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AhlaamBella
07-27-2006, 01:13 PM
Salaam,

I havn't posted in ages but I'm back! lol

Anyway, has anyone read 'does my head look big in this?'? It's about a muslim girl who doesn't do anything according to Islam except pray occasionally. Then suddenly she decides to wear the hijab. Only the headscarf but it is still a big step for a teenage girl going through problems with friends, guys and looks. I suggest you read it. I have just started reading it and already I admire her confidence. I wear the hijab and jilbab but lack self-confidence but now...I just feel so different thanks to the way the author has worded her text.

comments please!

Wasalaam,
Khadijah :sister:
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Kittygyal
07-27-2006, 01:14 PM
oh welcome sis missed ya alot
anyway no i haven't read it humm
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amirah_87
07-27-2006, 01:26 PM
salaams,

welcome back sis

hmmm...your name rings a bell!!:?:?

did you change your avatar ukthiy, did you have a lil iraqi with a headband on :X

ANYWAYS:

i ain't read that book!!....:peace:
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Anonymous.92
07-28-2006, 08:20 AM
I have read that book. I also admire her confidence and so forth.

What I don't like is her example for the muslim sisters who read about her. I mean they describe her as wagging, listening to music, having guys for friends, wearing makeup, tantrums etc. Because the girls that might read it might get the wrong impression that all of that is ok when it is not.
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AhlaamBella
07-29-2006, 12:53 PM
Originally Posted by Anonymous.92
I have read that book. I also admire her confidence and so forth.

What I don't like is her example for the muslim sisters who read about her. I mean they describe her as wagging, listening to music, having guys for friends, wearing makeup, tantrums etc. Because the girls that might read it might get the wrong impression that all of that is ok when it is not.
salaam,

i couldn't agree more! the whole adam thing bugs. I mean the way the author has portrayed it makes you want things to go ahead when really it's completly haraam!
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bint_muhammed
07-29-2006, 10:38 PM
i read a bit bout the author in a newspaper and gets whats ironic she doesnt wear the hijab! anywayz i'd like to read it, oh whats the author called? lol
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Anonymous.92
07-30-2006, 01:47 AM
The author is called Randa Abdel Fattah.
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searchingsoul
07-30-2006, 07:10 AM
I read a review of this book. It sounded interesting.
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AhlaamBella
07-31-2006, 05:47 PM
Originally Posted by ya_Giney
i read a bit bout the author in a newspaper and gets whats ironic she doesnt wear the hijab! anywayz i'd like to read it, oh whats the author called? lol
omg! really? She wrote all those inspirational passages about wearing the hijab and she doesn't even wear it herself!
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Ashley
08-03-2006, 05:50 PM
i havent read it but my friend who is a muslim did and she said it was kinda crazy and alot of crap but i would like to read it
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Protected_Diamond
08-03-2006, 05:54 PM
:sl:

I've read a summary of it, sounds good. Its intresting because the sister doesn't wear the hijaab and she wrote a book about it.

:w:
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searchingsoul
08-03-2006, 06:01 PM
Originally Posted by Umm Salamah
:sl:

I've read a summary of it, sounds good. Its intresting because the sister doesn't wear the hijaab and she wrote a book about it.

:w:
She probably just wanted to make some money.
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Rie_Maya
08-03-2006, 06:09 PM
The catchy blurb on the back nicely sums up the whole context of the novel:

The slide opened and I heard a gentle, kind voice:
‘What is your confession, my child?’
I was stuffed. The priest would declare me a heretic; my parents would call me a traitor…
The priest asked me again: ‘What is your confession, my child?”
‘I’m Muslim,’ I whispered.

In today’s society this focus is extremely relevant and intriguing. It also allows the reader to really delve into the life of a young girl, dealing with normal adolescent issues, with an additional focus on religion and belief.

Abdel-Fattah has written an extremely likeable novel, which will appeal to both children and adults. She has easily captured the heart and spirit of her main character, Amal Mohamed Nasrullah Abdel-Hakim, a sixteen-year-old Australian-Palestinian-Muslim still coming to grips with her various identity hyphens. Mind you, Abdel-Fattah herself went through the same issues growing up, so the warmth of the novel obviously comes from real experiences.

It’s hard enough to be cool as a teenage when being one issue behind the latest Cosmo disqualifies you from the in-group. Try wearing a veil on your head and getting in the ‘bums up’ position at lunchtime and you know you’re in for a tough time. Luckily my friends support me, although they’ve got a few troubles of their own. Simone, blonde and gorgeous, has got serious image problems, and Leila’s really intelligent but her parents are more interested in her getting a marriage certificate than her high school certificate. And I thought I had problems…

Amal decides one day to wear the hijab, full-time! ‘Full-timers’ are what her Muslim friends call girls who wear the hijab all the time, which basically means wearing it whenever you’re in the presence of males who aren’t immediate family. After many debates and by the power of watching a ‘Friends’ episode, Amal is ready to demonstrate her belief. Not only do the students question and abuse her, but they also are proud and intrigued by such a strong character. However, her religion also forbids her to sleep with anyone other than her future husband. Try telling that to the boy you have the hots for and the feeling is mutual.

The magic ingredients that Abdel-Fattah uses, are exceptional writing (obviously written from the heart), adorable characters, intelligent thoughts and lastly, familiar settings. I consider Melbourne my second home; my family has lived in Camberwell and the surrounding areas. Much to my delight this was where Amal lives and she and her friends frequent Chadstone Shopping Centre, my local place to shop.

To be honest, I had not given it much thought as to how some kids today deal with the normal pressures of adolescence but also have to contend with their religious differences. This book really was an eye opener. It is thought provoking, relevant, and educational. It is a fantastic novel to give all children aged 14 and up. Who knows, the positive message this book portrays might even help break some very uncomfortable barriers between children of different religions and nationalities.
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azim
08-03-2006, 06:34 PM
Asalaamu alaykum.

The fact she doesn't wear hijab does taint the book a little.

That said, its great to see Muslim authors. Theres very few of them around.
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SirZubair
08-03-2006, 06:35 PM
Originally Posted by azim
That said, its great to see Muslim authors. Theres very few of them around.
Ahh yes. True.

But one of the best (Martin Lings) passed away.

May allah swt shower him with his mercy.
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Rie_Maya
08-03-2006, 06:58 PM
I'd disagree - there are far more Muslim authors out there than you'd realise- but often have to look more carefully..........and they tend to often write about real-life events.........
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SirZubair
08-04-2006, 09:14 AM
Originally Posted by Rie_Maya
I'd disagree - there are far more Muslim authors out there than you'd realise- but often have to look more carefully..........and they tend to often write about real-life events.........

Oh yeah? :) Name some?

http://www.islamicboard.com/general-...favourite.html

^ Go to that thread and name your favourite authors and books :)
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