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truemuslim
12-06-2007, 03:26 AM
Assalamu alaikum. I am in the U.S right now, whenever I see a muslim at a store or something (rarely) I see the ladies are usually wearing a hijab, decent shirt, and tight jeans. It would be OK if they were wearing a long skirt or something, but I have never seen any of them wearing a jilbab or od long skirt or anything nonharam. Yes, they do wear a hijab, but thats not all a muslim should wear. the only people I have seen dress decently in the U.S are yemeni's, nothing else. and sometimes Saudi arabians. But there is an islamic dress code called Satr, and we should all follow it! Here is what I know about it : According to the Islamic dress code Satr, mature girls and women should cover there entire body except the face and hands when they are out in public, or when there are men other than their close relitives are present. They may wear whatever they like in private. However, avoid nakedness even in front of close relatives and women.

Mature boys and men are required to cover the body between the navel and the knees at the very least. However, it is best to wear modest clothing. They should also avoid nakedness, even in front of other men and close relatives. Men are also forbidden from wearing gold jewelery and silk clothing.

BOTH MEN AND WOMEN SHOULD WEAR LOOSE AND THICK ENOUGH CLOTHING SO THE SHAPE OF THE BODY IS NOT OBVIOUS!

If they wear a hijab but tight clothes than why would you wear a hijab??? also some boys are even trying to droop there pants and wear LOOOONG shirts...muslims:-\ ?? Thanks. :thankyou:
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Woodrow
12-06-2007, 03:43 AM
Originally Posted by truemuslim
Assalamu alaikum. I am in the U.S right now, whenever I see a muslim at a store or something (rarely) I see the ladies are usually wearing a hijab, decent shirt, and tight jeans. It would be OK if they were wearing a long skirt or something, but I have never seen any of them wearing a jilbab or od long skirt or anything nonharam. Yes, they do wear a hijab, but thats not all a muslim should wear. the only people I have seen dress decently in the U.S are yemeni's, nothing else. and sometimes Saudi arabians. But there is an islamic dress code called Satr, and we should all follow it! Here is what I know about it : According to the Islamic dress code Satr, mature girls and women should cover there entire body except the face and hands when they are out in public, or when there are men other than their close relitives are present. They may wear whatever they like in private. However, avoid nakedness even in front of close relatives and women.

Mature boys and men are required to cover the body between the navel and the knees at the very least. However, it is best to wear modest clothing. They should also avoid nakedness, even in front of other men and close relatives. Men are also forbidden from wearing gold jewelery and silk clothing.

BOTH MEN AND WOMEN SHOULD WEAR LOOSE AND THICK ENOUGH CLOTHING SO THE SHAPE OF THE BODY IS NOT OBVIOUS!

If they wear a hijab but tight clothes than why would you wear a hijab??? also some boys are even trying to droop there pants and wear LOOOONG shirts...muslims:-\ ?? Thanks. :thankyou:
:w:

Come to Austin and you will see that is not the case everyplace in the USA. although you will not find many Muslim women in the grocery Stores, most will be doing their shopping in the various Halal markets.
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------
12-06-2007, 12:22 PM
:salamext:

I guess some people try to fit in with the 'American Lifestyle'.
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Woodrow
12-06-2007, 01:10 PM
Originally Posted by Muj4h1d4
:salamext:

I guess some people try to fit in with the 'American Lifestyle'.
True, only I would say as what they perceive as the "American Lifestyle" which is more of a Hollywood fantasy. Much like people in the Western world are seeing Bangladesh like 'Bollywood" shows it.

There is no such thing as an "American Lifestyle" an Amish Farmer does not resemble a Texas Cowboy who has no resemblance to a Washington Lawyer that is nothing like a Los Vegas dancer.

Each State here has a very individual life style. Some good, some bad but all different.
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Noor 13
12-06-2007, 01:39 PM
:sl:
When I used to live in Canada there were plenty of girls too dressed in tight pants, a modest shirt and a Hijab. Especially young girls are more dressed this way. I do agree that it is not the proper way to be dressed but I don't want to judge them. They might still be sincere Muslims in their heart. I saw in different Islamic countries women properly dressed but not behaving the way we should as Muslim women. The dress alone doesn't make people true believers
:w:
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------
12-06-2007, 01:42 PM
:salamext:

Yeh, but if you think about it logically sis, if they were strong/true believers, then wouldn't they care about the basic beliefs of Islam? E.g. not wear tight clothing?

(This is purely for the sake of discussion, only Allaah alone Knows whether they are true believers or not.)
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Woodrow
12-06-2007, 02:09 PM
Originally Posted by Muj4h1d4
:salamext:

Yeh, but if you think about it logically sis, if they were strong/true believers, then wouldn't they care about the basic beliefs of Islam? E.g. not wear tight clothing?

(This is purely for the sake of discussion, only Allaah alone Knows whether they are true believers or not.)
I will agree I have seen some Muslim Dressing like that in the vicinity of New York and Chicago. But, I suspect it is more of a "Big City" thing. There is too much anonymity in the large Cities. However, I tend to stay away from large cities and find that small town people are usually much more conservative in their clothing and behavior. I don't get get out very often any more. so I can only speak of what I see in my own immediate area. The Muslims here do dress very conservatively and very proper.
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mariam.
12-06-2007, 02:23 PM
that's go on even in Islamic country, I live in syria and I saw that every where .. very sad to say :cry:
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chosen
12-06-2007, 04:06 PM
I live in New York and here you see everything...from muslim women with their faces covered and wearing gloves..to muslims in tight jeans and tank tops....the important thing to remember is that this is also common among christians..christians, especially christian women are told to dress modestly..
Please aways remember to hate the sin and not the sinner..
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doodlebug
12-06-2007, 05:07 PM
Originally Posted by truemuslim
the only people I have seen dress decently in the U.S are yemeni's, nothing else.
assalam alaykum

Where are you looking in the US? I see many muslims dressed decently but I wouldn't have a clue if they were Yemeni or not. How do you know they're Yemeni?:?


I wear a long button down shirt and either a long skirt or loose pants to work but I see no reason to wear a jilbab over it all. To me that's more of a cultural thing than a religious thing and since I am from the US, not from the Middle East, I'd rather dress similarly to what I'm used to. It is difficult though to retain one's culture when trying to dress as a muslimah, but I do try. :D
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qassy!
12-06-2007, 06:09 PM
Originally Posted by truemuslim

If they wear a hijab but tight clothes than why would you wear a hijab???
In London the girls are the same tight clothes n everything

and

The Hibjab girls in the college are like the worst!!! :raging: there where tight clothes

I dunno the girls in london where hijab but still link boys, so they dress 2 impress could be same in the usa?
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Intisar
12-06-2007, 08:34 PM
:sl: Why don't you approach these sisters and try and give them some sincere da'wah or naseeha? Maybe they're just unaware that what they're wearing is not correct.
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truemuslim
12-06-2007, 10:24 PM
Originally Posted by doodlebug
assalam alaykum

Where are you looking in the US? I see many muslims dressed decently but I wouldn't have a clue if they were Yemeni or not. How do you know they're Yemeni?:?


I wear a long button down shirt and either a long skirt or loose pants to work but I see no reason to wear a jilbab over it all. To me that's more of a cultural thing than a religious thing and since I am from the US, not from the Middle East, I'd rather dress similarly to what I'm used to. It is difficult though to retain one's culture when trying to dress as a muslimah, but I do try. :D


yea if you wair that you dont need a jilbab though. nice dressing sister...also i know they are yemeni when we meet them a t the mosque and stuff. not all are yemeni though:)
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truemuslim
12-06-2007, 10:26 PM
Originally Posted by Sister-Ameena*
:sl: Why don't you approach these sisters and try and give them some sincere da'wah or naseeha? Maybe they're just unaware that what they're wearing is not correct.
yes sister i do when i can.
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crayon
12-14-2007, 10:12 AM
It's a similar situation all over the world, what with TV reaching practically everyone, EVERYONE EVERYWHERE is trying to fit in with the typical image of a "beautiful woman". Then putting a hijab on.

edit to add- Also, people seem to assume that hijab is just a scarf you wear on your head. I'm not just talking about the tight clothes some people wear with hijab, but also about their behavior in public. Hijab is an attitude, it's a way of life. They act just like everyone they see on tv, not stopping to consider if it's right or not. I've even seen hijabis flirting!
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truemuslim
12-14-2007, 05:00 PM
Originally Posted by mariam.
that's go on even in Islamic country, I live in syria and I saw that every where .. very sad to say :cry:

Yes...umm..no offence but lets not look at syrians... well i see them on the t.v ...and WoW, no diff between them and the americans. they were even drinking beer! can that "islamic country" get ANY LOWER THAN THAT??? of course not all of them, i hear nasheeds by some syrians... but then i look where they are from and i see they were from syria but raised in mekka, so yea. thanks.:D


Originally Posted by crayon
It's a similar situation all over the world, what with TV reaching practically everyone, EVERYONE EVERYWHERE is trying to fit in with the typical image of a "beautiful woman". Then putting a hijab on.

edit to add- Also, people seem to assume that hijab is just a scarf you wear on your head. I'm not just talking about the tight clothes some people wear with hijab, but also about their behavior in public. Hijab is an attitude, it's a way of life. They act just like everyone they see on tv, not stopping to consider if it's right or not. I've even seen hijabis flirting!
Exactly! Thats what I see girls doing in my MOSQUE!!
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crayon
12-14-2007, 05:27 PM
Please don't tell me that by "that" you mean flirting?!
Please?
:S
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truemuslim
12-14-2007, 05:29 PM
Originally Posted by crayon
Please don't tell me that by "that" you mean flirting?!
Please?
:S
that= flirting, laughing, and hanging around with them in the kiddy rooms whille the moms are upstairs praying not knowing what there 15-19 year old daughters are doing...:cry:
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crayon
12-14-2007, 05:36 PM
Wow.:-\
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truemuslim
12-14-2007, 05:39 PM
Originally Posted by crayon
Wow.:-\
thats the word!:D:happy:
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tigersabre
12-14-2007, 06:04 PM
I disagree with this post and criticisms of sisters wearing tight pants a bit. Not because I have a fiqhi difference of opinion - I agree with it, and I live in the US and my wife wears hijaab and jilbaab, and I have my own personal preferences thrown in there (nothing flashy or eye catching in the colors either).

However, it's not the dress code, it's the attitude of judgement that some of us have when we see something like this. We tend to have a 100% attitude - either you do all of it, or you don't, and that's it.

I saw a post earlier questioning whether these people were "true/strong" believers or not. I'm sorry, these are ridiculous things for people to be questioning by themselves.

Here's a hypothetical - if a scholar sees a Muslim prostrating before a grave or an idol, will he immediately make takfeer of him, or will he first question the person to understand if that person knows what is in front of him, or try to take an assessment of the situation? The answer is that he will first assess the situation by talking to the individual himself before making a judgement.

Likewise here - you don't know their situation, their level of knowledge, and for sure you don't know their level of Eman, and that can't be judged by watching one or two mistakes. We all make mistakes, some are apparent, and some are hidden.

When you see your brothers and sisters making mistakes, make an excuse for them so that you are not passing judgement and holding negative views of your brothers and sisters - then go to them and ask them why they are doing what they are doing, in a friendly way. You may find that they simply are not aware that they are doing something wrong. We've all been ignorant. Or it may be that the person knows what should be done, and they are gradually working their way into it. Is it better to wear tight jeans with or without a hijaab? Clearly, it's better with because you are gradually moving away from what is wrong to what is correct, and this is a principle the scholars advocate, that even if you can't totally correct a situation, if you can move it one step closer to something better, then do so.

Finally, let me conclude by saying that the opinion in the opening post, some may consider to be quite liberal, and would expect everything to be covered of the face, with only one eye open, and in some cases, no eyes showing with gloves on.
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truemuslim
12-14-2007, 06:09 PM
Originally Posted by tigersabre
I disagree with this post and criticisms of sisters wearing tight pants a bit. Not because I have a fiqhi difference of opinion - I agree with it, and I live in the US and my wife wears hijaab and jilbaab, and I have my own personal preferences thrown in there (nothing flashy or eye catching in the colors either).

However, it's not the dress code, it's the attitude of judgement that some of us have when we see something like this. We tend to have a 100% attitude - either you do all of it, or you don't, and that's it.

I saw a post earlier questioning whether these people were "true/strong" believers or not. I'm sorry, these are ridiculous things for people to be questioning by themselves.

Here's a hypothetical - if a scholar sees a Muslim prostrating before a grave or an idol, will he immediately make takfeer of him, or will he first question the person to understand if that person knows what is in front of him, or try to take an assessment of the situation? The answer is that he will first assess the situation by talking to the individual himself before making a judgement.

Likewise here - you don't know their situation, their level of knowledge, and for sure you don't know their level of Eman, and that can't be judged by watching one or two mistakes. We all make mistakes, some are apparent, and some are hidden.

When you see your brothers and sisters making mistakes, make an excuse for them so that you are not passing judgement and holding negative views of your brothers and sisters - then go to them and ask them why they are doing what they are doing, in a friendly way. You may find that they simply are not aware that they are doing something wrong. We've all been ignorant. Or it may be that the person knows what should be done, and they are gradually working their way into it. Is it better to wear tight jeans with or without a hijaab? Clearly, it's better with because you are gradually moving away from what is wrong to what is correct, and this is a principle the scholars advocate, that even if you can't totally correct a situation, if you can move it one step closer to something better, then do so.

Finally, let me conclude by saying that the opinion in the opening post, some may consider to be quite liberal, and would expect everything to be covered of the face, with only one eye open, and in some cases, no eyes showing with gloves on.

hey i only wanted to tell you all what is satr...and i don't hate these people that do these, when i go to sunday school at my masjid i tell them about satr and things, most are my friends anyway...oh and do you have anything to say about boys droopin there pants?

that is a haram, i read it somewhere..i forget where tho... thanks:D
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tigersabre
12-14-2007, 06:22 PM
Originally Posted by truemuslim
hey i only wanted to tell you all what is satr...and i don't hate these people that do these, when i go to sunday school at my masjid i tell them about satr and things, most are my friends anyway...oh and do you have anything to say about boys droopin there pants?

that is a haram, i read it somewhere..i forget where tho... thanks:D
See, it's not the ruling - it's how we treat the issue. I agree with the rulings that you're putting out there, I disagree with how we're looking at these people. We ought to look at them as brothers and sisters in Islam who need to bridge a gap, maybe in knowledge, maybe in positive support from others who are currently more practicing.

We also need to have our priorities straight - if a kid is sagging his pants, and he only calls himself Muslim because mom and dad told him he's Muslim, chances are that advising about sagging pants is not what he needs - what he needs is that someone start by building up his Eman, teaching him about tawheed, about jannah and naar, and getting his mind on that in a general sense (not, bro, if you don't stop sagging your pants, you'll go to hell). Once this person establishes Eman, and they're praying, you can start telling them about other things, like the fiqh of dress, and how one should be. When their mind is focused on Allah, and on al-akhirah, then the things that can stand in the way of that become easy to remove.

But many of our youth put the cart before the horse, and this is why people get annoyed with them - they don't know how to assess a situation and say, should I be talking to this Muslim about fiqh issues or Eman issues? The Prophet sallallaahu alayhi wa sallim started with Eman issues in Makkah, and then Fiqh issues eventually in Madeenah. We ought to follow that model as well to bring Muslims closer to Allah and the practices that Allah has enjoined on us.
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truemuslim
12-14-2007, 06:53 PM
Originally Posted by tigersabre
See, it's not the ruling - it's how we treat the issue. I agree with the rulings that you're putting out there, I disagree with how we're looking at these people. We ought to look at them as brothers and sisters in Islam who need to bridge a gap, maybe in knowledge, maybe in positive support from others who are currently more practicing.

We also need to have our priorities straight - if a kid is sagging his pants, and he only calls himself Muslim because mom and dad told him he's Muslim, chances are that advising about sagging pants is not what he needs - what he needs is that someone start by building up his Eman, teaching him about tawheed, about jannah and naar, and getting his mind on that in a general sense (not, bro, if you don't stop sagging your pants, you'll go to hell). Once this person establishes Eman, and they're praying, you can start telling them about other things, like the fiqh of dress, and how one should be. When their mind is focused on Allah, and on al-akhirah, then the things that can stand in the way of that become easy to remove.

But many of our youth put the cart before the horse, and this is why people get annoyed with them - they don't know how to assess a situation and say, should I be talking to this Muslim about fiqh issues or Eman issues? The Prophet sallallaahu alayhi wa sallim started with Eman issues in Makkah, and then Fiqh issues eventually in Madeenah. We ought to follow that model as well to bring Muslims closer to Allah and the practices that Allah has enjoined on us.

i know i understand everything your saying, but i never did say anything like im annoyed by these people or anything, and yes thats true if there parents teach them about eman then they will learn more about how to dress properly and start praying and stuff. I think you really understand it well, I hope the muslim in all the countries learn about the iman right. Inshallah:D
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