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Helena
04-12-2006, 09:54 PM
:sl:

A man was walking through the marketplace one afternoon when, just as the muezzin began the call to prayer, his eye fell on a woman's back. She was strangely attractive, though dressed in fulsome black, a veil over head and face, and she now turned to him as if somehow conscious of his over-lingering regard, and gave him a slight but meaningful nod before she rounded the corner into the lane of silk sellers. As if struck by a bolt from heaven, the man was at once drawn, his heart a prisoner of that look, forever. In vain he struggled with his heart, offering it one sound reason after another to go his way?wasn't it time to pray??but it was finished: there was nothing but to follow.

He hastened after her, turning into the market of
silks,breathing
from the exertion of catching up with the woman, who had unexpectedly outpaced him and even now lingered for an instant at the far end of the market,many shops ahead. She turned toward him, and he thought he could see a flash of a mischievious smile from beneath the black muslin of her veil,
as she? was it his imagination?? beckoned to him again.

The poor man was beside himself. Who was she? The daughter of a wealthy family? What did she want? He requickened his steps and turned into the lane where she had disappeared. And so she led him, always beyond reach, always tantalizingly ahead, now through the weapons market, now the oil merchants', now the leather sellers'; farther and farther from where they began. The feeling within him grew rather than decreased. Was she mad? On and on she led, to the very edge of town.

The sun declined and set, and
there she was, before him as
ever. Now they were come, of all places, to the City of Tombs. Had he been in his normal senses, he would have been afraid, but indeed, he now reflected,stranger places than this had seen a lovers' tryst.

There were scarcely twenty cubits between them when he saw her look back, and, giving a little start, she skipped down the steps and through the great bronze door of what seemed to be a very old sepulcher.A soberer moment might have seen the man pause, but in his present state,there was no turning back, and he went down the steps and slid in after her.

Inside, as his eyes saw after a moment, there were two flights of
steps that led down to a second door, from whence a light shone, and which he equally passed through. He found himself in a large room, somehow unsuspected by the outside world, lit with candles upon its walls. There sat
the woman, opposite the door on a pallet of rich stuff in her full black dress, still veiled, reclining on a pillow against the far wall. To the right of the pallet, the man noticed a well set in the floor.

"Lock the door behind you," she said in a low, husky voice that was almost a whisper, "and bring the key."

He did as he was told.

She gestured carelessly at the well. "Throw it in."

A ray of sense seemed to penetrate for a moment the clouds
over his understanding, and a bystander, had there been one, might have detected the slightest of pauses.

"Go on," she said laughingly, "You didn't hesitate to miss the prayer as you followed me here, did you?"

He said nothing.

"The time for sunset prayer has almost finished as well,"
she said with gentle mockery. "Why worry? Go on, throw it in. You
want to please me, don't you?"

He extended his hand over the mouth of the well, and watched as he let the key drop. An uncanny feeling rose from the pit of his stomach as moments passed but no sound came. He felt wonder, then horror, then comprehension.

"It is time to see me," she said, and she lifted her veil to reveal
not the face of a fresh young girl, but of a hideous old crone, all
darkness and vice, not a particle of light anywhere in its eldritch lines.

"See me well," she said. "My name is Dunya, This World. I am your beloved. You spent your time running after me, and now you have caught up with me. In your grave. Welcome, welcome."

At this she laughed and laughed, until she shook herself into a small mound of fine dust, whose fitful shadows, as the candles went out, returned to the darkness one by one.

------------------------

As Allaah, Exalted be He says in The Glorious Qur'an:


"Whatever is with you, will be exhausted, and whatever with Allaah (of good deeds) will remain." (An-Nahl 16:96)

"Know that the life of this world is only play and amusement, pomp and mutual boasting among you, and rivalry in respect of wealth and children, as the likeness of vegetation after rain, thereof the growth is pleasing to the tiller; afterwards it dries up and you see it turning yellow; then it becomes straw. But in the Hereafter (there is) a severe torment (for the unbelievers, evildoers), and (there is) Forgiveness of Allaah and (His) Good Pleasure (for the believers, gooddoers), whereas the life of this world is only a deceiving enjoyment." (Al-Hadid 57:20)

So wot u all think?

:w: :)
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Maimunah
04-12-2006, 10:03 PM
great mashaallah:)
jazakaallah khayr for sharing it:)
wasalaam
Reply

Helena
04-12-2006, 10:05 PM
:sl:

welcome sis....anytime!!

:w:
Reply

Helena
04-12-2006, 11:46 PM
:sl:

come on guys.....more views inshalah...just a reminder are we living for the duniya or jannah?

:w:
Reply

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extinction
04-12-2006, 11:52 PM
wicked story defo makes you think for sure...speaking of which its almost maghrib time....
Reply

Umm Salama
04-13-2006, 06:15 AM
AS Salam Alaikum

Mushallah good story mushallah

Salam Alaikum Wr Wb
Umm Salama
Reply

sapphire
04-14-2006, 07:55 PM
mashallah great story.........makes you think...........jazakallah for sharing.....:)
Reply

Battle_4_Peace
04-15-2006, 01:57 PM
My name is Dunya (World)

A man was walking through the marketplace one afternoon when, just as the Mu'azzin began the call to prayer, his eye fell on a woman's back. She was strangely attractive, though dressed in fulsome black, a veil over head and face, and she now turned to him as if somehow conscious of his over lingering regard, and gave him a slight but meaningful nod before she rounded the corner into the lane of silk sellers.

As if struck by a bolt from heaven, the man was at once drawn, his heart a prisoner of that look, forever. In vain he struggled with his heart, offering it one sound reason after another to go his way-wasn't it time to pray but it was finished, there was nothing but to follow.

He hastened after her, turning into the market of silks, breathing from the exertion of catching up with the woman, who had unexpectedly outpaced him and even now lingered for an instant at the far end of the market, many shops ahead. She turned toward him, and he thought he could see a flash of a mischievous smile from beneath the black muslin of her veil, as she-was it his imagination beckoned to him again.

The poor man was beside himself. Who was she? The daughter of a wealthy family? What did she want? He re quickened his steps and turned into the lane where she had disappeared. And so she led him, always beyond reach, always tantalizingly ahead, now through the weapons market, now the oil merchants', now the leather sellers' farther and farther from where they began.

The feeling within him grew rather than decreased. Was she mad? On and on she led, to the very edge of town.

The sun declined and set, and there she was, before him as ever. Now they were come, of all places, to the City of Tombs. Had he been in his normal senses, he would have been afraid, but indeed, he now reflected, stranger places than this had seen a lovers' tryst. There were scarcely twenty cubits between them when he saw her look back, and, giving a little start, she skipped down the steps and through the great bronze door of what seemed to be a very old sepulcher. A soberer moment might have seen the man pause, but in his present state, there was no turning back, and he went down the steps and slid in after her.

Inside, as his eyes saw after a moment, there were two flights of steps that led down to a second door, from whence a light shone, and which he equally passed through. He found himself in a large room, somehow unsuspected by the outside world, lit with candles upon it's walls. There sat the woman, opposite the door on a pallet of rich stuff in her full black dress, still veiled, reclining on a pillow against the far wall. To the right of the pallet, the man noticed a well set in the floor.

'Lock the door behind you', she said in a low, husky voice that was almost a whisper, 'And bring the key'. He did as he was told.

She gestured carelessly at the well. 'Throw it in'. A ray of sense seemed to penetrate for a moment the clouds over his understanding, and a bystander, had there been one, might have detected the slightest of pauses.

'Go on', she said laughingly, 'You didn't hesitate to miss the prayer as you followed me here, did you?'

He said nothing. 'The time for sunset prayer has almost finished as well', she said with gentle mockery. 'Why worry? Go on, throw it in. You want to please me, don't you?' He extended his hand over the mouth of the well, and watched as he let the key drop. An uncanny feeling rose from the pit of his stomach as moments passed but no sound came. He felt wonder, then horror, then comprehension.

'It is time to see me', she said, and she lifted her veil to reveal not the face of a fresh young girl, but of a hideous old crone, all darkness and vice, not a particle of light anywhere in it's eldritch lines. 'See me well', she said. 'My name is DUNYA, This World. I am your beloved'.

'You spent your time running after me, and now you have caught up with me. In your grave. Welcome, welcome'. At this she laughed and laughed, until she shook herself into a small mound of fine dust, whose fitful shadows, as the candles went out, returned to the darkness one by one.

:w:
Reply

Ghazi
04-15-2006, 02:01 PM
Salaam

Good post bro
Reply

afriend2
04-15-2006, 02:20 PM
salaam,

jazakAllah for sharing that post with us akhee :)

wassalam
Reply

freeze
04-22-2006, 11:15 PM
My name is Dunya

A man was walking through the marketplace one afternoon when, just as the Mu'azzin began the call to prayer, his eye fell on a woman's back. She was strangely attractive, though dressed in fulsome black, a veil over head and face, and she now turned to him as if somehow conscious of his over lingering regard, and gave him a slight but meaningful nod before she rounded the corner into the lane of silk sellers.

As if struck by a bolt from heaven, the man was at once drawn, his heart a prisoner of that look, forever. In vain he struggled with his heart, offering it one sound reason after another to go his way-wasn't it time to pray but it was finished, there was nothing but to follow.

He hastened after her, turning into the market of silks, breathing from the exertion of catching up with the woman, who had unexpectedly outpaced him and even now lingered for an instant at the far end of the market, many shops ahead. She turned toward him, and he thought he could see a flash of a mischievous smile from beneath the black muslin of her veil, as she-was it his imagination beckoned to him again.

The poor man was beside himself. Who was she? The daughter of a wealthy family? What did she want? He re quickened his steps and turned into the lane where she had disappeared. And so she led him, always beyond reach, always tantalizingly ahead, now through the weapons market, now the oil merchants', now the leather sellers' farther and farther from where they began.

The feeling within him grew rather than decreased. Was she mad? On and on she led, to the very edge of town.

The sun declined and set, and there she was, before him as ever. Now they were come, of all places, to the City of Tombs. Had he been in his normal senses, he would have been afraid, but indeed, he now reflected, stranger places than this had seen a lovers' tryst. There were scarcely twenty cubits between them when he saw her look back, and, giving a little start, she skipped down the steps and through the great bronze door of what seemed to be a very old sepulcher. A soberer moment might have seen the man pause, but in his present state, there was no turning back, and he went down the steps and slid in after her.

Inside, as his eyes saw after a moment, there were two flights of steps that led down to a second door, from whence a light shone, and which he equally passed through. He found himself in a large room, somehow unsuspected by the outside world, lit with candles upon it's walls. There sat the woman, opposite the door on a pallet of rich stuff in her full black dress, still veiled, reclining on a pillow against the far wall. To the right of the pallet, the man noticed a well set in the floor.

'Lock the door behind you', she said in a low, husky voice that was almost a whisper, 'And bring the key'. He did as he was told.

She gestured carelessly at the well. 'Throw it in'. A ray of sense seemed to penetrate for a moment the clouds over his understanding, and a bystander, had there been one, might have detected the slightest of pauses.

'Go on', she said laughingly, 'You didn't hesitate to miss the prayer as you followed me here, did you?'

He said nothing. 'The time for sunset prayer has almost finished as well', she said with gentle mockery. 'Why worry? Go on, throw it in. You want to please me, don't you?' He extended his hand over the mouth of the well, and watched as he let the key drop. An uncanny feeling rose from the pit of his stomach as moments passed but no sound came. He felt wonder, then horror, then comprehension.

'It is time to see me', she said, and she lifted her veil to reveal not the face of a fresh young girl, but of a hideous old crone, all darkness and vice, not a particle of light anywhere in it's eldritch lines. 'See me well', she said. 'My name is DUNYA, This World. I am your beloved'.

'You spent your time running after me, and now you have caught up with me. In your grave. Welcome, welcome'. At this she laughed and laughed, until she shook herself into a small mound of fine dust, whose fitful shadows, as the candles went out, returned to the darkness one by one.
Reply

NJUSA
04-22-2006, 11:38 PM
:rollseyes
Reply

Isra
04-23-2006, 01:34 AM
Wow, that makes you think...
Reply

Muslimaatan
04-23-2006, 02:03 AM
OMG!! SUBHANA ALLAH!! woooooooow!! i thought itz gonna have some differnet ending! omg..that's scary..Subhaana Allah!!
Reply

MinAhlilHadeeth
04-28-2006, 01:08 PM
The Woman: A Parable


A man was walking through the marketplace one afternoon when, just as the muezzin began the call to prayer, his eye fell on a woman's back. She was strangely attractive, though dressed in fulsome black, a veil over head and face, and she now turned to him as if somehow conscious of his over-lingering regard, and gave him a slight but meaningful nod before she rounded the corner into the lane of silk sellers. As if struck by a bolt from heaven, the man was at once drawn, his heart a prisoner of that look, forever.

In vain he struggled with his heart, offering it one sound reason after another to go his way "wasn't it time to pray?”, but it was finished: there was nothing but to follow.He hastened after her, turning into the market of silks, breathing from the exertion of catching up with the woman, who had unexpectedly outpaced him and even now lingered for an instant at the far end of the market, many shops ahead. She turned toward him, and he thought he could see a flash of a mischievious smile from beneath the black muslin of her veil, as she glared at him beckoned to him again. Was it his imagination?

The poor man was beside himself. Who was she? The daughter of a wealthy family? What did she want? He requickened his steps and turned into the lane where she had disappeared. And so she led him, always beyond reach, always tantalizingly ahead, now through the weapons market, now the oil merchants', now the leather sellers'; farther and farther from where they began. The feeling within him grew rather than decreased. Was she mad? On and on she led, to the very edge of town.The sun declined and set, and there she was, before him as ever. Now they were come, of all places, to the City of Tombs. Had he been in his normal senses, he would have been afraid, but indeed, he now reflected, stranger places than this had seen a lovers' tryst.

There were scarcely twenty cubits between them when he saw her look back, and, giving a little start, she skipped down the steps and through the great bronze door of what seemed to be a very old sepulcher. A soberer moment might have seen the man pause, but in his present state, there was no turning back, and he went down the steps and slid in after her.Inside, as his eyes saw after a moment, there were two flights of steps that led down to a second door, from whence a light shone, and which he equally passed through. He found himself in a large room, somehow unsuspected by the outside world, lit with candles upon its walls. There sat the woman, opposite the door on a pallet of rich stuff in her full black dress, still veiled, reclining on a pillow against the far wall. To the right of the pallet, the man noticed a well set in the floor.

"Lock the door behind you." she said in a low, husky voice that was almost a whisper, "and bring the key."

He did as he was told.

She gestured carelessly at the well. "Throw it in."

A ray of sense seemed to penetrate for a moment the clouds over his understanding, and a bystander, had there been one, might have detected the slightest of pauses.

"Go on," she said laughingly, "You didn't hesitate to miss the prayer as you followed me here, did you?" He said nothing. "The time for sunset prayer has almost finished as well," she said with gentle mockery. "Why worry? Go on, throw it in. You want to please me, don't you?"

He extended his hand over the mouth of the well, and watched as he let the key drop. An uncanny feeling rose from the pit of his stomach as moments passed but no sound came. He felt wonder, then horror, then comprehension.

"It is time to see me," she said, and she lifted her veil to reveal not the face of a fresh young girl, but of a hideous old crone, all darkness and vice, not a particle of light anywhere in its eldritch lines."See me well," she said. "My name is Dunya, This World. I am your beloved. You spent your time running after me, and now you have caught up with me. In your grave. Welcome, welcome."

At this she laughed and laughed, until she shook herself into a small mound of fine dust, whose fitful shadows, as the candles went out, returned to the darkness one by one.

-Shaykh Nuh Ha Mim Keller
Reply

master_seth
05-04-2006, 06:48 PM
nice story , see now u jst put me off gurls 4eva
y wud u do such a fing, nahh im only playin wit u, but seriously fanx 4 da story
Reply

Kittygyal
05-04-2006, 06:51 PM
salam,

to for the story sis :)

w.salam
Reply

Sunflower
05-04-2006, 07:41 PM
jazakallah for the story i heard it b4 n it has words of wisdom.....
Reply

MinAhlilHadeeth
05-05-2006, 08:26 AM
Lol akhee... it was supposed 2 put u off chasing the dunya!
Jazak-Allah for the comments.
:w:
Reply

firdaw
05-23-2006, 03:35 AM
thanxs for the story sis it was nice i like it
Reply

MinAhlilHadeeth
05-23-2006, 10:22 AM
Cool, glad you guys liked it!
:w:
Reply

~AMIRA~
05-30-2006, 04:50 PM
nice story
Reply

Abdul-Raouf
08-11-2006, 05:20 PM
A man was walking through the marketplace one afternoon when, just as the
muezzin began the call to prayer, his eye fell on a woman’s back. She was
strangely attractive, though dressed in fulsome black, a veil over head and
face, and she now turned to him as if somehow conscious of his over-lingering
regard, and gave him a slight but meaningful nod before she rounded the corner
into the lane of silk sellers. As if struck by a bolt from heaven, the man was
at once drawn, his heart a prisoner of that look, forever. In vain he
struggled with his heart, offering it one sound reason after another to go his
way—wasn’t it time to pray?—but it was finished: there was nothing but to
follow.

He hastened after her, turning into the market of silks, breathing from the
exertion of catching up with the woman, who had unexpectedly outpaced him and
even now lingered for an instant at the far end of the market, many shops
ahead. She turned toward him, and he thought he could see a flash of a
mischievious smile from beneath the black muslin of her veil, as she—was it
his imagination?—beckoned to him again.

The poor man was beside himself. Who was she? The daughter of a wealthy
family? What did she want? He requickened his steps and turned into the lane
where she had disappeared. And so she led him, always beyond reach, always
tantalizingly ahead, now through the weapons market, now the oil merchants’,
now the leather sellers’; farther and farther from where they began. The
feeling within him grew rather than decreased. Was she mad? On and on she led,
to the very edge of town.

The sun declined and set, and there she was, before him as ever. Now they
were come, of all places, to the City of Tombs. Had he been in his normal
senses, he would have been afraid, but indeed, he now reflected, stranger
places than this had seen a lovers’ tryst.

There were scarcely twenty cubits between them when he saw her look back,
and, giving a little start, she skipped down the steps and through the great
bronze door of what seemed to be a very old sepulcher. A soberer moment might
have seen the man pause, but in his present state, there was no turning back,
and he went down the steps and slid in after her.

Inside, as his eyes saw after a moment, there were two flights of steps that
led down to a second door, from whence a light shone, and which he equally
passed through. He found himself in a large room, somehow unsuspected by the
outside world, lit with candles upon its walls. There sat the woman, opposite
the door on a pallet of rich stuff in her full black dress, still veiled,
reclining on a pillow against the far wall. To the right of the pallet, the
man noticed a well set in the floor.

“Lock the door behind you,” she said in a low, husky voice that was almost a
whisper, “and bring the key.

He did as he was told.

She gestured carelessly at the well. “Throw it in.

A ray of sense seemed to penetrate for a moment the clouds over his
understanding, and a bystander, had there been one, might have detected the
slightest of pauses.

“Go on,” she said laughingly, “You didn’t hesitate to miss the prayer as you
followed me here, did you?

He said nothing.

“The time for sunset prayer has almost finished as well,” she said with
gentle mockery. “Why worry? Go on, throw it in. You want to please me, don’t
you?

He extended his hand over the mouth of the well, and watched as he let the
key drop. An uncanny feeling rose from the pit of his stomach as moments
passed but no sound came. He felt wonder, then horror, then comprehension.

“It is time to see me,” she said, and she lifted her veil to reveal not the
face of a fresh young girl, but of a hideous old crone, all darkness and vice,
not a particle of light anywhere in its eldritch lines.

“See me well,” she said. “My name is Dunya, This World. I am your beloved.
You spent your time running after me, and now you have caught up with me. In
your grave. Welcome, welcome.

At this she laughed and laughed, until she shook herself into a small mound
of fine dust, whose fitful shadows, as the candles went out, returned to the
darkness one by one.
Reply

syilla
08-11-2006, 05:26 PM
is this story true?

i read somewhere about this a weird eye man...whose dua is mustajab and help his country by making dua so that they will be rain...

his eyes was weird because he felt guilty of missing prayer because of a woman....he tried to take out his eyes...

is this stories related?
Reply

Abdul-Raouf
08-11-2006, 05:40 PM
sorry sister i dont know about the reation...........
Reply

syilla
08-11-2006, 06:27 PM
its okay....don't worry about it.
Reply

"..MariAm.."
08-11-2006, 06:32 PM
salam
nice story wid a gud moral ... :D
Reply

Samee
08-11-2006, 07:50 PM
:sl:

Yes, I recall a hadith about Allah tossing a really old ugly woman into the hellfire last. This woman represents the dunya.
Reply

H4RUN
08-11-2006, 07:51 PM
:sl:
excellent moral, too many people nowadays are in love with this duniya, a TEMPORARY duniya...as the saying goes, live in this duniya as though you're a traveller, which we are....
JazakAllah khair for that reminder akhi :)
ma'salama
:w:
Reply

afriend
08-11-2006, 08:01 PM
Yeah I heard ths quite a few times....scares me to death....

There's another story I'd like to tell...But When I have the time I'll post it up inshallah...it's really long :D
Reply

InToTheRain
08-11-2006, 08:18 PM
:w:

Scary story with good morals... WALK WITH DA FACE DOWN ;D
Reply

Woodrow
08-11-2006, 08:36 PM
Scary story? I think not. It is really quite mild compared to the duniya we each live daily.

We all do exactly the same thing on a daily basis in fact probably more like on a minute to minute basis. Anytime we spend even a fraction of a second with our thoughts directed to something besides Allah(swt) it is the same as if we have done it for all enternity.

It is only by the mercy of Allah(swt) and his justice towards our limitations that we have any hope of escaping hellfire.
Reply

InToTheRain
08-11-2006, 08:57 PM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
It is only by the mercy of Allah(swt) and his justice towards our limitations that we have any hope of escaping hellfire.
True, even if we did praise Allah(swt) and worship him from birth till death it will not equate to him greatness.
Reply

AQSA
08-11-2006, 08:58 PM
/\ /\ Mashallah, well said.....just makes you wonder though........Subhanallah

jz kyr for the post br
Reply

umm-sulaim
08-13-2006, 11:27 PM
Wow, i really wasn't expecting such an ending....something to think about!

wassalaam
Reply

Abdul-Raouf
11-13-2006, 01:32 PM
World Attracts A Lot>>>> But U Need To Control Urself
Reply

ummahzy
11-13-2006, 01:48 PM
This story was written by Sheikh Nuh Ha Mim Keller

(will post if i can find the link in my favourites sometime soon, inshallah)
Reply

Saifadin_Qutuz
11-13-2006, 04:56 PM
I hope mines is beautiful :lol:
Reply

glo
11-13-2006, 05:04 PM
Originally Posted by syilla
is this story true?
I think it's not a true story, but a parable ... a story, which tries to explain and emphasize a moral meaning.

Peace
Reply

Yasmine018
11-15-2006, 09:44 AM
:sl:

Its a great story. But upon readung this it made me froze:uuh: with fear.
Jazaakillah Khair.

:w:
Reply

Khayal
02-10-2007, 06:49 AM
:sl:

jazakAllah!


:w:
Reply

------
03-25-2008, 01:56 PM
:salamext:

Pretty Woman

A man was walking through the marketplace one afternoon when, just as the muadhdhin began the call to prayer, his eye fell on a woman's back. She was strangely attractive, though dressed in fulsome black, a veil over head and face, and she now turned to him as if somehow conscious of his over-lingering regard, and gave him a slight but meaningful nod before she rounded the corner into the lane of silk sellers.

As if struck by a bolt from heaven, the man was at once drawn, his heart a prisoner of that look, forever. In vain he struggled with his heart, offering it one sound reason after another to go his way - wasn't it time to pray? - but it was finished: there was nothing but to follow. He hastened after her, turning into the market of silks, breathing from the exertion of catching up with the woman, who had unexpectedly outpaced him and even now lingered for an instance at the far end of the market, many shops ahead. She turned toward him, and he thought he could see a flash of a mischievous smile from beneath the black muslin of her veil, as she - was it his imagination? - beckoned to him again.

The poor man was beside himself. Who was she? The daughter of a wealthy family? What did she want? He quickened his steps and turned into the lane where she had disappeared. And so she led him, always beyond reach, always tantalizingly ahead, now through the weapons market, now the oil merchants', now the leather sellers'; farther and farther from where they began. The feeling within him grew rather than decreased. Was she mad? On and on she led, to the very edge of town.

The sun declined and set, and there she was, before him as ever. Now they were come, of all places, to the City of Tombs. Had he been in his normal senses, he would have been afraid, but indeed, he now reflected, stranger places than this had seen a lovers' tryst.

There were scarcely twenty cubits between them when he saw her look back, and, giving a little start, she skipped down the steps and through the great bronze door of what seemed to be a very old sepulchre. A soberer moment might have seen the man pause, but in his present state, there was no turning back, and he went down the steps and slid in after her.

Inside, as his eyes saw after a moment, there were two flights of steps that led down to a second door, from whence a light shone, and which he equally passed through. He found himself in a large room, somehow unsuspected by the outside world, lit with candles upon its walls. There sat the woman, opposite the door on a pallet of rich stuff in her full black dress, still veiled, reclining on a pillow against the far wall. To the right of the pallet, the man noticed a well set in the floor.

"Lock the door behind you,"
she said in a low, husky voice that was almost a whisper, "and bring the key." He did as he was told. She gestured carelessly at the well. "Throw it in."

A ray of sense seemed to penetrate for a moment through the clouds over his understanding, and a bystander, had there been one, might have detected the slightest of pauses.

"Go on," she said laughingly, "You didn't hesitate to miss the prayer as you followed me here, did you?"

He said nothing.

"The time for sunset prayer has almost finished as well," she said with gentle mockery. "Why worry? Go on, throw it in. You want to please me, don't you?"

He extended his hand over the mouth of the well, and watched as he let the key drop. An uncanny feeling rose from the pit of his stomach as moments passed but no sound came. He felt wonder, then horror, then comprehension.

"It is time to see me,"
she said, and she lifted her veil to reveal not the face of a fresh young girl, but of a hideous old crone, all darkness
and vice, not a particle of light anywhere in its eldritch lines.

"See me well," she said. "My name is Dunya. I am your beloved. You spent your time running after me, and now you have caught up with me. In your grave. Welcome, welcome."

At this she laughed and laughed, until she shook herself into a small mound of fine dust, whose fitful shadows, as the candles went out, returned to the darkness one by one.......


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Ummu Sufyaan
03-26-2008, 09:59 AM
:sl:
nice....lol at your sig
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------
06-11-2008, 09:01 AM
:salamext:

..BuMp..
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Afraa
06-11-2008, 10:21 PM
Manshallah, Thank you for the Reminder!
jazakulah khayr
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