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Sultan ahmet
09-09-2005, 10:24 AM
Assalamualaikum W.W

I just would like to talk about the forgotten Islamic history in Turkey. Recently I visited Istanbul (known as Constantinople in earlier days), and the amount of Islamic History there is Immense! This is one of the places all Muslims should visit, where the prophet (SAW) hair, tooth, footprint sword and other auspicious items lay. Also many of the Sahabas (people who seen the prophet) have been buried at this place, such as Ayoob AL Ansari (RA).

Going further I shall give you a brief insight of the Ottoman Empire who bought this land by sacrificing their blood.

One family reigned over the Ottoman Empire for seven centuries, and, unlike most dynasties, they ruled in an unbroken line, thirty-six of them altogether, from the 13th century until the 20th century.
There were abdications and depositions but never a hiatus. They were never overthrown by a foreign power and no usurper ever gained the throne. The Western world called them Ottoman, but their Turkish name is Osmanli, taken from the first ruler of the Ottoman state, Osman.
It seemed amazing at the time, 1453 AC, that this previously obscure clan breached the walls and conquered the Byzantine capital of Constantinople. But the Byzantine Empire, weakened by repeated Mongolian sacking, suffering from subsequent internal confusion, and with no powerful leadership to guide them, fell to the Turkish invaders. Under Mehmed the Conqueror, the Ottomans rebuilt the devastated city of Constantinople into the fabulously wealthy capital they renamed Istanbul, with large warehouses, the Covered Bazaar, Topkapi Palace, and several mosque complexes.
It was Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent however, who brought the Ottoman Empire to its zenith. The fourth Ottoman sultan to reign, from 1520 until 1566, he presided over the most powerful state in the world. A remarkable military strategist, he more than doubled the Ottoman land holdings he inherited from his father. He also brought a profusion of elegant mosques, baths, schools, fountains, and gardens to Istanbul. A virtual renaissance occurred in literature, the arts, the sciences, and he set a new standard of jurisprudence.
Upon Süleyman’s demise, the gradual decline of the Ottoman Empire began, finally disintegrating completely three hundred years later in 1924 when Kemal Ataturk abolished the Muslim caliphate and founded the Republic of Turkey. Much of the original splendor created by the Ottomans remains in Istanbul, though, and experiencing an architectural marvel such as Süleymaniye Mosque gives a unique view to a unique period in Turkish history
There is this cartoon which can be bought from’ http://www.soundvision.com/shop/pview.asp?item=147-001
Also there’s a link between Constantinople (Istanbul) and Dajjal. Bothers and sisters are requested to read on this topic.

If there is any other bothers or sisters out there who has also been to Istanbul, please share your experience

Jazakallah

To widen the issue other sahabas buried in turkey are

Abu Dardar (RA) <---in a small garden located near mehtar mosque which is no longer in use

Kaab Ibn Malik (RA)(Fought in the battle of Tabuk) also in the same compound but was closed Abu Shaibat Al Khudri (RA) and Hamiduallah Al Ansari (RA)

Jaabir (RA) Lived during the time of Khilafas as well was 93 years old; Father of Abdullah Bin Amr

Amr Ibn El As (RA) <---located in the underground mosque

Wahab Ibn Usherye (RA) <---located in the underground mosque

Sufyan Ibn Uyeyre (RA) <---located in the underground mosque; Teacher of imam

malik (RA)

May Allah give us the ability to take benefit from the places of benefit, and make us go to these places for benefit,

AMEEN
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azim
09-09-2005, 03:42 PM
Salamalaykum.

I recently went Umrah, and we visited Turkey for 24 hours before hand. It's a miracle of Allah subhanwa-tala because those 24 hours felt like a week. We went so many places and did so many things (we only slept for a few hours, lol).

The first thing that struck about Istanbul was the strength of faith of it's people. We went to Fajr prayer there at 4am in a mosque that was in quite a secluded place (one of the Sahaba's was buried there and it had a few big trees with a lot of birds, I wish I could remember the name of the mosque). Despite it being 4am and about a 10 minute walk up a hill, the mosque was jam packed. The amazing thing was that it was just an ordinary day, these people would pray Fajr and then go to school and work.

We were staying with an Islamic school in the area (the Yahya Islamic Centre I think, it was apparently the oldest Islamic school in the city). They not only provided free lodging for us, but then organised transport for us. They also called in a guide to take us around all the Masjids in Turkey as well as some other nice locations. They insisted on providing this for free but we managed to pay for the transport in the end. The people we so extraordinarily nice. I pray Allah accepts them all into Jannah and rewards them greatly for the affection they showed us.

We went to Al-Fatih mosque to pray maghrib the night we arrived in Turkey. Just on the off chance, one of the members from the group gave Salam to the imam of the mosque without recognising him. The imam was so touched by this that he gave us a guided tour of the mosque, as well as some rooms which were off limit for most people. He then took us to what used to the Khalifs meeting room, sat us down, recited Quran for us and served us all tea. We didn't even speak to the same language but Islam was enough to bring us together.

I was upset we only had a single day in Turkey, inshallah I could one day go there and spend a few weeks. I highly recommend all brothers and sisters to visit the city.

Salam.
Reply

sena
09-09-2005, 05:18 PM
Originally Posted by azim
Salamalaykum.



The first thing that struck about Istanbul was the strength of faith of it's people. We went to Fajr prayer there at 4am in a mosque that was in quite a secluded place (one of the Sahaba's was buried there and it had a few big trees with a lot of birds, I wish I could remember the name of the mosque). Despite it being 4am and about a 10 minute walk up a hill, the mosque was jam packed. The amazing thing was that it was just an ordinary day, these people would pray Fajr and then go to school and work.
the name of the mosque is Eyup Sultan mosque. and I would like to thank for your nice words about my country. we wait again to Turkey...
Reply

sena
09-09-2005, 05:42 PM
Originally Posted by Sultan ahmet
Assalamualaikum W.W

I just would like to talk about the forgotten Islamic history in Turkey. Recently I visited Istanbul (known as Constantinople in earlier days), and the amount of Islamic History there is Immense! This is one of the places all Muslims should visit, where the prophet (SAW) hair, tooth, footprint sword and other auspicious items lay. Also many of the Sahabas (people who seen the prophet) have been buried at this place, such as Ayoob AL Ansari (RA).

Going further I shall give you a brief insight of the Ottoman Empire who bought this land by sacrificing their blood.

One family reigned over the Ottoman Empire for seven centuries, and, unlike most dynasties, they ruled in an unbroken line, thirty-six of them altogether, from the 13th century until the 20th century.
There were abdications and depositions but never a hiatus. They were never overthrown by a foreign power and no usurper ever gained the throne. The Western world called them Ottoman, but their Turkish name is Osmanli, taken from the first ruler of the Ottoman state, Osman.
It seemed amazing at the time, 1453 AC, that this previously obscure clan breached the walls and conquered the Byzantine capital of Constantinople. But the Byzantine Empire, weakened by repeated Mongolian sacking, suffering from subsequent internal confusion, and with no powerful leadership to guide them, fell to the Turkish invaders. Under Mehmed the Conqueror, the Ottomans rebuilt the devastated city of Constantinople into the fabulously wealthy capital they renamed Istanbul, with large warehouses, the Covered Bazaar, Topkapi Palace, and several mosque complexes.
It was Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent however, who brought the Ottoman Empire to its zenith. The fourth Ottoman sultan to reign, from 1520 until 1566, he presided over the most powerful state in the world. A remarkable military strategist, he more than doubled the Ottoman land holdings he inherited from his father. He also brought a profusion of elegant mosques, baths, schools, fountains, and gardens to Istanbul. A virtual renaissance occurred in literature, the arts, the sciences, and he set a new standard of jurisprudence.
Upon Süleyman’s demise, the gradual decline of the Ottoman Empire began, finally disintegrating completely three hundred years later in 1924 when Kemal Ataturk abolished the Muslim caliphate and founded the Republic of Turkey. Much of the original splendor created by the Ottomans remains in Istanbul, though, and experiencing an architectural marvel such as Süleymaniye Mosque gives a unique view to a unique period in Turkish history
There is this cartoon which can be bought from’ http://www.soundvision.com/shop/pview.asp?item=147-001
Also there’s a link between Constantinople (Istanbul) and Dajjal. Bothers and sisters are requested to read on this topic.

If there is any other bothers or sisters out there who has also been to Istanbul, please share your experience

Jazakallah

To widen the issue other sahabas buried in turkey are

Abu Dardar (RA) <---in a small garden located near mehtar mosque which is no longer in use

Kaab Ibn Malik (RA)(Fought in the battle of Tabuk) also in the same compound but was closed Abu Shaibat Al Khudri (RA) and Hamiduallah Al Ansari (RA)

Jaabir (RA) Lived during the time of Khilafas as well was 93 years old; Father of Abdullah Bin Amr

Amr Ibn El As (RA) <---located in the underground mosque

Wahab Ibn Usherye (RA) <---located in the underground mosque

Sufyan Ibn Uyeyre (RA) <---located in the underground mosque; Teacher of imam

malik (RA)

May Allah give us the ability to take benefit from the places of benefit, and make us go to these places for benefit,

AMEEN
thanks brother for informative post..

Jazakallahu khyran...
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Sultan ahmet
09-10-2005, 03:14 PM
So sister, are you born and bread in Istanbul? If so you don’t know how lucky you are!

Yes brother Azim, that mosque you went to was called ‘Eyup Al Ansari’ mosque. Eyup al-Ansari, a friend of Prophet Mohammed and standard-bearer of the Muslim Army, was martyred by an arrow during the Arabic siege of Constantinople. Buried by his friends, Eyup's tomb was discovered by the Mehmet the Conqueror and his teacher after the fall of Constantinople.

The faith mosque you went is also filled with light. There is an imam, who is the only person to do the Tafsir of the Quran in to Turkish. When I went recently he was ill and was living in the outskirts, in a forest for natural recovery. Apparently the name of this place begins with ‘C’; if Wednesday is translated into Turkish (that’s what I was told lol) I hope the sister can help me out lol
Reply

sena
09-10-2005, 04:35 PM
Originally Posted by Sultan ahmet
So sister, are you born and bread in Istanbul? If so you don’t know how lucky you are!

Yes brother Azim, that mosque you went to was called ‘Eyup Al Ansari’ mosque. Eyup al-Ansari, a friend of Prophet Mohammed and standard-bearer of the Muslim Army, was martyred by an arrow during the Arabic siege of Constantinople. Buried by his friends, Eyup's tomb was discovered by the Mehmet the Conqueror and his teacher after the fall of Constantinople.

The faith mosque you went is also filled with light. There is an imam, who is the only person to do the Tafsir of the Quran in to Turkish. When I went recently he was ill and was living in the outskirts, in a forest for natural recovery. Apparently the name of this place begins with ‘C’; if Wednesday is translated into Turkish (that’s what I was told lol) I hope the sister can help me out lol
yes brother, I was born in İstanbul so I feel lucky for living here as you said..that place's name you want to know is Çarşamba, yes it means in turkish ''wednesday''...

JazakAllahu khayran

wesselam
Reply

M Ilyas
09-10-2005, 08:59 PM
Salaam

The history of turkey was nice and interesting until that fool Ataturk (Mustafa kemal) appeared! look at what he tried to do to Turkey
Reply

Zuko
09-10-2005, 10:31 PM
I wish I could vist turkey, and egypt and greece..... and a whole lot of other places, lol
Reply

sena
09-11-2005, 01:57 PM
Originally Posted by M Ilyas
Salaam

The history of turkey was nice and interesting until that fool Ataturk (Mustafa kemal) appeared! look at what he tried to do to Turkey

hey brother , if beloved Gazi Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK didn't exist, there wasn't Turkey today. may Allah accept his paradise..He is father of Turks..and will be forever..
Reply

azim
09-12-2005, 12:54 AM
Salamu alaykum.

Inshallah one day I have the chance to visit again. I can't believe Turkey has been made into a secular country. The strength of iman of the people there is amazing. Jazakhallah-khaiyral for telling me the name of the mosque btw. Eyub Al-Ansari. It was such a beautiful mosque, and very peaceful. The fajr prayer there was amazing. I'm not sure if ths is common in Turkey, or just in this mosque, but they would do Dhikr for about 30 minutes before hand. Everyone repeating the shahada, only stopping to hear a quick lecture from the Imam before continuing all in union. I was born and raised in the UK, our fajr prayer in the mosque is barely made up of 5 people (although I make no criticism of anyone, since I rarely attend this myself). I've never been surrounded by so many strong muslims before. Alhamdulillah. I pray I can one day visit Turkey again.
Reply

M Ilyas
09-12-2005, 09:23 AM
Selaam Sena

hey brother , if beloved Gazi Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK didn't exist, there wasn't Turkey today. may Allah accept his paradise..He is father of Turks..and will be forever..
Hey dear sister, I know how much the turks admire him but he has not done anything good to Turkey except make it secular. It was far better with the Ottomans, I mean look at what Ataturk did he abandoned the khilafah. Sorry respected Sister I cannot agree with the things he has done.

Regards
Reply

Sultan ahmet
09-12-2005, 09:44 AM
That’s what I don’t understand, Gazi Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK
When I went turkey recently, a tour guide in fethiye, told me that men weren’t aloud to keep a beard when going to university and that girls weren’t allowed to keep a head scarf. In fact she said girls used to wear a wig on top of their scarf!

The ayah sofa museum, wasn’t that a mosque before?

Tell me more about Gazi Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK, persuade me to believe that he was right.
Reply

Ummu Amatullah
09-12-2005, 10:49 AM
Asallama Alaikum yeah me too.Turkey seems like a nice place to live.Facsinating history :thumbs_up
Also there’s a link between Constantinople (Istanbul) and Dajjal.
Say what? :omg: :omg: :omg:
Reply

sena
09-14-2005, 04:59 PM
Originally Posted by Sultan ahmet
That’s what I don’t understand, Gazi Mustafa Kemal ATATÜRK
When I went turkey recently, a tour guide in fethiye, told me that men weren’t aloud to keep a beard when going to university and that girls weren’t allowed to keep a head scarf. In fact she said girls used to wear a wig on top of their scarf!
this situation exist from 1999.that time goverment is left wieved goverment and they banned to enter school with hijab an beard. before this time there wasn't problem about this. this situation is not related to Gazi Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. coming goverments up to now after his death had changed alots of things.I would like to add clear something, Gazi Mustafa Kemal Atatürk's wife was wearing black hijab. please look at this picture;

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abdul Majid
03-26-2006, 11:36 PM
barakallahfeek brother, thanks for the info about lovly turkey
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north_malaysian
03-27-2006, 04:12 AM
Islamist worldwide are demonising Kemal Ataturk because he brought down Ottoman Caliphate. But ones have to remember:-

1) Ataturk defeat the Greek for Turkish sovereignity.
2) Ataturk being good friends to Europe for Turkish survival.
3) Ottoman Caliphate was not that Islamic in Ataturk times.

Only Allah knows the truth. But I have to leave it to the Turks too. They knew him better than us. But in Malaysian history book good things written about him because of the Young Turks Movement. Which actually influenced Young Malay Movement in Malaya. If Kamal Ataturk dont spark this Young Turk Movement, there will be no initiative for Malays to seek independent from British.
Reply

abdul Majid
03-27-2006, 04:13 AM
young turks....lol
Reply

snakelegs
03-27-2006, 06:13 AM
thanks for an interesting post!
Reply

north_malaysian
03-27-2006, 08:07 AM
What's wrong with young turks? they give us, the Malays inspiration to go against British for independent. It's written in our history textbooks.
Reply

maryam (",)
03-27-2006, 09:08 AM
salaams
and nasil siniz sena?

was fortunate enuf to go to turkey 3 times and i'd love to go back, inshallah
first time i went there was for a conference on 'a call to peace days' which was held in konya. it was an amazing experience and the ppl we met were really hospitable and made our stay a memorable one. we went to Mevlana's Mausoleum and saw the whirling dervishes in action there. we also visited istanbul and bursa. the architecture, food, ppl, atmosphere...everything about turkey is amazing...mashallah...except of course that i was really disappointed to see such a poor turnout of ppl at the masajid during salaah time. and if they were ppl, it was mostly the older generation, with less than a sprinkling of youth.

the conference in itself was awesome, in that we met lotsa turks who were proud of being muslim and who had forsaken their careers, studies etc bcoz they weren't allowed to practise islam
Reply

justahumane
03-27-2006, 10:14 AM
Salam Sister Sena,

Is it true that polygamy is not allowed in Turky? Is it a crime there?
Reply

abdul Majid
03-27-2006, 07:54 PM
turkey is unfortunatly influenced by filth
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