PDA

View Full Version : your fondest memory of Ramadan as a child...



جوري
09-19-2007, 01:25 AM

I remember arches like this at my grandma's old lane

my city so full of history war torn and in tears...


but they called her the devestator.. though she has been devestated much.. each wall, each city street, each corner spoke of history.. you can feel yourself amidst a battle scene ... or alone in dimly torched mosque in the night to pray



yes I walked her street, and of her citadel wrote a thousand prose



holding the hands of my grandmother or aunt, between its archways I ran chasing the sun.. her name rolls of my tongue like a beautiful ballade



my mother country will probably one day hold me in her deep.. as I now hold her in mine.. but no her history isn't my fondest memory nor are her old provinces and streets.. rather sleeping at my grandma's old house in Ramadan.. I wish I can re-live just one day.. living on memories is almost too much to bear seeing how many of them passed on.. nonetheless --I visit them still in my mind from time to time and especially during Ramadan.. we'd be scattered about the huge house me and my million cousins, aunts and uncles.. the grand room had six french style windows on each wall... the 5th window was my favorite.. there was a crooked nail there I used to always put my finger on as if to console it for its asymmetry.. much happened there, from soccer matches, to mothers yelling at their kids, to the cactus fruit man peeling away as we lowered our plates to him in banana leaf baskets along with 10 or 20 piasters...
but it was there too in the wee hours of the night that the 'mos7rati' (night caller) came about drumming... waking people by their first names-- Ms lila , Usama effendi wake up oh you who are sleeping and praise your lord, and with it the old lane would again come alive.. It is probably a pastime that is no longer practised?
I don't know... my uncle has died since, and so did my sweet aunt, my grandmother too, and her niece aunt kawthar and her son nabeel .. long gone is the old house, its old walls probably in some reckless abandon.. but not from my memory...

Anyhow would love to hear your stories too of your old country and your fondest memory of Ramadan..
:w:
Reply

Login/Register to hide ads. Scroll down for more posts
Woodrow
09-19-2007, 01:34 AM
:w:

Cairo is indeed Beautiful. You are very fortunate to have those memories.

Myself as a revert have no childhood memories of Ramadan. This is my second Ramadan as a Muslim, so I am just starting my memories.

Thank you for sharing yours. Memories come alive and are a source of joy both to the giver and to the reciever. The wonder is there is no limit with how many people they can be shared.
Reply

جوري
09-19-2007, 01:46 AM
Originally Posted by Woodrow
:w:

Cairo is indeed Beautiful. You are very fortunate to have those memories.

Myself as a revert have no childhood memories of Ramadan. This is my second Ramadan as a Muslim, so I am just starting my memories.

Thank you for sharing yours. Memories come alive and are a source of joy both to the giver and to the reciever. The wonder is there is no limit with how many people they can be shared.
Shokran akhi..your words are so kind... it is amazing, how we might not realize it, but we make memories on this forum and grow as a family.. I remember I had joy inside my heart last Ramadan and didn't know why?.. then I remembered being on LI, for the first time in a long while I shared the experience with Muslims the world over.. it was almost like being in the old house with my then huge family.. sometimes one feels so lonely in Ramadan, not just that people are eating and going about their day.. the spiritual part is just not there-- and there is no way to recapture it, as it can only exist back there.... but now, seeing people's dishes and pictures of their home, their mosques and their countries, their children and the joy on their faces, helps recapture that old feeling.. so how about this.. you don't have to tell us of your childhood memory of Ramadan but your favorite memory.. there is always that moment that warms the heart and wraps onself in a wonderful comfort blanket... that way all muslims born, or new can share in this thread insha'Allah

:w:
Reply

snakelegs
09-19-2007, 02:35 AM
nice thread.
as an american born, i can't really imagine what it must feel like to stroll around in such an old city, though i try in my mind's eye, anyway.
it's sad how so many can not return to the lands they miss so much - either due to war or due to the lack of employment. i meet so many people who are so homesick.
i love the 2nd picture from the top.
Reply

Welcome, Guest!
Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up
Malaikah
09-19-2007, 02:54 AM
:sl:

I clearly remember trying to fast once when I was little... then me and bros gave up because my parents had just bought a yummy looking watermelon lol. :D
Reply

جوري
09-19-2007, 03:03 AM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
nice thread.
as an american born, i can't really imagine what it must feel like to stroll around in such an old city, though i try in my mind's eye, anyway.
it's sad how so many can not return to the lands they miss so much - either due to war or due to the lack of employment. i meet so many people who are so homesick.
i love the 2nd picture from the top.
Thank you snakey...Maybe you can tour one day? I have lived in so many countries ( England, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Turkey, Holland) some for a few yrs some for months, I miss them all and along the way had to let go ( as it can deaden one to live in the past so much).. and since I've learned.. 'that home is where the heart is and I take it with me every where' ;D
was hoping for a good turn out here but.... maybe folks are shy? :p :?

peace!
:w:
Reply

جوري
09-19-2007, 03:04 AM
Originally Posted by Malaikah
:sl:

I clearly remember trying to fast once when I was little... then me and bros gave up because my parents had just bought a yummy looking watermelon lol. :D
here in the states?
Reply

Malaikah
09-19-2007, 06:49 AM
Nope, never been to the states.

(NB: I am not really swimming with thermus aquaticus in Yellowstone National Park. If I were, I would be dead.)
Reply

جوري
09-19-2007, 09:39 AM
Originally Posted by Malaikah
Nope, never been to the states.

(NB: I am not really swimming with thermus aquaticus in Yellowstone National Park. If I were, I would be dead.)
;D I was wondering what a special suit you must be sporting to be able to swim in there...:mmokay:
nonetheless, I still await a happy childhood memory or two of Ramadan's gone by...
:w:
Reply

Ibn Al Aqwa
09-19-2007, 09:45 AM
lol, dont really have many

I remember though, when i was about 11, my mum gave me a banana to open my fast, but i didnt realise that the fast was supposed to open in about 5 mins, so i started to eat it...and broke my fast....

lol, thats about it...
Reply

------
09-19-2007, 09:51 AM
:salamext:

I remember I used to be in high school, and the fasts used to open quickly then, and I used to walk home from school with my friend, cold wind passing by our faces, the sunset above us.....Ahhh those days... :D
Reply

Al-Zaara
09-19-2007, 10:26 AM
Selam aleykum wa rahmetallahu wa barakthu,

Beautiful memories mashaAllah.
Reply

Ummu Sufyaan
09-19-2007, 10:57 AM
:sl:
well, i dont really have one from when i was a child, but i remember two years ago, we hooked on to satelite tv. it was/is really lovely watching the taraweeh prayers from the haram. actually, it was my best ramadan.
:sl:
Reply

gladTidings
09-19-2007, 12:04 PM
:sl:

Cool topic sis.

My memories of ramadhan are full of warmth (mostly because ramadhan was during the winter months), love and ofcourse my mums delicious food. Ramadhan was like a magical month, where everybody was so tolerant of each other, no fighting with siblings and no getting into trouble with parents. Alhamdullilah now its just as special if not better.

I dont ever remember breaking my fast intentionally, but I do remember accidently eating, sometimes a whole meal! I remember an incident where I had made the intention to fast the night before and prayed taraweeh but decided not to keep it on the morning. Later on during the day my parents were abit confused as to why I was eating, and they told me it was wrong for me to break my fast like that. Poor little me thought I had done something terribly wrong and fainted. :-[
Reply

IbnAbdulHakim
09-19-2007, 12:08 PM
i rememba going to spit in the sink every 5 seconds because i thought swallowing saliva breaks our fast :uuh:
Reply

yigiter187
09-19-2007, 12:11 PM
when ı was child ı would say to my mum:" hey mum!when you go fasting ı will stay at my uncles" :D :statisfie
Reply

Woodrow
09-19-2007, 12:25 PM
My first experience with Ramadan was as a Non-Muslim living in Morocco. Initially I found it upsetting. all of my favorite eating places were closed in the day time. But, a strange thing happened. I got to know Moroccan people, as so much of the day time was available to actually speak with and watch the people. I was quite impressed with the Piety I saw.
Reply

Anwarica
09-19-2007, 01:03 PM
:sl:
When I was young, unfortunately Ramdan was all about the special food (such as Konafa) and the Fanos (lantern) .. also the streets full of some decorations and colorful papers .. there's one day that I tried to make a fanos by designing on some strong papers and holding them together, I put a small candle inside and after few seconds it turned into ash :thumbs_up

I remember also Sheikh Naqshabandy and his famous nasheed on the radio, but that was recently not a childhood memory to be precise.
Reply

chacha_jalebi
09-19-2007, 04:11 PM
salaam

sis ambrosia the way you described your memories was heavy:D

i remem wen was little we used to get motivated to fast by being given £1 for every fast lol

and openin d fasts bak home frm school and prayin in freezin rooms lol

when your a bit older you undastand more so each ramadan has betta memories:D
Reply

The Ruler
09-19-2007, 04:13 PM
:sl:

your fondest memory of Ramadan as a child...
Food.

:w:
Reply

جوري
09-19-2007, 05:13 PM
These were all brilliant thank you so much for sharing (jazakoum Allah for putting a smile on my face).. Sob7an Allah.. I believe my two favorites were spitting every two minutes because saliva invalidates the fast and the paper fanoos that turned into ashes ;D ;D.. children do amazingly foolish things.. it is really delightful.. you can't think of this stuff as an adult.. it is as if the originality meter goes down ;D
I too had lovely fanoos.. with 8 doors every door used to open in a different way.. there was one compartment that was especially intriguing.. I don't even know why at the time, it was the most greatest thing.. it was a series of three steps to open It had two interlocking metal hooks.. I kept opening and closing it all day, until the hinges that held the door in place came apart.. and I was the saddest little girl in the world imsad... well my mom told me she wasn't going to get me another one and I was crushed.. but my dad did try to fix it on multiple occasions, and it never worked .. eventually he put the hinges over the stove to try to melt the metal into itself but it meant I could never open that mystery door again imsad ;D
Anyhow back in the day (which isn't that long ago) :-[ most fanoos were made to use candles.. now the ones I mostly see are battery operated.. they are just not as good... but I imagine it is less fire hazerdous...
Thank you all-- still hope for more but won't be greedy :-[
:w:
Reply

جوري
09-19-2007, 05:41 PM
I am not sure if everyone has the tradition of a fanoos in Ramadan in their country? but this is what they look like







they come in different shapes/sizes and prices...

:w:
Reply

ahsan28
09-19-2007, 06:27 PM
Originally Posted by Amatul Malik
:sl:
Food.

:w:
Same for me :D besides teasing my elder sis to give me the eatables secretly before iftar :D In case of her refusal, I used to coerce her by hiding her shoes and books ;D

Elder sis are more kind and friendly than moms :D
Reply

farhan2
09-20-2007, 12:11 AM
mA very nice memories peeps..
id have to say when i was around 5ish which where i can remember from, as my family wasn't as big as it is now.. we all used to live under one roof.. and it was really fun just playing about in this really really big house..as it seemed then but now, on the odd occasion i pass that house going somewhere is alot smaller.
But yeah we had alot of fun times there.. mainly there were 6 or 7 kids rather then 30ish which is the case now.. haha.. and we used to play in the garden and all at once we would all climb on our first double swing and see/saw that we had.. it was soo funny how we all managed to get on there at the same time.. and at the end of the evening having played TAG or if you call it IT or football etcetc we would all have our cloaths marked with the green grass or the mud and dirt from playing or something.. except for one person who was always seemed to keep himself clean.. :okay: anyway so thats one..
of course ripping the wrapping paper off our presents.. you cant forget that..
Another one would be.. a very famous tradition that we even sometimes do now like the last few years, for old time sake.. we would sing Talalba Darualayna.. all together really loudly.. that was fun.. as that was really the only nasheed we used to know at the time..:happy:
And lastly, i can never forget this one..
One eid when we were maybe 7ish or 8ish, one of our uncles.. pilled us all in the car.. this still being 6 or 7 of us, and as our eid gift each we went out to the park and played for an hour or something which was really fun and whilst in the car.. we would again sing Talalba Darualayna which i still love today.. the classic one sung by Yusuf Islam.. and then the real present came in..
the same uncle after the park.. took us to this Ice cream palour.. where he bought us these huge ice cream sundays.. and these were really really big to us at the time.. never had one like this before in our life.. and he let us get any flavors and toppings, sprinkles etcetc we wanted, and we had one between two.. and all i can remember was none of us were able to finish them.. we just about eat half and then my uncle ate as much as he could of the leftovers.. and we were smothered in ice cream and chocolate and everything.. and that was a very fun eid..
oh and one more Another eid, a different uncle.. my chacha once piled us all up into his van and drove us to the park.. and before we got there.. as some of us were in the boot.. one of my cus's cut his hand and didnt even realise till i told him.. and these were really bad cuts..they were at the joints of his fingers like if you look at your hand and on each finger you have two lines.. he cut all his four fingers on one of his hands, it wasnt really deep but enough for him to start bleeding.. but yea the best thing was he never cried, not once.. he was soo brave mA..but its a memory that will last forever.
And this time lastly, wrestling.. there were three of us boys.. and my uncle. he would make us wrestle each other for entertainment.. that was funny.. it was like a proper match.. where we had all our aunties and uncles as the audience.. and i have to say i did happen to win most of the time.:happy:
But yeah those are my most prized memories of Ramadan from when i was little.. :shade: :smile:
Reply

Nawal89
09-20-2007, 12:18 AM
hm Ramadhan memories..

In malaysia we have this market called the pasar ramadhan, or the ramadhan market, you can buy allll sorts of things to break your fast with in that market..its soo nice. So one day, when Mummy didnt feel like cooking, she sent my brohter there and told him to buy "all sorts of stuff" and gave him 20 RM. And my rascal brother went and ONLY bought his favorite sweet..with the whole 20RM.. which is ALOT. when he came home we were all sooo mad, but then my aunt came in and said its okay..We'll jus eat this for dinner then..Because she was calm and smiling, it did make a nice iftaar after all even though we all felt sick after that lol.
Reply

Intisar
09-20-2007, 12:50 AM
:sl: I am still a child :D, but my fondest memory was actually quite funny. My sister and I were little kids in elementary school (I was in the 3rd grade, and she in the 4th) and my mother allowed us to fast on the weekend. So I was upstairs watching TV with the family and my older sister came out of the washroom. My eldest sister noticed her wipe her mouth and asked her, ''Sis, did you drink water?" My other sister said, "N-n-o..! No! Of course not! I promise you I didn't!!" And then my sister asked her, ''Then why did you wipe your mouth of water?" My sister then replied, ''OK fine, it was because I was thirsty.'' And then my whole family laughed and my mother led her into the kitchen to get some food. Man, it was so funny!! :giggling: ;D
Reply

ahsan28
09-20-2007, 01:04 AM
Originally Posted by Nawal89

And my rascal brother went and ONLY bought his favorite sweet..with the whole 20RM.. which is ALOT. when he came home we were all sooo mad
So it is confirmed that boys are wild mustangs and they remain uncontrollable :D

Lesson learnt is, never under-estimate their capabilities :D
Reply

snakelegs
09-20-2007, 04:07 AM
i like those lanterns. are they a tradition in all muslim countries?
is there any symbolism in them, stories about them, or are they just plain pretty?
Reply

جوري
09-20-2007, 04:38 AM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
i like those lanterns. are they a tradition in all muslim countries?
is there any symbolism in them, stories about them, or are they just plain pretty?
I am not sure if they are popular else where? I did find this on the BBC
The streets of the Egyptian capital Cairo are currently alight with special festive lanterns. These have been used to light up Ramadan nights there since the Fatimids empire-- which ruled Egypt from 969 to 1171
I put empire.. they put 'dynasty'.. I don't think they have their facts straight most of the time ...
I was also able to find these two sites of it

Since Ramadan is considered to be the most joyful month of the whole year, children also have their share of fun. The "fanoos" or lantern is a must for every kid. These are traditionally made of tin and colored glass, with a candle inside. More modern examples are battery operated, but really lack the spirit (though each year there seems to be a trend to see who can produce the most snazzy fanoos). All mosques and streets during the whole month are full of colored lights in a festival fashion, and in the past, children played in the streets with their lanterns, singing "wahawy ya wahawy". This tradition is still practiced, though rarely now in the streets, except in middle class or poor neighborhoods, and in the countryside.
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/ramadan.htm

and I got it all from this site :lol: but one of the links there seems to be having a mal-function...
Ramadan fanoos question

they are really adorable.. I used to chant along with other kids... come to think of it, I don't know what I was chanting?.. maybe some of the Egyptians or syrian or Morrocan members can tell us what 'wa7awy ya wa7awy eyoo7a' means? ;D
thank you
:w:
Reply

جوري
09-20-2007, 04:46 AM
look what I found on same site.. it is the mosa7rati... the night drummer that wakes people up for si7oor



The natives must be restless. Are those drums I here?
Ramadan has a mysterious tradition that has come to be associated with it for various reasons. The Misaharaty (Musaharati) is one of the oldest, most deep-rooted traditions found during Ramadan. El Misaharaty is the name given to the person who walks and beats a drum in residential areas to wake people up to eat their sohor (a meal eaten before the beginning of the fast) before morning prayers. Yet, today, this ancient practice seems to be in decline.

El Misaharaty is always accompanied by the children of the neighborhood who enjoy helping him in beating his drums and calling out: Es ha ya nayem…Wahed el dayem….Ramadan Karim…Es ha ya nayem… Wahed el razaq… meaning "Awake, oh faster and praise Allah. Welcome to you Ramadan, month of forgiveness." He starts his round at 3:00 am sharp and beats his drum three times, after his chanting. He goes from his house and walks to nearly every house in the neighborhood. As he reaches each house he stands in front of it and calls its residents by name. Typically, since his duty is to wake people up, the Misaharaty makes so much noise that he can be heard for several blocks in all directions.
the one in my grandmother's old lane knew everyone by name.. except the kids.. I used to peak out and scream my name to him ;D.. and they would be so upset with me.. sometimes he'd make errors and just say jumbled words when he couldn't remember, it sounded so hilarious.. I believe people paid him in 3eed with cookies... kids used to take cookies from his cart and give it back to him, so I hear I have never done this ...
I am just dying to know other people's traditions in Ramadan though.. I didn't even know there were Muslims in Bosnia until war broke out.. I am sure country and province has its own traditions?...

peace-- :w:
Reply

snakelegs
09-20-2007, 05:17 AM
interesting stuff.
i would think at least the first few years in a non-muslim country, ramadan would be kind of sad, or lacking some of its special-ness.
Reply

جوري
09-20-2007, 05:23 AM
It had lost its 'special-ness' for some time.. only recently I have tried to regain it .. but you know when you are a kid.. it is a month that is entirely beguiling!
Reply

snakelegs
09-20-2007, 05:42 AM
well, i hope you continue to regain it!
we can't go back, that is true.
it will never be the same, but that doesn't mean we can't know joy!
Reply

north_malaysian
09-20-2007, 05:54 AM
I remember when I was six year-old and started to fast... I had to stay in the classroom alone as everybody was in the kindergarten's canteen.

I wouldn't dare going to the canteen as my mum told my teacher that I was fasting.
Reply

Al-Zaara
09-20-2007, 06:06 AM
Selam aleykum,

I remember when I was 12 or something, I wanted to help my sisters with their fasting, to do something so they wouldn't think about the hunger.

So my two younger sisters and I went outside to play. There was this big tree and we played underneath it, pretending it was our house. Then we took berries from bushes and flowers, stones, sand etc. acting as if they were ingredients, herbs and spices... We had toys suppoused to be plates, knives, fork, teapot, pitcher etc.. and acted as if we were preparing iftaar-dinner. lol

We played until my Mum called us to come to eat iftaar. MashaAllah, the imagination of children is just fascinating. :D
Reply

north_malaysian
09-20-2007, 06:21 AM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
i like those lanterns. are they a tradition in all muslim countries?
is there any symbolism in them, stories about them, or are they just plain pretty?
In Malaysia, the Malays have "Malam Tujuh Likur" which is on the final week of Ramadhan. They will decorate their houses with all sorts of lights as they are welcoming the angels to bless their houses in Lailatul Qadr (Night of Power) and these lights will be displayed until the end of Syawal.












Reply

Ummah
09-20-2007, 03:47 PM
i remember my first ever fast, my mum held a little iftaar party. i broke my fast 1 or 2 minutes before the iftari time with a kujoor, and the camera was rolling on me the whole time

really its hilarious to watch!
Reply

islamirama
09-20-2007, 04:04 PM
Originally Posted by snakelegs
i like those lanterns. are they a tradition in all muslim countries?
is there any symbolism in them, stories about them, or are they just plain pretty?
It seems more like an arab tradition and maybe malay/indo too if i'm not mistaken. You won't find those lanterns hanging in SE Asia, but you will find drummers (even those without drums) walking the streets and calling others to wake up.
Reply

Ummah
09-20-2007, 05:19 PM
^ yeah my mum said when she lived in Pakistan people would play drums at Sehri/Suhoor time and wake everyone up saying the losers are the people who miss out on such a valuable time.

Sounds sooo coooolll!!
Reply

islamirama
09-20-2007, 05:26 PM
Originally Posted by Ummah
^ yeah my mum said when she lived in Pakistan people would play drums at Sehri/Suhoor time and wake everyone up saying the losers are the people who miss out on such a valuable time.

Sounds sooo coooolll!!
you make it sound like it was so long ago :)

i know they did it in the 80s, not sure after that. It has gotten pretty modern there lately...
Reply

ahsan28
09-20-2007, 05:34 PM
Originally Posted by Ummah
^ yeah my mum said when she lived in Pakistan people would play drums at Sehri/Suhoor time
Now they have digital musical instruments :D

Western democracy :D
Reply

Ummah
09-20-2007, 08:57 PM
Originally Posted by islamirama
you make it sound like it was so long ago :)

i know they did it in the 80s, not sure after that. It has gotten pretty modern there lately...
lol what makes u think im not talking about a time long ago... coz im talking about the 50's!
Reply

Ummah
09-20-2007, 08:58 PM
Originally Posted by ahsan28
Now they have digital musical instruments :D

Western democracy :D

lol please tell me ur jokinggg!
Reply

ahsan28
09-20-2007, 09:04 PM
Originally Posted by Ummah
lol please tell me ur jokinggg!

Yes :D
Reply

north_malaysian
09-21-2007, 01:45 AM
Originally Posted by islamirama
It seems more like an arab tradition and maybe malay/indo too if i'm not mistaken. You won't find those lanterns hanging in SE Asia, but you will find drummers (even those without drums) walking the streets and calling others to wake up.
In Malaysia and Indonesia too...



Reply

syilla
09-21-2007, 02:14 AM
^^^but not in my states :lol:
Reply

snakelegs
09-21-2007, 02:42 AM
Originally Posted by islamirama
It seems more like an arab tradition and maybe malay/indo too if i'm not mistaken. You won't find those lanterns hanging in SE Asia, but you will find drummers (even those without drums) walking the streets and calling others to wake up.
so no lanterns in pakistan or india? maybe they should start!
i like 'em. much prettier than xmas lights.
Reply

north_malaysian
09-21-2007, 02:58 AM
Originally Posted by syilla
^^^but not in my states :lol:
mine too... in Malaysia, it's popular in Sabah.
Reply

pramudito
09-21-2007, 03:34 AM
this is my first ramadan...and everything is perfect. so insha Allah that would be my fondest memory of this holy month:)
Reply

ahsan28
09-21-2007, 07:05 AM
Originally Posted by north_malaysian
In Malaysia and Indonesia too...
]
The drummer culture is very popular in Central and East Africa. They like wild safari dance while beating the huge drums :D . A wonderful experience to witness their performance during festivals.
Reply

smile
09-22-2007, 02:06 PM
my fondest memory???

being hungry
Reply

sevgi
09-22-2007, 02:27 PM
telling ppl i was fasting...i liked the attention

and also secretly breaking my fast when noone was looking...i was only 4 or 5 tho...

peace.
Reply

ahsan28
09-22-2007, 02:43 PM
Originally Posted by sumeyye
telling ppl i was fasting...i liked the attention

breaking my fast when noone was looking...i was only 4 or 5 tho..peace.
:ooh: :ooh:

ohhh just 4-5 years old, no problem :D :)
Reply

sevgi
09-22-2007, 02:50 PM
Originally Posted by ahsan28
:ooh: :ooh:

ohhh just 4-5 years old, no problem :D :)
my mum got us used to fasting very early...it was a serious matter for all of us...almost every year she wud try n get us to fast the number of days according to our age...

age 5=5 fasts
age 6=6 fasts
etc

i remember i fell really badly once and i was fasting...i mustve been about 7 or something and my grandma tryed to make me drink water and i refused till they almost killed me...they arent very religious ppl..but they try.
Reply

jb17
09-25-2007, 03:45 AM
i remember getting up super early to eat! haha. that's what i remember
Reply

jb17
09-25-2007, 03:47 AM
Originally Posted by sumeyye
my mum got us used to fasting very early...it was a serious matter for all of us...almost every year she wud try n get us to fast the number of days according to our age...

age 5=5 fasts
age 6=6 fasts
etc

i remember i fell really badly once and i was fasting...i mustve been about 7 or something and my grandma tryed to make me drink water and i refused till they almost killed me...they arent very religious ppl..but they try.
wow.. i have to be honest, as a kid i barely fasted. i fasted more when i was 12 then when iwas 15. im only beginning to really fast again for real. i was very religious when i was younger then i let go for some reason. my parents barely let me fast now lol its funny you fasted so young. my brother isnt allowed to fast and hes 11
Reply

Hey there! Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account.

When you create an account, you can participate in the discussions and share your thoughts. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. And you can like posts and make new friends.
Sign Up

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-03-2013, 04:10 PM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-29-2009, 09:47 PM
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-26-2007, 03:59 PM

IslamicBoard

Experience a richer experience on our mobile app!