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  1. #1
    Array fschmidt's Avatar
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    Talmudic Judaism (OP)


    http://www.missionislam.com/nwo/talmud.htm

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSy6ENVAJlY

    https://www.amazon.com/Jewish-Histor...dp/B00GGOEL4A/

    Mainstream Judaism is Talmudic Judaism today. Talmudic Judaism is fundamentally parasitic and should not be tolerated in a moral community. Only Karaite Judaism is okay.

    What is the final solution? Require everyone in your community to periodically eat meat and milk together. For example, cheeseburgers or shawarma with yogurt sauce. This will eliminate Talmudic Judaism which prohibits this, but won't affect Karaite Judaism or other followers of the Old Testament.


    Please note that I am ethnically jewish and attended Orthodox synagogue, so I can personally confirm that the above links are accurate. I am posting this because, based on my experience at my local mosque, I think Muslims are naive when it comes to dealing with Judaism.

  2. #81
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    Re: Talmudic Judaism

    Report bad ads?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoppy View Post
    I'm wondering why are there so few Jews? Islam came much later and there are almost 2 billion Muslims, yet only 20 million Jews.
    Simply because it is not a universal religion like Islam and Christianity. The religion isn't missionary/Dawah based. Its tribal. Hinduism is similar - its region based. Most Hindus still live in India.
    Last edited by Zafran; 03-15-2018 at 02:01 AM.
    2 | Likes Bushwackk, cinnamonrolls1 liked this post
    Talmudic Judaism

    Do you think the pious don't sin?

    They merely:
    Veiled themselves and didn't flaunt it
    Sought forgiveness and didn't persist
    Took ownership of it and don't justify it
    And acted with excellence after they had erred - Ibn al-Qayyim

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  4. #82
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    Re: Talmudic Judaism

    Salaam

    Like to contribute, interesting insight into what Jews believe.

    Ask the Rabbi: Why Don’t Jews Believe in Original Sin?


    Why Don’t Jews Believe in Original Sin? This is a delicate question, as it exposes one of the fundamental differences between the Christian outlook and the Jewish one.... So what, in fact, do Jews believe?

    Consider the terms tov and ra, conventionally translated, as I wrote before, as “good” and “evil.” At every stage of the world’s creation, G-d pronounced it tov before proceeding to the next stage. On the creation of mankind, He pronounced it tov me’od (“very good”), and there is no indication thereafter that He changed his mind.

    Ra does not actually mean “evil” in the English sense of the word. Some glimmering of its actual meaning can be ascertained from some of the other ways that the root is used. For instance, in Psalms II, 9 King David beseeches G-d to deal with his enemies: Tero‘em beshevet barzel (“You should smash them with an iron rod”), or in Isaiah XXIV, 19 the prophet begins his description of an earthquake: Ra’o hithro‘a‘a ha’aretz ("the Earth is completely shaken”). From these, we can see that it means something like “unstable, broken, dysfunctional” and therefore “bad.”

    Human beings come into this world innocent of anything, but possessed of a capacity for good (commonly termed the yetzer hatov) as well as a destructive capacity, commonly termed the yetzer hara. The yetzer hara presents all the physical urges, the needs and wants, of the physical body which, like everything else in the physical realm, is subject to entropy -- that is, it wears out and falls apart. But he is also provided with a soul, whose highest purpose is to control those urges and channel them into positive actions.

    To this end, children are provided with parents and other mentors, whose job it is to teach them right from wrong and self-control, so that his soul is capable of taking charge and leading a proper, sanctified life. Until that moment when he is capable of taking over, any “sins” that the child commits are the responsibility of the parent.

    So when does a Jewish individual begin to sin? At the age of bar or bath mitzva. These terms mean “son or daughter of the commandments” because on reaching that age, they become subject to the 613 commandments in the Torah, and their parents are no longer responsible for their actions. This landmark occurs when a boy is 13 years old and a girl is 12. One of the most emotional moments of the bar mitzva ceremony comes when the boy’s father pronounces the blessing, baruch sheptarani me‘onsho shel ze (“Blessed is He who has exempted me from this one’s punishment”).

    What is the Jewish concept of the satan? Well, we agree with the Christians that he is a mal’ach, conventionally translated “angel,” but there’s nothing “fallen” about him. He works for the same Divine Boss as all the other mal’achim. Think of the satan (the word means “adversary”) as the proctor of an exam. The proctor isn’t actively rooting for you to fail the test; to the contrary, he wants you to pass. But he administers a tough test, to be certain that it tests all your capabilities and that you’ve mastered the material, i.e. the life lessons available from one’s parents and other mentors. If you manage to pass the test, no one is happier than the satan.

    https://pjmedia.com/faith/ask-rabbi-dont-jews-believe-original-sin/

  5. #83
    KaifaHaluKa's Avatar
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    Re: Talmudic Judaism

    Talmud is only minor purpose why Jews was arise , what do you think ?

  6. #84
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    Re: Talmudic Judaism

    @Junon
    Thanks for claring this up for us. Now I know a little more about Jews view on this subject. I cannot say I agree on this, but I do understand their view.

    Quote Originally Posted by Junon View Post
    Salaam

    Like to contribute, interesting insight into what Jews believe.

    Ask the Rabbi: Why Don’t Jews Believe in Original Sin?


    Why Don’t Jews Believe in Original Sin? This is a delicate question, as it exposes one of the fundamental differences between the Christian outlook and the Jewish one.... So what, in fact, do Jews believe?

    Consider the terms tov and ra, conventionally translated, as I wrote before, as “good” and “evil.” At every stage of the world’s creation, G-d pronounced it tov before proceeding to the next stage. On the creation of mankind, He pronounced it tov me’od (“very good”), and there is no indication thereafter that He changed his mind.

    Ra does not actually mean “evil” in the English sense of the word. Some glimmering of its actual meaning can be ascertained from some of the other ways that the root is used. For instance, in Psalms II, 9 King David beseeches G-d to deal with his enemies: Tero‘em beshevet barzel (“You should smash them with an iron rod”), or in Isaiah XXIV, 19 the prophet begins his description of an earthquake: Ra’o hithro‘a‘a ha’aretz ("the Earth is completely shaken”). From these, we can see that it means something like “unstable, broken, dysfunctional” and therefore “bad.”

    Human beings come into this world innocent of anything, but possessed of a capacity for good (commonly termed the yetzer hatov) as well as a destructive capacity, commonly termed the yetzer hara. The yetzer hara presents all the physical urges, the needs and wants, of the physical body which, like everything else in the physical realm, is subject to entropy -- that is, it wears out and falls apart. But he is also provided with a soul, whose highest purpose is to control those urges and channel them into positive actions.

    To this end, children are provided with parents and other mentors, whose job it is to teach them right from wrong and self-control, so that his soul is capable of taking charge and leading a proper, sanctified life. Until that moment when he is capable of taking over, any “sins” that the child commits are the responsibility of the parent.
    until here everything is clear...but then...
    Quote Originally Posted by Junon View Post

    So when does a Jewish individual begin to sin? At the age of bar or bath mitzva. These terms mean “son or daughter of the commandments” because on reaching that age, they become subject to the 613 commandments in the Torah, and their parents are no longer responsible for their actions. This landmark occurs when a boy is 13 years old and a girl is 12. One of the most emotional moments of the bar mitzva ceremony comes when the boy’s father pronounces the blessing, baruch sheptarani me‘onsho shel ze (“Blessed is He who has exempted me from this one’s punishment”).
    Blessed is he who has exempted me from this one's punishment? how selfisch does that sound? The parent is not exempted at all. yes the individual can make a decision between right and wrong on its own at that age, but still he is dependant of what is been taught. If the parent did not teach him anything, or wrong morals or insufficient, then the parent is still responsible for at least some of the part of the sins this individual makes.

    For example, if I was used to drink every evening in front of my child, or gamble, swear, talk bad around someones back....and later on my child does the same...just because I was a bad example for him...then I cannot expect that I am 100% exempted from all sins he is going to make because of this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Junon View Post

    What is the Jewish concept of the satan? Well, we agree with the Christians that he is a mal’ach, conventionally translated “angel,” but there’s nothing “fallen” about him. He works for the same Divine Boss as all the other mal’achim. Think of the satan (the word means “adversary”) as the proctor of an exam. The proctor isn’t actively rooting for you to fail the test; to the contrary, he wants you to pass. But he administers a tough test, to be certain that it tests all your capabilities and that you’ve mastered the material, i.e. the life lessons available from one’s parents and other mentors. If you manage to pass the test, no one is happier than the satan.

    https://pjmedia.com/faith/ask-rabbi-...-original-sin/
    I understand how Jews see Satan. similar like the Angel of Death...bad image because he is a creature who takes one's soul away, and therefore much hated, but he is just an angel doing his job.
    Satan is different though. He refused to obey God and tries to distract us from the right path.
    and he would be very happy if we failed the test.

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