PDA

View Full Version : Homework/coursework thread



Uthman
04-12-2005, 09:04 PM
:sl:

I was thinking that we could use this thread to exchange help and advice to people regarding their homework. :) Just post if you need any help. :)

:w:
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
Uma Rayanah
04-13-2005, 09:59 AM
:sl:

amazin topic... indeed every one needs help...

i'm here help 2 ,,
:D

* but don't blame me if i give u da wrong answer.. u know at least i hv tried!!* ;D
Reply

aamirsaab
04-13-2005, 02:01 PM
me 2...or me 3...

ah i know where 2 start
maths
hehe good subject - (not AS level - i dont do AS level maths but i have done gcse maths...and im guite good at it :p )
Reply

Saif
04-13-2005, 03:10 PM
Cool idea,
I can help with sciences, hated it but I'm sure something stuck
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
Uma Rayanah
04-13-2005, 04:59 PM
is any of uz do sociology ???
Reply

niqaabii
04-14-2005, 11:23 AM
does anyone do AS level business studies(aqa)
Reply

S_87
04-14-2005, 03:39 PM
yh i did sociology :thumbs_up
Reply

Uthman
04-14-2005, 05:41 PM
:sl:

SATS is coming up soon! :( No matter what you may say Amani and Arwa and others you cannot stop me from being worried about it. Hey, is there any help anyone wants? You will be surprised how a mature, young adult can help! :)

:w:
Reply

yoshiyahu
04-15-2005, 01:55 AM
Anyone wanna do my Calculus homework for me?

lol j/k
Reply

Saif
04-15-2005, 07:39 AM
SATS is coming up soon! No matter what you may say Amani and Arwa and others you cannot stop me from being worried about it. Hey, is there any help anyone wants? You will be surprised how a mature, young adult can help!
I don't really know you, and although you say so your self mashallah-have to accept you are actually quite mature-make sure you get those 8's in may.

Does anybody know any good physiology websites?
Reply

S_87
04-15-2005, 08:03 AM
awww mashaAllah osman :D
you revise then :thumbs_up
Reply

islam4eva
04-20-2005, 07:29 PM
:sl:

Bro Osman i kno hw u feel iv got my SAT's in 2 weeks too!!

I still havent started to revise yet...
But inshallah i will do well!

wslm
Reply

SalafiFemaleJih
04-20-2005, 07:30 PM
how do you do fractions???

now now, not all amrikkans are like me
Reply

Far7an
04-21-2005, 03:56 PM
Five principles of Gestalt psychology


  • Proximity: we group by distance or location
  • Similarity: we group by type
  • Symmetry: we group by meaning
  • Continuity: We group by flow of lines (alignment)
  • Closure: we perceive shapes that are not (completely) there.
Reply

Far7an
04-21-2005, 03:56 PM
Ignore the post above, it is for one of my freinds who is studying with me.
Reply

S_87
05-06-2005, 10:47 AM
Originally Posted by SalafiFemaleJih
how do you do fractions???

now now, not all amrikkans are like me
;D
what dya mean missy?

u mean
Fraction definitions.
Reducing fractions.
Adding and subtracting fractions.
Multiplying fractions.
Dividing fractions
Reply

Lateralus63
05-06-2005, 11:19 AM
Originally Posted by farhan247
Five principles of Gestalt psychology


  • Proximity: we group by distance or location
  • Similarity: we group by type
  • Symmetry: we group by meaning
  • Continuity: We group by flow of lines (alignment)
  • Closure: we perceive shapes that are not (completely) there.
Oh i remember studying that, my main interest in psychology lies in cognitive which is what you explained above and also in behavioural psychology.

Revision sucks.
Reply

Uthman
05-11-2005, 05:40 PM
:sl:

This is about Exothermic reactions in Chemistry. Why do some reactions give off heat? :brother:

:w:
Reply

أحمد
05-11-2005, 05:44 PM
:sl:

:D Steel Wool generating heat :mad:


Chemical reactions occur every day all around us. A chemical reaction is a process where one type of substance is chemically converted to another substance. That fizzling toilet bowl cleaner is a chemical reaction. The fire in your fireplace is another type of chemical reaction. The smoke that comes out of Dad's ears when you lose one of his favorite golf clubs is a result of a chemical reaction. OK, so maybe that's a bad example. This experiment demonstrates a chemical reaction that's fairly common all around us (and we don't have to touch Dad's golf clubs to make this one work).
  1. Put the thermometer in the jar and close the lid.
  2. Wait about 5 minutes and write down the temperature.
  3. Remove the thermometer from the jar.
  4. Soak a piece of steel wool in vinegar for one minute.
  5. Squeeze the vinegar out of the steel wool pad. Wrap the steel wool around the bulb of the thermometer.
  6. Place the thermometer and steel wool back into the jar and close the lid.
  7. Wait 5 minutes.
  8. Now take a look at the temperature.
What happened to the temperature? Are you surprised that it the temperature rose (sorry this experiment didn't produce any smoke but then again, you didn't get grounded either).

The vinegar removes any protective coating from the steel wool, allowing the iron in the steel to rust. Rusting is a slow combination of iron with oxygen. When this happens, heat energy is released. The heat released by the rusting of the iron causes the mercury in the thermometer to expand and rise.

Parent's Note. Chemical reaction is a process in which one substance is chemically converted to another. All chemical reactions involve the formation or destruction of bonds between atoms (atoms, made up of protons and neutrons in a central nucleus surrounded electrons, are the smallest particle of a chemical element that can take part in a chemical reaction without being permanently changed) . Chemical reactions include the rusting of iron and the digestion of food. Most chemical reactions give off heat. For example, chemical reactions that occur in digestion give off heat that keeps our bodies warm and functioning.

Chemists use chemical equations to express what occurs in chemical reactions. Chemical equations consist of chemical formulas and symbols that show the substances involved in chemical changes. The chemical reaction for the rusting of iron shows that four atoms of solid iron react with three molecules of oxygen gas to form two units of solid rust. Experiments demonstrate that iron and oxygen react in these proportions in air at room temperature. Rust is the product, or result, of the reaction. Iron and oxygen are the reactants. The reactants are the substances that undergo chemical change.

Info from: http://web.ask.com/redir?u=http%3A%2...nip&Complete=1

:w:
Reply

أحمد
05-11-2005, 05:50 PM
:sl:

:D Also:

:mad: Thermo chemistry
THERMOCHEMISTRY
There are some specialty areas of Chemistry. You can learn about Electrochemistry, Nuclear Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry. Here we want to talk a little about THERMOCHEMISTRY, the division of chemistry that deals with temperature in chemical reactions.

Some reactions give off a lot of heat while other use up a lot of heat. Have you ever seen those cold or heat packs in a first aid kit? There are chemicals in those bags that go through a reaction and make heat and cold. Chemists sat in labs with a bunch of chemicals and figured out the best ones to use for those packs.

The idea behind those reactions is that chemical bonds store a lot of energy. If you break those bonds, heat is given off. Sometimes when you make bonds, you need a lot of heat, that's when everything around the molecules gets really cold, the heat is sucked out of the area. Bonds are energy. Some store more energy than others.

Scientists use the Greek letter "DELTA" to say that there has been a change in something. In Thermochemistry they often use the symbol "Delta-T" which means there was a change in temperature.

WHAT ARE HEAT AND COLD?
It's a pretty simple idea. You think of heat, you think of fire. You think of cold, you think of an ice cube. It all has to do with KINETIC ENERGY. Heat has a lot of kinetic energy and gives it away, cold doesn't have much and absorbs energy from the area. Scientists measure heat in something called JOULES.

There are two kinds of heat in chemistry. The first is caused by PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. As you get more kinetic energy, there is more activity in the system. This extra activity makes more COLLISIONS occur. It is the collisions which are heat (like when you increase the pressure in a system). The second type of heat is caused by CHEMICAL PROCESSES. Instead of exciting a system and feeling the heat, chemical bonds are broken and energy is released. The release in energy charges up the system and the molecules bounce around faster, resulting in that physical activity we just talked about.

HEAT AND THE ENERGY AROUND YOU
There is energy all around us. Just like MATTER is all around us. Usually you will feel this energy as heat. Let's say it's really hot out today. Why is it hot? One big reason is that there is a lot of heat coming from the Sun. The Sun is a big furnace, and that furnace heats the earth. When the Sun is really bright, it transmits energy to the atoms and molecules in the air and ground, making them heat up. That is why you feel hotter. The Sun makes your molecules more excited because of the energy hitting you.

How about when you burn a piece of wood? When you burn something you release the energy from the chemical bonds in the wood. Where did the energy come from? The sun. A plant needs the sun to grow. Light hits the plant and helps a process called PHOTOSYNTHESIS. The plant captures the energy and stores it in the chemical bonds. When you burn a piece of wood, you are releasing all of the energy stored up, and that energy is heat.

Info From: http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/kids/sc...ochemistry.htm

:w:
Reply

أحمد
05-11-2005, 06:36 PM
:sl:

:D Don't forget:
chemical reaction, process by which one or more substances may be transformed into one or more new substances. Energy is released or is absorbed, but no loss in total molecular weight occurs. When, for example, water is decomposed, its molecules, each of which consists of one atom of oxygen and two of hydrogen, are broken down; the hydrogen atoms then combine in pairs to form hydrogen molecules and the oxygen atoms to form oxygen molecules. In a chemical reaction, substances lose their characteristic properties. Water, for example, a liquid which neither burns nor supports combustion, is decomposed to yield flammable hydrogen and combustion-supporting oxygen. In some reactions heat is given off (exothermic reactions), and in others heat is absorbed (endothermic reactions). Furthermore, the new substances formed differ from the original substances in the energy they contain. Chemical reactions are classified according to the kind of change that takes place. When a compound, which consists of two or more elements or groups of elements, is broken down into its constituents, the reaction is called simple decomposition. When two compounds react with one another to form two new compounds, the reaction is called double decomposition. In so-called replacement reactions the place of one of the elements in a compound is taken by another element reacting with the compound. When elements combine to form a compound, the reaction is termed chemical combination. Oxidation and reduction reactions are extremely important. Reversible reactions are those in which the chemical change taking place may be paralleled by another change back to the original substances. The rates at which chemical reactions proceed depend upon various factors, e.g., upon temperature, pressure, and the concentration of the substances involved and, sometimes, upon the use of a chemical called a catalyst. In some chemical reactions, such as that of photographic film, light is an important factor. The changes taking place in a chemical reaction are represented by a chemical equation. An element's activity, i.e., its tendency to enter into compounds, varies from one element to another.



Science


chemical reaction

A process in which atoms of the same or different elements rearrange themselves to form a new substance. While they do so, they either absorb heat or give it off.


WordNet


Note: click on a word meaning below to see its connections and related words. The noun chemical reaction has one meaning:

Meaning #1: (chemistry) a process in which one or more substances are changed into others
Synonym: reaction



Wikipedia


@import url(http://www.answers.com/main/content/wp/css/common.css);@import url(http://www.answers.com/main/content/wp/css/gnwp.css);chemical reaction
A chemical reaction or is a reaction of two or more chemicals (reagents), yielding a chemical change and a product(s). A chemical change is defined as molecules attaching to each other to form larger molecules, molecules breaking apart to form two or more smaller molecules, or rearrangement of atoms within molecules. Chemical reactions usually involve the making or breaking of chemical bonds.



Types

There are six types of common chemical reactions. Most reactions will be classified as one of these, though there may be others that cannot be classified:
  • Synthesis
    • Also called composition or direct combination.
    • Two or more individual atoms, ions, or molecules coming together and forming a new substance.
    • Only one product.
    • Example: A + B → AB
  • Decomposition

    • Also called analysis
    • A chemical compound breaks apart into two or more individual atoms, ions, or molecules.
    • Only one reactant.
    • Example: AB → A + B
  • Combustion

    • A specific type of decomposition, involving large amounts of light and heat. Comustion reactions typically involve carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (the reactants) forming carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) (the products).
    • Example: CxHx + O2 → CO2 + H2O
  • Single displacement

    • Also called single replacement.
    • One compound and one element are displaced.
    • One compound and one element on both sides.
    • Example: AB + C → AC + B
  • Double displacement

    • Also called double replacement, metathesis, or ion exchange
    • Two compounds are displaced.
    • Two compounds on both sides.
    • Example: AB + CD → AC + BD
  • Neutralization

    • Also called water-forming reactions.
    • A specific type of double displacement reactions involving an acid and a base (reactants) neutralizing (canceling each other out) to form water.


  • In a rearrangement reaction, the atoms and bonds within a molecule rearrange to form an isomer of the original compound.
A-B=C → A=B-C
  • In an oxidation-reduction reaction (also known as a redox reaction), one reactant loses electrons (that is, it is oxidized), and the other reactant gains electrons (it is reduced). The oxidized reactant is the reducing agent and the reduced reactant is the oxidizing agent.
    • Example: A + B → A+ + B-
    • Single displacement reactions are typically also redox reactions.
A chemical reaction does not change the nucleus of the atom in any way, only the interaction of the electron clouds of the involved atoms. (Changes in the composition of the nuclei of atoms are called nuclear reactions, and are not considered chemical reactions, although chemical reactions may follow a nuclear transformation.)




Energy and reactions

A chemical reaction almost always involves a change in energy, conveniently measured in terms of heat. The energy difference between the "before" and "after" states of a chemical reaction can be calculated theoretically using tables of data (or a computer). For example, consider the reaction CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O (combustion of methane in oxygen). By calculating the amounts of energy required to break all the bonds on the left ("before") and right ("after") sides of the equation, we can calculate the energy difference between the reactants and the products. This is referred to as ΔH, where Δ (Delta) means difference, and H stands for enthalpy, a measure of energy which is equal to the heat transferred at constant pressure. ΔH is usually given in units of kJ (thousands of joules) or in kcal (kilocalories). If ΔH is negative for the reaction, then energy has been released. This type of reaction is referred to as exothermic (literally, outside heat, or throwing off heat). An exothermic reaction is more favourable and thus more likely to occur. Our example reaction is exothermic, which we already know from everyday experience, since burning gas in air gives off heat.

A reaction may have a positive ΔH. This means that, to proceed, the reaction requires an input of energy from outside. This type of reaction is called endothermic (literally, inside heat, or absorbing heat).



Reaction rate

The rate of a chemical reaction depends on:


Reversibility

Every chemical reaction is, in theory, reversible. In a forward reaction the reactants are converted to products. In a reverse reaction products are converted into reactants.

Chemical equilibrium is the state in which the forward and reverse reaction rates are equal, thus preserving the amount of reactants and products. However, a reaction in equilibrium can be driven in the forward or reverse direction by changing reaction conditions such as temperature or pressure. Le Chatelier's principle can be used to predict whether products or reactants will be formed.

Although all reactions are reversible to some extent, some reactions can be classified as irreversible. An irreversible reaction is one that "goes to completion." This phrase means that nearly all of the reactants are used to form products. These reactions are very difficult to reverse even under extreme conditions.



Law of mass action

The concentrations of reactants and products determine the rate of forward and reverse reactions.



Catalyst

A catalyst increases the speed of a reaction by lowering the activation energy needed for the reaction to take place, and supplies enough energy for the reaction to happen. A catalyst is not destroyed or changed during a reaction, so it can be used again.



See also


This entry is from Wikipedia, the leading user-contributed encyclopedia. It may not have been reviewed by professional editors (see full disclaimer)


Mentioned In



chemical reaction is mentioned in the following topics:
active site (Science)catalyst (Science)reduction (Science)stoichiometryanticatalystchemiluminescenceendergonicesterificationfluorinationinhibitorMore>

This Information is from Answers.com


:w:
Reply

Uthman
05-11-2005, 09:41 PM
:sl:

JazakAllahu Khayran. :) Thank you so so much. :)

:w:
Reply

Ameeratul Layl
10-06-2005, 01:19 PM
:sl:

Im doing my AS level coursework for biology.
If anyone can help (wen I need it)....I will.....make dua for u ;)
Reply

~*Sister*~
10-19-2005, 02:59 PM
salaam

i study Religious studies and Earlychildhood studies so if any need any help let me know and il be glad to help! inshallah

w.salaam
Reply

Duhaa
10-20-2005, 12:48 PM
Originally Posted by Ameeratul Layl
:sl:

Im doing my AS level coursework for biology.
If anyone can help (wen I need it)....I will.....make dua for u ;)

I did AS-level Biology. ...and the coursework.
The coursework isn't that bad. It's just the write up that bugs ;)
Btw are you doing AQA?
Reply

Ameeratul Layl
10-20-2005, 12:49 PM
Originally Posted by Savdah
I did AS-level Biology. ...and the coursework.
The coursework isn't that bad. It's just the write up that bugs ;)
Btw are you doing AQA?

:sl:
I think so.
Ive dun the onion DNA extract coursework.Havent had results yet
Reply

Duhaa
10-20-2005, 01:01 PM
I didnt do DNA extracting from onions.
I remember doing something about the effect of hydrogen peroxide on liver or something to that effect.
But I definitely remember it was liver ... the smell...what a stink!! ;)
Reply

Ameeratul Layl
10-20-2005, 01:03 PM
Originally Posted by Savdah
I didnt do DNA extracting from onions.
I remember doing something about the effect of hydrogen peroxide on liver or something to that effect.
But I definitely remember it was liver ... the smell...what a stink!! ;)

:sl:
Its fun cutting thisngs up. After the hols I will be disecting a heart....I hope ppl faint! Neva seen such a scene b4, itll be funny. ;D

Where can I ger exam papers from for biology (off the internet)? :)

Allah ma3ik
:coolsis: :love: :coolsis:
Reply

Duhaa
10-20-2005, 01:11 PM
I got loads of papers off the net but you need a fast printer and the printer to yourself because there's lots of it and it can take time! ;)
Depending on the exam board you're using eg AQA go on to their homepage so for AQA go to www.aqa.org.uk
Then click on 'Qualifications'
On the drop-down menu go on GCE AS/A not GCE AS
Then find your subject
Biology has spec A and B. I did B but you probably know yours.
Hope that helps :)
Reply

Ameeratul Layl
10-20-2005, 01:15 PM
Originally Posted by Savdah
I got loads of papers off the net but you need a fast printer and the printer to yourself because there's lots of it and it can take time! ;)
Depending on the exam board you're using eg AQA go on to their homepage so for AQA go to www.aqa.org.uk
Then click on 'Qualifications'
On the drop-down menu go on GCE AS/A not GCE AS
Then find your subject
Biology has spec A and B. I did B but you probably know yours.
Hope that helps :)

:sl:

JazakAllah sis, I owe you!

Allah ma3ik MWAH! :love:
Reply

Duhaa
10-20-2005, 01:21 PM
Originally Posted by Ameeratul Layl
:sl:

JazakAllah sis, I owe you!

Allah ma3ik MWAH! :love:

Naah, I'm a Muslim and Muslims help each other. Right?
Anyway hope you get through those exams just fine because personally i think you're studying the hardest ones there are.
Insha allah you'll do well :)
Reply

Ameeratul Layl
10-20-2005, 01:25 PM
you're studying the hardest ones there are.
Insha allah you'll do well :)[/QUOTE]


:sl: Wat? u talking about bio?

Thank you sis. ;)
Reply

Uthman
03-19-2006, 07:46 PM
:sl:

Similarities between Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole?

Achivements of Florence Nightingale?

Achievements of Mary Seacole?

Problems faced by each?

Who made the most important contribution to medicine - Florence Nightingale or Mary Seacole?

Answer me these questions and I'll make it worth your while.
Reply

ummAbdillah
03-19-2006, 07:53 PM
Salaam
I have a test coming on inheritance and natural selection
Can anyone help me out?
ma'salaam
Reply

Silver Pearl
03-19-2006, 07:58 PM
Originally Posted by lovly_lady
Salaam
I have a test coming on inheritance and natural selection
Can anyone help me out?
ma'salaam
Yeah I can help you on that sis, you can PM me if you want or post your Question here and others can help you if I forget or something.

Brother Osman, sorry I can’t help there but inshallah someone will come to your rescue.

:wasalamex
Reply

The Ruler
03-23-2006, 08:11 PM
:sl:

ermm...can sum1 plz rtell me how to plot graphs wen da equationis lyk...say...

y=(2x-3)/2 :? :? :?

:w:
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 18
    Last Post: 02-19-2009, 02:32 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-04-2007, 07:59 AM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-28-2007, 11:48 AM
  4. Replies: 53
    Last Post: 05-16-2006, 09:41 AM

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!