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Hamas
05-16-2007, 01:19 PM
Assalmu Alaikum,

Just a small question to which i already know the answear to but i wanted to ask you guys to see wheather you agree with me or not.

What is the meaning of Mawla?

JazakAllah
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------
05-16-2007, 01:51 PM
:salamext:

In the context of Urdu or Arabic?
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Hamas
05-16-2007, 02:07 PM
Originally Posted by Muj4h1d4
:salamext:

In the context of Urdu or Arabic?
Assalamu Alaikum,

Well sister, i asked the question in english didnt i? so obviously i would like it to be answeared in english, no?

no need to be too smart now is there? :D
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Hamas
05-16-2007, 02:53 PM
Originally Posted by Hamas
Assalamu Alaikum,

Well sister, i asked the question in english didnt i? so obviously i would like it to be answeared in english, no?

no need to be too smart now is there? :D
Maybe you meant something else? because when you translate urdu or arabic into english, sometimes the meaning of some words can differ from the original text so if thats where you were comming from i do so apologize.
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doorster
07-17-2007, 07:25 PM
z
Originally Posted by Hamas
Assalmu Alaikum,

Just a small question to which i already know the answear to but i wanted to ask you guys to see wheather you agree with me or not.

What is the meaning of Mawla?

JazakAllah
It means lord, master, sovereign

Mawlānā is an Arabic word literally meaning "our lord" or "our master"

It is used as a title for "religious leaders" in the Indian subcontinent

Objection

In past, Salafi-influenced scholars have objected to the use of 'Maula' and hence 'Maulana' as a title referring to humans, believing that 'Maula' should exclusively be used to refer to God.

Response of "Shia" and "Sunni", as well as the "Ahl-e-Hadeeth" of India/Pakistan

They reject this objection on two grounds. First,they say Maula is not a name of God. Second, they cite a hadith "If I am the Maula then Ali is also the Maula". Prophet Muhammed said that after Ali returned from the mission of Ghadar Qum and complained some of the people under him did not obey his orders. "Shia" and "Sunni" interpret this differently but agree the title can be used to refer to humans.

I believe it is quoted out of context: So of whomsoever I am the maula (master/leader in that situation) this Ali is also his maula (master/leader in that situation).

for example when I was a gunner (equal to a private), I had to obey a lance bombardier as much as I would have had to, a Sergeant Major
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snakelegs
07-18-2007, 01:19 AM
so that's a hadith! i always thought it was a poem by khusrau. isn't it persian?
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doorster
07-18-2007, 01:24 AM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
so that's a hadith! i always thought it was a poem by khusrau. isn't it persian?
Salam

Amir Khusrau was 13th century sufi poet from Delhi, India

wasalam (and peace)
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snakelegs
07-18-2007, 01:29 AM
yes, but i was confused. you said that man kuntu maula was a hadith? is that a persian translation? :confused:
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doorster
07-18-2007, 02:37 AM
It is Arabic that may have been used in some Persian poem. anyway since my transliteration is diabolical, I haver removed it just leaving English translation

wa salam (and peace)

BTW I am confused now too so I'll have to speak to someone with knowledge before I make another post in this thread
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F@tim@
07-18-2007, 06:15 PM
There are many many different meanings to the word 'Mawla'(in Arabic). The different schools of thought differ upon the meaning.

Some of them are:
~Protector
~Friend
~Master
~Client
~Slave
~Authoritative figure
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doorster
07-18-2007, 06:21 PM
:sl:
Originally Posted by F@tim@
There are many many different meanings to the word 'Mawla'(in Arabic). The different schools of thought differ upon the meaning.

Some of them are:
~Protector
~Friend
~Master
~Client
~Slave
~Authoritative figure
I disagree, If I may dare!

for starters:
Is "Master" not the exact opposite of "Slave"?
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F@tim@
07-18-2007, 06:25 PM
In Arabic one word can have absolutely loads of meanings.
Obviously they are both opposite to each other but can be used 4 both words in different contexts.
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doorster
07-18-2007, 06:32 PM
:sl:
Originally Posted by F@tim@
In Arabic one word can have absolutely loads of meanings.
Obviously they are both opposite to each other but can be used 4 both words in different contexts.
I am laughing now, if I may be allowed.

in no language a word can mean the 2 opposites. when we say a word can mean many things, we mean synonyms

these are same
  • car and automobile
  • long time and extended time
  • baby and infant
  • student and pupil
  • buy and purchase
  • pretty and attractive
  • sick and ill
  • quickly and speedily
  • on and upon
these are not same
  • black and white
  • master and slave
  • high and low
  • up and down
these are exact opposites
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F@tim@
07-18-2007, 06:43 PM
Yh well mashAllah you're very clever for knowing about all the languages.
All i did was google it.
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doorster
07-18-2007, 07:00 PM
I am not knower of all languages! I apologize if I gave that impression.

you are right about Google I just did a search and found a lot of stuff on wikipedia and other sites including this: http://www.alinaam.org.za/mahmood/mahmood32.htm

:(

wasalam alakum
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doorster
07-18-2007, 07:38 PM
Originally Posted by Alpha Dude
:sl:^ So, by that site you gave, kind sir, does it mean Mawla can actually mean slave and master...i.e, the sister was correct? :eek: :eek:How dare you. :giggling:
:w:

yes, and it is spinning my head, and it gives license to people translate as they will

:w:

edit:
since I started to read Dr. Jamal Badawi, I have started to look closely at Bukhari -- God forbid -- I don't care much for some of it
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Malaikah
07-20-2007, 01:43 AM
:sl:

Yeh, for some weird reason words in Arabic can have multiple meanings, some of which are totally the opposite of each other.:-\

That is just weird.
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snakelegs
07-20-2007, 01:57 AM
hebrew does that too, tho right now i can't think of any examples.
so mawla is the same root as auliya apparently. i always thought it was persian!
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north_malaysian
07-20-2007, 02:49 AM
I've read an article wrote by an anti-salafist. He said that the salafis opposed the term "Sayyidina" to be used on human beings.... is it true?
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doorster
07-20-2007, 03:15 AM
"Sayyidina" just means "our Leader"

Maulana on the other hand means, according to Quraan, "Our Master"
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doorster
07-20-2007, 03:25 AM
when in Qura'an انت مولانا means "you are our Master" then I am never going to say it means our slave, our client and our whatnot
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