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chris4336
11-17-2006, 01:55 PM
Hello I have not yet converted, but for the past 6 months I have been reading and studying about Islam. Recently I have gotten to the point where I will spend hours each day online reading about the rules, interpretations of the Quran, Hadith, etc. The problem is that I'll read something written by Muslims and feel great about Islam, then I'll come across a Christian website and all my doubts about Islam are revived. I feel like I'm not really getting anywhere in terms of increasing my imam.

Any reverts, or Muslims from birth, go through something similar to this? It is getting in the way of my studying for medical school, however, I keep tellilng mysellf that finding the truth is more important than anything in this world. I wish I could just believe completely and fully...but I still have doubts in my mind.

Thank you.
Christina
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Umar001
11-17-2006, 01:59 PM
Hey, you know, I ended up leaving college, cos I feel islam is for me more important and because of the way I had been brought up I found that I'd spend more time on academical stuf than studying Islam.

Can I pm you, for the rest of the answers? Feel free to say no. :)
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Angelzz
11-17-2006, 02:34 PM
I know how you feel Chris... Im addicted too just like you and have been for a long time now - reading everything and anything i can get my hands on. i have read numerous books and pamphlets that were either given to me generously or i have bought or borrowed from my local library - and ever since i was referred to this site i have spent hours every night this week checking it all out and i still want more more more.

I can't believe the amount thirst i have for Islam. And when i read or discover something new about it i get all excited as if i were the first in the world to know about it. lol.
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chris4336
11-17-2006, 02:55 PM
Hello, yes please feel free to PM me.

Thanks for the responses its nice to know there are others out there who feel the same. I am studying medicine so I try to look at it as studying somethng incredible that Allah has created, but sometimes I just cannot focus.

Its tough, but I guess its part of the whole thing of leaving this world behind.

Have you guys converted yet?

Christina
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Umar001
11-17-2006, 02:57 PM
Yea I reverted, just over a year ago now,
heres the short version of my reversion story,

http://www.islamicboard.com/333869-post129.html
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Angelzz
11-17-2006, 02:58 PM
I havent as yet ... though its something ill probably will be doing soon. At the moment im looking into the practise side of things - i have been recently introduced to some sisters and have been asking heaps of questions about the women side of things
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Abu Zakariya
11-17-2006, 03:10 PM
My advice for you would be to pray to God and turn to Him as much as you can. He is the one that guides. So ask Him to help and guide you, and then be patient.

Secondly, if the Christian websites cause your doubts to be revived, I would recommend you to simply avoid all of the polemic and focus on Islams main teaching: tawhid. Tawhid is what Islam is all about.
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chris4336
11-17-2006, 03:20 PM
Thanks for the PMs, but please note I cannot PM you back as I'm not a full member yet!
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Woodrow
11-17-2006, 03:30 PM
Hello Chris and Welcome to the forum. I've only been a revert for about a year and a half. It took me nearly 50 years to discover that I was born Muslim and I finaly returned home.

Your feelings are quite normal. There are many misconceptions about Islam and to accept Islam we do need to sort out the misconceptions from the facts.

I assume you are/were a Christian. Once you "feel" the message of Islam you will understand that being a Muslim is not against the true teachings of Jesus(swt). Islam is the fulfillment of the truth.

My reverting came very sudden once I "felt" the truth.
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glo
11-17-2006, 03:40 PM
I think these feelings are a sign of God stirring our hearts.

I remember feeling very much like that before I became a Christian: I devoured everything I could get my hands on regarding Christianity. I sat up at night, reading the gospel. And I wanted to be with other people who shared my faith all the time. I just wanted more, more, more.
There was a real buzz, a real excitement about God touching my heart and calling me!
I think I will remember this expression: Being addicted to God! That's brilliant! :D

Christina and Angel, welcome both to LI.
May you find what you are seeking, and may you walk with God. :)



Peace :)
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- Qatada -
11-17-2006, 07:06 PM
Welcome to Islaam. :)


Islaam is a religion which take's years upon years to understand it's every aspect, it has many different fields and sciences, and reflecting on and excelling in the different fields is a great achievement. Throughout one's life, a persons faith may wear out 'like clothes wear out' as the Messenger of Allaah (peace be upon him) said. This is natural, and this is why the Messenger of Allaah (peace be upon him) said in the same hadith that one should ask Allaah to strengthen their faith.



On my opinion you guys should accept islaam immediately, you know it's the truth and you also know that there will be many bridges on the way. These bridges will have to be crossed anyway, but if you submit to Allaah - He will help you through this straight clear path. Even if hardships come, or even if you see something you become confused about, realise that you will also face that as muslims - but knowledge and faith (emaan) will overcome that confusion.

You will be rewarded for your efforts because even the best of muslims learnt different aspects of islaam (i.e. some scholars mastered fiqh (deriving laws from the Qur'an and Authentic Sunnah, yet they never mastered other aspects such as hadith etc.) Yet they were muslims and were rewarded greatly for their works insha'Allaah (God willing.)


Similarly, you guys will learn about islaam insha'Allaah, and you will also see many obstacles on the way. But by accepting islaam, you will be rewarded for your works, and you can even put it into practise with Allaah Almighty on your side. You know you want that, and there's nothing stopping you from taking that first step insha'Allaah. Take that first step towards Allaah Almighty, and He will take many more steps towards you.


That's just my humble opinion. :)



Allaah Almighty knows best.



Peace.
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rubiesand
11-17-2006, 07:24 PM
Your soul is thirsty sister.

Drink deep and enjoy the pure water of Islam!


:Alhumdill
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DigitalStorm82
11-17-2006, 09:54 PM
Welcome to the forum and Islam :) Well almost there...

My only suggestion is that you focus on the religion your learning.... Once you've learnt much as you can and have a good idea of what Islam teaches... and then read what christianity teaches... you'll realize that they are very similar like brother woodrow said..

But focus on one at a time... study islam until you think you know more than the average muslim... and the proper rulings on certain things... and if it makes sense to you... go for it :)

Try to stay away from sites that bash religions... because they are all misquoted and just nonsense... not what you need to read right now especially.

Take your time.... but keep in mind the life is short... so dont take too long lol ;)
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chris4336
11-17-2006, 10:39 PM
Thank you so much for the replys...yes I see that they are very similiar (and similar to Judiasm in my humble opinion).

I am scared of taking that final leap I guess...I read somewhere that this can be a tatic of Satan..ie: getting so caught up in the little rules that you lose the path of God...I have lots to think about this weekend
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- Qatada -
11-17-2006, 10:54 PM
I remember a character which may have a powerful impact on a person who has to take that final leap, but isn't sure whether islaam they should take it or not. [Hope you don't find it too long]


Hamzah was fully aware of the greatness of his nephew and of the truth he came with. He used to know him not only as a nephew, but also as a brother and friend because they both belonged to the same generation. They always played together and walked together on the same road of life step by step. But in their youth they departed, each one in his own way: Hamzah preferred the life of leisure, trying to take his place among the prominent leaders of the Quraish and Makkah, while Muhammad chose the life of seclusion away from the crowd, immersed in the deep spiritual meditation that prepared him to receive the truth.

Despite the fact that each of them had a different way of living out his own youth, Hamzah was always attentive to the virtues of his friend and nephew. Such virtues helped Muhammad to win a special place in the hearts of people and helped to draw a clear outline for his great future.



The next day, Hamzah went out as usual. At the Ka'bah he found a number of Quraishi noblemen. He sat with them, listening to what they had to say: they were talking about Muhammad. For the first time .Hamzah saw them worried about the call his nephew was propagating with a tone of bitterness and rage marking their voices. Before that, they had never paid attention - at least they had pretended not to do so - but on that day their faces looked perplexed, upset, and aggressive.

Hamzah laughed at their talks and accused them of exaggeration. Abu Jahl said to his companions that Hamzah was the best one to know the danger of his nephew's call and that he pretended to underestimate this danger till the Quraish would relax so much that when they awakened it would be after his nephew had complete control over them.

They kept talking and threatening while Hamzah sat, sometimes smiling, sometimes frowning. When they dispersed his head was full of new ideas about the issues of his nephew that they had discussed in his presence.



Days passed and the Quraish's whispering about the Prophet's call increased. Later, whispering turned into provocation and Hamzah watched from a distance. His nephew's composed, steadfast attitude towards their provocations puzzled him. Such an attitude was quite unfamiliar to the Bani Quraish, who were themselves known to be strong and challenging.

If doubts of the greatness and truth of Muhammad could steal into anyone's heart, they would have never stolen into Hamzah's heart, because he was the best one to know Muhammad from his early childhood to his youth, then to his proud, honest manhood. Hamzah knew Muhammad as he knew himself and maybe more. Since they had come into life together, grown up together, and attained full strength together, Muhammad's life had been as pure and clear as the sunlight. It never occurred to Hamzah that Muhammad could make an error or a doubtful act in his life. He never saw Muhammad angry, hopeless , greedy, careless, or unstable.



Hamzah was not only physically strong, but was also wise and strong-willed. Therefore, it was natural for him to follow a man in whose honesty and truthfulness he wholeheartedly believed. Thus he kept a secret in his heart that was soon going to be disclosed.

Then came the day. Hamzah went out of his house towards the desert carrying his bow to practice his favorite sport of hunting (in which he was very skilled). He spent most of his day there. On his way home he passed by the Ka'bah as usual, to circumambulate it.




Near the Ka'bah, a female servant of 'Abd Allah Ibn Jud'aan saw him and said, "O Abu 'Umaarah! You haven't seen what happened to your nephew at the hands of Abu Al-Hakam Ibn Hishaam. When he saw Muhammad sitting there, he hurt him and called him bad names and treated him in a way that he hated." She went on to explain what Abu Jahl had done to the Prophet of Allah.

Hamzah listened to her carefully and paused for a while, then with his right hand he picked up his bow and put it on his shoulder. He walked with fast, steady steps towards the Ka'bah, hoping to meet Abu Jahl there. He decided that if he did not find him, he would search for him everywhere till he did.



As soon as he reached the Ka'bah he glanced at Abu Jahl sitting in the yard in the middle of the Quraishi noblemen. Hamzah advanced very calmly towards Abu Jahl and hit him with his bow on the head till it broke the skin and bled. To everybody's surprise, Hamzah shouted: "You dare to insult Muhammad while I follow his religion and I say what he says? Come and retaliate upon me. Hit me if you can." In a moment they all forgot how their leader Abu Jahl had been insulted and they were all thunderstruck by the news that Hamzah had converted to Muhammad's religion and that he saw what Muhammad saw and said what he said. Could Hamzah really have converted to Islam when he was the strongest and most dignified Quraishi young man?

Such was the overwhelming disaster to which the Quraish were helpless, because Hamzah's conversion would attract others from the elite to do the same. Thus Muhammad's call would be supported, and he would find enough solidarity that the Quraish might wake up one day to find their idols being pulled down.

Indeed, Hamzah had converted, and he announced what he had kept secret in his heart for so long.

Again Hamzah picked up his bow, put it on his shoulder, and with steady steps and full strength left the place with everyone looking disappointed and Abu Jahl licking the blood flowing from his wounded head.

Hamzah possessed a sharp sight and clear consciousness. He went home, and after he had relaxed from the day's exhaustion he sat down to think over what had happened. He had announced it in a moment of indignation and rage. He hated to see his nephew getting insulted and suffering injustice with no one to help him. Such racial zeal for the honour of Bani Haashim's talk had made him hit Abu Jahl on the head and shout declaring his Islam. But was that the ideal way for anyone to change the religion of his parents and ancestors and to embrace a new religion whose teachings he had not yet become familiar with and whose true reality he had not acquired sufficient knowledge of? It was true that Hamzah had never had any doubts about Muhammad's integrity, but could anybody embrace a new religion with all its responsibilities just in a moment of rage as Hamzah had done?



It was true that he had always kept in his heart a great respect for the new call his nephew was carrying and its banner, but what should the right time have been to embrace this religion if he was destined to embrace it? Should it be a moment of indignation and anger or a moment of deep reflection? Thus he was inspired by a clear consciousness to reconsider the whole situation in light of strict and meticulous thinking.

Hamzah started thinking. He spent many restless days and sleepless nights. When one tries to attain the truth by the power of mind, uncertainty will become a means of knowledge, and this is what happened to Hamzah. Once he used his mind to search Islam and to weigh between the old religion and the new one, he started to have doubts raised by his innate inherited nostalgia for his father's religion and by the natural fear of anything new. All his memories of the Ka'bah, the idols, the statues and the high religious status these idols bestowed on the Quraish and Makkah were raised.


It appeared to him that denying all this history and the ancient religion was like a big chasm, which had to be crossed. Hamzah was amazed at how a man could depart from the religion of his father that early and that fast. He regretted what he had done but he went on with the journey of reasonable thinking. But at that moment, he realized that his mind was not enough and that he should resort sincerely to the unseen power. At the Ka'bah he prayed and supplicated to heaven, seeking help from every light that existed in the universe to be guided to the right path.

Let us hear him narrating his own story: I regretted having departed from the religion of my father and kin, and I was in a terrible state of uncertainty and could not sleep. I came to the Ka'bah and supplicated to Allah to open my heart to what was right and to eliminate all doubts from it. Allah answered my prayer and filled my heart with faith and certainty. In the morning I went to the Prophet (PBUH) informing him about myself, and he prayed to Allah that He may keep my heart stable in this religion.
In this way Hamzah converted to Islam, the religion of certainty.



more on the life of Hamzah:
http://www.islamicboard.com/biograph...b.html?=Hamzah



The main thing you have to do is to pray to Allaah sincerely, especially when you have the least amount of worldly distractions, maybe even in prostration? And ask Allaah sincerely to guide you, to place you on the straight path and to keep you firm on it.

If you are sincere, Allaah will place that faith in your heart and you will see a change in your life insha'Allaah. Allaah loves those who put their trust in Him. :)




Allaah Almighty knows best.



Peace.
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glo
11-17-2006, 10:54 PM
Hi Christina

I have been thinking about your post ... and actually got out of bed again to post this reply - just to find that you are logged on too! :)

I always feel a little awkward when I - as a Christian - give advice to converts (or nearly-converts) to Islam ... and I want you to know that I respect your choice, and I have no desire to sway your opinion, whatever it may be.

In the time I have been in this forum, I have found that you cannot really sit on the fence between Christianity and Islam!
The central person between both faiths is Jesus,and you need to be clear on where you stand with him:
Was he a simple guy, a mythical figure, a prophet of God or is he God himself?

You will get many opinions, and many convincing arguments for all of these possibilities ... so I would advise you to search for the answer in you own heart.
Get with God, and ask him to guide you!!

For me, as a born-again Christian, who has committed her life to Jesus Christ, it seems quite impossible to see Jesus as anybody else but God - but I know people in this forum have made that switch, so it is possible! :)

I will tell you a short story:
Before I became a Christian, I was quite interested in paganism.
I had read much about it, and found much of it very appealing and interesting.
But when I came to try to pray to these various gods and goddesses, I found myself totally unable to do so! I just couldn't!
No words came out, and I became repulsed at the sheer thought of praying in such a way.


What I am trying to say, is that by the end of the day it was God's guidance, and his stirring of my heart that made me turn away and choose a different path ...

I pray that God will guide you, and that you will walk with him always!
And have a great weekend! :)

Peace :)
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chris4336
11-17-2006, 11:52 PM
The story of Hamzah is beautiful and completly new to me...thank you.

Glo - Thank you for the advice. It seems that everyones advice comes down to prayer...I have been praying for guidance but I know I need to be patient.

Also, Glo, if you don't mind me asking you, why does a Christian spend so much time on Muslim message boards? It just kind of surprised me.
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glo
11-18-2006, 12:09 AM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Glo - Thank you for the advice. It seems that everyones advice comes down to prayer...I have been praying for guidance but I know I need to be patient.
Yep! :D
Also, Glo, if you don't mind me asking you, why does a Christian spend so much time on Muslim message boards? It just kind of surprised me.
Tee hee, that's a good question ... :giggling:

I live in a town with a fairly high number of Muslims, and I have found it increasingly frustrating that I do not know how to communicate and interact with them. The Muslim community here seems to keep itself very much to itself - so how was I to learn about their beliefs and customs??
So I came here to learn more about Islam.

The reasons I am still here are
  • There is more to learn about Islam than I had anticipated! :rollseyes
  • I have come across many misconceptions and misunderstanding about my faith, which I would like to clarify and explain, to gain better mutual understanding and respect for each other's faiths.
  • I have met lovely people and made many friends!
  • But perhaps most importantly, I have found a real heart for some of the young people here, who are struggling with their lives, their faith, and their friends' and families' reactions to it. I guess my maternal instincts sometimes get the better of me ... :D


Welcome on board, anyway.

peace
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chris4336
11-18-2006, 12:21 AM
Yes that sounds wonderful. We should all hope to see open and understanding.

I'm from the states and the one thing I have learned in this journey is that people in my country are really lacking God in their lives...in any form. Its very sad really, and IMHO has caused a lot of problems in our society. At least where I am from being of strong faith, in any faith, labels you a wacko.

My friends and family are MUCH more concerned about me now that I am home at night studying religion than before when I was out drunk at a dance club. I find that aspect frustrating :-\

Thanks for your support.

BTW I just wanted to say that I have been reading about Islam online for about 6 months now, and I don't know how I missed this site. It is by far the best I have found. Thank you everyone!
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glo
11-18-2006, 12:43 AM
Originally Posted by chris4336
I'm from the states and the one thing I have learned in this journey is that people in my country are really lacking God in their lives...in any form. Its very sad really, and IMHO has caused a lot of problems in our society. At least where I am from being of strong faith, in any faith, labels you a wacko.
Yes, it's the same here in the UK. :uhwhat
Unfortunately, fanatics in all religions add greatly to that perception - and it seems to take the peaceful actions and love of many believers to undo the damage caused by a few misguided fanatics!

Peace
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Umar001
11-18-2006, 12:46 AM
Yea same here in the Uk, I mean being a black young revert matches all the catagories for a potential terrorist, only one being more convising is a young asian/pakistani male. But Alhamdulilah.
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Nσσя'υℓ Jαииαн
11-18-2006, 12:57 AM
Welcome to the forums sis Chris(oh a rhyme!) lol
I read your first, its deep :(
Anyways I really hope u find what ur looking for, InshAllah.
If your considering Islam, please do not delay.
You never know when ur time may come.
Good luck!
Peace :)
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chris4336
11-18-2006, 02:57 AM
Can I just post an experience that happened to me tonight that pretty much sums up my experience with Islam?

I was feeling great, at peace, certain that I was getting closer to God...then I'm reading and I find a ruling that woman cannot initiate a divore from their husbands (but, obviously men can). I know its because of the financial responsibilties of the man...but come on.

I have come to terms with some of the major issues I used to have with Islam...the 4 wives, the "beating" verse, the hijab. But WHY is it always something? And its not just Islam...its every religion.

I'm sorry if I'm offending anyone but I'm really upset right now. Why does it feel like I have to give up so much of what I believe in to be accepted by god? How do you guys deal with these major issues in Islam - Sisters, do you in your heart find peace with the idea that if you are not happy in your marriage you cannot leave? Brothers would you really want your sister or mother sitting home alone with her children three nights a week because her husband is with his other wives? I know these are loaded issues and I don't want to start debates, just wondering if there is some way to find peace with these things (and other things that might seem wrong - such as slavery).

Also, do these scholars drive you nuts sometimes??? For every 100 how to make your husband happy lists out there I see mabye 1 about the wife. I actually read a ruling regarding a married man raping his wife??? How can this even be discussed if its commanded to treat them with kindness?

Perhaps its just very very hard for me to distinguish how Islam is supposed to be practices vs. how it is actually practiced.

I feel like I felt something and then it all just slips away.

Sorry to ramble, just kind of emotional right now and need to vent.
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جوري
11-18-2006, 03:02 AM
Originally Posted by IsaAbdullah
Yea same here in the Uk, I mean being a black young revert matches all the catagories for a potential terrorist, only one being more convising is a young asian/pakistani male. But Alhamdulilah.
lol... that was actually sort of funny in a dark comedy way imsad ...
it was Jesus peace be upon him who stated (what does it matter if you have gained the world but lost soul?)... I read that in the Arabic bible... I can't think of anything more applicable to today's society. does it really matter who thinks what of you so long as you have found your peace?

When people make hateful comments or give you funny looks, it is because they are uncomfortable with themselves and the world around them, not through any fault of your own. It is prejudices... YES, with all our technologies and advancements, people's brains can be quite primitive and instinctive... they feel threatened but can't get to the root of what threatens them.... It is a big bombastic thing the media creates, like a Pavlov experiment... they hear or see Muslim and it triggers a response, a primitive, ridiculous response.... it is unfortunate for them, because I believe they miss out on some great sincere people......

Not everyone is like that though, and I can see it even if it seems subtle, and negligable by all acounts... people who will not be willed by their govt into a particular thought, will in fact think for themselves and draw appropriate conclusions.......

Your reward is with the one who created you... and G-D must love you to have helped you find a way to him... hold your head high, and be proud of what you are, from your skin color to the religion you chose as a way of life. And never fear........ for G-D insh'Allah will always accompany you! :)
:w:

p.s my best wishes for the original poster, Insh'Allah may you find the right path...... and be an instrument to help those in need.....

I wasn't personally aware that a woman couldn't initiate a divorce? my uncle's wife initiated one, and they brought an imam who tried to make peace between them but it didn't work out, so he gave her one and left lots of things in her name including an Apt for her to live in since she didn't want to go back to her parent's house... ( eventually they got back together Al7mdlilah)

I think in Islam one assumes the best of/and from people but sadly people abuse it. Both men and women are equally guilty. Don't bother yourself with such peripheral details that hopefully will never apply to you.... every life is a subjective experience... live it the best you can.. Walk in the light of G-D and be the best chris you can be, and you will bear only that which your own hands have offered... you are not responsible for all of humanity...chris........ be well, I sincerely wish you the best.....
peace!
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chris4336
11-18-2006, 03:18 AM
Purest - Thanks for the PM, I cannot yet reply because I am not a full member but hopefully we can talk soon.
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جوري
11-18-2006, 03:19 AM
It is my pleasure....

they offer some good advise in that first Aid step up for USMLE... think it might be applicable here?

anyhow... just use your best judgement... ISlam is really easy and meant to help you in all facets of life... from the way you pray to hopefully the way you deal with your patients....

say have you ever wondered why scrubbing for surgery is so very similar to making abultion for prayers? I always found that fascinating? maybe surgeons borrowed a little ha? Think Islam prepares you for so much and Insh'Allah you will find your way to it...


peace!
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جوري
11-18-2006, 03:21 AM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Oh and Purest can I ask you a question...grrr this is so annoying that I can't PM you. But what do you make of the verse in Quran that says something about the male's fluid coming from between his back and ribs???? I tried to ask this question here but it got blocked, and I can't really find a satisfying answer.
I am not familiar with such a verse to be honest? maybe you can give me a verse number and a chapter, I'll ask a scholar for an informed response.......

you can have leaky fluids from the umblicus however with a urachus.........

Also when you read embryology you will find out the testes descend from the back to the front they actually hang in the beginning where your kidneys are.... in fact with some children who have mumps or are born prematurely they end up with undescended testes (cryptorchidsm )... in the fetus, the testes descend to the vicinity of the internal ring of the inguinal canal by approximately 28 weeks gestational age. Then, by about 29 weeks gestation, the testes descend into the scrotum. With testicular descent, the lining of the peritoneal cavity extends into the inguinal canal and scrotum. This peritoneal canal is referred to as the processus vaginalis. Each testis descends through the inguinal canal external to the processus vaginalis. In the female fetus, a similar mechanism with descent of the ovaries into the pelvis occurs. So they start from a different location than where they end... and obviousely that is where sperm is stored...

I am not sure if that is what you are asking though? please provide me with a chapter and verse number as I have a feeling the translation is probably misused by whomever is trying to misguide you... I am fluent in Arabic, and read the Quran daily obviousely especially in the month of Ramadan...so it is still fresh in my mind and I don't remember shrugging my shoulders or recoiling from an unusual verse... so perhaps something is lost to you in the translation all together?.... I am certain there is an answer here for you in the refutation section insha'Allah... or at least provide me with chapter and verse and I'll help you through it

peace chris =)
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starfortress
11-18-2006, 06:28 AM
Chris4336^^^

Hi
I suggesting you to read this explanation here about polygamy

When is Polygamy allowed in Islam

Islam does not allow marriage of multiple wives for males' sexual privileges and desires as Anti-Islamics claim. A normal man who makes enough money to keep him surviving in life can not provide a fair quality of life to all his wives, which means that he must not be allowed to marry multiple wives because he will only make his society worse.

Noble Verse 4:3 came to solve social problems. Unfortunately today, some Muslims intensify the Muslim's social problems in the Islamic poor countries by marrying multiple wives and bringing more and more illiterate and poor kids into the society which on the long run will only keep their entire society below the level of poverty. Therefore, Noble Verse 4:3 doesn't allow polygamy just for anyone or any reason and Noble Verse 4:129 certainly nullifies the excuse Allah Almighty gave to Muslim men to practice polygamy. Therefore, unless we have social or personal dilemmas where too many Muslim men were lost, or there is problems with the wife toward her husband, then polygamy should not be allowed nor justified in my Islamic view.

And Allah Almighty knows best, and may He forgive me if I made any mistakes in this article.
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al_yaziya
11-18-2006, 07:44 AM
Hello Christina,

Welcome to the forum :). i understand what you are going through! i have recently within the last few months converted to islam, so if u have anything u need to talk about just let me know.
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rubiesand
11-18-2006, 10:16 AM
About women initiating divorce:

Islam does recognize the right of both partners to end their matrimonial relationship. Islam gives the husband the right for Talaq (divorce). Moreover, Islam, unlike Judaism, grants the wife the right to dissolve the marriage through what is known as Khula'..............

In the case of the wife choosing to end the marriage, she may return the marriage gifts to her husband. Returning the marriage gifts in this case is a fair compensation for the husband who is keen to keep his wife while she chooses to leave him. The Quran has instructed Muslim men not to take back any of the gifts they have given to their wives except in the case of the wife choosing to dissolve the marriage:

"It is not lawful for you (Men) to take back any of your gifts except when both parties fear that they would be unable to keep the limits ordained by Allah. There is no blame on either of them if she give something for her freedom. These are the limits ordained by Allah so do not transgress them" (Quran 2:229).

Also, a woman came to the Prophet Muhammad seeking the dissolution of her marriage, she told the Prophet that she did not have any complaints against her husband's character or manners. Her only problem was that she honestly did not like him to the extent of not being able to live with him any longer. The Prophet asked her: "Would you give him his garden (the marriage gift he had given her) back?" she said: "Yes". The Prophet then instructed the man to take back his garden and accept the dissolution of the marriage (Bukhari).

In some cases, A Muslim wife might be willing to keep her marriage but find herself obliged to claim for a divorce because of some compelling reasons such as: Cruelty of the husband, desertion without a reason, a husband not fulfilling his conjugal responsibilities, etc. In these cases the Muslim court dissolves the marriage.

In short, Islam has offered the Muslim woman some unequalled rights: she can end the marriage through Khula' and she can sue for a divorce. A Muslim wife can never become chained by a recalcitrant husband.
source


Christina, I worry about the sources you are reading from. What kind of a scholar is going to say that a woman cannot initiate divorce? When they can, and at the time of the Prophet (peace be upon him), they did. You may be reading from a site that looks Islamic, but very likely what they are saying is not accepted by the vast majority of Muslims. A good mainstream source of info is islamonline.net. Here is a link to what they have to say on the question of women's right to divorce: here
Reply

Malaikah
11-18-2006, 10:27 AM
:sl:

To add to what sis rubiesand said, the following are also good websites for islamic knowledge:

http://www.islam-qa.com/index.php?ln=eng
www.islamtoday.com
Reply

Maimunah
11-18-2006, 10:36 AM
peace

please check out this site n amy help u find answers:)

http://www.muslim-answers.org/Introd...am/miscons.htm

peace
Reply

chris4336
11-18-2006, 10:40 AM
Thanks for those links...here is the link that I found (not quite sure how to do this yet)

Due to this spirit of Islam, Allah Most High granted the right of divorce to the husband and not the wife or any other third party. If one was to look at the verses in the Qur’an that deal with divorce, one will see that the address of divorce is directed to the husbands and not the wives.


And this is from http://qa.**************/issue_view....D=1841&CATE=11

How do you guys know who to believe?
Reply

Malaikah
11-18-2006, 10:44 AM
:sl:

Which website is it from? The wife certainly has a right to divorce, but the way a wife requests divorce is different to the way a husband does it, thats all.

We know who to believe by identifing who is following the way of the prophet pbuh. The prophet allowed women to divorce their husbands, therefore it is wrong for anyone to claim that women cannot initiate divorce.

It is also possible that you misunderstood what the website has actually said. :)

From the very link that you gave it said:

In conclusion, Shariah primarily give the unilateral right to divorce to the husband. However, under certain conditions, the wife also has a right to seek for the annulment of the marriage. This is the ruling that was chosen for us by our Creator and it is totally in accordance with logic, common sense and the betterment of the society as a whole.
So I think perhaps you did misunderstand. The right of divorce is the husbands, however the wife CAN also divorce her husband.
Reply

Malaikah
11-18-2006, 10:50 AM
Khula’: definition and how it is done

Question:
What is khula and what is the correct procedure? If the husband does not want to divorce the wife, can the divorce still happen? What about in societies like America, where women who don’t like their husbands (in some case, because the husbands are religious). The women think that they have the freedom that if they don’t like the men, they can divorce them.

Answer:
Praise be to Allaah.

Khula’ means the separation of the wife in return for a payment; the husband takes the payment and lets his wife go, whether this payment is the mahr which he gave to her, or more or less than that.

The basic principle concerning this is the verse in which Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“And it is not lawful for you (men) to take back (from your wives) any of your Mahr (bridal-money given by the husband to his wife at the time of marriage) which you have given them, except when both parties fear that they would be unable to keep the limits ordained by Allaah (e.g. to deal with each other on a fair basis). Then if you fear that they would not be able to keep the limits ordained by Allaah, then there is no sin on either of them if she gives back (the Mahr or a part of it) for her Al-Khul‘ (divorce)”

[al-Baqarah 2:229]

The evidence for that from the Sunnah is that the wife of Thaabit ibn Qays ibn Shammaas (may Allaah be pleased with him) came to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and said, “O Messenger of Allaah, I do not find any fault with Thaabit ibn Qays in his character or his religious commitment, but I do not want to commit any act of kufr after becoming a Muslim.” The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said to her, “Will you give back his garden?” Because he had given her a garden as her mahr. She said, “Yes.” The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said to Thaabit: “Take back your garden, and divorce her.”

(Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 5273).


From this case the scholars understood that if a woman cannot stay with her husband, then the judge should ask him to divorce her by khula’; indeed he should order him to do so.

With regard to the way in which it is done, the husband should take his payment or they should agree upon it, then he should say to her “faaraqtuki” (I separate from you) or “khaala’tuki (I let you go), or other such words.

Talaaq (i.e., divorce) is the right of the husband, and does not take place unless it is done by him, because the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Talaaq is the right of the one who seizes the leg (i.e., consummates the marriage)” i.e., the husband. (Narrated by Ibn Maajah, 2081; classed as hasan by al-Albaani in Irwa’ al-Ghaleel, 2041).

Hence the scholars said that whoever is forced to divorce his wife by talaaq wrongfully, and divorces her under pressure, then his divorce is not valid. See al-Mughni, 10/352.

With regard to what you mention, that a woman in your country might arrange her own divorce through the man-made laws, if this is for a reason for which it is permissible to seek a divorce, such as disliking her husband, not being able to stay with him or disliking him because of his immoral ways and indulgence in haraam actions, etc., there is nothing wrong with her seeking divorce, but in this case she should divorce him by khula’ and return to him the mahr that he gave to her.

But if she is seeking divorce for no reason, then that is not permissible and the court ruling on divorce in this case does not count for anything in terms of sharee’ah. The woman still remains the wife of the man. This gives rise to a new problem, which is that this woman is regarded as a divorcee in the eyes of the (man-made) law, and can re-marry after her ‘iddah ends, but in fact she is still a wife and not a divorcee.

Shaykh Muhammad ibn Saalih al-‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked about a similar matter and said:

Now we have a problem. The fact that she is still married to him means that she cannot marry anyone else, but according to the court ruling she is apparently divorced from him, and when her ‘iddah ends she can re-marry. I think that the only way out of this problem is that good and righteous people should get involved in this matter, to bring about reconciliation between the man and his wife. Otherwise she has to give him some payment, so that it will be a proper shar’i khula’.

Liqa’ al-baab al-Maftooh by Shaykh Muhammad ibn ‘Uthaymeen, no. 54; 3/174.

Islam Q&A
Reply

chris4336
11-18-2006, 11:16 AM
Right so my understanding of this is that the women ask...but the ultimate authority to initate divorce rests with the husbands.

And you, as a sister, feel that this ruling is completely understandable? If a sister is being beat by her husband, the judge orders the man to divorce her but he refuses then what?

I have read the arguments...that woman are more irrational, ect. I guess my question for all of you..Are there things you accept in Islam that you don't really agree with but accept because they are orders from God? This is really whats keeping me from Islam. Its hard when you learn for your whole life that woman should have the same rights as men, slavery is wrong, and homosexuals should be treated with respect...to leave ALL those beliefs behind. I know Islam gave women lots of rights, slavery was looked down up, but you still CANNOT get around the fact that men have more rights and that slavery is permitted in Quran. It requires a tremendous amount of faith I think to leave your old beliefs behind. People who are born Muslims do not have to struggle like this.

I have spent a lot of time looking for "proofs" in the Quran. If its from God who am I to argue? One of the things I like so much about Islam is that I can really see how its teachings, when PROPERLY put into practice can really help society. Prehaps I just do not fully understand all these rules.
Reply

Muhammad
11-18-2006, 11:38 AM
Greetings Chris,

Regarding that thread about the fluids coming from between the ribs, I believe it has been moved here:

http://www.islamicboard.com/refutati...ion-semen.html

I gave you some links in that thread where you can read more about the issue.

One thing to bear in mind is to take things one step at a time. If you take in everything at once, it might seem overwhelming for someone who has not experienced this before. Go for understanding the basics, and if you understand these well, this is enough to start implementing.

If we look at how the Qur'an was revealed and the life of the Prophet (peace be upon him), things occurred in stages. The early verses were those pertaining to belief in Allaah and strengthening the faith of the believers. Once their faith was firmly rooted, then came the more detailed laws and aspects of Islam. In this way, the laws were gradually revealed to allow people to adapt and take things slowly so as not to drive them away from the truth.

One beautiful example of this was the law for women to observe hijab - perhaps you have already read about this story. This law did not come immediately, but rather some time later when the Prophet (peace be upon him) had emigrated to Madinah. And such was the faith of the women that when the verse (24:31) was revealed, the women tore their aprons and covered themselves in obedience to Allah's Command.

So concentrate on the most important things first, because once you have found God and recognised Him as having the most perfect Knowledge and Wisdom, it will be easy for you to accept His commands and to strive for His sake. Perhaps by doing so, it will not feel like you are giving up what you believe in to be accepted, but rather through submission will be an acceptance on your part to answer His call to success:

Allâh calls to the home of peace (i.e. Paradise, by accepting Allâh's religion of Islâmic Monotheism and by doing righteous good deeds and abstaining from polytheism and evil deeds) and guides whom He wills to a Straight Path. [Qur'an, 10:25]

Peace.

P.S. We have a couple of threads about slavery here:
http://www.islamicboard.com/islamic-...ery-quran.html
http://www.islamicboard.com/basics-i...ery-islam.html
Reply

Malaikah
11-18-2006, 11:38 AM
Originally Posted by chris4336
And you, as a sister, feel that this ruling is completely understandable? If a sister is being beat by her husband, the judge orders the man to divorce her but he refuses then what?
If that is the case I dont think he has the right to refuse. In the article is said:
From this case the scholars understood that if a woman cannot stay with her husband, then the judge should ask him to divorce her by khula’; indeed he should order him to do so.
It said 'order'. You dont have much option when you are ordered to do something. right?
Are there things you accept in Islam that you don't really agree with but accept because they are orders from God?
Sometimes the only reason we dont agree with things is because we dont understand them. To be honest there were lots of things that confused me, but when I took the time to actually read up on the stuff and understand the wisdom behind everything, it makes more sense and I start to agree with it as well.

Alhamdilillah at the moment there is nothing I disagree with in Islam. :)
Its hard when you learn for your whole life that woman should have the same rights as men,
JUSTICE is not always the same as equality. You can have equality if you want, but that means we will have no justice. Which is more important? Of course justice is. Women and men are equal in many, many ways in islam. However, in somethings they are not equal and they can never be equal in these things, because if you made them equal then you would be treating the women with injustice!

This word – equality – which many thinkers in both the east and the west advocate in various fields of life is a word which is based on deviation and a lack of understanding, especially when the speaker attributes this idea of equality to the Qur’aan and to Islam.

One of the things that people misunderstand is when they say that “Islam is the religion of equality”. What they should say is that Islam is the religion of justice.
Source (Read the full article, its pretty good).

slavery is wrong,
Inshaallah read up on slavery in Islam, and you will realise that even though it is permissible, there are sooooo many regulations on it. For example, you cant take a free person as a slave, only prisoners of war and stuff, and in reality its for there own good, what else are we gonna do with them? Slaves have so many rights in Islam, the western concept of slavery is just so different to the Islamic one.

and homosexuals should be treated with respect
Would you treat a murderer with respect? A theif? A racist? Homosexuality is a SIN just like any other sin, and there can be no respect for it.
but you still CANNOT get around the fact that men have more rights and that slavery is permitted in Quran.
Men also have many, many duties. Have you ever thought of that? Also, women have all the rights they need already. God will never treat His slaves with injustice. Please make sure you are reading from the proper source, NOT anti-islamic websites and stuff.

For example, check out this link and read the chapter about how a husband must treat his wife, you will see the rights that God has given women, and the magnitude of the duty that the husband has:
http://kalamullah.com/Books/The%20Ideal%20Muslim.pdf (page 48 of the pdf file)

It requires a tremendous amount of faith I think to leave your old beliefs behind. People who are born Muslims do not have to struggle like this.
But we are born into western societies, most of us anyway, and we are bombarded with such concepts too. So you are not alone. However, the point is that when you do your research properly, and you get your facts 100% right, you understand things more and you will know that you have the truth in your hands, and that everything else around you is a bunch of man-made lies, supported by none other than the devil himself.

One of the things I like so much about Islam is that I can really see how its teachings, when PROPERLY put into practice can really help society. Prehaps I just do not fully understand all these rules.
Thats good to hear. :) Hopefully you will soon be able to clear up all your misconceptions and will be ready to be become a Muslim. Ameen. :)

EDIT- also check out this post (post 13) about the rights/duties of men and women in Islam and how they compare to womens:
http://www.islamicboard.com/marriage...tml#post479120

Also, you might be interested in watching the video, "PERFECT JUSTICE: Debunking the Male Bias Myth":
http://kalamullah.com/yasir-qadhi.html
Reply

chris4336
11-18-2006, 12:04 PM
Thanks SO MUCH for your reply. Helped me out a lot. Once I had the same issues with Hijab, but now I understand...hopefully these others things will become clear to me as well. Its good to know that some Muslims go through this as well. Hopefully my faith can be as strong as yours one day.

I'm not seeing the link on how the husband has to treat his wife??? I would be interested to read it.

I agree with the notion of the equality and justice...but in that link there are still some phrases that I don't agree with for example:

because Allaah has made one of them to excel the other’ i.e., because men are superior to women and are better than women.

I don't think the Quran states men are "superior" than woman, rather they excel in certain areas - strength for example and this cannot be denied. And I really don't think that men are smarter than woman, as the article claims, nor do I think that Allah says this in Quran. I guess here my problem here is NOT with the Quraric verse, rather the interpretation.

Thanks a lot and hopefullly I will grow in faith and gain more wisdom to deal with stuff like this better
Reply

- Qatada -
11-18-2006, 12:08 PM
Try checking these lectures out:


http://www.islamicboard.com/marriage...-lecture.html?


And also women's rights in islaam by yusuf estes: [he clears lots of misconceptions regarding the 'beating' verse etc. and also aspects such as divorce. Download the one called 'womens rights']

http://www.islamicboard.com/560689-post2.html



One more point i want to clarify is that when islaam came, slavery was so common, as common as we see people selling on the shopping channel. There are many, many ahadith which tell people to free slaves, and the huge reward in return for that. As brother Muhammad said, this slavery couldn't be removed altogether, and therefore had to be done in stages. We know that if a person sins, the expiation for that may be to 'free a slave' whereas in another form of expiation may be to 'free a believing slave.'


I really think you should check this small article on slavery in islaam, because it cleared alot of my misconceptions too alhamdulillah (praise be to Allaah):

The Islamic position on Slavery: A refutation of doubts



Allaah Almighty knows best.



Peace.
Reply

Malaikah
11-18-2006, 12:10 PM
Originally Posted by chris4336
I don't think the Quran states men are "superior" than woman, rather they excel in certain areas - strength for example and this cannot be denied. And I really don't think that men are smarter than woman, as the article claims, nor do I think that Allah says this in Quran. I guess here my problem here is NOT with the Quraric verse, rather the interpretation.
lol I agree on that one. What it means is that they have certain characteristics that make them better for the job. Thats all.

I'm not so sure where he got the intellegence thing from though, sure doesnt apply with most women I know anyway. ;D

Umm, so the link didnt work? I'll see what I can do about it...

Also, just in case you missed it, I added the my last post:

EDIT- also check out this post (post 13) about the rights/duties of men and women in Islam and how they compare to womens:
http://www.islamicboard.com/marriage...tml#post479120

Also, you might be interested in watching the video, "PERFECT JUSTICE: Debunking the Male Bias Myth":
http://kalamullah.com/yasir-qadhi.html
EDIT- I just realised i forgot to actually add the link to the husband thing lol, here it is:
http://kalamullah.com/Books/The%20Ideal%20Muslim.pdf (check out from page 48 of teh pdf file onwards)
Reply

glo
11-18-2006, 09:24 PM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Thanks SO MUCH for your reply. Helped me out a lot. Once I had the same issues with Hijab, but now I understand...hopefully these others things will become clear to me as well. Its good to know that some Muslims go through this as well. Hopefully my faith can be as strong as yours one day.

Thanks a lot and hopefullly I will grow in faith and gain more wisdom to deal with stuff like this better
Hi Christina

I tried to email you, but I don't think it worked ...
And there is little point PMing you because you cannot reply ...

Do you remember a convert to Islam here in LI, called doodlebug?
She is from the US, like you.
I know she went through similar concerns and struggles as you are, before she converted.
She doesn't come here so often now, but I am in contact with her, and could ask her to find you here ... or ask her if I can give you her email addy.

Let me know what you think, and I will get in touch with her. :)

Peace,
Reply

chris4336
11-18-2006, 10:14 PM
Haha you know the funny thing is that Doodlebug is active on another message board that I visit a lot!!! It was so funny to see her name here - I mean I am assuming its the same person - how many people are named Doodlebug? I can PM on that message board so thats where I'll be heading now.

Thank! :happy:
Reply

glo
11-19-2006, 07:32 PM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Haha you know the funny thing is that Doodlebug is active on another message board that I visit a lot!!! It was so funny to see her name here - I mean I am assuming its the same person - how many people are named Doodlebug? I can PM on that message board so thats where I'll be heading now.

Thank! :happy:
LOL
No, I can't imagine that there are too many Doodlebugs around ...

If you decide to PM her, you can tell her that I recommended her! :D

Peace
Reply

YusufNoor
11-19-2006, 11:39 PM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Thanks SO MUCH for your reply. Helped me out a lot. Once I had the same issues with Hijab, but now I understand...hopefully these others things will become clear to me as well. Its good to know that some Muslims go through this as well. Hopefully my faith can be as strong as yours one day.

I'm not seeing the link on how the husband has to treat his wife??? I would be interested to read it.

I agree with the notion of the equality and justice...but in that link there are still some phrases that I don't agree with for example:

because Allaah has made one of them to excel the other’ i.e., because men are superior to women and are better than women.

I don't think the Quran states men are "superior" than woman, rather they excel in certain areas - strength for example and this cannot be denied. And I really don't think that men are smarter than woman, as the article claims, nor do I think that Allah says this in Quran. I guess here my problem here is NOT with the Quraric verse, rather the interpretation.

Thanks a lot and hopefullly I will grow in faith and gain more wisdom to deal with stuff like this better
erm, Insha'Allah!

try to obtain Qur'ans with explanations to their translations. i'm currently reading "The Message of The Qur'an translated and explained" by Muhammed Asad. it's wonderful!
Reply

Dawud_uk
11-21-2006, 08:17 AM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Hello I have not yet converted, but for the past 6 months I have been reading and studying about Islam. Recently I have gotten to the point where I will spend hours each day online reading about the rules, interpretations of the Quran, Hadith, etc. The problem is that I'll read something written by Muslims and feel great about Islam, then I'll come across a Christian website and all my doubts about Islam are revived. I feel like I'm not really getting anywhere in terms of increasing my imam.

Any reverts, or Muslims from birth, go through something similar to this? It is getting in the way of my studying for medical school, however, I keep tellilng mysellf that finding the truth is more important than anything in this world. I wish I could just believe completely and fully...but I still have doubts in my mind.

Thank you.
Christina

assalaamu alaykum, (which if you have done your studying you will know means peace be upon you!)

islam is indeed more important than your college but they need not be conflicting, but if you find that your search for the truth is slowing down due to studying then that search for truth and salvation is more important.

i think such doubts are quite common, not everyone gets them before reverting but most do.

i would suggest you varify what people tell you as Allah tells us to in the Quran, so if some christian is coming up with some some and you are not sure if it is true or false then post it here and we can discuss it with you cant we?

hope that helps,

assalaamu alaykum,
Abu Abdullah
Reply

north_malaysian
11-21-2006, 08:35 AM
Wow... many Muslims are not addicted to Islam like you.

I'll give you reps...

and on behalf of all Malaysian forummers here:

[BANANA]SELAMAT DATANG !!!
(WELCOME!!!)[/BANANA]
Reply

YusufNoor
11-21-2006, 12:44 PM
Originally Posted by Dawud_uk
assalaamu alaykum, (which if you have done your studying you will know means peace be upon you!)

islam is indeed more important than your college but they need not be conflicting, but if you find that your search for the truth is slowing down due to studying then that search for truth and salvation is more important.

i think such doubts are quite common, not everyone gets them before reverting but most do.

i would suggest you varify what people tell you as Allah tells us to in the Quran, so if some christian is coming up with some some and you are not sure if it is true or false then post it here and we can discuss it with you cant we?

hope that helps,

assalaamu alaykum,
Abu Abdullah
one thing to keep in mind, Shaytan does NOT want you to become a Muslim! he WILL try to keep you off the "straight path". so check with those on the "straight path" as often as possible! we actually ask Allah (SWT), AT LEAST 5 times a day to "guide us on the straight path"!

try learning the phrase "a'oodo billahi minashaytin-ir rajim", which translates something like like: "I seek refuge in Allah (SWT) from the accursed shaytin"; then repeat as often as needed!

btw, Dawud, nice to see you taking a break from M2:TW ;D
i found this web site on one of your post at .c0m! :thankyou:

i've pm King Haggard a few times about his erasing your signature there (i know him from another forum); hope it helps. if not, i'll pm other mods and Shoggie if i have to! :inshallah
Reply

Muhammad
11-21-2006, 03:38 PM
:sl:

Originally Posted by YusufNoor
try to obtain Qur'ans with explanations to their translations. i'm currently reading "The Message of The Qur'an translated and explained" by Muhammed Asad. it's wonderful!
A discussion on which translations are recommended can be found here:

http://www.islamicboard.com/educatio...ou-prefer.html
Reply

snakelegs
11-21-2006, 08:18 PM
is abdullah yusuf ali the same as yusuf ali?
thanks.
Reply

Ansar Al-'Adl
11-21-2006, 08:34 PM
yes.
Reply

Yanal
10-18-2008, 12:55 AM
Originally Posted by Al Habeshi
Hey, you know, I ended up leaving college, cos I feel islam is for me more important and because of the way I had been brought up I found that I'd spend more time on academical stuf than studying Islam.

Can I pm you, for the rest of the answers? Feel free to say no. :)
Now this person is truly addicted to Islam I mean leaving college.Any best wishes from me so that you can finally find which religion your heart lays just al habeshi.You should ask him because he is a revert."Seeking knowledge is better than a whole night of prayer" Muhammad(pbuh) said.
Reply

INsearch
10-23-2008, 06:49 PM
Originally Posted by chris4336
Hello I have not yet converted, but for the past 6 months I have been reading and studying about Islam. Recently I have gotten to the point where I will spend hours each day online reading about the rules, interpretations of the Quran, Hadith, etc. The problem is that I'll read something written by Muslims and feel great about Islam, then I'll come across a Christian website and all my doubts about Islam are revived. I feel like I'm not really getting anywhere in terms of increasing my imam.

Any reverts, or Muslims from birth, go through something similar to this? It is getting in the way of my studying for medical school, however, I keep tellilng mysellf that finding the truth is more important than anything in this world. I wish I could just believe completely and fully...but I still have doubts in my mind.

Thank you.
Christina
:bump1:

I am the same way :( only its when I am not reading anything about Islam I start getting the doubts as to whether or not I believe :( I see you converted tho :) thats good :) I heard that if you worry then you obviously believe (is their truth to that statement?) also from a Jewish person I heard "its fine to question but not to let it keep you from doing the right thing" something along those lines :) I hope to convert soon to :) but my doubts shatter me :(
Reply

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