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north_malaysian
09-22-2006, 06:54 AM
When Woodrow mentioned about the Lipka Tatars in other thread.... suddenly I remembered my university years...


There are Chechens and Tatars in the university, while the Chechens are so determined with their independent state of Chechenistan ... the Tatars seems proud te be called as Russians.

For example, during Ramadhan... the Tatars would set up a stall selling "Russian food".... I mean .... do Tatars really feel that they belongs to Russia?

Russia Federation also sends their Quran Reciter each year to Kuala Lumpur International Koranic Recitation Competition.... so does this mean that Tatars are proud to be Russians?

Why it's different with the Chechens?
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Woodrow
09-22-2006, 07:02 AM
I am primarily familiary with the Lipkas. To be honest there are only a few that I know personaly. But, those that I know, want to return to Lithuania and are not very happy that the Russiana excilled their ancestors to Siberia.

I have a hard time thinking that any Tatar, who has any knowledge of his history, would claim to be Russian.

Thank you for using the proper spelling of Tatar. Most of us in the Western world spell it Tartar, but Tatar is the proper spelling and closer to the pronunciation.
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north_malaysian
09-22-2006, 07:26 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
I am primarily familiary with the Lipkas. To be honest there are only a few that I know personaly. But, those that I know, want to return to Lithuania and are not very happy that the Russiana excilled their ancestors to Siberia.

I have a hard time thinking that any Tatar, who has any knowledge of his history, would claim to be Russian.

Thank you for using the proper spelling of Tatar. Most of us in the Western world spell it Tartar, but Tatar is the proper spelling and closer to the pronunciation.
Actually, the Tatars in the university proudly call themselves as Russians. Their signboard for the stall says "Russian food"....

Furthermore, never heard of Tatars claiming for independent as the Chechens.....

"Tatar" is the same word we used in Malay Language.....

Can you tell me about the Tatar people's history, who are they actually? People are saying they're Mongol's descendants ... but why they have 'blue' eyes?
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north_malaysian
09-22-2006, 07:39 AM
There is a proverb:

"Scratch a Russian and you'll find a Tatar"

Taken from: http://www.panorama.ru/works/patr/ir/13.html
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Woodrow
09-22-2006, 08:13 AM
It is a mixture. Yes there is Mongol Ancestry and most Tatars do retain some oriental features. However, there was some Indo-European influence also.

the Tatar are divided into the "White Horde" and the "Golden Horde" The white horde although of Mongol Ancestry has more caucasian features. The language is more like Arabic.

Here is a good link on the Lipkas

http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/ntstar/history.htm


Links specificaly about the Lithuanian Lipkas:

http://www.gaumina.lt/totoriai/english/index.html

http://alka.mch.mii.lt/visuomene/totoriai/trumpa.en.htm

As this thread is more historical than Current world affairs I am moving it to the General Forum.
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north_malaysian
09-22-2006, 08:41 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
It is a mixture. Yes there is Mongol Ancestry and most Tatars do retain some oriental features. However, there was some Indo-European influence also.

the Tatar are divided into the "White Horde" and the "Golden Horde" The white horde although of Mongol Ancestry has more caucasian features. The language is more like Arabic.

Here is a good link on the Lipkas

http://www.angelfire.com/jazz/ntstar/history.htm


Links specificaly about the Lithuanian Lipkas:

http://www.gaumina.lt/totoriai/english/index.html

http://alka.mch.mii.lt/visuomene/totoriai/trumpa.en.htm

As this thread is more historical than Current world affairs I am moving it to the General Forum.
Several questions:

1) Wow... the Lipkas really love their country...Lithuania... but do Lithuanian Christians recognise Lipkas as part of them?

2) From the Polish map.... it shown that the only religious building exist in both towns of Bohoniki and Kruszyniani is a mosque. Does this means that 100% of the population in both town are Muslims?

3) Princess Fraczyska Mirza Lipka Cassels, the Princess of Lipka Tatars at the White Horde at Caledonia ... is she a Muslim?

4) Why Lipka Tatars wont build their mosques with stones?
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Woodrow
09-22-2006, 04:23 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
Several questions:

1) Wow... the Lipkas really love their country...Lithuania... but do Lithuanian Christians recognise Lipkas as part of them?

Religious freedom of any form is only now returning to Lithuania. It is going to be a growth process for both Christian and Muslim. Historicaly there was much acvceptance of each other.

2) From the Polish map.... it shown that the only religious building exist in both towns of Bohoniki and Kruszyniani is a mosque. Does this means that 100% of the population in both town are Muslims?

I would be more prone to say that they are the only ones practising their religion. Under Communist rule Poland was officialy atheist. Religion is only now returning to some towns.3) Princess Fraczyska Mirza Lipka Cassels, the Princess of Lipka Tatars at the White Horde at Caledonia ... is she a Muslim?

Yes, the name Mirza identifies her as being Muslim

4) Why Lipka Tatars wont build their mosques with stones?
That goes back to the 1400's. It had to do with the treaties between the Tatars and the King at the time. It is probably something that will change as more Lipkas return.



This is quite interesting to me. although I was aware of my Lipkas ancestry, it was only after I reverted to Islam did I become aware of my Islamic ancestry.
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starfortress
09-22-2006, 04:36 PM
:sl:

Wow this is new to me..
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Woodrow
09-22-2006, 05:01 PM
Historicaly it shows just how far Islam had expanded prior to the Crusades. I think it is worthy to note that the Lipkas were invited into Lithuania and did rise to Nobility status as a choice of the people and not because of any conquest.

If it had not been for Islam, Lithuania might have kept the old Pagan beliefs. Lithuania's history is entwined with the history of the Lipkas.

I now wonder if perhaps Pope John-Paul might have had a bit of Lipkas ancestry as he was from Poland and at one point Poland and Lithuania were one country. John-Paul is remembered as working for Muslim-Catholic dialogue.
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north_malaysian
09-24-2006, 02:39 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
I now wonder if perhaps Pope John-Paul might have had a bit of Lipkas ancestry as he was from Poland and at one point Poland and Lithuania were one country. John-Paul is remembered as working for Muslim-Catholic dialogue.
Pope JP2 was so popular among Muslims when he kissed the Holy Koran. There are also rumours about him being a crypto-Muslim. He is the first Pope to greet Ramadhan to Saudi King. The first Pope to visit a mosque. He's good!!!

Woodrow, I've heard about Tatars in Finland who defended their country in wars. As Finland is near to the Baltics, are those Finnish Tatars are Lipkas too? I've heard that Finnish Tatars are very successfull in businesses and banking.
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Igence
12-14-2006, 09:45 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
When Woodrow mentioned about the Lipka Tatars in other thread.... suddenly I remembered my university years...


There are Chechens and Tatars in the university, while the Chechens are so determined with their independent state of Chechenistan ... the Tatars seems proud te be called as Russians.

For example, during Ramadhan... the Tatars would set up a stall selling "Russian food".... I mean .... do Tatars really feel that they belongs to Russia?

Russia Federation also sends their Quran Reciter each year to Kuala Lumpur International Koranic Recitation Competition.... so does this mean that Tatars are proud to be Russians?

Why it's different with the Chechens?

:sl:

I'm sorry, this is an old thread, but as I found it, I decided to reply.

Yes I am Tatar and I live in Tatarstan, Kazan (Qazan). We are proud to be Tatars and we never say we are Russians, but our citizenship is Russian. We have our own culture, but there are many common features between Tatars and Russians:
  1. Most Tatars speak Russian;
  2. Most Russians who live in Tatarstan speak Tatar (Tatarça)
  3. The appearance of Tatars and Russians has many common features (for example, swarthy Russians with black hair, or blue-eyed tow-head Tatars

Some Tatars may say they proud to be Russians. It means that Tatars are proud that they have they own republic, language and they have managed to save their cutlure and religion in this country (by the Help of God, certainly).
Moreover, Tatars adopted Islam (922 AD) earlier that Russian adopted Christianity, Tatars had great culture and they are proud of their history. And the biggest part of European Russia belonged to Tatars 500 years ago, it was Golden Horde, after Mongols' Invasion, and Bulgarstan before the invasion (also an Islamic state). So we live on our anciet earth, and we are proud we are able to be muslims here. Alhamdulillah!

:w:
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Woodrow
12-15-2006, 01:09 AM
As far as Tatars wanting to be identified with Russia. I have not seen that in the little I know of my families history.
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snakelegs
12-15-2006, 05:47 AM
Originally Posted by Igence
:sl:
I'm sorry, this is an old thread, but as I found it, I decided to reply.
i'm glad you did - that was interesting! and welcome to LI! :)
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north_malaysian
12-15-2006, 07:49 AM
Originally Posted by Igence
:sl:

I'm sorry, this is an old thread, but as I found it, I decided to reply.

Yes I am Tatar and I live in Tatarstan, Kazan (Qazan). We are proud to be Tatars and we never say we are Russians, but our citizenship is Russian. We have our own culture, but there are many common features between Tatars and Russians:
  1. Most Tatars speak Russian;
  2. Most Russians who live in Tatarstan speak Tatar (Tatarça)
  3. The appearance of Tatars and Russians has many common features (for example, swarthy Russians with black hair, or blue-eyed tow-head Tatars

Some Tatars may say they proud to be Russians. It means that Tatars are proud that they have they own republic, language and they have managed to save their cutlure and religion in this country (by the Help of God, certainly).
Moreover, Tatars adopted Islam (922 AD) earlier that Russian adopted Christianity, Tatars had great culture and they are proud of their history. And the biggest part of European Russia belonged to Tatars 500 years ago, it was Golden Horde, after Mongols' Invasion, and Bulgarstan before the invasion (also an Islamic state). So we live on our anciet earth, and we are proud we are able to be muslims here. Alhamdulillah!

:w:
nice info!!!!
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Chechen
12-15-2006, 08:16 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
When Woodrow mentioned about the Lipka Tatars in other thread.... suddenly I remembered my university years...


There are Chechens and Tatars in the university, while the Chechens are so determined with their independent state of Chechenistan ... the Tatars seems proud te be called as Russians.

For example, during Ramadhan... the Tatars would set up a stall selling "Russian food".... I mean .... do Tatars really feel that they belongs to Russia?

Russia Federation also sends their Quran Reciter each year to Kuala Lumpur International Koranic Recitation Competition.... so does this mean that Tatars are proud to be Russians?

Why it's different with the Chechens?

Cause we just hate Russians and they hate us. We've never wanted to be part of Russia or be considered as Russians.
Reply

Igence
12-15-2006, 09:27 PM
Thank you for your replies, brothers, Jazak Allahu Khairan!

To Chechen: I completely understand you, I respect Imam Shamil who helped all Caucasians to save their freedom, but what can we do now? Yes, actually Tatars always dream of their own land, and it would be a muslim land... But we are in the middle of Russia, unlike Chechen Republic, so we can't dream of the freedom... Once we lost our war and we were defeated... In the beginning of 1990s Tatastan was about to do the same thing as Chechen Republic, but Russian tanks in Mari-El (near Tatarstan) didn't allow us to continue our movement. I remember we used to help Chechens with food and goods, but then we couldn't understand whom we had to help, because now many Chechens had given up... People are tired of war, now they want peace.... as a part of Russia, yes..... And do you know, I think it means that we've lost our Ummah (but Allah knows best)... Because since 1552 AD (or maybe much earlier) Muslims didn't help each other.... The same with Chechen republic... It's very difficult, but I completely understand you, brother! I had the same feelings several years ago, but now I've admitted that the freedom is impossible for us... We have not enough Muslims to help us... But at the same time now we want to create a Russian Empire, where muslims would feel like at home, and muslims would have rights to do what they must do as muslims!

Wassalam!
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Woodrow
12-15-2006, 09:30 PM
Originally Posted by Chechen
Cause we just hate Russians and they hate us. We've never wanted to be part of Russia or be considered as Russians.
Those are pretty much the sentiments I heard from my ancestors. Although my Grandfather served Tsar Nicholas in the Russian Army as a Cavalry Officer. That would have been in about 1895. Prior to Russia taking over Lithuania.

The Tatars have a long reputation of being skilled horsemen.
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north_malaysian
12-16-2006, 01:39 AM
Originally Posted by Igence
Thank you for your replies, brothers, Jazak Allahu Khairan!

To Chechen: I completely understand you, I respect Imam Shamil who helped all Caucasians to save their freedom, but what can we do now? Yes, actually Tatars always dream of their own land, and it would be a muslim land... But we are in the middle of Russia, unlike Chechen Republic, so we can't dream of the freedom... Once we lost our war and we were defeated... In the beginning of 1990s Tatastan was about to do the same thing as Chechen Republic, but Russian tanks in Mari-El (near Tatarstan) didn't allow us to continue our movement. I remember we used to help Chechens with food and goods, but then we couldn't understand whom we had to help, because now many Chechens had given up... People are tired of war, now they want peace.... as a part of Russia, yes..... And do you know, I think it means that we've lost our Ummah (but Allah knows best)... Because since 1552 AD (or maybe much earlier) Muslims didn't help each other.... The same with Chechen republic... It's very difficult, but I completely understand you, brother! I had the same feelings several years ago, but now I've admitted that the freedom is impossible for us... We have not enough Muslims to help us... But at the same time now we want to create a Russian Empire, where muslims would feel like at home, and muslims would have rights to do what they must do as muslims!

Wassalam!
Now, I begun to understand why the Tatar and Chechen students in Malaysia are different.... thanks...
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north_malaysian
12-16-2006, 01:41 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
Those are pretty much the sentiments I heard from my ancestors. Although my Grandfather served Tsar Nicholas in the Russian Army as a Cavalry Officer. That would have been in about 1895. Prior to Russia taking over Lithuania.

The Tatars have a long reputation of being skilled horsemen.
you and your grandfather must be very skillful in military service then...:happy:
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Woodrow
12-16-2006, 04:43 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
you and your grandfather must be very skillful in military service then...:happy:
My Grandfather had a strong military bearing. I was a bit of a radical. Back in my AF days us sky jockeys were not very well noted for following Military protocol. It was only on very rare occasions I ever even wore a uniform. I almost got court martialed over that, but that is another story.

Getting back to the Tatars. I beleive most including even those of us who are only part Tatar would love to seen an independent Tatar Nation in either the Baltic refion or Southern Russia. Seperate from the Russians, but on peaceful terms with them.

Language wise there is a difference between the Tatars of Tatarstan and the Lipkas of the Baltic regions, but the ancient heritage is the same. I believe the Lipkas used the Arabic alphabet longer then the people of Tatarstan did if the people of Tatarstan ever did use it. If I Recall Lithuania used the Arabic Alphabet from the 1200s till the mid 1700s and then briefly used the Roman alphabet finaly adopting the Cyrillic (Russian) Alphabet, which most Lithuanians still use.
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Igence
12-16-2006, 12:04 PM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
My Grandfather had a strong military bearing. I was a bit of a radical. Back in my AF days us sky jockeys were not very well noted for following Military protocol. It was only on very rare occasions I ever even wore a uniform. I almost got court martialed over that, but that is another story.

Getting back to the Tatars. I beleive most including even those of us who are only part Tatar would love to seen an independent Tatar Nation in either the Baltic refion or Southern Russia. Seperate from the Russians, but on peaceful terms with them.

Language wise there is a difference between the Tatars of Tatarstan and the Lipkas of the Baltic regions, but the ancient heritage is the same. I believe the Lipkas used the Arabic alphabet longer then the people of Tatarstan did if the people of Tatarstan ever did use it. If I Recall Lithuania used the Arabic Alphabet from the 1200s till the mid 1700s and then briefly used the Roman alphabet finaly adopting the Cyrillic (Russian) Alphabet, which most Lithuanians still use.
:sl:

Tatarstan Tatars used the Arabic script from 922 AD (officially, in fact, a little bit earlier) till 1920s (i.e. 1000 years!), then the Latin Alphabet for 10 years, and then the Russian Alphabet + 6 additional letters. In 1990s Tatars decided to restore the Latin Alphabet (it has many similarities with Turkish), officially it should be in 2001, but Russian government passed a law forbidding using any other alphabets for all nations, which live in Russian Federation, except the Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet. Otherwise, the national minorities will not be allowed to use their language as official in their national regions and republics. Tatar is official language in Tatarstan, everybody studies it at school, all documents are in Tatar and in Russian, so if Tatars change their alphabet now, they won't be able to use their language for official purposes and in education. Nevertheless, many sites in the Internet use both scripts now, or even only the Latin script...

for example, http://kitapxane.noka.ru/ - Web-library of Tatar literature

:w:
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Woodrow
12-16-2006, 02:27 PM
It turns out that you did use the Arabic Script longer then us Lipkas did. That is good new. Now I am curious about the language differences. From my understanding Lithuanian, the adopted language of the Lipkas is of mid-eastern origin also but it seems to be a hybrid of Macedonian, Aramaic and Arabic. If I understand correctly the language in Tatarstan is closer to classical Arabic.

Do you have any knowledge if Lithuanian bears any resemblance to the old Tatar language? The Lipkas in Lithuanian had pretty much adopted the Lithuanian Language or esle formed into the Lithuanian Language.

Lithuanian and Letish are 2 languages that confuse Linguistic students as to their origin.
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Igence
12-16-2006, 08:34 PM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
It turns out that you did use the Arabic Script longer then us Lipkas did. That is good new. Now I am curious about the language differences. From my understanding Lithuanian, the adopted language of the Lipkas is of mid-eastern origin also but it seems to be a hybrid of Macedonian, Aramaic and Arabic. If I understand correctly the language in Tatarstan is closer to classical Arabic.

Do you have any knowledge if Lithuanian bears any resemblance to the old Tatar language? The Lipkas in Lithuanian had pretty much adopted the Lithuanian Language or esle formed into the Lithuanian Language.

Lithuanian and Letish are 2 languages that confuse Linguistic students as to their origin.
:sl:

What you've mentioned is news to me!

Actually Tatar language of Tatarstan is a Turkic language. And Turkic languages are Altaic languages.

Here are some Altaiic languages: Japanese, Korean, Mongolian, Manchurian and some others

Here are some Turkic languages: Turkish, Tatar, Azeri, Uzbek, Bashkir, Uighur, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Noghai, Kumyk, Yakut (Sakha), Khakas, Altai, Shor and so on, and so forth...

Whereas Arabic is a Semitic language...

Example of Tatar (the way to check whether you understand it or not):

Añlasañ - Tatarsıñ!

(If you understand, you are Tatar)

Actually we have many Arabic and Persian words in our language, but the origin of our language and culture is Asia, and the origin of Arabic is Africa.

:w:
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Woodrow
12-16-2006, 08:40 PM
Thank You, This is the most I learned of the True Tatar language from any source. I knew that the Lithuanian my family spoke was not related to the original Tatar, but because of the alphabet I assumed Tatar was based on Arabic.

Then again the old Lithuanian used the Arabic Alphabet too. Lithuanian also has a few Arabic words mixed in it.
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Chechen
12-16-2006, 09:00 PM
Originally Posted by Igence
Thank you for your replies, brothers, Jazak Allahu Khairan!

To Chechen: I completely understand you, I respect Imam Shamil who helped all Caucasians to save their freedom, but what can we do now? Yes, actually Tatars always dream of their own land, and it would be a muslim land... But we are in the middle of Russia, unlike Chechen Republic, so we can't dream of the freedom... Once we lost our war and we were defeated... In the beginning of 1990s Tatastan was about to do the same thing as Chechen Republic, but Russian tanks in Mari-El (near Tatarstan) didn't allow us to continue our movement. I remember we used to help Chechens with food and goods, but then we couldn't understand whom we had to help, because now many Chechens had given up... People are tired of war, now they want peace.... as a part of Russia, yes..... And do you know, I think it means that we've lost our Ummah (but Allah knows best)... Because since 1552 AD (or maybe much earlier) Muslims didn't help each other.... The same with Chechen republic... It's very difficult, but I completely understand you, brother! I had the same feelings several years ago, but now I've admitted that the freedom is impossible for us... We have not enough Muslims to help us... But at the same time now we want to create a Russian Empire, where muslims would feel like at home, and muslims would have rights to do what they must do as muslims!

Wassalam!

Of course I completely understand you it is very hard fighting Russia cause it's one of the most powerful countries in the world and the whole world is afraid to go against Russia plus they have nukes. But we still continue fighting them because we believe we can win. Chechens have always been great warriors and there's nothing we love more than freedom and that's why the Russians are afraid of us. They're afraid of us cause after 400 years they still haven't managed to beat us and we don't intend on stopping with our struggle. Yes of course many of our people have died and suffered but slowly the Russians are starting to realise that they cannot beat us cause we'd rather die than live as slaves to anyone. It's better to die on your feet than to live on your knees...
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north_malaysian
12-18-2006, 03:44 AM
How about the Christian Tatars (Khryashen?) ? Are they forced to be Christians or converted willingly?
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Woodrow
12-18-2006, 03:54 AM
I really don't know. But in Lithuania I suspect that the Tatars who were not deported became Christian by choice. They could not be defeated by the Crusades but finaly assimilated into the population.
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north_malaysian
12-18-2006, 04:01 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
I really don't know. But in Lithuania I suspect that the Tatars who were not deported became Christian by choice. They could not be defeated by the Crusades but finaly assimilated into the population.
yeah.. like lots of Muslim Arabs became Catholics in South america, because there are no mosques or people teaching Islam, thus they're assimilated into Latino comunities.
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north_malaysian
12-18-2006, 04:19 AM
There are 110,000 Kerashen Tatars speaking Uralic dialect in Russia. they're Christians.

From wikipedia:

VOLGA TATARS
1) Kazan Tatars - Sunni Muslims
2) Noqrat Tatars
3) Perm Tatars
4) Kerashen Tatars - Orthodox Christians
5) Nagaybak Tatars - Orthodox Christians
6) Tiptar Tatars - Sunni Muslims
7) Mishar Tatars
8) Qasim Tatars
9) Astrakhan Tatars

TATARS OF CRIMEA, UKRAINE AND POLAND
1) Crimean Tatars - Sunni Muslims
2) Lipka Tatars
3) Belorussian Tatars - Sunni Muslims, some Orthodox Christians

CAUCASIAN TATARS
1) Nogai Tatars - Sunni Muslims
2) Qundra Tatars
3) Karachay Tatars - Sunni Muslims
4) Mountain Tatars - Shiite Muslims

SIBERIAN TATARS
1) Siberian Tatars
2) Baraba Tatars - Sunni Muslims
3) Chulym Tatars - Orthodox Christians, some Shamanists
4) Abakan Tatars
5) Altay Tatars
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Woodrow
12-18-2006, 04:33 AM
If memory serves me right most of the Siberian Tatars were from Eastern Europe and the Balkans and deported by the Russians to Siberia. The Causcasian Tatars were primarily Circassians who dominated the Causcaus mountains and were nearly exterminated by the Russians with some fleeing to Jordan were many still live in the vicinity of Petra.
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north_malaysian
12-18-2006, 05:34 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
with some fleeing to Jordan were many still live in the vicinity of Petra.
There are Tatars in Jordan too?

I think lots of Tatars found refuge in Turkey... and some managed to be in New York too, right?
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Woodrow
12-18-2006, 05:41 AM
Circassian Royal Guard.
The Circassians

The Circassians are a non-Arab Islamic people originally from the Caucasus region of western Asia. Southward Russian expansion during the 19th century forced between 1.25 and two million Circassians to emigrate south. Many of these perished along the way, but around one million reached the Ottoman Empire, where they settled first in the Balkans and later in the Levant region of the Middle East.



Circassians first arrived en masse in Jordan in 1878, where they settled in Amman, Wadi Seer and Na’ur. Today, Circassian populations can be found also in Jerash, Sweileh, Zarqa, Azraq and other parts of northern Jordan. Estimates of the Circassian population vary from 20,000 to 80,000.

The Ottomans managed the resettlement of the Circassians to some extent, recruiting them into the police and governmental structures. Until the 1940s, they continued to overwhelmingly prefer service in the army or government, but now they are represented in a diverse assortment of sectors and professions. Today, Circassian Jordanians are a well-educated people who continue to play a role in Jordan’s political, economic and social life, larger than their numbers would indicate.

Circassian culture places strong emphasis on respect for the elderly and closely-knit extended families. Marriage with anyone sharing the same surname of either parent is strictly forbidden. Circassians are also well known for their honesty. In fact, Jordanian Circassians constitute King Hussein’s ceremonial guard.

Source:http://www.kinghussein.gov.jo/people1.html
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north_malaysian
12-18-2006, 05:43 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
Circassian Royal Guard.
The Circassians

The Circassians are a non-Arab Islamic people originally from the Caucasus region of western Asia. Southward Russian expansion during the 19th century forced between 1.25 and two million Circassians to emigrate south. Many of these perished along the way, but around one million reached the Ottoman Empire, where they settled first in the Balkans and later in the Levant region of the Middle East.



Circassians first arrived en masse in Jordan in 1878, where they settled in Amman, Wadi Seer and Na’ur. Today, Circassian populations can be found also in Jerash, Sweileh, Zarqa, Azraq and other parts of northern Jordan. Estimates of the Circassian population vary from 20,000 to 80,000.

The Ottomans managed the resettlement of the Circassians to some extent, recruiting them into the police and governmental structures. Until the 1940s, they continued to overwhelmingly prefer service in the army or government, but now they are represented in a diverse assortment of sectors and professions. Today, Circassian Jordanians are a well-educated people who continue to play a role in Jordan’s political, economic and social life, larger than their numbers would indicate.

Circassian culture places strong emphasis on respect for the elderly and closely-knit extended families. Marriage with anyone sharing the same surname of either parent is strictly forbidden. Circassians are also well known for their honesty. In fact, Jordanian Circassians constitute King Hussein’s ceremonial guard.

Source:http://www.kinghussein.gov.jo/people1.html
wow... talking about loyalty.
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