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جوري
07-08-2007, 01:47 AM
please let me know which Arabic calligraphy style appeals to you most
Naskh Naskh was one of the earliest scripts to evolve. It gained popularity after being redesigned by the famous calligrapher Ibn Muqlah in the 10th century. Because of Ibn Muqlah's comprehensive system of proportion, Naskh style displays a very rhythmic line.

Naskh later was reformed by Ibn al-Bawaab and others into an elegant script worthy of the Qur'an -- and more Qur'ans have been written in Naskh than in all the other scripts together. Since the script is relatively easy to read and write, Naskh appealed particularly to the general population.

Naskh is usually written with short horizontal stems -- and with almost equal vertical depth above and below the medial line. The curves are full and deep, the uprights straight and vertical, and the words generally well spaced. Currently, Naskh is considered the supreme script for almost all Muslims and Arabs around the world.
Farsi/ ta'liq Ta'liq (hanging) script is believed to have been developed by the Persians from an early and little known Arabic script called Firamuz. Ta'liq, also called Farsi, is an unpretentious cursive script apparently in use since the early 9th century.

The calligrapher Abd al-Hayy, from the town of Astarabad, seems to have played an important role in the script’s early development. He was encouraged by his patron, Shah Isma'il, to lay down the basic rules for the writing of Ta'liq. The script is currently in great favor with Arabs, and it is the native calligraphic style among the Persian, Indian, and Turkish Muslims.

The Persian calligrapher Mir Ali Sultan al-Tabrizi developed from Ta'liq a lighter and more elegant variety which came to be known as Nasta'liq. However, Persian and Turkish calligraphers continued to use Ta'liq as a monumental script for important occasions.

The word Nasta'liq is a compound word derived from Naskh and Ta'liq. Ta'liq and Nasta'liq scripts were used extensively for copying Persian anthologies, epics, miniatures, and other literary works -- but not for the Holy Qur'an.

Deewani Deewani script is an Ottoman development parallel to Shikasteh (broken style). The script was largely developed by the accomplished calligrapher Ibrahim Munif in the late 15th century from the Turkish/Persian Ta'liq. Deewani reached its zenith in the 17th century, thanks to the famous calligrapher Shala Pasha.

Like Riq'a, Deewani became a favorite script for writing in the Ottoman chancellery. Deewani is excessively cursive and highly structured with its letters undotted and unconventionally joined together. It uses no vowel marks. Deewani also developed an ornamental variety called Deewani Jali which also was known as Humayuni (Imperial). The development of Deewani Jali is credited to Hafiz Uthman. The spaces between the letters are spangled with decorative devices which do not necessarily have any orthographic value. Deewani Jali is highly favored for ornamental purposes.
Kufi Kufi was the dominant priestly script in early times. It was created after the establishment of the two Muslim cities of Basrah and Kufah in the second decade of the Islamic era (8th century A.D.). The script has specific proportional measurements, along with pronounced angularity and squareness. It became known as al-Khat al-Kufi (Kufi script).

Kufi script had a profound effect on all Islamic calligraphy. In contrast to its low verticals, Kufi has horizontal lines that are extended. The script is considerably wider than it is high. This gives it a certain dynamic momentum. The script often is chosen for use on oblong surfaces. With its glorious Handasi (geometrical) construction, Kufi could be adapted to any space and material -- from silk squares to the architectural monuments left by Timur at Samarqand.

Because Kufi script was not subjected to strict rules, calligraphers employing it had virtually a free hand in the conception and execution of its ornamental forms.
ThuluthThuluth script was first formulated in the 7th century during the Umayyad caliphate, but it did not develop fully until the late 9th century. The name means 'a third' -- perhaps because of the proportion of straight lines to curves, or perhaps because the script was a third the size of another popular contemporary script. Though rarely used for writing the Holy Qur'an, Thuluth has enjoyed enormous popularity as an ornamental script for calligraphic inscriptions, titles, headings, and colophons. It is still the most important of all the ornamental scripts.

Thuluth script is characterized by curved letters written with barbed heads. The letters are linked and sometimes intersecting, thus engendering a cursive flow of ample and often complex proportions. Thuluth is known for its elaborate graphics and remarkable plasticity.
Req'aa This script, also called Ruq'ah (small sheet), evolved from Naskh and Thuluth. Although Riq'a has a close affinity with Thuluth, Riq'a developed in a different direction. Riq'a became simplified. The geometric forms of the letters are similar to those of Thuluth but are smaller with more curves. Riq'a is rounded and densely structured with short horizontal stems, and the letter alif is never written with barbed heads.

Riq'a was one of the favorite scripts of Ottoman calligraphers and underwent many improvements at the hand of Shaykh Hamdullah al-Amasi. Later, Riq'a was revised by other calligraphers and went on to become the most popular and widely used script. Today, Riq'a is the preferred script for handwriting throughout the Arab world

and lastly which one resembles most your handwriting, if you can write in Arabic
Thank you
:w:
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Woodrow
07-08-2007, 02:02 AM
:w:

I like the simplicity of Riq'aa. When I attenpt to write in Arabic, it is the form I am trying to use.
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جوري
07-08-2007, 02:06 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
:w:

I like the simplicity of Riq'aa. When I attenpt to write in Arabic, it is the form I am trying to use.
That is what I use as well-- although my affinity has always been for Kufi, but I have never been able to master it... so I admire it from afar...
thank you for your vote and participation...
:w:
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noodles
07-09-2007, 01:47 AM
Sadly, I can't write Arabic nor do I understand it, so I've to settle for reading it.

From the picture samples you've displayed here, My eyes keep drifting towards Kufi. I find the blend of artistry and script very appealing. In my opinion, it must really take a strong imagination and a steady hand to be able to write it.

Aside from that, I love the Naskh script, it's really easy on the eyes for Non-native Arabic speakers like me.
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Yanal
07-09-2007, 02:18 AM
Asalam alakum i like Farsi/ ta'liq
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Sinbad
07-09-2007, 02:21 AM
I feel a patriotic urge to say Farsi/ ta'liq. But that Kufi was much cooler!:D Looks like balkony bars, or some kind of Iron wall surrounding a park, its like a decoration.
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جوري
07-09-2007, 06:18 AM
Thanks for all the replies... what happened to all the previous posts that were here? eh-- just as well..
I guess we have no Turks on board?... no one is up for deewani, where I find its cursive circular style rather warm and provocative...There is definitely something highly artistic and ornate about Kufi -- I am surprised that it is losing out to Farsi...
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MustafaMc
07-09-2007, 12:12 PM
I prefer what is most simple. I see Arabic as language meant to convey a message rather than as an art form.
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Umar001
07-09-2007, 12:19 PM
I saw Uthaymeen's handwriting, and I thought it was a squiggle, but now i see its a style. MashaAllah.
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AmarFaisal
07-09-2007, 12:50 PM
For personal use, I use Farsi/Ta'liq (in urdu)

For writing Arabic I use simply Naksh and it's also easier to read in the Quran.

But the beauty of calligraphy is in sophistication that soothes the eye, I like Deewani and Thuluth.

I vote for Farsi as it is very delicate and I have always admired my colleages at school who mastered this art at very young ages.
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umm-sulaim
07-09-2007, 02:31 PM
I didn't know the names of the other writing styles jazaakillaahu khayraa.
I write in rik'a/naskh something between the two. but farsi ta'liq is niceeee maasha'Allaah!
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Pk_#2
07-09-2007, 02:38 PM
Thuluth looks good :)

Erm...Jazakillah khair sister - nice thread!
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Mawaddah
07-09-2007, 03:23 PM
:sl:

Masha'allah!! I love all of the writings :)

My writing would be more towards the Farsi/Ta'liq with some Ruq'ah concepts as I had practised Ruq'ah for a while...
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Sinbad
07-09-2007, 03:51 PM
Originally Posted by PurestAmbrosia
There is definitely something highly artistic and ornate about Kufi -- I am surprised that it is losing out to Farsi...
Me to, for simple writing farsi is the best, but beauty kufi is much better.

Islam as borrowed a lot from persian culture, like art. Some Iranians say that Islam destroyed Iran, I dont think so at all, they just transformed it, in the 1700s The persian and sunni king nadir counqered Delhi in India.

It was the brittish empire that destryed persia not Islam...
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جوري
07-09-2007, 04:48 PM
Originally Posted by MustafaMc
I prefer what is most simple. I see Arabic as language meant to convey a message rather than as an art form.
:sl:
Agreed akhi-- I just started this thread because of something I'd read in the refutation section, it is more an indirect way to "politely" point the attention to those who seek to find error in the Quran, when they have no knowledge of Arabic, that what they misconstrue as evidence of textual change, is nothing more than calligraphy... part of the posts that were deleted up to and including this one


where I asked a textual expert to decode the Arabic written in each of those styles which go back from 6-7 century to the most modern..
:w:
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snakelegs
07-10-2007, 05:41 AM
i didn't vote because though i am learning a number of arabic words from urdu, i do not speak arabic. but i like the naksh the best and the farsi 2nd - they are easier to read.
something i've always wondered about when you see the shahadah and various qur'anic quotes written in real fancy, ornate calligraphy styles - can you actually read it? is it easy for you?
here's an example: (i like stuff like this btw)
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جوري
07-10-2007, 06:25 AM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
i didn't vote because though i am learning a number of arabic words from urdu, i do not speak arabic. but i like the naksh the best and the farsi 2nd - they are easier to read.
something i've always wondered about when you see the shahadah and various qur'anic quotes written in real fancy, ornate calligraphy styles - can you actually read it? is it easy for you?
here's an example: (i like stuff like this btw)
I can yes.. although once a dear colleague of mine got me a card from the STAATLICHE MUSEEN ZU Berlin --MUSEUM FUR Islamische Kunst --( their Islamic section)-- I copied that from the card now as I am looking at it-- anyhow I kept straining my eyes to make sense of it, finally took it home and got my fancy magnifier from cape cod (I never take it out, unless I want to live in the moment) but I digress-- and alas I finally discovered that the whole thing was written in Farsi, for I couldn't understand any of it no matter how hard I strained..Actually says on the back Gebetsniche (Mirhab) aus der Maiden-Moschee Iran ( Kaschan), dat. 623H. (1226)-- probably if I had flipped it over then I'd have saved myself a major embarrassment instead of feigning knowing what it says :lol:
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snakelegs
07-10-2007, 06:28 AM
;D we've all been there.
that's cool that you can read these things. i've seen some very beautiful intricate pictures that were made from arabic calligraphy.
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جوري
07-10-2007, 06:35 AM
here is a picture of it by the way

and if you can read German
Moschee mit Blätterdach
< zur&#252;ck
1
2
3
4
5
6
weiter >



Gebetsnische (Mihrab) aus der Gro&#223;en Moschee von Kaschan/ Nordwestiran, 1226, 280 x 180 cm; Foto: Gudrun Stenzel
Die Gebetsnische aus der Ruine einer Moschee in Konya (drittes Viertel des 12. Jahrhunderts) l&#228;dt ein zu einer &#228;hnlich aktiven Deutung des scheinbar reinen Ornaments (Abb.). Der Bauteil aus Fayencemosaik wurde &#252;ber Jahre sorgf&#228;ltig zusammengesetzt und erg&#228;nzt; ann&#228;hernd die H&#228;lfte fehlte. Der dreifarbige Fayencedekor – t&#252;rkis, schwarz, gelb mit stellenweise wei&#223;en Putzzwischenfeldern – entspricht dem Bau- und Ornamentstil der t&#252;rkischen Seldschukendynastie des 13. Jahrhunderts. Die Vertiefung der Nische zeigt ein Flechtband, das im ungleichm&#228;&#223;igen Zickzack-Verlauf geometrische Figuren erzeugt. Ausgehend von facettierten S&#228;ulchen zu beiden Seiten w&#246;lbt sich eine Art (auf arabisch „muqarnas“ genanntes) Zellwerk auf – erst beim genaueren Hinschauen geben sich die Zellen als zu gro&#223;en, aufrechten Blattb&#252;scheln &#252;ber kurzen &#196;sten stilisierte Formen zu erkennen, die den Ursprung der S&#228;ulen wie B&#228;ume organisch fortf&#252;hren. Dem Betrachter wird sogar ein Querschnitt durch die beiden Baumkronen angedeutet, im Gabelblatt-Rankenwerk der flachen Front &#252;ber den S&#228;ulen, zentriert in einem aufgefalteten Stern in jedem Zwickel.

Nun k&#246;nnte man aus der Darstellung zum Weiterdenken angeregt werden und die zweite H&#228;lfte des facettierten Nischenhalbrunds virtuell zu einer Kuppel erg&#228;nzen, die auch den Betrachter &#252;berw&#246;lbt. Die sch&#246;ne Vorstellung, sich in einer Laube zu befinden, die sch&#252;tzt und erfreut, mag ihn zum Tr&#228;umen mitrei&#223;en – bis er des gro&#223;en, in erfindungsreichster Kalligraphie gefa&#223;ten Koranverses aus Sure 29 dar&#252;ber gewahr wird, die an den Zweck des Moscheebesuchs gemahnt: „Steh auf zum Gebet, wahrlich, das Gebet verbietet, was abscheulich und verwerflich ist
http://kunst.zeit.de/805.html?&tx_cccbrowse_pi1[pointer]=2&cHash=574c8285b0
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amirah_87
07-10-2007, 08:41 AM
:sl:

MashaAllah, all the handwrittings are so kool.

I write in a combination of Riqa' & Farsi/Ta'liq. These two are really helpful if you're writting from a dictated lesson/Muhaadharah. You'd have difficulties catching up if you were to write it in Naskh.
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umm-sulaim
07-10-2007, 08:45 AM
yh saheeh about dictation, i use farsi ta'liq/rik'a when u have to write really fast too. With letter writing i prefer rik'a n naskh.
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north_malaysian
07-10-2007, 08:58 AM
I could only write in naskh as it the official handwriting used in public exam papers (Arabic and Islamic studies subjects). Plus the Malay language written in Jawi script (Arabic alphabets) is in Naskh. And my handwriting is so bad in whatsoever language...:giggling:

But I love Ruq'ah..................... :thumbs_up
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snakelegs
07-10-2007, 09:28 AM
check out this one:
http://kunst.zeit.de/805.html?&tx_cccbrowse_pi1[pointer]=3&cHash=b54661fc7a
(i tried to post it, but it was too big and fat).

hmmmm - you will need to copy and past the address.
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thirdwatch512
07-10-2007, 09:30 AM
i liked deewani
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جوري
07-10-2007, 06:16 PM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
check out this one:
http://kunst.zeit.de/805.html?&tx_cccbrowse_pi1[pointer]=3&cHash=b54661fc7a
(i tried to post it, but it was too big and fat).

hmmmm - you will need to copy and past the address.
lols.. yes thank you.. I included this same link in the bottom of post 20?.. but yes it is pretty cool... thanks so much for sharing :smile:
:w:
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Ra`eesah
07-10-2007, 08:30 PM
Assalamu`Alaykum

Maasha`Allaah interesting thread! My writing is Naskh and my husbands is reqaa. I should scan his notes, and upload it here,its a disaster!

Voted for Deewani
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snakelegs
07-10-2007, 08:50 PM
Originally Posted by PurestAmbrosia
lols.. yes thank you.. I included this same link in the bottom of post 20?.. but yes it is pretty cool... thanks so much for sharing :smile:
:w:
the link just keeps going to the first page. anyway, i think i've figured out how to post it. i love this colour - you really have to make it bigger to appreciate.

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جوري
07-10-2007, 08:57 PM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
the link just keeps going to the first page. anyway, i think i've figured out how to post it. i love this colour - you really have to make it bigger to appreciate.

it is yes.. it says to establish prayer, as prayer prohibits (sinning/bad deeds etc.) ( wa'aqeemo asalat, ina asalat tanhy 3an alf7sha'a wal monkar) if you read from right to left horizontally, if you weren't familiar with Quranic Arabic those words would be read differently, by the way there are no dots on the consonants either and I can still read it, contrary to popular belief that establishing or incorporating that sort of orthography caused words to look distorted and lose original meaning.. Also, I'll have to bring an example of how prayer technically should be written and how it is actually written in the Quran--but I must run now :hmm:
:sl:
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north_malaysian
07-11-2007, 01:47 AM
From my observations most grand mosques in Malaysia have Kufi on the Mihrab (the wall facing Mecca where the Imam usually lead the prayer), Thuluth on the walls and Diwani on the dome. If I'm not mistaken there is an institute for Islamic Calligraphy in Malaysia...
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Khayal
07-11-2007, 03:27 AM
:sl:

I liked Thuluth!!! nice thread.

:sl:
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north_malaysian
07-11-2007, 03:35 AM
there's another one "Muhaqqaq"

see the part 4 of the Article.

http://www.sakkal.com/ArtArabicCalligraphy.html
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north_malaysian
07-11-2007, 03:41 AM
The chinese Muslims also have their own Arabic calligraphy style called "Sini"

http://www.hajinoordeen.com/
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جوري
07-11-2007, 08:00 PM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
The chinese Muslims also have their own Arabic calligraphy style called "Sini"

http://www.hajinoordeen.com/
Masha'Allah indeed .. thanks so much for sharing
:w:
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Ra`eesah
07-11-2007, 08:09 PM
Maasha`Allaah, its beautiful. Sini just means chinese in arabic. Sin is China

so sini style, chinese style.
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north_malaysian
07-12-2007, 01:38 AM
The Chinese Muslims are very unique right?.... they have their own Arabic calligraphy and their own mosque architecture... No wonder Islam survives there....

I've seen the Sini Calligraphy master demonstrations in Malaysia... the way they write those Arabic word just like the way they write the chinese ones...

They used the same kind of brush and paper... and the movement is like a kung-fu master!!!:coolious:
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tearsofice21
07-12-2007, 04:07 AM
Assalamu 'alaikum,

For writing, I prefer Naskh because it's easy to read.. but for artistic purposes, I like Thuluth.. Masha'Allah beautiful!!
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tearsofice21
07-12-2007, 04:09 AM
Assalamu 'alaikum

Just wanted to add: Sini is also beautiful Masha'Allah!! Wow sounds cool north_malaysian :D
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Ali.
12-18-2007, 06:35 PM
I liked Naskh :D
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crayon
12-19-2007, 08:02 AM
Kufi is beautiful.
Shame I can't read it, though.:D
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amirah_87
12-19-2007, 10:05 PM
:sl:

^ Yeah it's pretty hard. It takes a lot of practise n' getting used to.

Just in case people want to know what's been writing in those different scripts, I'm gonna transliterate a few of the lease obvious inshaAllaah:

- Kufi

1) " Laa ilaaha illal-laah"
2) "Allama bil qalam"

- Thuluth

The first one's clear inshaAllaah. The second one says:

"Wa ja'alnaakum shu'uubanw-wa qabaa'ila li-ta'aarafuu.."

- Dewaani

The second one took quite a while for me to figure out! buh!

"Alaa bi-dhikrillaahi tat'ma-innul-quluub.."

.. Haaji Noor Deen's calligraphy is real good. I also quite like Hasan Al-Mas'uud's.
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Re.TiReD
08-12-2008, 09:13 PM
:bump:

Beautiful thread masha'Allah!
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Danah
08-13-2008, 01:50 PM
I used Dewani and I voted for it, itd my fav style
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Re.TiReD
08-13-2008, 03:15 PM
Thuluth and Naskh are the ones that most mirror my calligraphy style....its very difficult though :skeleton: :-[
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yasin ibn Ahmad
08-14-2008, 11:32 AM
Originally Posted by Skye Ephémérine
Thanks for all the replies... what happened to all the previous posts that were here? eh-- just as well..
I guess we have no Turks on board?... no one is up for deewani, where I find its cursive circular style rather warm and provocative...There is definitely something highly artistic and ornate about Kufi -- I am surprised that it is losing out to Farsi...
There is saying that goes:
The Noble Qur'an was sent down on Mecca,
and it was recited in Cairo,
and it was written in Istanbul

I prefer Riqa.
And also check that site I am sure you haven't heard or seen this before.
Some parts are Turkish so a short explanation.Above the Qur'an page it says the words which come from te same root overlaps
Each link shows a different example.

http://www.hayratvakfi.org/index.php...mune=1&lang=tr
http://www.hayratvakfi.org/index.php...mune=2&lang=tr
http://www.hayratvakfi.org/index.php...mune=6&lang=tr
http://www.hayratvakfi.org/index.php...une=10&lang=tr
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waji
08-21-2008, 12:17 PM
:sl:
I like Naskh simple and easy to understand
other looks good and beautiful
and i think other types are not for common use
:w:
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Güven
08-21-2008, 12:20 PM
I like Farsi, Thuluth And Deewani :statisfie

Sini Looks Beautiful too
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جوري
08-23-2008, 05:07 AM
wow forgot about this old thread..who resurrected it? lol
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Thinker
08-23-2008, 02:23 PM
I posted a message on Thursday on a thread I started some time back in the Discovering Islam section. I got the messahe back 'pending approval' and it appears to be still pending! As this message is on Caligraphy I'll try same message here . . .

Looking on the web, it appears that the earliest written copy of the Qur'an is written in Kufic script. I would like to know how similar/dissimilar Kufic is to modern day Arabic. If you type in Kufic into Google several pictures come up of script written in Kufic, if there is a native Arab out there I'd like to know if you can read it or how easy difficult it is to read?

Thanks
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جوري
08-23-2008, 04:51 PM
Originally Posted by Thinker
I posted a message on Thursday on a thread I started some time back in the Discovering Islam section. I got the messahe back 'pending approval' and it appears to be still pending! As this message is on Caligraphy I'll try same message here . . .

Looking on the web, it appears that the earliest written copy of the Qur'an is written in Kufic script. I would like to know how similar/dissimilar Kufic is to modern day Arabic. If you type in Kufic into Google several pictures come up of script written in Kufic, if there is a native Arab out there I'd like to know if you can read it or how easy difficult it is to read?

Thanks
I believe I have in fact seen your message some where, with people responding to it.. why don't you check under your user profile to see if you have a subscription still to it?

Kufi is an art form.. it is Arabic but done in a ornate style.. I think only artisans use it?
it is quite easy to read.. All of them are quite easy to read.. sometimes when the letters are too interwined you need to latch on to the one word you recognize in there and then they will all unravel..

hope that answered your q? :-[

peace
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Al-Zaara
08-23-2008, 05:06 PM
Selam aleykum,

Originally Posted by Skye Ephémérine
I guess we have no Turks on board?... no one is up for deewani, where I find its cursive circular style rather warm and provocative...
Of course you have Turks here!

I like Deewani and Thuluth. I love Deewani more like an art, I don't think I'll ever master it, but I so love it and voted for it.

I'm aiming for Thuluth instead, inshaAllah. But currently my writing resembles a mixture of Thuluth and Muhaqqaq, lol.
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Güven
08-23-2008, 05:06 PM
O yeah Forgot To Ask , I guess This Calighrapy Is Deewani ?? And Does Someone Know Whats Written There? :)

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Güven
08-23-2008, 08:07 PM
^Sooo No One ????
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جوري
08-23-2008, 11:21 PM
it says in the name of God most gracious most merciful!

:w:
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Güven
08-23-2008, 11:25 PM
:sl:

JazakAllahu Khair Sis :thumbs_up, Its Written Soo Beautiful :statisfie

:w:
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جوري
08-23-2008, 11:28 PM
it is nice.. done isometrically mirror- image style ..
Jazaks

:w:
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Banu_Hashim
12-02-2008, 11:38 AM
I was browsing through old threads, and found this one. I voted for Thuluth. :)
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Zuzubu
03-21-2011, 07:22 AM
I like farsi, because I speak farsi. =)
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Ummu Sufyaan
03-23-2011, 06:18 AM
^are you a shia?
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