourage you to investigate Venezuela's monetary policy more closely.

Chavez assumed strict control over Venezuelan currency in the early 2000s. Hyperinflation began during that period due to government mismanagement, and it continues today. Maduro recently pinned the new Bolivar (devalued at something like 95%) to his own cryptocurrency, the Petro. The big bad West did not enforce any of those decisions.

What a coincidence that autocratic governments that assume absolute control over their currencies and start printing money like crazy tend to experience hyperinflation.

Dan Edge
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CuriousonTruth
02-10-2019, 02:17 PM
Originally Posted by DanEdge
I encourage you to investigate Venezuela's monetary policy more closely.

Chavez assumed strict control over Venezuelan currency in the early 2000s. Hyperinflation began during that period due to government mismanagement, and it continues today. Maduro recently pinned the new Bolivar (devalued at something like 95%) to his own cryptocurrency, the Petro. The big bad West did not enforce any of those decisions.

What a coincidence that autocratic governments that assume absolute control over their currencies and start printing money like crazy tend to experience hyperinflation.

Dan Edge
Yet autocratic rulers backed by the West flourish.
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alfaqir
02-10-2019, 10:59 PM
Originally Posted by CuriousonTruth
I am sure the West has nothing to do with Venezuela's hyper inflation. Just like the West has nothing to do with Iran's hyperinflation, or Turkey's inflation. Or Russia's 4 year long recession.

What a coincidence that illiberal countries who oppose the West are the only ones whose economy ends up struggling. Very interesting indeed.

I wasn't born yesterday.
Yet those countries' situation is still not comparable to Venezuela, they don't have shortages on basic goods and crazy high crime rates.Apparently the Venezuelan regime succeeded to mismanage their country on a Mugabe's Zimbabwe level. That's really an achievment.
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CuriousonTruth
02-11-2019, 12:48 AM
Originally Posted by alfaqir
Yet those countries' situation is still not comparable to Venezuela, they don't have shortages on basic goods and crazy high crime rates.Apparently the Venezuelan regime succeeded to mismanage their country on a Mugabe's Zimbabwe level. That's really an achievment.
1 dollar is worth around 150,000 Iranian dial I think. So Iran's economy is in very bad shape. Just like Venezuela Iran kept itself alive by allying with certain states.

The problem is not that socialism or Islamic systems are inherently bad. Problem is the West is home of the Banks and controls most of the world's wealth. So they can apply economic pressure to make any system look bad.
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Junon
02-11-2019, 11:25 AM
Salaam

More on the problems of Venezuela.



More recent.



1 dollar is worth around 150,000 Iranian dial I think. So Iran's economy is in very bad shape. Just like Venezuela Iran kept itself alive by allying with certain states.

The problem is not that socialism or Islamic systems are inherently bad. Problem is the West is home of the Banks and controls most of the world's wealth. So they can apply economic pressure to make any system look bad.
Brother I agree but its not black and white. The economic policy followed by recent governments in Venuzuela has been very very problematic but this doesnt justify outside powers (no doubt being led by the USA) installing its own lapdog and taking over its economy in the name of 'freedom' and 'democracy', 'human rights' etc etc ad nauseum.

The routine gets old after a while and many are wise to it.



There has to be a solution that benifets the people of Venezuela, its neigbours and the surrounding region. If outside powers genuinely want to help then good but if not then they should stay away.
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DanEdge
02-11-2019, 11:57 AM
Originally Posted by Junon
Salaam

More on the problems of Venezuela.



More recent.





The economic policy followed by recent governments in Venuzuela has been very very problematic but this doesnt justify outside powers (no doubt being led by the USA) installing its own lapdog and taking over its economy in the name of 'freedom' and 'democracy', 'human rights' etc etc ad nauseum.

The routine gets old after a while and many are wise to it.

I agree that United States involvement is undesirable, but how can one consider Guaidó anyone's lap dog? Venezuelans elected him to the position that he is in right now (Head of Assembly). The Venezuelans protesting all over the world and in Venezuela want him to be President.

Venezuelans will not let Maduro stay in power, and I doubt Maduro is going down without a fight. Hopefully, the Venezuelan military will depose him on their own. But if they don't, and the fighting starts, then a lot of innocent people are going to get killed.

If that happens, then the United States may well send it's 5,000 battle ready troops from Colombia into Venezuela. We could defeat the Loyalists within a week. It wouldn't be like Afghanistan because there is no popular support for Maduro (his approval ratings were below 20% during the 2018 elections, yet he still won, go figure). Guaidó would take over and they could start getting to work healing their country. The 3 million+ refugees could start to come home.

If civil war starts in Venezuela, are we to do nothing, even if Venezuelans ask us to intervene? It is a complex moral question to be sure. My view: we stay out of it unless and until violence starts to erupt. If Maduro starts murdering his own people to protect his position of power, then I would support US intervention.

Dan Edge
Dan Edge
Reply

Futuwwa
02-13-2019, 07:04 AM
Originally Posted by Junon
Salaam

Americans are interested in more 'regime' change'. This time in Venezuela, short video that will get you up to speed on the situation (American perspective).

Blurb

Donald Trump may be the main thing keeping Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro going...

This is what I've been saying too. A century of US dominance of Latin America through various dirty means has led to US influence having become utterly toxic. When Trump first murmured about pulling off a regime change in 2017, the Venezuelan opposition had to go overboard to denounce and condemn any such thing, knowing fully well that being seen as standing up to US domination is good for Maduro's approval rating.
Reply

Abz2000
02-13-2019, 08:05 AM
Originally Posted by DanEdge
I encourage you to investigate Venezuela's monetary policy more closely.

Chavez assumed strict control over Venezuelan currency in the early 2000s. Hyperinflation began during that period due to government mismanagement, and it continues today. Maduro recently pinned the new Bolivar (devalued at something like 95%) to his own cryptocurrency, the Petro. The big bad West did not enforce any of those decisions.

What a coincidence that autocratic governments that assume absolute control over their currencies and start printing money like crazy tend to experience hyperinflation.

Dan Edge


Ummm, hows abouts the sanctions and the cia money printing, the worthless "bank of" de la rue notes which most international money exchangers on the streets refuse to accept, and the constant attacks via corrupt sellout mafia politicians who meet in secret with the american government, similar stuff happened in zimbabwe when he attempted to nationalize the diamond mines after stating that previous corrupt administrations were shills who had simply been doing the mir jafar ali khan on behalf of eic - oh the way the rothschild associated diamond companies went beserk after he let his common people into the diamond fields .... but then he was forced to back doen and they were ripped apart by helicopter gunships before the british companies retook control.
Reply

CuriousonTruth
02-13-2019, 02:54 PM
Originally Posted by DanEdge
I agree that United States involvement is undesirable, but how can one consider Guaidó anyone's lap dog? Venezuelans elected him to the position that he is in right now (Head of Assembly). The Venezuelans protesting all over the world and in Venezuela want him to be President.

Venezuelans will not let Maduro stay in power, and I doubt Maduro is going down without a fight. Hopefully, the Venezuelan military will depose him on their own. But if they don't, and the fighting starts, then a lot of innocent people are going to get killed.

If that happens, then the United States may well send it's 5,000 battle ready troops from Colombia into Venezuela. We could defeat the Loyalists within a week. It wouldn't be like Afghanistan because there is no popular support for Maduro (his approval ratings were below 20% during the 2018 elections, yet he still won, go figure). Guaidó would take over and they could start getting to work healing their country. The 3 million+ refugees could start to come home.

If civil war starts in Venezuela, are we to do nothing, even if Venezuelans ask us to intervene? It is a complex moral question to be sure. My view: we stay out of it unless and until violence starts to erupt. If Maduro starts murdering his own people to protect his position of power, then I would support US intervention.

Dan Edge
Dan Edge
yep the west intervenes, and everyone lives happily ever after. lol
Reply

space
02-13-2019, 04:43 PM
another day, another money & power thing as usual..
Reply

CuriousonTruth
02-14-2019, 09:38 AM
https://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/ne...TCe0DG-7uyrvqk

Juan Guaido, Venezuela's US-backed self-declared president, said he was working to restore ties with Israel a decade after the country severed relations with the Jewish state in solidarity with the Palestinian people.


Guaido said "I am very happy to report that the process of stabilising relations with Israel is at its height," in a quote pulled by Reuters from an Israel Hayom interview.


Israel joined the United States, Canada and a host of South American countries "in recognising the new leadership in Venezuela" last month. 50 countries now recognise the hopeful leader.
Reply

Junon
02-14-2019, 11:02 PM
Salaam

Another update, oh dear not him.



Being questioned on his record.







'History doesnt repeat but it does rhyme'. A look at his past record. This was during the 1980s.



The drums of war are beating.



USA concern for defending bringing 'freedom' and 'democracy' has always been very selective.



Wasnt expecting this cracks in the MSM narrative.

Reply

Junon
02-22-2019, 08:10 PM
Salaam

Another update

Blurb

We go to Caracas, Venezuela, for an update on the escalating standoff between President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader and self-proclaimed president Juan Guaidó. Guaidó claims he is preparing to deliver humanitarian aid from the Colombian border Saturday. Maduro has rejected the plan, saying the effort is part of a broader attempt to overthrow his regime.

This comes as Trump’s special envoy to Venezuela and right-wing hawk, Elliott Abrams, is leading a U.S. delegation traveling by military aircraft to the Colombian border, supposedly to help deliver the aid. The United Nations, the Red Cross and other relief organizations have refused to work with the U.S. on delivering that aid to Venezuela, which they say is politically motivated. We speak with Venezuelan sociologist Edgardo Lander, a member of the Citizen’s Platform in Defense of the Constitution.

“This certainly is not humanitarian aid, and it’s not oriented with any humanitarian aims,” Lander says. “This is clearly a coup carried out by the United States government with its allies, with the Lima Group and the extreme right wing in Venezuela.”


Reply

Junon
02-24-2019, 10:50 AM
Salaam

Like to share. Another perspective on Venezuela's economic problems.



Letter from Caracas

If there is one symbol of the mess our country is in, it is state oil company Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA)m which produces and exports most of our oil, earns almost all our money and is also one of our biggest borrowers, with debts around $40bn.

In its heyday around 30 years ago, PDVSA was considered the worlds best run national oil company; it is now among the worst - and there is plenty of competition.

Our reserves surpass those of Saudi Arabia; but years of mismangament, corruption and chronic underinvestment have taken their toll, with oil production around half what it was only three years ago. Output of 1.1, barrels a day look certain to drop further now that Donald Trump has hit PDVSA with sanctions targeting exports to the US (equivalent to more than a thrid of production) and freezing the assets of its US oil refeining subsidiary, Citgo. the longer our lumbering president Nicolas Maduro clings to power, the more likely the US will tighten these sanctions.

At a time of crises, you'd think Maduro might call upon people with experience to turn the company around and get production back on its feet. But no: the person running PDVSA and the oil ministry is General Manuel Quevedo, who has more experience cracking the skulls of opposition protestors than getting oil out of the ground. He speaks no English and railes to journalists at Opec meetings about 'neo imperialists' ie US - trying to steal our oil wealth.

PDVSA is now effectively under the armys control, with former company executives either in the slammer on corruption charges or forced to flee the country. Exiles include PDVSA former long serving overlord, Rafael Ramirez, who did a stint as Venezuelas ambasador to the UN, is hiding somewhere in Europe and is plotting a comeback if Maduro is swept from power. But he too, has been tainted by corruption: last year a judge in Andorra charged his cousin, former PDVSA exec Diego Salazar, with masterminding a scheme to launder $2bn from the company between 2004 and 2013. Ramirez was, somehow not involved.

Oil could be a decisive factor in how long Maduro, ostracised by the US and most of Europe and Latin America, is able to hang on. Russia backs Maduro, as much for commercial reasons as political ones. Over the past 5 years state controlled giant Rosneft (in which BP is a minority shareholder) has been awarded several lucrative oil production assets. Rosneft has also lent PDVSA $6.5bn and is now being repaid in oil.

That debt has been halved, but the Russians fear regime change in Caracas could leave them out of pocket, and isolated, as the US oil companies move in. China, too, has big exposure to Venezuela and is also being repaid in oil - leaving PDVSA with previous little cash of its own.

Most PDVSA's outstanding debt is to bondholders, which include US heavyweights such as Goldman Sachs. there dream is that Maduro makes a quick exit, US backed upstart Juan Guaido takes over, and PDVSA becomes great - and a great customer - again.

As US sanctions kick in, PDVSA could normally rely on firendly trading firms to get around the restrictions. But maybe not this time. Last March, a trust representing PDVSA filed a lawsuit in Miami against several prominent trading firms, including the top three of Vitol, Glencore and Trafigura, accusing them of colluding in a scheme to rig oil supply tenders conducted by PDVSA. the traders deny any wrongdoing, of course, and their lawyers say the case should be thrown out because the US no longer recognises Maduro as president.

PE Issue 1490
Reply

DanEdge
02-24-2019, 01:29 PM
Originally Posted by Junon
Salaam

Like to share. Another perspective on Venezuela's economic problems.



Letter from Caracas

If there is one symbol of the mess our country is in, it is state oil company Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA)m which produces and exports most of our oil, earns almost all our money and is also one of our biggest borrowers, with debts around $40bn.

In its heyday around 30 years ago, PDVSA was considered the worlds best run national oil company; it is now among the worst - and there is plenty of competition.

Our reserves surpass those of Saudi Arabia; but years of mismangament, corruption and chronic underinvestment have taken their toll, with oil production around half what it was only three years ago. Output of 1.1, barrels a day look certain to drop further now that Donald Trump has hit PDVSA with sanctions targeting exports to the US (equivalent to more than a thrid of production) and freezing the assets of its US oil refeining subsidiary, Citgo. the longer our lumbering president Nicolas Maduro clings to power, the more likely the US will tighten these sanctions.

At a time of crises, you'd think Maduro might call upon people with experience to turn the company around and get production back on its feet. But no: the person running PDVSA and the oil ministry is General Manuel Quevedo, who has more experience cracking the skulls of opposition protestors than getting oil out of the ground. He speaks no English and railes to journalists at Opec meetings about 'neo imperialists' ie US - trying to steal our oil wealth.

PDVSA is now effectively under the armys control, with former company executives either in the slammer on corruption charges or forced to flee the country. Exiles include PDVSA former long serving overlord, Rafael Ramirez, who did a stint as Venezuelas ambasador to the UN, is hiding somewhere in Europe and is plotting a comeback if Maduro is swept from power. But he too, has been tainted by corruption: last year a judge in Andorra charged his cousin, former PDVSA exec Diego Salazar, with masterminding a scheme to launder $2bn from the company between 2004 and 2013. Ramirez was, somehow not involved.

Oil could be a decisive factor in how long Maduro, ostracised by the US and most of Europe and Latin America, is able to hang on. Russia backs Maduro, as much for commercial reasons as political ones. Over the past 5 years state controlled giant Rosneft (in which BP is a minority shareholder) has been awarded several lucrative oil production assets. Rosneft has also lent PDVSA $6.5bn and is now being repaid in oil.

That debt has been halved, but the Russians fear regime change in Caracas could leave them out of pocket, and isolated, as the US oil companies move in. China, too, has big exposure to Venezuela and is also being repaid in oil - leaving PDVSA with previous little cash of its own.

Most PDVSA's outstanding debt is to bondholders, which include US heavyweights such as Goldman Sachs. there dream is that Maduro makes a quick exit, US backed upstart Juan Guaido takes over, and PDVSA becomes great - and a great customer - again.

As US sanctions kick in, PDVSA could normally rely on firendly trading firms to get around the restrictions. But maybe not this time. Last March, a trust representing PDVSA filed a lawsuit in Miami against several prominent trading firms, including the top three of Vitol, Glencore and Trafigura, accusing them of colluding in a scheme to rig oil supply tenders conducted by PDVSA. the traders deny any wrongdoing, of course, and their lawyers say the case should be thrown out because the US no longer recognises Maduro as president.

PE Issue 1490
Thanks for providing some balance, brother. Though I remind myself that the Von Mises Institute is heavily biased towards capitalism, so I take their analysis with a grain of salt. But there is a lot of truth to it.

I am very concerned about the situation at the Venezuela Colombia border. As many as four people died yesterday trying to get aid trucks across the border. Al Jazeera reports that Venezuela military forces were setting food trucks on fire. BBC had pictures and video of protesters furiously working to get food and medical supplies off the trucks before they burned up.

While all this was happening, Maduro threw a little party in the capital and was dancing salsa with some lady on the street. My blood boils. He cut diplomatic ties with Colombia, giving Columbian staff 24 hours to get out of the country.

I think we are witnessing the beginning of the end for Maduro.

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/...201249087.html

Dan Edge
Reply

Junon
02-26-2019, 10:19 PM
Salaam

I agree the situation is not black and white, I think the socialistic policies have caused immense problems, but the US and its lackeys arent intervening due to their 'benevolence'. That idea has been debunked time and time again.

Blurb

Governments lie to justify wars. Newspapers and TV news programs assist governments by forwarding those lies to the American public. The US Government has gone to war over and over based upon lies. This video focuses upon the deceit used by the government and the news media to sell wars to the American public since the end of WW2.

That includes the Korean War, the war on Vietnam and Cambodia, the embargo/sanctions against Cuba, the invasion of Panama, the invasion of Iraq (Desert Storm), the invasion of Serbia, the invasion of Afghanistan, the second invasion of Iraq, the overthrow of government of Libya, U.S. bombings and killings in Pakistan, the U.S. arming and funding of rebels in Syria, the U.S. embargo and sanctions against Iran -- just to name a few of the more well-known illegal wars waged by the United States Government. All of these military operations, as well as the many others not named here, were sold to America by lies and misinformation.

The question is: Why do Americans continue to believe what they are told by their government or their news media?




Though the propoganda has evolved since this time.

Plenty of patriotic Americans know the deal.



Trump doesnt mess around.



The laws by which the global Oligarchs rule.



Like Ive said, I dont agree with socialism. Both sides have to come together and find a negotiated settlement. One way the USA could allieviate the suffering would be to lift the sanctions sit down with their opposite number and hammer out their differences in a constructive manner.

What we dont need is more of this.


Having said all this I appreciate your viewpoint Dan, good to get different perspective (eg. I didnt realise how badly Venezuela has been governed, corruption, the strength of opposition) even if we disagree.
Reply

Junon
02-28-2019, 08:08 PM
Salaam

Like to share, more analysis of the situation. Another even handed take.

Reply

CuriousonTruth
03-06-2019, 02:11 PM
Although I completely distrust any of the Western media, Jimmy Dore and Kyle Kulinski hold a 'fair' position on Venezuela.
Reply

Junon
03-11-2019, 01:13 AM
Salaam

Another update. American Black ops?









Comment.

We’ve seen the west’s approach to Venezuela before – in Syria, Egypt, Afghanistan, need I go on?

Instead of pleading with those who will not support him, the self-proclaimed interim president of Venezuela might want to take a closer look at who his foreign friends are

The closest I ever came to Venezuela, many years ago, was a transit connection at Caracas airport. I noticed a lot of soldiers in red berets and a clutch of goons, and it reminded me, vaguely, of the Middle East.

Now, sitting in the rain squalls of the wintry Levant, I flick through my newspaper clippings of our recent local autocrats – Saddam, Assad, al-Sisi, Erdogan, Mohammed bin Salman (you can fill in the rest for yourself) – and I think of Nicolas Maduro.

The comparisons are by no means precise. Indeed, it’s not the nature of the “strongmen” I’m thinking about. It’s our reaction to all these chaps. And there are two obvious parallels: the way in which we sanction and isolate the hated dictator – or love him, as the case may be – and the manner in which we not only name the opposition as the rightful heir to the nation, but demand that democracy be delivered to the people whose torture and struggle for freedom we have suddenly discovered.

And before I forget it, there’s one other common thread in this story. If you suggest that those who want presidential change in Venezuela may be a little too hasty, and our support for – let us say – Juan Guaido might be a bit premature if we don’t want to start a civil war, this means you are “pro-Maduro”.

Just as those who opposed the 2003 invasion of Iraq were “pro-Saddam”, or those who thought the west might pause before it supported the increasingly violent opposition in Syria were labelled “pro-Assad”.

And those who defended Yasser Arafat – over a long period a super-terrorist, a super-diplomat and then a super-terrorist again – against those who would oust him as leader of the Palestinians, were abused as “pro-Arafat”, “pro-Palestinian”, “pro-terrorist” and, inevitably, “anti-Semitic”. I recall how George W Bush warned us after 9/11, that “you are either with us or against us”. The same threat was made to us about Assad.

Erdogan has used it in Turkey (less than three years ago) and it was a common line in the forgotten 1930s used by none other than Mussolini. And now I quote Trump’s US secretary of state Michael Pompeo on Maduro: “Now it is time for every other nation to pick a side … either you stand with the forces of freedom, or you’re in league with Maduro and his mayhem.”

You get the point. Now is the time for all good people to stand alongside the United States, the EU, the nations of Latin America – or do you support the Russkies, Chinese, Iranian headbangers, the perfidious Corbyn and (of all people) the Greeks? Talking of the Greeks, European pressure on Alexis Tsipras to conform to the EU’s support for Guaido – proving that the EU can indeed bully its smaller members – is a good argument for Brexiteers (though far too complex for them to understand).

But first, let’s take a look at our favourite tyrant, in the words of all who oppose him. He’s a powerful dictator, surrounded by generals, suppressing his people, using torture, mass arrests, secret police murders, rigged elections, political prisoners – so no wonder we gave our support to those who wish to overthrow this brutal man and stage democratic elections.

Not a bad precis of our current policy towards the Maduro regime. But I am referring, of course, word-for-word, to the west’s policy towards the Assad regime in Syria. And our support for opposition democracy there wasn’t terribly successful.

We were not solely responsible for the Syrian civil war – but we were not guiltless since we sent an awful lot of weapons to those trying to overthrow Assad. And last month the notepad of US national security advisor John Bolton appeared to boast a plan to send 5,000 US troops to Colombia…

And now let’s tick the box on another Maduro-lookalike – at least from the west’s simplistic point of view: the military-backed elected field marshal-president al-Sisi of Egypt, whom we love, admire and protect. Powerful dictator? Yup. Surrounded and supported by generals? You bet, not least because he locked up a rival general before the last election. Suppression? Absolutely – all in the interest of crushing “terrorism”, of course.

Mass arrests? Happily yes, for all the inmates of Egypt’s savage prison system are “terrorists”, at least according to the field marshal-president himself. Secret police murders? Well, even forgetting the young Italian student suspected by his government to have been allegedly tortured and bumped off by one of Sisi’s top Egyptian cops, there’s a roll call of disappeared activists.

Rigged elections? No doubt about it, although al-Sisi still maintains that his last triumph at the polls – a cracking 97 per cent – was a free and fair election.

President Trump sent his “sincere congratulations”. Political prisoners? Well, the total is 60,000 and rising. Oh yes, and Maduro’s last victory – a rigged election if ever there was one, of course – was a mere 67.84 per cent.

As the late sage of the Sunday Express, John Gordon, might have said: it makes you sit up a bit. So, too, I suppose, when we glance a bit further eastwards to Afghanistan, whose Taliban rulers were routed in 2001 by the US, whose post-9/11 troops and statesmen ushered in a new life of democracy, then corruption, warlordism and civil war.

The “democracy” bit quickly came unstuck when “loya jurgas”, grand councils, turned into tribal playpens and the Americans announced that it would be an exaggeration to think that we could achieve “Jeffersonian democracy” in Afghanistan. Too true.

Now the Americans are negotiating with the “terrorist” Taliban in Qatar so they can get the hell out of the Graveyard of Empires after 17 years of military setbacks, scandals and defeats – not to mention running a few torture camps which even Maduro would cough to look at.

Now all this may not encourage you to walk down memory lane. And I haven’t even listed the sins of Saddam, let alone our continuing and cosy relationship – amazing as it still seems – with that Gulf state whose lads strangled, chopped up and secretly buried a US-resident journalist in Turkey.

Now just imagine if Maduro, tired of a journalist critic slandering him in Miami, decided to lure him to the Venezuelan embassy in Washington and top the poor guy, slice him up and bury him secretly in Foggy Bottom. Well now, I have a feeling that sanctions might have been applied to Maduro a long time ago. But not to Saudi Arabia, of course, where we are very definitely not advocating democracy.

“Now is the time for democracy and prosperity in Venezuela,” quoth John Bolton this week. Oh, yes indeed. Maduro runs an oil-soaked nation yet its people starve. He is an unworthy, foolish and vain man, even if he’s not Saddamite in his crimes. He was rightly described by a colleague as a dreary tyrant. He even looks like the kind of guy who tied ladies to railway lines in silent movies.

So good luck to Guaido. Palpably a nice guy, speaks eloquently, wise to stick to aid for the poor and fresh elections rather than dwell on just how exactly Maduro and his military chums are going to be booted out.

In other words, good luck – but watch out. Instead of pleading with those who will not support him – the Greeks, for example – he might take a closer look at who his foreign friends are. And do a quick track record on their more recent crusades for freedom, democracy and the right to life. And by the way, I haven’t even mentioned Libya.

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices...-a8768821.html

More analysis.

Reply

Junon
04-04-2019, 09:47 PM
Salaam

Another update

The anti-imperial alliance

Now China has sent troops to Venezuela as well:

A group of Chinese soldiers arrived in Venezuela on Sunday as part of a cooperation program between Beijing and Caracas. According to reports, more than 120 soldiers from the Chinese People’s Liberation Army arrived at Venezuela’s Margarita Island to deliver humanitarian aid and military supplies to the government forces.

The arrival of the People’s Liberation Army in Venezuela comes just days after the Russian armed forces deployed to the country to install a military helicopter training facility.

However, this move by the Russian military has not come without heavy criticism from the Trump administration and several U.S. congressmen.

“Maduro calls for hands off #Venezuela while he invites security forces from Cuba and Russia, so he and his cronies can keep plundering Venezuela. It is time for Venezuelan institutions to stand for their sovereignty. Russia and Cuba, #HandsOffVenezuela,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted on March 28th.

These moves by the Russian and Chinese armed forces appear to be a powerplay against the U.S. administration, who is actively pushing to remove Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro from power.
As I observed last year, Syria was a major turning point and will likely mark the end of the global US empire. The fall of Libya and the near-expansion of NATO to Ukraine and Georgia forced the Russians and the Chinese to realize that the time for resistance had finally arrived, and their strategists recognized that the US military is too weak and overextended to be capable of enforcing the Monroe Doctrine.

Since the US is almost certain to back down on Venezuela, where its chosen puppet has absolutely no popular support, it is safe to expect US retreats on other fronts as China and Russia start putting on the pressure elsewhere in South and Central America. Remember, China already controls the Panama Canal and has considerable influence on the west coast of Canada.

I suspect this is why Israel is being so aggressive with regards to the Golan Heights and Gaza, as they must recognize that their ability to act underneath the aegis of US protection is rapidly running out of time.

http://voxday.blogspot.com/
Reply

Junon
05-01-2019, 02:12 PM
Salaam

Another update, Guaido attempted a coup, it failed.

Reply

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