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sonz
10-01-2006, 03:07 AM
The UK’s chief inspector of Prisons, Anne Owers, expressed concerns over the treatment of Muslim detainees at Belmarsh maximum security prison in east London, Reuters reported.

Owers said Belmarsh staff doesn’t understand the social and religious behavior of Muslim prisoners, adding that there were few relationships between staff and detainees.

“The situation in relation to Muslim prisoners, in a prison holding many of those suspected of involvement in the recent terrorist incidents, was particularly sensitive and complex," Owers said in her report.

"It was noticeable that half the prisoners we surveyed ... said that they had felt unsafe at Belmarsh. This appeared particularly strong among the small number of Asian prisoners,” she added.

Owers, who made an unannounced inspection of Belmarsh last October, also stressed the importance of understanding the detainees in order to manage them safely.

"We did not believe this was the case for staff in relation to Muslim prisoners at Belmarsh," she said, adding that Muslim detainees felt their treatment by staff had worsened since the July 7 London bombings.

”Full stretch”

According to the report, around a quarter of Belmarsh’s 900 detainees were foreigners, half were black or minority ethnic detainees, and over 100 were Muslims.

"The prison’s high security and special security units were at full stretch, holding, among others, those suspected of the failed suicide bomb attempts of July," the report said.

Owers also said she was concerned over the way staff treated four Muslim inmates who were banned from attending Friday prayers.

Another detainee charged with terrorism offences was held separately with his own dedicated group of staff who provided a "very poor quality of life", the chief inspector said.

"Young Muslim prisoners were concerned that ordinary social and religious behavior on their part was misinterpreted by staff as being problematic," the report said.

"What was clear was that there were few sturdy relationships, and little mutual understanding, between staff and this group of young prisoners,” it added.
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Muezzin
10-01-2006, 05:35 AM
No doubt some right-winger will come along and say something along the lines of:

"They're terror suspects, they don't deserve to be treated 'humanely'"

Or

"Well, MOST of them in there are guilty anyway"

Anyhow, Belmarsh is a blemish on the justice system. Even suspects who are cleared and released are put under surveillance and curfews.
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wilberhum
10-02-2006, 08:21 PM
And coming in on the far right, Wilber arrives. LOL

I noticed that there was no comparison between Muslims and non-Muslims.

Few relationships between staff and detainees
I sure that is a standing order for the guards.
Felt unsafe
Person is a dangerous place. I surprised at half. I would have expected at least 90%.
Importance of understanding the detainees
There is absolutely no need to understand detainees. There only job is to maintain order.
Muslim detainees felt their treatment by staff had worsened since the July 7 London bombings.
Absolutely unacceptable but expectable.
But,
The prison’s high security and special security units were at full stretch, holding, among others, those suspected of the failed suicide bomb attempts.
Sounds to me like they are trying to keep them safe.
she was concerned over the way staff treated four Muslim inmates who were banned from attending Friday prayers.
And the reason they were banned form Friday prayers? I would like to know what they did before I got too concerned over how they were treated. And what treatment did they receive?
Another detainee charged with terrorism offences was held separately with his own dedicated group of staff who provided a "very poor quality of life", the chief inspector said.
Now what does that mean? I think prisons provide a very poor quality of life. I think for there own safety they need to be held separately.
What was clear was that there were few sturdy relationships, and little mutual understanding, between staff and this group of young prisoners
What? Is prison supposed to be a social club?

Prison is where you hold people who have committed crimes and sometimes to hold people suspected of committing crimes.
It is not a place for bonding with guards, feeling safe and secure, create sturdy relationships, or enhances your quality of life.
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Torquemada
10-02-2006, 09:20 PM
What did the guards do? I want specifics? I can say muhammed isn't a prophet and that could be consider harsh treatment.
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Muezzin
10-03-2006, 07:49 AM
With all due respect, I think Anne Bowers, as the UK’s chief inspector of Prisons, is in the best position to judge detainees' treatment.
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