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vpb
12-13-2005, 12:50 AM
Selam Alejkum,
15.26 And surely We created man from dried clay of moulded mud......

this confuses me. Why it is not He created man but We created man...

I would like to have a answer from a scholar since they know more about Qur'an.

May ALLAH be with you !
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azim
12-13-2005, 01:12 AM
It's the royal we, to give more respect to the one being referred to.

i.e. Queen Victoria was meant to have said "We are not amused", same thing.

Also, the Quran is Allah speaking directly to you, so 'we' makes more sense then 'he', although sometimes 'I' is used. 'He' is used because third person is another way of showing respect.

Thats, the basicals. Inshallah someone more learned can explain in greater depth though.
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Mu'maneen
12-13-2005, 01:12 AM
:sl:

Everything created, everything carried out is by the will of Allah. Not a thing happens even if it is the size of an atom except by the permission of Allah.

Allah has Angels working for Him alone. Though they carry out such work, they do such actions except by the will of Allah, for every single creation of Allah is dependent upon Him alone where Allah is independent upon everything else.

As Allah has Angels working for Him (though He surely does not need them at all for He is Al-Qawi (The Possessor of All Strength), Al-Badi' (The Originator) etc), in Qur'an we usually come across "We" in Qur'an though everything is commanded by the will of Allah alone.


---------------------

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http://hstrial-besmail.homestead.com/islam.html
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Ansar Al-'Adl
12-13-2005, 01:14 AM
:sl:
http://www.islaam.net/display/displa...569&category=2
http://thetruereligion.org/modules/w...0f7ce9cc235e2e
http://www.islamweb.net/ver2/archive...ang=E&id=11712
http://www.drzakirnaik.com/pages/qanda/24.php
:w:
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vpb
12-13-2005, 01:20 AM
thank you for your explanation.

May ALLAH bless you !
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cihad
12-15-2005, 03:20 PM
i also wondered that
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TabTabiun
12-16-2005, 09:26 PM
As-Salaam Walikum-It Is the ROYAL we It does not mean like more than one.
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mariamq
12-16-2005, 11:05 PM
Subhanallah, I wonderd the same thing but i thought i would soud silly asking it. Jazakallah khair.
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Tasneem
12-16-2005, 11:58 PM
Originally Posted by vpb
Selam Alejkum,
15.26 And surely We created man from dried clay of moulded mud......

this confuses me. Why it is not He created man but We created man...

I would like to have a answer from a scholar since they know more about Qur'an.

May ALLAH be with you !

Yeah-I was also confused about this too.
Reply

khalid zaheer
12-20-2005, 10:04 AM
:sl:

:) But I am surprised, not for the matter discussing but for wondering & confusion of most of the linked members.

:w:
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TabTabiun
12-27-2005, 09:18 PM
Originally Posted by Jihad_spun
Yeah-I was also confused about this too.
As-Salaam Walikum-Did NOT Umee... EXPLAIN This To You???:eek: .:enough!:
***MaSalaama***
Reply

Khayal
03-17-2006, 05:01 PM

The Meaning of The Pronoun "We" As Used in The Qur'aan
by Brother Yahya Adel Ibrahîm

:sl:
It is a feature of literary style in Arabic that a person may refer to himself by the pronoun nahnu (we) for respect or glorification. He may also use the word ana (I), indicating one person, or the third person huwa (he). All three styles are used in the Qur'an, where Allaah addresses the Arabs in their own tongue. ( Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa'imah, 4/143).



"Allaah, may He be glorified and exalted, sometimes refers to Himself in the singular, by name or by use of a pronoun, and sometimes by use of the plural, as in the phrase (interpretation of the meaning):'Verily, We have given you a manifest victory" [al-Fath 48:1], and other similar phrases. But Allaah never refers to Himself by use of the dual, because the plural refers to the respect that He deserves, and may refer to His names and attributes, whereas the dual refers to a specific number (and nothing else), and He is far above that."
( Al-'Aqeedah al-Tadmuriyyah by Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah, p. 75).

These words, innaa ("Verily We") and nahnu ("We"), and other forms of the plural, may be used by one person speaking on behalf of a group, or they may be used by one person for purposes of respect or glorification, as is done by some monarchs when they issue statements or decrees in which they say " We have decided…" etc. [This is known in English as "The Royal We" – Translator]. In such cases, only one person is speaking but the plural is used for respect. The One Who is more deserving of respect than any other is Allaah, may He be glorified and exalted, so when He says in the Qur'an innaa ("Verily We") and nahnu ("We"), it is for respect and glorification, not to indicate plurality of numbers. If an aayah of this type is causing confusion, it is essential to refer to the clear, unambiguous aayaat for clarification, and if a Christian, for example, insists on taking ayaat such as
"Verily, We: it is We Who have sent down the Dhikr (i.e., the Qur'an)"
[al-Hijr 15:9 – interpretation of the meaning] as proof of divine plurality, we may refute this claim by quoting such clear and unambiguous aayaat as (interpretation of the meanings):
"And your god is One God, there is none who has the right to be worshipped but He, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful" [al-Baqarah 2:163]
and
"Say: He is Allaah, the One" [al-Ikhlaas 112:1]
and other aayaat which can only be interpreted in one way. Thus confusion will be dispelled for the one who is seeking the truth. Every time Allaah uses the plural to refer to Himself, it is based on the respect and honour that He deserves, and on the great number of His names and attributes, and on the great number of His troops and angels.


(Al-'Aqeedah al-Tadmuriyyah by Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah, p. 109).
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Ummu Amatullah
03-18-2006, 05:35 AM
:sl:
Jazak'Allah sister I strongly think that the feminist sisters should really read this thread.Subhan'Allah I mean when there's an all sisters answers & questions session in our masjid the sisters are always saying things such as," How come man get this much hoorol-Qayn and the sisters aren't promised such things?How come in the Holy Quran Allah is addressed in a Masculine tone or way?How come 2 women witnesses are equal to 1 man witness? and etc...........

It's extremely annoying :grumbling
:w:
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Abdullah4ever
05-06-2006, 08:33 PM
:sl:

The Meaning Of The Pronoun "WE" As Used In The Quran

It is a feature of literary style in Arabic that a person may refer to himself by the pronoun nahnu (we) for respect or glorification. He may also use the word ana (I), indicating one person, or the third person huwa (he). All three styles are used in the Qur'an, where Allaah addresses the Arabs in their own tongue. ( Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa'imah, 4/143).

"Allaah, may He be glorified and exalted, sometimes refers to Himself in the singular, by name or by use of a pronoun, and sometimes by use of the plural, as in the phrase (interpretation of the meaning):'Verily, We have given you a manifest victory" [al-Fath 48:1], and other similar phrases. But Allaah never refers to Himself by use of the dual, because the plural refers to the respect that He deserves, and may refer to His names and attributes, whereas the dual refers to a specific number (and nothing else), and He is far above that."

( Al-'Aqeedah al-Tadmuriyyah by Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah, p. 75).

These words, innaa ("Verily We") and nahnu ("We"), and other forms of the plural, may be used by one person speaking on behalf of a group, or they may be used by one person for purposes of respect or glorification, as is done by some monarchs when they issue statements or decrees in which they say " We have decided…" etc. [This is known in English as "The Royal We" – Translator]. In such cases, only one person is speaking but the plural is used for respect. The One Who is more deserving of respect than any other is Allaah, may He be glorified and exalted, so when He says in the Qur'an innaa ("Verily We") and nahnu ("We"), it is for respect and glorification, not to indicate plurality of numbers. If an aayah of this type is causing confusion, it is essential to refer to the clear, unambiguous aayaat for clarification, and if a Christian, for example, insists on taking ayaat such as

"Verily, We: it is We Who have sent down the Dhikr (i.e., the Qur'an)"

[al-Hijr 15:9 – interpretation of the meaning] as proof of divine plurality, we may refute this claim by quoting such clear and unambiguous aayaat as (interpretation of the meanings):

"And your god is One God, there is none who has the right to be worshipped but He, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful" [al-Baqarah 2:163]

and

"Say: He is Allaah, the One" [al-Ikhlaas 112:1]

and other aayaat which can only be interpreted in one way. Thus confusion will be dispelled for the one who is seeking the truth. Every time Allaah uses the plural to refer to Himself, it is based on the respect and honour that He deserves, and on the great number of His names and attributes, and on the great number of His troops and angels.

(Al-'Aqeedah al-Tadmuriyyah by Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah, p. 109)
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Hussein radi
05-25-2006, 03:17 PM
why sometimes in the Qur'an Allah says We?
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Muhammad
05-25-2006, 03:22 PM
:sl:

Threads merged.
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samobosna96
05-31-2006, 12:25 AM
it doesnt take a long post to explain it.... the WE used is the Royal WE...... Allah is the Soverieng King of everything....
Reply

CavemanDoctor
05-31-2006, 12:51 AM
Peace.

But sometimes Allah doesn't use We (but rather Me, or I), so the question becomes: why is We used in some verses and not in others?

Is it possible that certain instances of "We refer to Allah as well as other entities (e.g. angels). For example, if Allah says "We gave this Book...", can this refer to Allah giving the Book, through the use of angels (like Jibreel)?
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