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Al-Zaara
08-30-2006, 07:42 PM
:salamext:

I wondered, those who went or go in the nine-year compulsory school in Non-Muslim countries, like European ones, what subject did you have instead of Religion? Did you choose Religion or something else...?

In Finland we Non-Christians have a different subject. It is called something like "outlook of life" and we study about moral and ethics, a bit philosophy and much more. A very interesting subject. One of my favourite ones. :)

I just wondered how it is in the UK, US or somewhere else... :)

:wasalamex
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glo
08-30-2006, 07:47 PM
Unless you go to a faith-based school, here in the UK all pupils are taught 'Religious Education'. This teaches the basics of the main religions, as well as ethical and moral issues, which are not religion-specific. The idea is to teach pupils about the different religions and faiths, not any religion specifically.
It looks at the functional side, rather than the spiritual side (if that makes sense).

Anybody who wishes, can be excluded from attending Religious Education. In my experience that very rarely happens though.
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Al-Zaara
08-30-2006, 07:58 PM
Originally Posted by glo
Unless you go to a faith-based school, here in the UK all pupils are taught 'Religious Education'. This teaches the basics of the main religions, as well as ethical and moral issues, which are not religion-specific. The idea is to teach pupils about the different religions and faiths, not any religion specifically.
It looks at the functional side, rather than the spiritual side (if that makes sense).

Anybody who wishes, can be excluded from attending Religious Education. In my experience that very rarely happens though.
Greetings,

Wow, that seems very nice. :)
Here I've asked the Christians and their teachers what they study in that subject, and it is mainly Luther Christianity, and a little bit of other religions, but just about 3 lessons of it, then back to Christianity.

In my subject "outlook on life", we do study other religions too, the same way you described it, functional not spiritual. :)

Thank you for your answer, glo!

Peace,
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Woodrow
08-30-2006, 08:36 PM
Here in the US the public schools can not teach a specific religion. Comparative religions can be covered in philosophy and social study courses, but no one religion can be placed over another and no worship can be included.

Many parents choose to send their children to private or religious schools because of that. They are exempt from many of the tax supported public schools and you can usually find a school that will be based on your chosen faith. The only requirement is that in order to be academicaly accredited they need to provide the basic secular core studies such as grammar, mathematics etc. The problem is many charge quite a bit even the ones established by a church or mosque, they can be too expensive for the average person. Many Catholics and Jews will usually try to send they children to a religious school rather than a secular public one. Here in Austin the Islamic Center is begining to offer a Grade school program which combines Religious studies with the accredited secular academis. Sadly it is beyond an affordable tuition for my Grand Children.
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glo
08-30-2006, 08:43 PM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
Here in the US the public schools can not teach a specific religion. Comparative religions can be covered in philosophy and social study courses, but no one religion can be placed over another and no worship can be included.

Many parents choose to send their children to private or religious schools because of that. They are exempt from many of the tax supported public schools and you can usually find a school that will be based on your chosen faith. The only requirement is that in order to be academicaly accredited they need to provide the basic secular core studies such as grammar, mathematics etc. The problem is many charge quite a bit even the ones established by a church or mosque, they can be too expensive for the average person. Many Catholics and Jews will usually try to send they children to a religious school rather than a secular public one. Here in Austin the Islamic Center is begining to offer a Grade school program which combines Religious studies with the accredited secular academis. Sadly it is beyond an affordable tuition for my Grand Children.
What about home schooling, Woodrow? That's quite common in the US, isn't it? I know a lot of Christian family opt for that.
In the UK it is possible to do home schooling, but I don't think it's terribly common.
I know that in Germany it is not permitted.
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amirah_87
08-30-2006, 08:46 PM
Originally Posted by glo
Unless you go to a faith-based school, here in the UK all pupils are taught 'Religious Education'. This teaches the basics of the main religions, as well as ethical and moral issues, which are not religion-specific. The idea is to teach pupils about the different religions and faiths, not any religion specifically.
It looks at the functional side, rather than the spiritual side (if that makes sense).

Anybody who wishes, can be excluded from attending Religious Education. In my experience that very rarely happens though.
As salaamu alaykum,

Like Glo said.. We call these lessons R.E../ P.S.H.R.E!!....

& every term we were taken to a different Place of worship.. Mosque, Gurudwara, Church...etc!!
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azim
08-30-2006, 09:12 PM
Asalaamu alaykum.

I loved R.E in both highschool and college. It was definately the most interesting topic and I loved the debates.

The college I went to was catholic, but it didn't teach catholicism 'overtly' in the R.E classes, rather they opted for a more subliminal way of teaching (not in the bad way).

A lot of the kids I spoke to had gone to Catholic primary and high schools and said their religion (catholicism) was always part of the classes. Lucky kids, I dream of what it would have been like to go to an Islamic highschool/primary school. *sigh*.
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AhlaamBella
08-31-2006, 10:09 AM
Well I go to an islamic high school and just finished my R.E GCSE in year 10 that was focused only on Islam.
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glo
08-31-2006, 10:38 AM
Originally Posted by Baby_Pearl
Well I go to an islamic high school and just finished my R.E GCSE in year 10 that was focused only on Islam.
Can I ask in which country you live, Baby Pearl?
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The Ruler
08-31-2006, 10:40 AM
salam...

in kuwait we either had islamic studies or summink called moral studies which was for kids dat wernt muslims....kinda irrelevant dat was wasnt it...lol :)

wassalam
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AhlaamBella
08-31-2006, 10:50 AM
Originally Posted by glo
Can I ask in which country you live, Baby Pearl?
England. :)
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Al-Zaara
08-31-2006, 01:28 PM
:sl:

Now I understand much better. :) I even realise better now that Finland is actually a kind of very religious Christian country... Which isn't seen at first glance I think, anyways...

JazakAllah khair for your answers, brothers and sisters!!! :rose:

:w:
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Woodrow
08-31-2006, 07:36 PM
Originally Posted by glo
What about home schooling, Woodrow? That's quite common in the US, isn't it? I know a lot of Christian family opt for that.
In the UK it is possible to do home schooling, but I don't think it's terribly common.
I know that in Germany it is not permitted.
They do receive home schooling in addition to the public school. Primarily in Language studies. In the home Urdu is spoken. Unfortunalty I don't speak it. Their father is teaching them Urdu. I get to teach them Arabic, I use the BYKI language program plus a series of Arabic Language PC games. They also have a formal Arabic class on Saturdays. Four days a week in the evenings they have formal Qur'an lessons and are learning to recite the Qur'an properly. Academicaly in the school core subject they are wll advanced so that is not a problem.
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syilla
09-01-2006, 01:58 AM
in malaysia we call it 'moral'

;) ;) ;)

Funny ha...to call a subject .... moral subject :D
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glo
09-01-2006, 06:16 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
They do receive home schooling in addition to the public school. Primarily in Language studies. In the home Urdu is spoken. Unfortunalty I don't speak it. Their father is teaching them Urdu. I get to teach them Arabic, I use the BYKI language program plus a series of Arabic Language PC games. They also have a formal Arabic class on Saturdays. Four days a week in the evenings they have formal Qur'an lessons and are learning to recite the Qur'an properly. Academicaly in the school core subject they are wll advanced so that is not a problem.
Sounds like you have some smart grandchildren there! :) How is your own Arabic coming along?

Can I ask you, Woodrow, how old are your grandchildren? And were they born into Islam?

(just being nosey :rollseyes )

peace
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Woodrow
09-01-2006, 07:37 AM
Originally Posted by glo
Sounds like you have some smart grandchildren there! :) How is your own Arabic coming along?

Can I ask you, Woodrow, how old are your grandchildren? And were they born into Islam?

(just being nosey :rollseyes )

peace
The only major problem I have with Arabic is that in speaking it I still speak a Moroccan dialect that I can't seem to shake. I can understand most people when they speak it, but nobody can understand me, except for a neighbor from Algeria. I also need to improve my reading and writting of it.

The cookie crumblers are 7 and 5, They were born Muslim. All the Grand kids were born Muslim. Oldest Grand daugther is now 19 and has 2 kids of her own. Sad part I did not see her from the time she was 6 months old until last year. Now, get to talk to here quite often and see her about once a month, her and her Husband live in Dallas.
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feb-2nd
09-01-2006, 08:01 AM
:sl:

We do have nine-year compulsory school here but we don't have much religious education in these 9 yrs. There is a little part about religions in grade 10 though or unless you go to an Islamic school here .. but even in that school there's nothing much about Islam ... they just teach you how to read Quran and allow you to pray Zuhr Salah in school .. but really it depends on which school you go to.

:w:
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