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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

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    Asalaam O alaikum....


    I thought this is the most important topic right now, especially as we have experienced an attack in one of Islams holiest city where our blessed Rasool Allah (sAllallahu alaihi wassallam) is buried. Most of us are aware that there was a bombing outside of Madinah Masjid 2 days ago as we approached the end of Ramadaan.

    We as Muslims need to point out and I have pointed out in the past at this forum that we need to realize as to where is this ideology stemming from. Where is this intolerance being generated from within this Ummah. Who are those people who thing they are the only ones who are Ahlal Haqq (people of the truth) while others who have difference with them are all Ahlal Biddah (people of innovation) and then the extreme among them go to such length that it leads them to form groups like ISIS in our age or in the past like the take over of the Grand Mosque of Makkah in 1979 and declare that spilling of innocent Muslim blood is okay as long as the aim is to achieve their objective which is 'Pure Islam' free from all kinds of innovations....

    Whether it is to declare Shias as Kuffaar or the Sufis as Kuffaar or the taking over of Masjid Al Haraam in 1979 or the recent bombing in Madinah Munawarra (City of the Prophet), we Muslims need to understand where does this fault lie in us so we can counter it...

    The aim for this thread is NOT TO HAVE LONG DISCUSSIONS AND DEBATES as generally happens with threads. I am just sharing this information so you may read, understand and then accept or reject is up to you.

    Hope this benefits and Eid Mubarak to all of you and your families.

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Spending money on militarism- by Muslim or Non Muslim countries - to counter violent attacks done in the name of Islam will do no good as long as the ideology that nourishes such intolerant interpretation will continue to exist. This is exactly what Shaykh Hakim Murad explains below.

    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists


    By Sh. Abdal Hakim Murad


    As New York turns its gap-toothed face to the sky, wondering if the worst is yet to come, Muslims, largely unheeded by the wider world, are counting the cost of the suicide bombings. The backlash against mosques and hijabs has been met by statements from Muslim communities around the globe, some stilted, but others which have clearly found an articulate and passionate voice for the first time. In comparison with the pathetic near-silence that hovered around mosques and major organisations during the Rushdie and Gulf War debacles, the communities now seem alert to their cultural situation and its potential precariousness. Many of the condemnations have been more impressive than those of the American President, who seems unable to rise above clichés.


    The motives are twofold. Firstly, and most patently, Sunni Muslims have been brought up in a universe of faith that renders the taking of innocent lives unimaginable. By condemning the attacks, we know that we defend the indispensable essence of Islam. Secondly, Muslims as well as others have died in large numbers. The Friday Prayers in the World Trade Centre always attracted more than 1,500 worshippers from the office community, many of whom have now surely died. The tourists, who spent their last moments choking on the observation deck, waiting for the helicopters that never came, no doubt included many Muslim parents and their children.

    But the Western powers and their fearful Muslim minorities, both battered so grievously by recent events, now need to think beyond press-releases and ritual cursings. We need to recognise, firstly, that there has been a steady ‘mission-creep’ in terrorist attacks over the past twenty years. Hijackings for ransom money gave way to parcel bombs, then to suicide bombs, and now to kiloton-range urban mayhem. It is not at all clear that this escalation will be terminated by further anti-terrorist legislation, further billions for the FBI, or retina scans at Terminal Three. America’s tendency to assume that money can buy or destroy any possible obstacle to its will now stands under a dark shadow. Far from being a climax and the catalyst for a hi-tech military solution, the attacks may be of more historical significance as an announcement to the militant subculture that a Star-Wars superpower is utterly vulnerable to a handful of lightly-armed young men. There could well be more and worse to come.


    Sobered by this, the State Department is likely to come under pressure from business interests to ask the question it never seems to notice. Why is there so much hatred of the United States, and so much yearning to poke it in the eye? Are the architects of policy sane in their certainty that America can enrage large numbers of people, but contain that rage forever through satellite technology and intrepid double-agents? Businessmen and bankers will now start to read carefully enough to discern that it is not US national interest, but the power of the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee, that tends to drive Washington’s policy in the world’s greatest troublespot. Threatened with disaster, corporate America may just prove powerful enough to face AIPAC down, and suggest, firmly, that the next time Israel asks Washington to veto the UN’s desire to send observers to Hebron, it pauses to consider where its own interests might lie.


    Among Muslims, the longer-term aftershock will surely take the form of a crisis among ‘moderate Wahhabis’. Even if a Middle-Eastern connection is somehow disproved, they cannot deny forever that doctrinal extremism can lead to political extremism. They must realise that it is traditional Islam, the only possible alternative to their position, which owns rich resources for the respectful acknowledgement of difference within itself, and with unbelievers. The lava-stream that flows from Ibn Taymiyya, whose fierce xenophobia mirrored his sense of the imminent Mongol threat to Islam, has a habit of closing minds and hardening hearts. It is true that not every committed Wahhabi is willing to kill civilians to make a political point. However it is also true that no orthodox Sunni has ever been willing to do so. One of the unseen, unsung triumphs of true Islam in the modern world is its complete freedom from any terroristic involvement. Maliki ulama do not become suicide-bombers. No-one has ever heard of Sufi terrorism. Everyone, enemies included, knows that the very idea is absurd.


    Two years ago, Shaykh Hisham Kabbani of the Islamic Supreme Council of America, warned of the dangers of mass terrorism to American cities; and he was brushed aside as a dangerous alarmist. Muslim organisations are no doubt beginning to regret their treatment of him. The movement for traditional Islam will, we hope, become enormously strengthened in the aftermath of the recent events, accompanied by a mass exodus from Wahhabism, leaving behind only a merciless hardcore of well-financed zealots. Those who have tried to take over the controls of Islam, after reading books from we-know-where, will have to relinquish them, because we now know their destination.


    When that happens, or perhaps even sooner, mainstream Islam will be able to make the loud declaration in public that it already feels in its heart: that terrorists are not Muslims. Targeting civilians is a negation of every possible school of Sunni Islam. Suicide bombing is so foreign to the Quranic ethos that the Prophet Samson is entirely absent from our scriptures. Islam is a great world religion that has produced much of the world’s most sensitive art, architecture and literature, and has a rich life of ethics, missionary work, and spirituality. Such are the real, and historically-successful, weapons of Islam, because they are the instruments that make friends of our neighbours, instead of enemies fit for burning alive. Those that refuse them, out of cultural impotence or impatience, will in the longer term be perceived as so radical in their denial of what is necessarily known to be part of Islam, that the authorities of the religion are likely to declare them to be beyond its reach. If that takes place, then future catastrophes by Wahhabi ultras will have little impact on the image of communities, whose spokesmen can simply say that Muslims were not implicated. This is the approach taken by Christian churches when confronted by, say, the Reverend Jim Jones’s suicide cult, or the Branch Davidians at Waco. Only a radical amputation of this kind will save Islam’s name, and the physical safety of Muslims, particularly women, as they live and work in Western cities.


    To conclude: there is much despair, but there are also grounds for hope. The controls of two great vehicles, the State Department, and Islam, need to be reclaimed in the name of sanity and humanity. It is always hard to accept that good might come out of evil; but perhaps only a catastrophe on this scale, so desolating, and so seemingly hopeless, could provide the motive and the space for such a reclamation.

    Addendum

    Although the response from Muslims in the UK seems to have been very favourable to my essay, with one or two requests that it be sent to national newspapers for reprinting on their pages, it is inevitable that under pressure from real or potential rioters and cross-burners, some Muslims consider premature any attempt to begin a debate among ourselves about the cultural and doctrinal foundations of extremism.


    It is true that no convictions have been secured, and that in the Shari’a suspects are innocent until proven guilty. However it is also regrettably the case that these suspects will not be tried under Shari’a law, and that we need, in the absence of a traditional framework of accusation and assessment, to hold our own discussions. This is particularly urgent in this case, since the damage to the honour of Islam, and the physical safety of innocent Muslims, in the West and in Central Asia and elsewhere, is very considerable. We Muslims are now at ‘ground zero’. As such, we cannot simply ignore the duty to ask each other what has caused the attitudes that probably, but not indisputably, lie at the root of these events.


    My essay, which endeavoured to kick-start this debate, takes its cue primarily from the UK situation, which is no doubt less intense than in the US, but is nonetheless serious. In particular I am concerned to insist that Muslims distance themselves from, for instance, the janaza prayer for the hijackers that was held two days ago at a London Wahhabi mosque (the term Wahhabi is more useful, since ‘Salafi’ can also refer to the Abduh-Rida reformism and is hence confusing). Having spoken to the editor of one of this country’s major Muslim magazines, it is clear that the small minority of voices which have been raised in support of the terrorist act were in every case of the Wahhabi persuasion. Clearly, we cannot simply ignore this on grounds of ‘Muslim unity’, since those people appear so determined to destroy Muslim unity, and endanger the security of our community.


    I hope that the recent events will spur Muslims to consider the implications for the wider ethos in which we understand our religion of the shift which we have witnessed over the past twenty years or so away from accommodationist and tolerant forms of Islam, and towards narrowmindedness. Al-Ghazali recommends a tolerant view of non-Muslims, and is prepared to grant that many of them may be saved in the next world; Ibn Taymiya, as Muhammad Memon has shown in his book on him, is vehement and adversarial. In our communities in the West, and indeed worldwide, we surely need the Ghazalian approach, not the rigorism of Ibn Taymiya. Not just because we need to reassure our neighbours, but also because we need to reassure those very many born Muslims who are made unsure about their attachment to Islam by events such as this that they can belong to the religion without being harsh and narrow-minded. Extremism can drive people right out of Islam. In 1999 the Conference of French Catholic bishops announced that 300 Algerians were among the year’s Easter baptisms. Noting that ten years earlier Muslims never converted at all, they reported that the change was the result of the spread of extreme forms of Islam in Algeria.


    In Afghanistan, too, there are now Christians for the first time ever, and I have heard from one ex-Taliban member that this is because of the extremism with which Islam is imposed on the people. The shift away from traditional Islam, and towards Ibn Taymiya’s position, has been widely documented, for instance by Ahmad Rashid, in his chapter ‘Challenging Islam’, in his book on the Taliban. The Saudi-Wahhabi connection has been very conspicuous.


    We must ask Allah to open the hearts of the Muslims everywhere to recognise that narrow mindedness and mutual anathema will lead us nowhere, and that only through spirituality, toleration and wisdom will we be granted success.


    The most appropriate du’a’ for our situation would seem to be: ‘Ya Hayyu Ya Qayyum, bi-rahmatika astaghiith’, which is recommended in a hadith in cases of fear and misfortune. It means: ‘O Living, O Self-Subsistent; by Your mercy I seek help.’

    http://masud.co.uk/recapturing-islam...he-terrorists/
    Last edited by syed_z; 07-06-2016 at 07:01 PM.
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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    "ISIS is a true product of Salafism, and we must deal with it with full transparency." says Sheikh 'Aadel Al-Kalbani, former Imam of the Grand Mosque in Mecca

    "ISIS is a true product of Salafism, and we must deal with it with full transparency." This statement was made not by liberal Muslim elements, who regularly criticize Salafism, but by Sheikh 'Aadel Al-Kalbani, former imam of the Grand Mosque in Mecca and a Salafi himself, hence its importance. Al-Kalbani is not the first Salafi to come out against ISIS – other Saudis have condemned the organization's conduct and operations – but Al-Kalbani has gone farther in his criticism: he has come out against the principles of the Salafi perception from which ISIS and its ilk draw, and has called for a rationalistic approach to Islam's distant past and what it means for Islam today instead of a blind reenactment of it.



    In two articles in the Saudi government daily Al-Riyadh, Al-Kalbani criticized elements in the Salafi stream for appropriating the truth and Islam and for permitting the killing of their opponents, and likewise criticized clerics and society that dared not come out against them. He stated that the call to blindly reenact the path of the Prophet Muhammad and of the forefathers of Islam stems from a faulty grasp of the essence of this path, and that Muhammad himself had rejected blind adoption of the perceptions of the past and blind following of the path of his predecessors, choosing instead a rationalistic approach appropriate for a changing reality. Al-Kalbani stated that clerics must take their heads out of the sand and move with the spirit of the times instead of rejecting and condemning any new idea.



    This is not the first time that Al-Kalbani has challenged the mainstream Saudi clerics. He has harshly attacked suicide bombings, [1] published a fatwa permitting poetry,[2] and called for allowing women to drive cars.[3]
    The following are translated excerpts from his two recent articles in Al-Riyadh:

    Sheikh 'Aadel Al-Kalbani (source: Assabile.com)



    "ISIS Is A True Product Of Salafism And We Must Deal With It With Full Transparency"



    On August 15, 2014, Sheikh Al-Kalbani tweeted (@abuabdelelah): "ISIS is a true product of Salafism and we must deal with it with full transparency."

    This statement sparked reactions across the social networks, and 10 days later, on August 24, Al-Kalbani wrote in an Al-Riyadh article titled "Is Terrorism A Salafi Product?": "Every time we see the fitna network sweeping up young people from among our sons... [and pitching them into]to a very deep abyss from which they will emerge only by means of idioms that drip blood, our conscience torments us and we wonder: From whence has this come upon us? How have they fallen into this? As if we could not do a thing before then.


    "But the opposite is true: The main reason for their deviation is our neglect – and by 'our' neglectI mean the [neglect of the]generation of the parents, and of the honorable members of society among the clerics, teachers, preachers, jurisprudents, and sociologists who are linked directly to that society. The words, the books, the sermons, the dramas, and all the artistic creativity and the essential link [to the audience] that these people present in all the media, whether print, radio, or television, [allow them] to monitorthe ideas of the young people and to participate in balancing them. I exclude [of course] that tiniest of minorities whose throat is parched from warning about the extremismof theSalafis.


    "Yes, this is the plant that has sprouted in the garbage dump of those who excessively pass judgment on others and pretend to represent Salafism. How gravely they have accused others of apostasy, of deviating from the right path, of heresy, and of licentiousness – as if the arena lies openbefore them and there is nobody to condemn them and no judge to punish them. Furthermore, they are received with feigned respect and admiration, and opportunities have been opened to them to plant in the minds of our young people that this one has gone astray and that one is an infidel and the other one is lax in religion. Even the greatest of clerics, past and present, are not spared their arrows. They spread the principles of Islam in a twisted manner that makes them incomprehensible or distorted, and preserve things that negate Islam. They measure the judge, the educated, and the student, and even the simple folk by what they [i.e. these extremists] have learned by heart [but] do not understand, and think that they are entitled to rule that the above mentioned are apostates and to call down upon themthe punishments of Allah that are no longer implemented and [by so doing, they think that they will] restore the glory and splendor of monotheism.


    "This group thinks that no one but itself and its supporters are the source of good and the defenders of monotheism – because [its members] imbibed with their mothers' milk [the view] that all Muslims worldwide do not understand [monotheism] and that they are not worshipping only Allah but are polytheists whoworship graves... and that there are no just clerics besides their own clerics and their disciples. [They think that] only a cleric whom they love, whom they heed and obey, and on whose say they reject or validate [others] – only he holds the truth and acts in accordance with the ways of [Islam's]just forefathers... They spread out and multiply, andpublicly call for following in the footsteps of some sheikh and for accepting his words in full. They have begun to classify people, preachers, and clerics – [for example,] this sheikh shouldn't be listened to because he is more loathsome than the Jews and the Christians, and that fatwa deviates [from the right path], so it is forbidden topray behind anyone who adopts it, or to sit with him, eat with him or respect him. They have begun... to separate the young people from the clerics who understand the result of [this activity by them] and what difficulties they are going to cause the nation.


    "Actually, there is no connection between the path of these extremists and the [true] path of the Salafis – which is tolerance, compassion, and gentleness, and in which there is no place for extremism and [religious] fanaticism. [Salafism] is a path that spreads love, brotherhood, and acceptance of the other among Muslims and coexistence with non-Muslims. But the thing is to understand it and to implement it – and not [just to] pretend [to do so] – in a way that is compatible with the deep roots of the past and with the demands of the present.


    "[However,] what is needed is a perception for reforming ideas, not admonitions, reproof, reactions and word-sparing that deal with the symptom and ignore the disease! There is still enough time to rehabilitate [these ideas], ideologically and practically, and to prevent society from splitting into sects and groups that throng after dignitaries who are enveloped in an aura of immunity [to sin and error] and sanctity, with each group thinking that it has the right to guide the nation and recruit its young people.


    "A plant is always like its roots. If we want a good, fruitful plant, it is incumbent upon everyoneto care forits roots, its water sources, the spread of its branches, and the fertility of the earth[from which it grows], and to protect it from ideas and viruses that turn its fruit and seeds to poison from which the generations sip and on which the young people grow up; from [these seeds] sprouts a plant that has in it no place for compassion and to whom love and friendship are totally alien."


    "We Remain Trapped In The Dungeons Of The Very Distant Past"; We Should "Rely On The Past As A Foundation" For Building The Present And Future, Not Destroying Them



    On August 31, 2014, Al-Kalbani published another article, "The Chains of the Past," in which he criticized the Salafism that advocates uncritical reliance on Islam's past, and called for a rationalistic critical approach. He wrote: "We never stop elevating the past at any cost, so much so that it has taken over our lives and thwarted our management of our present, and I do not know what it will do to our future. We claim that the past is the perception, the deeds, and the outlook of the forefathers [of Islam], to the point where if a catastrophe happens to one of us, he hastens to seek a solution for his catastrophe in a book written hundreds of years ago! And then we shout loudly, 'Islam is compatible with every time and every place[!]'


    "What is very strange is that we remain trapped in the dungeons of the very distant past, chewing over the words of Malik [bin Anas[4]], may the peace of Allah be upon him,'The last of this ummah will not be successful unless they followthe same [pattern] that was successful in the hands of its first ones,' and think that what it means is that we must remain in the first century of the era of the mission [of the Prophet Muhammad], in the same style of life, and in the same patterns and knowledge that he had.


    "From these words [of Malik bin Anas] I do not understand that our past [must] control our present and constrain our future; rather, I understand that [the past] is what caused the Prophet's honorable Companions to change their perception, and brought about their wonderful transition from the caves of darkness and straying into the light of truth... What improved the situation of the first generation [of Islam] was not preserving the heritage of the forefathers and the ideas of the previous generations, but the complete opposite. The first generation [of Islam] abandoned the [pattern] of blind imitation, and with the descent [ofKoran 96:1] 'Recite in the name of your Lord,' the use of the mindbegan, after it was neglected for many centuries; the wagon of change began to move and to shift the bitter reality full of oppression, backwardness, and idolatry with lofty and clear rational truths. They [the members of the first generation] opened their eyes to what had [always] been in front of them, but which the fog of imitating what their forefathers did had prevented them from seeing... until the honored Koran arrived and removed this fog and enabled them to see what they had been blind to, and to distinguish what they had not noticed [before].


    "In the same spirit, I want the past to free us from the yoke of the backwards present – not drag us towards it. I want our past to make us see reality as it is, and for us to rely on it in the areas of development and culture, and for us to emerge from it with momentum towards the horizons of the future and with an enlightened perception. This [should be done] under the direction ofthe two revelations [the Koran and the Sunna] – and not by means of the opinions of people who have invested most of their efforts in studying that era [of early Islam].


    "We should rely on the past as a foundation from which we head out to the future and to the building of the present; this is better than turning the past into [something] that binds our hands and arouses among us rivalry, conflict, and opinions for which we fight and as a result of which we weaken and splinter. Had we done this [from the outset],we would be sitting on the throne of the pinnacle of culture.


    "We must acknowledge that our past contains things that are not compatible with our present. The religious collapse of the West happened only after it becamefully aware of the depth of the yawning chasm between the scientific knowledge that serves the culture that the human mind has attained and the religious beliefs and laws set out by the church, which included beliefs that had been distorted or misunderstood, or were not appropriate for every time.


    "From among those who call for absolute adherence to the past there has emerged a young generation that defends and fights for opinions and ways that are devoid of the [the correct] Islamic concepts and religious views that can guide the ummah in the right direction. This gang, that has granted itself the right to banish minds, has not grasped the situation of the ummah, and has not managed to adapt to [today's reality]; therefore its path is to subdue the other or to accuse him of apostasy and of deviating from the right path. [These people] can be found in all walks of life,preventing men of insight from advancing and catching up to the present, and anyone who criticizes them and points out their mistakes is accused of being Khawarij[5] – an accusation tailored for such [critics]. Anyone who talks about women's rights is deviating from the right path andis loathsome and is lax in religion. Anyone who expresses a wise opinion that has been covered upand ignoredbecause it contradicts their Salafism, is going against the vast majority of the people... and so on...


    "What is strange is that these radical extremists who accuse their opponents of heresy and of apostasy acknowledge neitherthe stagnation of their own perception and ideas northe worthlessness of their religious law, and thus do not recognize that they have left seeds that are today inflicting suffering and torment on the ummah."


    Endnotes:

    [1] See MEMRI Special Dispatch No. 3728, Saudi Sheikh: One Who Kills Himself and Others in Order to Win the Virgins of Paradise Is Not a Martyr but a Suicide; Only the Truly Virtuous Will Gain Paradise, April 1, 2011.

    [2] See MEMRI Special Dispatch No. 4215, Political Poem By Saudi Prince Triggers Public Debate In Kingdom, March 5, 2013.

    [3] See MEMRI Inquiry & Analysis No. 1029, Saudi Activists Renew Campaign For Women's Driving, October 23, 2013.

    [4] Cleric (d. 795) and the founder of the Maliki school of thought, one of the four in Sunni Islam.

    [5] Derogatory term referring to a rebel cult in early Islam that split off from the army of Ali ibn Abi Talib at the Battle of Siffin in 657.


    http://www.memri.org/report/en/0/0/0...8205.htm#_edn1
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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Greetings,

    We must acknowledge that our past contains things that are not compatible with our present. The religious collapse of the West happened only after it becamefully aware of the depth of the yawning chasm between the scientific knowledge that serves the culture that the human mind has attained and the religious beliefs and laws set out by the church, which included beliefs that had been distorted or misunderstood, or were not appropriate for every time.
    This sounds like reforming talk to me. This is one of the first times I've heard a Muslim talk like this, and I think it's a very good thing, even though it may prove controversial.

    Peace
    Last edited by czgibson; 07-07-2016 at 01:09 AM.
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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    reformation is nothing new bro

    Science, is still a baby that is learning Qur'an.

    Scimi
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists


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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    (In the Name of God, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful)


    Quote Originally Posted by czgibson View Post
    Greetings,

    This sounds like reforming talk to me. This is one of the first times I've heard a Muslim talk like this, and I think it's a very good thing, even though it may prove controversial.

    Peace
    I really admire and respect Sheikh Abdal Hakim Murad and I have benefited from some of his lectures available online. To be honest, I don't think it is reform talk; it is merely doing what Muslims are already permitted within shariah but to which certain conservative segments of the Muslim population have shown sharp resistance due to the tunnel vision that mistakenly equates any taking of action in that direction to changing God's laws as previous nations (Jews and Christians) without seeing the larger picture that that permitting societal norms to dictate some specific understandings within shariah is about (a) making the rational choice permitted in the Quran, and (b) is about governing peoples with both justice and mercy which is the purpose of shariah, and (c) having the wider people's unique needs met as the honored creation of Allah, all without compromising the integrity of Islamic law or understanding of immutability of shariah as the body of divine law that guides a God-conscious Muslims's choices throughout his/her life. The aforesaid character of societal norm informing legal understanding is not to be confused with making the haram (forbidden) halal (sanctioned) in shariah or vice versa, which falls under the category of impermissible divinely cursed behavior such as suddenly saying that Islam permits sexual behaviors associated with and in homosexuality or lesbianism when it clearly does not. Also, the article, "Viewpoint: Door of Ijtihad is Open" that Shaykh Hisham Kabbani authored explains the concept of Islamic law allowing adaptation and change within the Islamic heritage of interpretation. To understand the context of how Islamic law allows societal norm to dictate some specific understandings in shariah, I'd like to also quote an excerpted portion of the text, "Understanding Islamic Law":

    Adaptation to Societal Norms

    Khalid Muhammad writes:
    Muslim jurists in the past were quite aware of the constant need to reconcile contradictions between social and legal norms. They continuously adjusted laws to bring them in line with the customs and norms of the people. The normative basis of the institutions and concepts such as family, property, rights, responsibility, criminality, civil obedience, social order, religiosity, international relations, war, peace, and citizenship have changed significantly over the last two centuries.[63]

    Iman Shāfiī, the founder of one of the four schools of thought, he was living in Bagdhad when he put forth his school of thought as Imām Abū Ħanīfa and Imām Mālik before him. Imām Shāfiī came in the 2nd century of hijri and established his school of thought in Baghdad 1250 years ago Hijri. When he moved from Baghdad to Egypt in the last years of his life, he changed his school of thought. He said, “I saw people more corrupted in Egypt then from Baghdad. So what I wrote previously and explained is insufficient to treat these corrupted people because I was more lenient. Now I have to be more strict. So I have to change [my rulings].”

    Shah Waliullah expounded the theory of evolution of society in four stages and found that social norms played a central role in the evolution of laws.[64]
    Ibn Abidin is a well-known Syrian Ħanafī jurist from the late Ottoman period. He wrote a short treatise on urf [custom] and its position in Islamic law” (Ibn Abidin 1884), explaining the validity of urf as a source of Shariah laws. He distinguished between two types of texts: Shariah and jurist law (fiqh). In case of conflict between a custom or usage and the Shariah text, Ibn Abidin rejected only those customs which were absolutely contradictory. In case of conflict with a jurist law text, the custom prevailed as a principle.[65]

    One can see this principle employed extensively today. Kamali mentions that “…jurists have gone on record in recent years to issue a verdict (fatwā) to declare photography permissible in this light. This is because photography has now become a ubiquitous practice among Muslims everywhere.”[66]

    In another paper, Kamali writes:

    Mālik is the chief source of the two important doctrines of public interest (maslaħa) and blocking the means (šad aļ-ļarā’i), both of which are eminently rational and rely mainly on personal reasoning. Maliki jurisprudence also attempted to forge a closer link with the practicalities of life in Medina and attached greater weight to social customs than other jurists did. [67]
    Last edited by Search; 07-07-2016 at 05:25 AM.

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Greetings and peace be with you syed,

    So much injustice has already happened, an eye for an eye and a death for a death is allowable. Instead of one blind person, there are now two, instead of one dead person, there are now two, but where does this end?

    The only solution is mercy, forgiveness, and letting go the right to justice, this is the most extreme form of any religion.

    We are not in a position to make judgements on terrorists, 150,000 deaths and a million refugees from Iraq, that is too much suffering. Can anyone here truthfully say that if they saw themselves, or their family as innocent victims in Iraq, that they would not take justice into their own hands, if no justice was available.

    They need as a leader, someone who has suffered a great loss, someone who is willing to lead by example and talk mercy, forgiveness and the need to rebuild a country, another Mandela or Ghandi. We pray that our God will forgive us our sins, so too, there is the need to forgive others, we should strive to be like God.

    We can only pray for them and send aid.

    In the spirit of praying for mercy and forgiveness.

    Eric
    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    You will never look into the eyes of anyone who does not matter to God.

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    My first question after reading the long posts. And having to read again the question after trying to remember what was said.

    Epic failure!

    Do you think islam is terrorism?

    Why do we need to recapture it back? I could pay some white people and have them say they are white supremists and plant these people around the world and just be a general menace to society and have the media painting something totally radical.

    Why would islam want to kill each other off if it wasn't for Syaitaan's work. I would not say which group of people are.responsible for this. We have been manipulated to the point of believing that we vause this.

    It is the outside interferences, planned from millenia past to derail Allah's message.

    It is the MEDIA that paints the two words side by side. We do not have to accede to that. They know the facts. But they remain shouting the same thing where we start to talk like them. That's what everybody believes only because that is what they keep saying.

    We don't have to take anything back from them. Just have to make a stand against them. But individually, what can we do?

    So if the media can have their way, soon it will be ISIS is Islam. .

    Would we have to take islam back from ISIS?

    Long winded way of saying that i find something a bit off with the OP


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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    As long as my heart does beat, I shall live, not lie
    For when my heart does stop its beat, with truth, I die.

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    This is an incredibly interesting thread, and at least half of my reason for posting this is so I will get updates in my feed when people continue posting to it. I'm going to read back over everything and continue to see what else everyone has to say, for now I have just one thing to point out as a Protestant Christian looking in from the outside.

    I look back on the Peace of Westphalia, and a good century-plus of gradual progression from there, as a crucial turning point in the way that Christianity and government existed alongside each other. As far as I've been able to gather so far (and perhaps my opinions will change or develop from this starting point), Islam needs to have a major Westphalian kind of situation, not universally or everywhere but in MENA and central Asia. It won't happen overnight, this type of thing never does, but there does need to be a comparable watershed event that leads down a similar sort of path when it comes to the relationship between religion and government. This is not to say that these regions need to adopt Western philosophy and government practices in toto or exactly as they are here- I will point out, however, that much of the philosophy that underpins the present situation in the West was inspired by thinkers and writers who were not exactly from the West, and then something else took off from there. These are some regions that need to develop something that is their own, but of course there are some general outcomes that the rest of the world hopes will result from that work.

    With that being said, here is what I want to point out. As the Peace of Westphalia was being discussed, hammered out, and agreed to, the main people responsible for creating and implementing the thing were not churchmen, they were rulers. Kings, princes, heads of state. The purpose of their work was to bring about a cessation of hostilities and change their situation so that the Wars of Religion could come to an end, and so people wouldn't keep dying in an endless struggle. As of that moment, it was pretty much just Catholic and Protestant rulers who were coming to this agreement.

    What a lot of people don't realize- and this is something that I think is incredibly important- is that the churchmen at that time were not all on board with this. Pope Innocent X, the leader of the Catholic Church, held to be a leader acting in the place of Christ and with his authority, a person in a position of power that could and up until recently had raised up and deposed rulers according to the wishes of the Catholic Church, someone accustomed to being in a position where rulers needed to get in line or else risk being removed from power and having their line of succession cut off to their descendants....this guy did not like the Peace of Westphalia. He issued a papal bull (albeit one that is not doctrinally binding and is also not a definitive statement on what the Catholic Church believes as a whole for all time or for any time) stating exactly that. In this bull, he directly addressed the rulers who were bringing the agreement into existence. The bull is called Zelo Domus Dei, and in it he called the Peace of Westphalia "null, void, invalid, iniquitous, unjust, damnable, reprobate, inane, empty of meaning and effect for all time." I will pause here for a moment to remind everyone that he's talking about something that ended the Wars of Religion and allowed Catholics and Protestants to live in relative peace, and not only that, it also gave rise to the modern Westphalian nation-state which continues to essentially constitute the underpinning of exactly what a country is in this world and how it ought to relate to other countries. That is the thing he was condemning with every hateful bone in his body.

    The rulers of Europe ignored him. They were all well aware of Zelo Domus Dei, they were also well aware of how it strictly forbade them from going forward with it. It literally said I, the pope, forbid you, yes you, from doing this thing. But for the first time in the history of Christian Europe, all these rulers ignored him, including and most notably the Catholic ones. They were no less Catholic for doing so (although they easily could have been disciplined), but they ignored their supreme leader in the interest of preserving life and securing peace for their people. The result? The Catholic Church has chosen to forget about this and acts as if it had never happened. It was the good sense of these rulers that put this world-changing thing into practice, and it took the Catholic Church about 300 years to put anything of their own into writing that even tangentially agrees with the substance of this Westphalian doctrine.

    I wish to remind you all of this for one very simple reason. Solutions to this issue might come from high level religious leaders in Islam. Really, they might, it is a lot different from the Catholic Church, after all. But real, workable solutions might also come from people who are not religious leaders, which is not to say they're non-Muslims, only to say they are rulers and not religious leaders at all. Those people might have the answers that you need, and they might need to go ahead and implement them over the objections of those who are the religious leaders, perhaps not all your religious leaders but potentially some very notable ones, possibly ones that have something to do with you. I don't know exactly how likely that is, but it could happen and it's something that has happened.

    Everyone see what I'm saying? This is the main point that I want to get across at this time. I'm not sure how everyone here feels about the Westphalian outcome in general, but I may be finding out in just a minute.
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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    yes, lets do this. Blame one group of individuals under the bus and redeem ourselves.

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Quote Originally Posted by greenhill View Post
    My first question after reading the long posts. And having to read again the question after trying to remember what was said.

    Epic failure!

    Do you think islam is terrorism?

    Why do we need to recapture it back? I could pay some white people and have them say they are white supremists and plant these people around the world and just be a general menace to society and have the media painting something totally radical.

    Why would islam want to kill each other off if it wasn't for Syaitaan's work. I would not say which group of people are.responsible for this. We have been manipulated to the point of believing that we vause this.

    It is the outside interferences, planned from millenia past to derail Allah's message.

    It is the MEDIA that paints the two words side by side. We do not have to accede to that. They know the facts. But they remain shouting the same thing where we start to talk like them. That's what everybody believes only because that is what they keep saying.

    We don't have to take anything back from them. Just have to make a stand against them. But individually, what can we do?

    So if the media can have their way, soon it will be ISIS is Islam. .

    Would we have to take islam back from ISIS?

    Long winded way of saying that i find something a bit off with the OP


    I think the leaders in the mid east need to do something about Isis - It falls on there shoulders - Its ultimately a political issue that is going to engulf the entire region unless the leaders in the mid east wake up.
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Do you think the pious don't sin?

    They merely:
    Veiled themselves and didn't flaunt it
    Sought forgiveness and didn't persist
    Took ownership of it and don't justify it
    And acted with excellence after they had erred - Ibn al-Qayyim

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Greetings and peace be with you Zafran;
    I think the leaders in the mid east need to do something about Isis - It falls on there shoulders - Its ultimately a political issue that is going to engulf the entire region unless the leaders in the mid east wake up.
    Ultimately, the solution comes from God, possibly millions of people would need to be merciful and forgive their neighbours, in order to find some kind of peace and reconciliation. The following is a story from the forgiveness project, a Palestinian and an Israeli..............


    Ghazi Briegeith, a Palestinian electrician living in Hebron, and Rami Elhanan, an Israeli graphic designer from Jerusalem, met through The Parents Circle – a group of bereaved families supporting reconciliation and peace. Ghazi’s brother was killed at a checkpoint in 2000. Rami’s 14-year-old daughter was the victim of a suicide bombing in Jerusalem in 1997.

    Rami

    I was on my way to the airport when my wife called and told me Smadar was missing. When something like this happens a cold hand grabs your heart. You rush between friends’ houses and hospitals, then eventually you find yourself in the morgue and you see a sight you’ll never forget for the rest of your life. From that moment you are a new person. Everything is different.

    At first I was tormented with anger and grief; I wanted revenge, to get even. But we are people – not animals! I asked myself, “Will killing someone else release my pain?” Of course not. It was clear to my wife and I that the blame rests with the occupation. The suicide bomber was a victim just like my daughter, grown crazy out of anger and shame.

    I don’t forgive and I don’t forget, but when this happened to my daughter I had to ask myself whether I’d contributed in any way. The answer was that I had – my people had, for ruling, dominating and oppressing three-and-a-half million Palestinians for 35 years. It is a sin and you pay for sins.

    At first I foolishly thought I could just go back to work and resume my life, but the pain was unbearable. Then, a year later, I met Ytzhak Frankenthal, the founder of the Parents’ Circle. He was wearing a ‘kippah’ on his head, and immediately I stereotyped him as an ‘Arab eater’. Even when he told me his personal story, and about the reconciliation work of Parents’ Circle, I was very cynical.

    He invited me to a meeting, and reluctantly I went along, just to take a look. I saw buses full of people, among them legends – parents who had lost kids in wars and who still wanted peace. I saw an Arab lady in a long black dress. On her chest was a picture of a six-year-old kid. A singer sang in Hebrew and Arabic, and suddenly I was hit by lightening. I can’t explain it, but from that moment I had a reason to get up in the morning again.

    Since then my work with the Parents’ Circle has become the centre of my life, a sacred mission. If we – Ghazi and I – can talk and stand together after paying the highest price possible, then anyone can. There is a high wall between our two nations, a wall of hate and fear. Someone needs to put cracks in the wall in order for it to fall down.

    Ghazi

    You need a ticket to belong to the Parents’ Circle – the ticket is to have lost a member of your close family. This means Rami and I are brothers of pain.

    My own brother was killed in 2000 at the beginning of the Intifada. I’d been with him just minutes before he died. As I was walking home I heard a shot. I found out later he’d been stopped and searched at the checkpoint. When he protested, the soldier shouted, “Shut your mouth, or I’ll shoot you, you son of a *****,” to which my brother replied: “YOU son of a *****!” So the soldier shot him. It was a machine gun in a kid’s hand. Sometimes the power makes them mad.

    At first I was completely out of my mind – crazy with grief. There should be no forgiveness for the killers of innocents, and yet even then I saw the soldier as a victim of the occupation just as my brother was, just as I am still. But forgiveness is a very personal thing. Even if I choose to forgive the person who killed my brother, I can’t force my brother’s kids to forgive. But I can show them that far more valuable than a violent response, is opening your heart to reconciliation and peace. I can show them that opening a new page is their only hope of living a better life than ours.

    The Palestinians have nothing left to lose, so the Israelis must realise that they are destroying their own nation by causing so much suffering. You don’t need to love each other to build a bridge between the two nations: you need respect. If I can stand with my Jewish brother Rami, respecting him as he respects me, then there is hope.

    http://theforgivenessproject.com/sto...lhanan-israel/

    If you found these stories interesting, click on the link for more, there are pictures of real people with more stories of forgiveness.

    In the spirit of praying for a merciful and forgiving world.

    Eric
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    You will never look into the eyes of anyone who does not matter to God.

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    syed_z's Avatar
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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric H View Post
    We are not in a position to make judgements on terrorists, 150,000 deaths and a million refugees from Iraq, that is too much suffering. Can anyone here truthfully say that if they saw themselves, or their family as innocent victims in Iraq, that they would not take justice into their own hands, if no justice was available.
    Greeting Eric,

    I very much agree what you're saying and where you're coming from.

    The purpose of creating this thread is to mention what is the cause of religious fanaticism that exists in the Muslim World. Unless we don't understand and determine the cause we cannot fix it, or at least try to fix it.

    I'm not only who says that, but the leading scholars of the Muslims world are saying this and even those who adhere to the Salafi thought like Sheikh Adel Kalbanis (Please refer to the 2nd post). Even they have been forced to come out and speak against those who are causing this ruckus for the sake of implementing 'Pure Islam'.

    Their actions are leading us towards a dead end. The 150,000 deaths that you mention and much more that have taken place across Muslim world were not all done by Western Military intervention. Majority of those are committed by Muslim hands. The question is what is causing that Muslim hand to commit such acts?

    The recent bomber in Madinah or the 1979 take over of Makkah, the suicide bombings across the Muslim world and the extermination of those who do not adhere to the point of view of a particular group, were not done by individuals whose families were being tortured. They were and continue to be done in the name of 'Striving for Pure Islam' by confused minds who think they are doing True Jihad (Struggle in the way of God to bring goodness)

    The Prophet (SallAllahu Alaihi Wassallam) said 'A time will come when the tongue will be sharper than a sword.'

    All it does is to give a religious ruling (Fatwa) by a religious authority to confuse enough the people's minds that results in extreme actions.

    It is a very defeatest mentality when we Muslims say that 'West or Israel is responsible for our destruction' ...while completely turning a blind eye towards destructive elements within the Muslim world.

    Religion is a very powerful and emotional tool. It can be used as a tool to manipulate the minds of individuals, especially young ones and make them believe what they are doing is completely inline with what Allah (swt) and His Prophet (SallAllahu Alaihi Wassallam) has taught.

    ISIS and groups like AL Qaida or TTP in Pakistan, were not formed overnight. It is a thought process that has its roots back in the 18th century in the province of Najd. A part about which the Prophet (SallAllahu Alaihi Wassallam) himself warned that from there will appear the Horn of Satan.

    The Prophet (s.w.s.) mentioned: “O Allah, give us baraka in our Syria, O Allah, give us baraka in our Yemen.” They said: “And in our Najd?” and he said: “O Allah, give us baraka in our Syria, O Allah, give us baraka in our Yemen.” They said: “And in our Najd?” and I believe that he said the third time: “In that place are earthquakes, and seditions, and in that place shall rise the devil’s horn [qarn al-shaytan].”’

    Qarn also means an Age or Time. Meaning an age in which Muslims coming from that part of the land (Najd) will be adhering to something which will be more harmful than beneficial and which they will not realize.

    I want to ask my Muslim brothers and sisters, how many times have you heard about a Maliki Suicide bomber or a Sha'afi Suicidal attacker or Al Qaida or ISIS adhering to the concept of Sufis and the Imams of the past? How many times have we heard that the extremists have emerged from the Sufis of the Qadiri Order?
    The traditional Sunni Islam or Sufis never propagate such interpretation which is bound to produce extremist mindset, a mindset that produces hatred towards any one who opposes them.

    It is plain and clear as to which Ideology almost all of these individuals adhere to and as a Muslim we need to point them out and counter in whatever way we can. Thats what the scholars are doing in the first 2 posts I made. If we all don't do our part, in whatever way we can, then it is us Muslims to be blamed for the reemergence of these ideas and as a result such individuals who accept such ideas.


    Shaykh Abdullah Bin Bayyah - a leading Islamic Scholar of North Africa - says ........"The problem is that even if you defeat these ideas militarily by killing the people, if you don't defeat the ideas intellectually, then the ideas will re-emerge." Bin Bayyah, for his part, said he has no illusions that a fatwa will stop the violence overnight. "These people won't suddenly lay down their weapons and come to the peace table," he said. "But in the middle range and the long range, if enough scholars come on board and really begin to address these issues at this level, the level of ideas, it will have an impact, lessening the effects of the radicalization of the youth. But it is going to take time."

    http://www.npr.org/2014/09/25/351277...-isis-violence
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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Greetings and peace be with you syed_z;

    Thank you for a thoughtful response.

    Shaykh Abdullah Bin Bayyah - a leading Islamic Scholar of North Africa - says ........"The problem is that even if you defeat these ideas militarily by killing the people, if you don't defeat the ideas intellectually, then the ideas will re-emerge." Bin Bayyah, for his part, said he has no illusions that a fatwa will stop the violence overnight. "These people won't suddenly lay down their weapons and come to the peace table," he said. "But in the middle range and the long range, if enough scholars come on board and really begin to address these issues at this level, the level of ideas, it will have an impact, lessening the effects of the radicalization of the youth. But it is going to take time."
    I believe it would need some very special scholars to issue fatwas leading to peace and reconciliation. If these scholars and their families had been innocent victims in conflict; and had suffered loss themselves, then they would have to obey the fatwas of peace and reconciliation they are issuing. This would be a powerful witness to their faith.

    I think some of the most powerful messages from the prophet pbuh, were the stories about how he reacted to events in his life.

    If the scholars who were issuing fatwas, were living comfortable lives and had not been affected by the horrors of war, they would simply be preaching. Anything positive is a help, but maybe fatwas issued from a place of comfort, might not be such a powerful witness for peace.

    In the spirit of praying for mercy, forgiveness, peace and reconciliation.

    Eric
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Quote Originally Posted by syed_z View Post
    Asalaam O alaikum....


    I thought this is the most important topic right now, especially as we have experienced an attack in one of Islams holiest city where our blessed Rasool Allah (sAllallahu alaihi wassallam) is buried. Most of us are aware that there was a bombing outside of Madinah Masjid 2 days ago as we approached the end of Ramadaan.

    We as Muslims need to point out and I have pointed out in the past at this forum that we need to realize as to where is this ideology stemming from. Where is this intolerance being generated from within this Ummah. Who are those people who thing they are the only ones who are Ahlal Haqq (people of the truth) while others who have difference with them are all Ahlal Biddah (people of innovation) and then the extreme among them go to such length that it leads them to form groups like ISIS in our age or in the past like the take over of the Grand Mosque of Makkah in 1979 and declare that spilling of innocent Muslim blood is okay as long as the aim is to achieve their objective which is 'Pure Islam' free from all kinds of innovations....
    Wa alaykum salam. Eid Mubarak.

    It's not know who carried out the attacks in Madina. Some analysts also assume that it was done by pro-iranian shiites.
    And there are also groups, which are considered terrorists by some governments, who also comdemned this attack.

    I wish to remind you all of this for one very simple reason. Solutions to this issue might come from high level religious leaders in Islam. Really, they might, it is a lot different from the Catholic Church, after all. But real, workable solutions might also come from people who are not religious leaders, which is not to say they're non-Muslims, only to say they are rulers and not religious leaders at all. Those people might have the answers that you need, and they might need to go ahead and implement them over the objections of those who are the religious leaders, perhaps not all your religious leaders but potentially some very notable ones, possibly ones that have something to do with you. I don't know exactly how likely that is, but it could happen and it's something that has happened.
    This can't happen, and didn't ever happened in modern history, or can you give an example? The leaders of the muslim countries today follow the instructions of the West. In many muslim countries the presidents use the money of the country for their own, having bank accounts abroad with other names or in the name of their sons etc. (like in Afghanistan, Yemen, Libya, Egypt) So they don't even consider their nation. And if a ruler (a president or a king) wants to make a radical change in goverment, they are confronted by the West, like it happened in Algeria in the 90s and in Egypt recently. Do you have an example from modern history in which a muslim ruler could make serious changes, following notable or any scholars?

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Quote Originally Posted by syed_z View Post
    I want to ask my Muslim brothers and sisters, how many times have you heard about a Maliki Suicide bomber or a Sha'afi Suicidal attacker or Al Qaida or ISIS adhering to the concept of Sufis and the Imams of the past? How many times have we heard that the extremists have emerged from the Sufis of the Qadiri Order?
    The traditional Sunni Islam or Sufis never propagate such interpretation which is bound to produce extremist mindset, a mindset that produces hatred towards any one who opposes them.
    Hamas in Palestine also used suicide bombings for a long time, aren't they following the madhab of Imam Shafii (rahimahullah)?

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    From syed_z:I want to ask my Muslim brothers and sisters, how many times have you heard about a Maliki Suicide bomber or a Sha'afi Suicidal attacker or Al Qaida or ISIS adhering to the concept of Sufis and the Imams of the past? How many times have we heard that the extremists have emerged from the Sufis of the Qadiri Order?
    The traditional Sunni Islam or Sufis never propagate such interpretation which is bound to produce extremist mindset, a mindset that produces hatred towards any one who opposes them.
    Sipah-e-Sahaabah (Hanafi, Deobandi, Sufi). Banned in Pakistan. Regarded as a terrorist organisation.

    Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (Hanafi, Deobandi, Sufi). Same.

    Tahreek-e-Taalibaan Pakistan (Hanafi, Deobandi, Sufi). Same.

    Jaysh-e-Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم (Hanafi, Deobandi, Sufi). Same.

    The Haqqani Network (Hanafi, Deobandi, Sufi). Same.

    The Islaamic Movement of Uzbekistan (Hanafi, Deobandi, Sufi). Same.

    Sayyid Qutb, regarded as the "Father of al-Qaa`idah", was a Shaafi`ee, Ash`ari, Sufi. He even believed in Wahdat-ul-Wujood.

    Barelvis (Hanafi, Sufi) have carried out numerous attacks on Deobandi Masaajid, Madaaris over the years. Anyone who has an iota of knowledge of Indo-Pak history knows about the feudal wars between Deoband and Barelvi. In addition to that, there have been - from the Barelvis - those who have killed the Kuffaar who insult Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم. Example: Malik Mumtaz Hussain Qadiri (yes, a Sufi from the "Qadiri Order") killing Salman Taseer. He was locked up, and the Barelvis put up posters in the street, saying "Mumtaz Qadri Is Our Hero", "Taseer got what he deserved", "Malik Mumtaz is the king of Islaam", "gulami e rasool main mout bhi qabool hai", etc. When he was brought in to court, hundreds of lawyers showered him with rose petals. Example #2: Asad Shah, killed on the 24th of March 2016 by Tanveer Ahmed, a member of Dawat-e-Islami (Hanafi, Sufi, Barelvi), due to Asad Shah being a Qadiyani and even claiming to be a "prophet" himself.

    -------------

    Secondly:

    Any attempt or desire to alter/"rationalise"/"improve"/"re-think", etc. the Deen of Islaam, is Kufr. Allaah Ta`aalaa says in the Qur'aan:

    اليوم أكملت لكم دينكم


    {"On this day, I have perfected for you your Deen."}

    When something is perfect, there is no room for alteration. If something can be made "better", then it was not perfect. Anyone intending to change Islaam believes that Islaam is not perfect. Listen: The Islaam which was brought by Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم was for all time. It was not only for the 600s and 700s CE. The Qur'aan was not only for the time of Sahaabah. Very often these days you hear this Kufr belief being thrown around, that Aayaat of Jihaad, etc. were "only for that time. They're abrogated. They don't apply to the 21st century." Such people are Kaafir. Their claims are baseless. They base their religion on licking the backsides of the Kuffaar; America in particular. Whatever America is not pleased with, to them, must be thrown out of Islaam. Let them understand this clearly: Islaam is the Deen of Allaah Ta`aalaa; neither America, nor Britain, nor France, nor Russia, nor Egypt, nor Saudi, nor any other country in the world, or any Kaafir in the world, has the right to meddle with Islaam and twist it to suit the impure and satanic desires of his Kuffaar masters whom he worships.

    "Blindly re-enacting the path of Rasoolullaah صلى الله عليه وسلم", in Shar`i terms, is called Ittibaa`-us-Sunnah (Following the Sunnah), and is a command of the Qur'aan.

    These days, people have become "Moslems for the sake of the Kuffaar". The entirety of their religion is based on pleasing the Kuffaar. They believe in whatever America tells them to believe in, and reject whatever America tells them to reject. On the Day of Qiyaamah, they must not come to Allaah Ta`aalaa seeking reward or Jannah, or protection from Jahannam. They must go to their American masters they worship in this Dunyaa, and see if they can give them Jannah or save them from Jahannam.


    الله أرنا الحق حقاً وارزقنا إتباعه وأرنا الباطل باطلاً وارزقنا إجتنابه

    واسلام
    Last edited by Huzaifah ibn Adam; 07-08-2016 at 04:46 PM.
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    اللي مالوش حد له ربّنا

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    Jazakallahu Khayran for this information, but do you have a source of Sayyid Qutb believing in Wahdatul Wujood?

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    آمين

    Yes. Read his Tafseer of Soorah al-Ikhlaas in "Fee Zhilaal-il-Qur'aan". He has a lengthy discussion on it.
    Last edited by Huzaifah ibn Adam; 07-08-2016 at 10:37 PM.
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    اللي مالوش حد له ربّنا

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    Re: Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists



    @syed_z, those are sweeping generalizations about "Wahhabis" or Salafis. It is typical of western media to associate extremism with Wahhabism. Those type of comments reek sectarianism.

    It is a different matter that we differ with them on academic grounds in Fiqh issues, but to say they are extremists is an accusation with no basis.


    We have been constantly reminded by scholars of all backgrounds that there is no place in Islam for terrorism against innocent civilians.

    Imam Ibn Taymiyyah , whom they associate with as the most influential figure of "wahhabism", says:

    “I am one of those most severe in forbidding that a person in particular should be declared as an unbeliever, an open sinner or a sinful transgressor until it is known that the proof of the Messenger is established upon him, the like of which, if it is opposed one becomes an unbeliever or a sinner or a transgressor. And I affirm that Allāh has forgiven the mistakes of this Nation (Ummah) – and that is general for affairs of belief, sayings and actions.” [1]

    He also stated clearly that there are legitimate barriers to the declaration of takfīr upon the person who apparently denies the texts:

    “It is possible that a man has not heard these revealed texts, or that he heard them but they are not established as being authentic with him, or as far as he sees they contradict other texts necessitating interpretation, even if it is incorrect.” [2]


    Ibn Al-Qayyim , another scholar of the 8th century says:
    “The Prophet (salallaahu ‘alaihi wassallam) legislated for this nation the obligation of rejecting the evil so that by its rejection, the goodness that Allāh and His Messenger love is obtained. And when rejecting evil leads to what is more evil and more hated by Allāh and His Messenger then it is not allowed to reject it – even if Allāh hates the evil and detests those who perform it. And this is like censuring [the transgressions] of the kings and the ones in authority by coming out to fight against them for verily that is the basis and foundation of every evil and every tribulation till the end of time. And the Companions asked permission from Allāh’s Messenger to kill the leaders who delay the prayer from its correct time saying, ‘Shall we not kill them?’ He replied, ‘No, so long as they establish the prayer.’ And he also said, ‘Whoever sees something from his Ruler that he dislikes, then let him be patient and let him not remove his hand from the Ruler’s obedience.’

    And whoever reflects upon the greatest and smallest trials that have befallen Islām, then he will see that that they are due to the negligence and wastage of this principle and the lack of patience when witnessing evil. So one seeks to bring about an end to evil and as a result of this, instead a greater evil is brought about. And the Messenger saw the greatest of evils in Mecca and yet he was not able to change them. In fact even when Allāh opened up Mecca for the Muslims and it became a land of Islām, he was resolved to changing the Kaʿbah and returning it to the foundations that Ibrāhīm had built it upon, but even though he had the capacity to do that, he was prevented from it by the fear that something greater would occur due to the lack of tolerance of the [tribe of] Quraish, since they were new to Islām and had recently left unbelief.

    For this reason he did not grant permission for rebelling against the leaders with the use of one’s hand due to the greatness of what results afterwards on account of it.” [3]


    “A group of Muslims came to al-Hasan al-Basrī seeking a verdict to rebel against al-Hajjāj [4] (a tyrannical and despotic general). So they said, “O Abu Saʿīd! What do you say about fighting this oppressor who has unlawfully spilt blood and unlawfully taken wealth and has done this and done that?”
    So al-Hasan said, “I hold that he should not be fought. If this is a punishment from Allāh, then you will not be able to remove it with your swords. If this is a trial from Allāh, then be patient until Allāh’s judgement comes, and He is the best of judges.”
    So they left al-Hasan, disagreed with him and rebelled against al-Hajjāj – so al-Hajjāj killed them all. Al-Hasan used to say, “If the people had patience when they are being tested by their unjust ruler, it will not be long before Allāh will give them a way out. However, they always rush for their swords, so they are left with their swords. By Allāh! Not even for a single day did they bring about any good.” [5]


    Shaikh Nasiruddin Al-Albani was asked, “Is that which is known nowadays as a military coup against the ruler mentioned in the Religion or is it an innovation?” So the Shaikh answered:

    “There is no basis for these acts in Islām. And it is in opposition to the Islamic manhaj (methodology) with respect to the daʿwah (Islamic call) and creating the right atmosphere for it. Rather it is an innovation introduced by the innovators which has affected some Muslims. This is what I have stated and explained in my notes to al-Aqeedah at-Tahāwiyyah [6].” [7]



    As you can see from all this, there is no relation between "wahhabism" or Salafism and Kharjism. Those who carry out the terrorist acts are Kharjites and they are not upon the way of the Salaf.


    ---
    References:
    [1] Majmūʿ al-Fatāwā, 3/229.
    [2] Majmūʿ al-Fatāwā of Ibn Taymiyyah 3/231.
    [3] Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyah, Iʿlām al-Muwaqqiʿīn ʿan Rabb il-ʿĀlameem.
    [4] Hajjāj bin Yūsuf was responsible for widespread oppression and killing towards the end of the time of the Companions. He besieged Makkah and bombarded the Kaʿbah. He killed the Companion ʿAbdullāh bin Zubair and crucified him in Makkah. See as-Siyar of Adh-Dhahabī.
    [5] Tabaqāt al-Kubrā (7/163-165)
    [6] A famous book of creed from the fourth century authored by Imām Abu Jaʿfar Ahmad ibn Muhammad At-Tahāwī (died 321H).
    [7] Al-Asālah magazine, issue 10.
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    Recapturing Islam From the Terrorists

    عن عبد الله بن مسعود رضي الله عنه : ـ
    مَن كانَ مُسْتَنًّا ، فَلْيَسْتَنَّ بمن قد ماتَ ، فإنَّ الحيَّ لا تُؤمَنُ عليه الفِتْنَةُ ، أولئك أصحابُ محمد - صلى الله عليه وسلم - ، كانوا أفضلَ هذه الأمة : أبرَّها قلوبًا ، وأعمقَها علمًا ، وأقلَّها تكلُّفًا ، اختارهم الله لصحبة نبيِّه ، ولإقامة دِينه ، فاعرِفوا لهم فضلَهم ، واتبعُوهم على أثرهم ، وتمسَّكوا بما استَطَعْتُم من أخلاقِهم وسيَرِهم ، فإنهم كانوا على الهُدَى المستقيم
    رواه ابن عبد البر في "جامع بيان العلم وفضله" (2/947ـ رقم 1810) ـ
    ‘Abdullah ibn Mas‘ood said: “Whoever wants to follow a path, let him follow the path of one who has died, for the living are not safe from fitnah. I mean the Companions of Muhammad . They were the best of this ummah: the purest in heart, the deepest in knowledge and the most straightforward. Allah chose them to accompany His Prophet and establish His religion, so recognise their status and follow in their footsteps and adhere as much as you can to their example of conduct and attitude, for they followed true guidance.” [Ibn ‘Abd al-Barr in Jaami‘ Bayaan al-‘Ilm wa Fadluhu, 2/947, no. 1810]

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