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*KB*
05-08-2006, 04:42 PM
salam my cool bros and sis's

whazzup?:okay: ;D

anyways.........just have a history assignment and wanted 2 have sum help.
the help required is do u know any history of wednesbury and what iz it?

thank u 4 all the help you insha'Allah can give me!

(also i know it shud go on the school section :?{well i think}:rollseyes but its school work not islamic so u know!)

all the best!
*KB*
:rose:
:coolious:
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Kittygyal
05-08-2006, 04:45 PM
salam.
well wednesday is a day where many people work :p
w.salam

(don't understand your queston :()
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*KB*
05-08-2006, 04:49 PM
its alrigh sis
jus asking if any1 knew
*KB*
:rose:
:coolious:

ps wednesbury is a town near walsall and west brom
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Kittygyal
05-08-2006, 04:52 PM
salam.
ok here you go sis some information on it :)
Wednesbury is one of the oldest parts of the Black Country. The "bury" part of the name indicates there may have been an Iron Age fort or "beorg" on Church Hill as long ago as 200BC, and the town was certainly a key defensive feature of the kingdom of Mercia.
In the Middle Ages the town was a rural village, with each family farming a strip of land and the heath nearby used for grazing. It was held by the King until the reign of Henry II, when it passed to the Heronville family. In the 14th century, while Wednesbury was still a farming community, local people began to mine their own coal and iron. By Tudor times, when local landowner William Paget was one of the most prominent men of the kingdom, pottery, metalwork and textiles were made. In the 17th century Wednesbury pottery - "Wedgbury ware" - was being sold as far afield as Worcester, while white clay from Monway Field was used to make tobacco pipes.

In the 18th century the town's main occupations were coal mining and nail making and with the canals came a big increase in population. The poor social conditions proved a fertile breeding ground for religious nonconformism, and in 1743 John Wesley first preached in the town. His views were not always well received - fears that he was trying to undermine society led to riots, and on one occasion he was chased out of the area!

In the later half of the 20th century, Wednesbury's industry declined, but new developments like the automotive park, the retail park and the pedestrianisation of Union Street have given a new look to the town. The traditional market is still a feature of the bustling centre; while the streets round Market Place are a protected conservation area.

PRINCESS ETHELFLEDA’S STRONGHOLD

Church Hill was one of a chain of Princess Ethelfleda’s strongholds in AD 916. She was the daughter of King Alfred The Great and she did her bit in Wednesbury to stop the Danes.

DOMESDAY BOOK

1086 Domesday Book Wednesbury was known as (Wadnesberie) and it is written that at that time it was a thriving rural community encompassing Bloxwich and Shelfield (now a modern borough of Walsall)

THE MANOR OF WEDNESBURY

The Manor of Wednesbury was Crown property until Henry II exchanged it with the Heronville family for the town of Stuntsfield in Oxfordshire. It passed through many great English families to their present day Lord Foley’s.

FAMOUS SON OF WEDNESBURY

William Paget (born 1505) is a famous Wednesbury man, he rose to be Secretary of State to King Henry XIII and later became 1st Marquis of Anglesey.

JOHN WESLEY – ANTI-METHODIST RIOT

The anti-methodist riots involving Revd. John Wesley, began on the 20th October 1743, while he was staying at Bridge Street, the home of Francis Ward. An anti-methodist mob was enticed by Revd Edward Egginton of the Parish church to prevent John Wesley from speaking. On arrival at Bentley Hall (2 miles away) the mob was turned away by Colonel Lane’s son and told to, “go home and be quiet”. Undeterred, the mob went to Justice Persehouse’s residence in Walsall where they received a similar reply. Resigned to return to Wednesbury, unfortunately, they met a mob and were overpowered by their rivals at Walsall. In the chaos, Wesley escaped from his persecutors, assisted by (Honest Munchin) George Clayton, William Sitch, Edward Slater, John Griffiths and Joan Parks.

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

The Industrial Revolution changed Wednesbury forever. Coal pits were recorded as early as 1315. It wasn’t until the modern age that these resources were used to their full extent. Clay was an early extraction for Wedgebury Ware. Iron ore and limestone and coal provided the 3 main ingredients for iron making.

COMMUNICATION AND GROWTH OF WEDNESBURY

The first iron works were on the River Thame, the river ran the water wheels and these provided power.

Wednesbury forge is mentioned as early as 1597 , later many factories emerged along the river banks for cheap transport. Wednesbury’s first canal was cut in 1769 to connect the coalfields to Birmingham. The 1826 Thomas Telford road improvements between London and Holyhead for the coach road opened up further communication links. 1783 Walsall Canal North East joined up in 1844 with the Thame Valley Canal. The Grand Junction Railway arrived at Wood Green in 1837 followed by London and North Western lines in 1850 and 1854 respectively.

Other industry in the 18th C included enamelling and gun-barrel forging. For 100 years was the chief industrial area for gun-barrel forging (tubing). Wednesbury became known as ‘Tubetown’ in far off places. One great company in Wednesbury was F H Lloyd & Co., Samson Lloyd II 1699-1779 established the Welsh Quaker links with the town, he married Sarah the daughter of Richard Parkes who was a Wednesbury Ironmaster. It was Richard Parkes who co-founded the famous Lloyd’s Banking Empire.

THE MARKET PLACE

Wednesbury (or its 17th C name of Wedgbury) had a market place which was established from Queen Ann’s Royal Charter of 1709, so it was one of the oldest Black Country markets.

WAR

William Mills Aluminium Foundry (inventor of the Mills Grenade) at Friar Park Road produced munitions during WW2 , they produced munitions under a cloak of secrecy.

TOWN PARK

Brunswick Park opened in 1887 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee. The park was created by Baron & Sons of Derby on a 28 acre waste land site that was purchased from The Patent Shaft and Axletree Co for £3,000. The canon that stands in the grounds was captured during the Crimean War 1854. A beautiful children's’ water fountain was also to be seen until the second world war, when it mysteriously disappeared.
w.salam
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HeiGou
05-08-2006, 04:52 PM
Originally Posted by *KB*
anyways.........just have a history assignment and wanted 2 have sum help.
the help required is do u know any history of wednesbury and what iz it?
You might want to look at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wednesbury

http://pages.britishlibrary.net/mike...ew_page_15.htm

http://www.birminghamuk.com/wednesbury.htm
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Snowflake
05-08-2006, 04:53 PM
Borough of Wednesbury - Arte Marte Vigore

Wednesbury used to be part of South Staffordshire and was made into a Municipal Borough in 1886 and together with Darlaston and Willenhall formed part of the Wednesbury Borough Constituency.

Wednesbury is one of the oldest parts of the Black Country. The "bury" part of the name indicates there may have been an Iron Age fort or "beorg" on Church Hill as long ago as 200BC, and the town was certainly a key defensive feature of the kingdom of Mercia.
In the Middle Ages the town was a rural village, with each family farming a strip of land and the heath nearby used for grazing. It was held by the King until the reign of Henry II, when it passed to the Heronville family. In the 14th century, while Wednesbury was still a farming community, local people began to mine their own coal and iron. By Tudor times, when local landowner William Paget was one of the most prominent men of the kingdom, pottery, metalwork and textiles were made. In the 17th century Wednesbury pottery - "Wedgbury ware" - was being sold as far afield as Worcester, while white clay from Monway Field was used to make tobacco pipes.

In the 18th century the town's main occupations were coal mining and nail making and with the canals came a big increase in population. The poor social conditions proved a fertile breeding ground for religious nonconformism, and in 1743 John Wesley first preached in the town. His views were not always well received - fears that he was trying to undermine society led to riots, and on one occasion he was chased out of the area!

In the later half of the 20th century, Wednesbury's industry declined, but new developments like the automotive park, the retail park and the pedestrianisation of Union Street have given a new look to the town. The traditional market is still a feature of the bustling centre; while the streets round Market Place are a protected conservation area.

PRINCESS ETHELFLEDA’S STRONGHOLD

Church Hill was one of a chain of Princess Ethelfleda’s strongholds in AD 916. She was the daughter of King Alfred The Great and she did her bit in Wednesbury to stop the Danes.

DOMESDAY BOOK

1086 Domesday Book Wednesbury was known as (Wadnesberie) and it is written that at that time it was a thriving rural community encompassing Bloxwich and Shelfield (now a modern borough of Walsall)

THE MANOR OF WEDNESBURY

The Manor of Wednesbury was Crown property until Henry II exchanged it with the Heronville family for the town of Stuntsfield in Oxfordshire. It passed through many great English families to their present day Lord Foley’s.

FAMOUS SON OF WEDNESBURY

William Paget (born 1505) is a famous Wednesbury man, he rose to be Secretary of State to King Henry XIII and later became 1st Marquis of Anglesey.

JOHN WESLEY – ANTI-METHODIST RIOT

The anti-methodist riots involving Revd. John Wesley, began on the 20th October 1743, while he was staying at Bridge Street, the home of Francis Ward. An anti-methodist mob was enticed by Revd Edward Egginton of the Parish church to prevent John Wesley from speaking. On arrival at Bentley Hall (2 miles away) the mob was turned away by Colonel Lane’s son and told to, “go home and be quiet”. Undeterred, the mob went to Justice Persehouse’s residence in Walsall where they received a similar reply. Resigned to return to Wednesbury, unfortunately, they met a mob and were overpowered by their rivals at Walsall. In the chaos, Wesley escaped from his persecutors, assisted by (Honest Munchin) George Clayton, William Sitch, Edward Slater, John Griffiths and Joan Parks.

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

The Industrial Revolution changed Wednesbury forever. Coal pits were recorded as early as 1315. It wasn’t until the modern age that these resources were used to their full extent. Clay was an early extraction for Wedgebury Ware. Iron ore and limestone and coal provided the 3 main ingredients for iron making.

COMMUNICATION AND GROWTH OF WEDNESBURY

The first iron works were on the River Thame, the river ran the water wheels and these provided power.

Wednesbury forge is mentioned as early as 1597 , later many factories emerged along the river banks for cheap transport. Wednesbury’s first canal was cut in 1769 to connect the coalfields to Birmingham. The 1826 Thomas Telford road improvements between London and Holyhead for the coach road opened up further communication links. 1783 Walsall Canal North East joined up in 1844 with the Thame Valley Canal. The Grand Junction Railway arrived at Wood Green in 1837 followed by London and North Western lines in 1850 and 1854 respectively.

Other industry in the 18th C included enamelling and gun-barrel forging. For 100 years was the chief industrial area for gun-barrel forging (tubing). Wednesbury became known as ‘Tubetown’ in far off places. One great company in Wednesbury was F H Lloyd & Co., Samson Lloyd II 1699-1779 established the Welsh Quaker links with the town, he married Sarah the daughter of Richard Parkes who was a Wednesbury Ironmaster. It was Richard Parkes who co-founded the famous Lloyd’s Banking Empire.

THE MARKET PLACE

Wednesbury (or its 17th C name of Wedgbury) had a market place which was established from Queen Ann’s Royal Charter of 1709, so it was one of the oldest Black Country markets.

WAR

William Mills Aluminium Foundry (inventor of the Mills Grenade) at Friar Park Road produced munitions during WW2 , they produced munitions under a cloak of secrecy.

TOWN PARK

Brunswick Park opened in 1887 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee. The park was created by Baron & Sons of Derby on a 28 acre waste land site that was purchased from The Patent Shaft and Axletree Co for £3,000. The canon that stands in the grounds was captured during the Crimean War 1854. A beautiful children's’ water fountain was also to be seen until the second world war, when it mysteriously disappeared.
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Kittygyal
05-08-2006, 04:56 PM
salam.
Wednesbury
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Map sources for Wednesbury at grid reference SO9895Wednesbury is a town in England's Black Country, part of the Sandwell metropolitan borough in West Midlands.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Neighbourhoods
3 Etymology
4 External links



[edit]
History
Originally, it is believed that Wednesbury was founded as an Iron Age Hill fort. Wednesbury is one of the oldest parts of the Black Country. The "bury" part of the name indicates there may have been an Iron Age fort or "beorg" on Church Hill as long ago as 200BC, and the town was certainly a key defensive feature of the kingdom of Mercia.

In 1086, the Domesday Book describes Wednesbury (Wadnesberie) as being a thriving rural community encompassing Bloxwich and Shelfield (now part of Walsall). During the Middle Ages the town was a rural village, with each family farming a strip of land with nearby heath being used for grazing. The town was held by the King until the reign of Henry II, when it passed to the Heronville family.

In 1315, coal pits were first found and recorded in Wednesbury - which led to an increase in the number of jobs that Wednesbury offered.

Mediaeval Wednesbury was very small, and its inhabitants would appear to have been farmers and farm workers. However, by 1315 coal had already been discovered and was being worked. Nail making was also in progress during these times. William Paget was born in Wednesbury in 1505, the son of a nail maker. He is noted as having risen to the position of Secretary of State, a Knight of the Garter and an Ambassador. He was one of executors of the will of Henry VIII.

In 1769, Wednesbury's canal banks were soon full of factories as in this year, the first caal was cut, linking Wednesbury's coalfields to the Birmingham industries. In the 17th century Wednesbury pottery - "Wedgbury ware" - was being sold as far away as Worcester, whilst white clay from Monway Field was used to make tobacco pipes.

By the 18th century the town's main occupations were coal mining and nail making and with the introduction of the first turnpike road in 1727 and the development of canals and later the railways came a big increase in population.

Wednesbury became notorius in the 1740s for its persecution of the new Methodist movement lead by John Wesley. Francis Asbury, Richard Whatcoat and the Earl of Dartmouth are among those who attended Methodist meetings in the town, and all of whom were in different ways to have a profound effect on the United States.

In 1887, Brunswick Park was opened to celebrate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. The year before this, Wednesbury had became a Municipal Borough. During the later half of the 20th century, Wednesbury's industry declined, but new developments like the automotive park, the retail park and the pedestrianisation of Union Street have given a new look to the town. The traditional market is still a feature of the bustling centre; while the streets around Market Place are now a protected conservation area

Wednesbury became a municipal borough in 1866, and continued in existence until 1966 when it became part of the County Borough of West Bromwich, which then itself merged with the County Borough of Warley in 1974. It gained the postcode WS10 which is shared with the town of Darlaston - part of the Walsall borough. The postal address for Darlaston is now Darlaston, Wednesbury.

Wednesburys bus station is located in the centre of the town near the swimming baths and links are available to Wolverhampton, Birmingham, West Bromwich and the shopping complex of Merry Hill.

It is served by the Midland Metro light rail (tram) system, with stops at Great Western Street and Wednesbury Parkway. The system's only maintenance depot is also located here. The current line runs from Wolverhampton to Birmingham, and a proposed extension to Brierley Hill is set to open in 2008.

[edit]
Neighbourhoods
Church Hill
Brunswick
Friar Park
Myvod Estate
Bustleholme
Wood Green
[edit]
Etymology
Wednesbury is derived from Wodin's borough.

[edit]
External links
Francis Asbury
http://www.wednesbury-rufc.co.uk/
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wednesbury"
Category: Towns in the West Midlands

w.salam
Reply

*KB*
05-08-2006, 05:01 PM
thnk u 4 that if u know any more cud u give?
luv u lot so much
*KB*
:rose:
:coolious:
Reply

Kittygyal
05-08-2006, 05:06 PM
salam.
sis go to this it's good info here :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wednesbury
w.salam
Reply

Kittygyal
05-08-2006, 05:08 PM
salam
sis may i ask do you want info on the wednesbury like in birmigham or other places?
if you can kindly elaborate on your questions i will be very pleased to help you even more :)
w.salam
Reply

strider
05-08-2006, 05:10 PM
Assalamu alaikum

I live in Darlaston--Wednesbury's neighbour. I suppose all the information has already been offered, so good luck with your assignment, sister. :)

Ma'assalama
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DaNgErOuS MiNdS
05-08-2006, 05:13 PM
im sre its somehwre near birmingham
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strider
05-08-2006, 05:16 PM
Assalamu alaikum

Originally Posted by DaNgErOuS MiNdS
im sre its somehwre near birmingham
Around 20-30 minutes away from B'ham city centre by car. :)

Ma'assalama
Reply

DaNgErOuS MiNdS
05-08-2006, 05:21 PM
Originally Posted by strider
Assalamu alaikum


Around 20-30 minutes away from B'ham city centre by car. :)

Ma'assalama

oh, I always hear it being mentioned....i'll add it to the 'did you know' thread lol
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Kittygyal
05-08-2006, 05:24 PM
Originally Posted by DaNgErOuS MiNdS
im sre its somehwre near birmingham
salam.
bro yes it is that's why i asked the sis if she wants info on birmigham or other places :)
w.salam
Reply

*KB*
05-13-2006, 12:38 PM
thank u very much insha'Allah with all ur help and Allah's blessings i shall do well.
Reply

Kittygyal
05-13-2006, 12:41 PM
salam.
sis i hope you do well if you want any more info please feel free to let us know just ask :)
w.salam
Reply

*KB*
05-13-2006, 12:44 PM
i will
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lipstick
09-02-2007, 09:25 PM
Wow someone from my town

cool

wednesbury has a poplation of around 36 thousand

88% of which are white
2% black-carribean or african
6% indian
and the rest made up of banladeshi and other

its a quiet town with barely any crime and loads of old people

22% of ppl are below 16
22% are old
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