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    Rukn Yamani

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    Rukn Yamani is the south corner of the Ka'bah. Its foundation is still in the same location as built by Ibraheem .

    The prophet used to touch this corner during Tawaf if he was near. But unlike Hajar Al-Aswad, a pilgrim should not kiss Rukn Yamani or say Allahu Akbar.


    It was the practice of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allah be on him) that when he passed between the Rukn Yamani and the Hajar al-Aswad, he recited the following du’a: “O Rabb, grant us (all that which is) good in this world, (all that which is) good in the Aakhirah and save us from the punishment of the fire (of Jahannam).” [Surah Baqarah, verse 201]


    According to https://islamqa.info/en/20425

    What is prescribed is to touch this corner, without kissing it or saying Allaahu akbar. If you cannot touch it then you should not point to it, because that was not narrated from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).


    Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:
    The Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to touch the Yemeni Corner, but he did not say Allaahu akbar. So based on this it is not Sunnah to say Allaahu akbar when touching it.
    Al-Sharh al-Mumti’, 7/283.

    Shaykh al-Albaani (may Allaah have mercy on him) said:
    (The pilgrim) touch the Yemeni Corner with his hand in each circuit (of Tawaaf), but he should not kiss it. If it is not possible to touch it, then he should not point to it with his hand.
    Manaasik al-Hajj wa’l-‘Umrah, p. 22

    Touching it is indicated by the hadeeth narrated by al-Haakim from Ibn ‘Umar, according to which, when the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) circumambulated the Ka’bah (Tawaaf), he would touch the Black Stone and the Yemeni Corner in each circuit.
    Saheeh al-Jaami’, no. 4751.

    Concerning the virtue of touching the Yemeni Corner, the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Touching the Black Stone and the Yemeni Corner indeed erases sins.” (Narrated by Ahmad from Ibn ‘Umar; classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Jaami’, no. 2194).



    In the book al-Taareekh al-Qadeem li Makkah wa Bayt-Allaah il-Kareem (The Ancient History of Makkah and the Noble House of Allaah) by Muhammad Taahir al-Kurdi al-Makki (vol. 3, p. 256), it says that the stone in the Yemeni Corner (al-Rukn al-Yamaani) goes back to the time when ‘Abd-Allaah ibn al-Zubayr (may Allaah be pleased with him) rebuilt the Ka’bah, and that it has remained until our own times, and that everyone who has rebuilt the Ka’bah kept this stone as it was. He says that in 1040 AH, during the time of Sultan Murad IV, who rebuilt the Ka’bah, the edge of the stone of this Corner was broken off, and molten lead was poured in its place, and before that the pieces of the stone had been put together, using adhesive and nails, during the era of the Fatimids.
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    Re: Rukn Yamani

    Although many names and places have been re-arranged in the previously revealed scriptures out of unfounded insecurity of corrupt kings and scribes (this has been proven) the substance itself is often still there - and we know without doubt that the historically celebrated place from before the advent of Muhammad - is Makkah.


    The origin of the word 'negev' is from the Hebrew root denoting 'dry'. In the Bible, the word Negev is also used for the direction 'south'; some English-language translations use the spelling "Negeb".

    In Arabic, the Negev is known as al-Naqab or an-Naqb ("the [mountain] pass"),[3][4] though it was not thought of as a distinct region until the demarcation of the Egypt-Ottoman frontier in the 1890s and has no traditional Arabic name. [5]

    During the British Mandate it was called Beersheba sub-district.[5]

    Nomads Edit
    Nomadic life in the Negev dates back at least 4,000 years [17] and perhaps as much as 7,000 years.[18]

    The first urbanized settlements were established by a combination of Canaanite, Amalekite, Amorite, Nabataean and Edomite groups circa 2000 BC.[17] Pharaonic Egypt is credited with introducing copper mining and smelting in both the Negev and the Sinai between 1400 and 1300 BC.[17][19]

    Biblical
    In the Bible, the term Negev only relates to the northern, semiarid part of what we call Negev today, located in the general area of the Arad-Beersheba Valley.



    The 1916 Sykes-Picot Agreement between Britain and France placed the Negev in Area B, "Arab state or states" under British patronage.[26] The Negev was taken from the Ottoman army by British forces during 1917 and became part of Mandatory Palestine.

    In 1922, the Bedouin component of the population was estimated at 72,898 out of a total of 75,254 for the Beersheba sub-district.[24] The 1931 census estimated that the population of the Beersheba sub-district was 51,082.[27] This large decrease was considered to be an artifact of incorrect enumeration methods used in 1922.[24] An Arabic history of tribes around Beersheba, published in 1934 records 23 tribal groups.[28]


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negev


    Najd
    The Arabic word najd literally means "upland" and was once applied to a variety of regions within the Arabian Peninsula. However, the most famous of these was the central region of the Peninsula roughly bounded on the west by the mountains of the Hejaz and Yemen and to the east by the historical region of Eastern Arabia and the north by Iraq and Syria.

    Medieval Muslim geographers spent a great amount of time debating the exact boundaries between Hejaz and Najd in particular, but generally set the western boundaries of Najd to be wherever the western mountain ranges and lava beds began to slope eastwards, and set the eastern boundaries of Najd at the narrow strip of red sand dunes known as the Ad-Dahna Desert, some 100 km (62 mi) east of modern-day Riyadh. The southern border of Najd has always been set at the large sea of sand dunes known today as Rub' al Khali (the Empty Quarter), while the southwestern boundaries are marked by the valleys of Wadi Ranyah, Wadi Bisha, and Wadi Tathlith.


    The northern boundaries of Najd have fluctuated greatly historically and received far less attention from the medieval geographers. In the early Islamic centuries, Najd was considered to extend as far north as the River Euphrates, or more specifically, the "Walls of Khosrau", constructed by the Sassanid Empire as a barrier between Arabia and Iraq immediately prior to the advent of Islam. The modern usage of the term encompasses the region of Al-Yamama, which was not always considered part of Najd historically.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najd



    6Abram traveled through the land as far as the site of the great tree of Moreh at Shechem. At that time the Canaanites were in the land. 7The Lord appeared to Abram and said, “To your offspringc I will give this land.” So he built an altar there to the Lord, who had appeared to him.

    8From there he went on toward the hills east of Bethel and pitched his tent, with Bethel on the west and Ai on the east. There he built an altar to the Lord and called on the name of the Lord.

    9Then Abram set out and continued toward the Negev.


    From the book of Genesis 12





    By faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going. 9By faith he made his home in the promised land like a stranger in a foreign country; he lived in tents, as did Isaac and Jacob, who were heirs with him of the same promise.

    10For he was looking forward to the city with foundations,
    whose architect and builder is God.


    11And by faith even Sarah, who was past childbearing age, was enabled to bear children because she (b) considered him faithful who had made the promise. 12And so from this one man, and he as good as dead, came descendants as numerous as the stars in the sky and as countless as the sand on the seashore.

    From the book of hebrews ch. 11


    Genesis 21: 1. And the LORD visited Sarah as he had said, and the LORD did unto Sarah as he had spoken. 2. For Sarah conceived, and bare Abraham a son in his old age, at the set time of which God had spoken to him. 3. And Abraham called the name of his son that was born unto him, whom Sarah bare to him, Isaac. 4. And Abraham circumcised his son Isaac being eight days old, as God had commanded him. 5. And Abraham was an hundred years old, when his son Isaac was born unto him. 6. And Sarah said, God hath made me to laugh, so that all that hear will laugh with me. 7. And she said, Who would have said unto Abraham, that Sarah should have given children suck? for I have born him a son in his old age. 8. And the child grew, and was weaned: and Abraham made a great feast the same day that Isaac was weaned. 9. And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, which she had born unto Abraham, mocking. 10. Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac. 11. And the thing was very grievous in Abraham's sight because of his son. 12. And God said unto Abraham, Let it not be grievous in thy sight because of the lad, and because of thy bondwoman; in all that Sarah hath said unto thee, hearken unto her voice; for in Isaac shall thy seed be called. 13. And also of the son of the bondwoman will I make a nation, because he is thy seed.
    14. And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and took bread, and a bottle of water, and gave it unto Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, and the child, and sent her away: and she departed, and wandered in the wilderness of Beer-sheba.
    15. And the water was spent in the bottle, and she cast the child under one of the shrubs. 16. And she went, and sat her down over against him a good way off, as it were a bowshot: for she said, Let me not see the death of the child. And she sat over against him, and lift up her voice, and wept. 17. And God heard the voice of the lad; and the angel of God called Hagar out of heaven, and said unto her, What aileth thee, Hagar? fear not; for God hath heard the voice of the lad where he is. 18. Arise, lift up the lad, and hold him in thine hand; for I will make him a great nation. 19. And God opened her eyes, and she saw a well of water; and she went, and filled the bottle with water, and gave the lad drink. 20. And God was with the lad; and he grew, and dwelt in the wilderness, and became an archer.

    21. And he dwelt in the wilderness of Paran: and his mother took him a wife out of the land of Egypt.
    22. And it came to pass at that time, that Abimelech and Phichol the chief captain of his host spake unto Abraham, saying, God is with thee in all that thou doest: 23. Now therefore swear unto me here by God that thou wilt not deal falsely with me, nor with my son, nor with my son's son: but according to the kindness that I have done unto thee, thou shalt do unto me, and to the land wherein thou hast sojourned. 24. And Abraham said, I will swear. 25. And Abraham reproved Abimelech because of a well of water, which Abimelech's servants had violently taken away. 26. And Abimelech said, I wot not who hath done this thing: neither didst thou tell me, neither yet heard I of it, but to day. 27. And Abraham took sheep and oxen, and gave them unto Abimelech; and both of them made a covenant. 28. And Abraham set seven ewe lambs of the flock by themselves. 29. And Abimelech said unto Abraham, What mean these seven ewe lambs which thou hast set by themselves? 30. And he said, For these seven ewe lambs shalt thou take of my hand, that they may be a witness unto me, that I have digged this well. 31. Wherefore he called that place Beer-sheba; because there they sware both of them. 32. Thus they made a covenant at Beer-sheba: then Abimelech rose up, and Phichol the chief captain of his host, and they returned into the land of the Philistines. 33.
    And Abraham planted a grove in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of the LORD, the everlasting God. 34. And Abraham sojourned in the Philistines' land many days.

    From the book of Genesis 21



    Hadith No: 2899

    Narrated/Authority of Salama bin Al-Akwa

    The Prophet (saw) passed by some people of the tribe of Bani Aslam who were practising archery. The Prophet said, "O Bani Ismail ! Practice archery as your father Isma'il was a great archer. Keep on throwing arrows and I am with Bani so-and-so." So one of the parties ceased throwing. Allah's Apostle (SAW) said, "What is the matter with you! Why have you ceased throwing?" They replied, "How should we throw while you are with them (i.e. on their side)?" On that the Prophet said, "Throw, and I am with all of you."

    http://ahadith.co.uk/chapter.php?cid=140&page=12



    It does appear that certain miscreants are working very hard to wipe out Islamic history from the time of Adam - to the extent that they are going as far as discrediting themselves by claiming that the story of Ibrahim is a fabricated concoction despite it's undeniability - simply by choosing to selectively use dubious and blatantly skewed narratives as primary source materials, the fact that so much of the previously revealed scriptures have been tampered with have made such wild conjectures easy, it is essential that we keep all this in mind when researching historical texts:

    ---

    The Abraham story cannot be definitively related to any specific time, and it is widely agreed that the patriarchal age, along with the exodus and the period of the judges, is a late literary construct that does not relate to any period in actual history.[4] A common hypothesis among scholars is that it was composed in the early Persian period (late 6th century BCE) as a result of tensions between Jewish landowners who had stayed in Judah during the Babylonian captivity and traced their right to the land through their "father Abraham", and the returning exiles who based their counter-claim on Moses and the Exodus tradition.[5]


    In the early and middle 20th century, leading archaeologists such as William F. Albright and biblical scholars such as Albrecht Alt believed that the patriarchs and matriarchs were either real individuals or believable composites of people who lived in the "patriarchal age", the 2nd millennium BCE. But, in the 1970s, new arguments concerning Israel's past and the biblical texts challenged these views; these arguments can be found in Thomas L. Thompson's The Historicity of the Patriarchal Narratives (1974), and John Van Seters' Abraham in History and Tradition (1975). Thompson, a literary scholar, based his argument on archaeology and ancient texts. His thesis centered on the lack of compelling evidence that the patriarchs lived in the 2nd millennium BCE, and noted how certain biblical texts reflected first millennium conditions and concerns. Van Seters examined the patriarchal stories and argued that their names, social milieu, and messages strongly suggested that they were Iron Age creations.[7] By the beginning of the 21st century, archaeologists had given up hope of recovering any context that would make Abraham, Isaac or Jacob credible historical figures.[8]


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham


    It is simply obvious that the pagans of Arabia who traced their lineage to a man called Ibrahim who was the father of another man called Ismail , whose mother's name happened to be haajar had NO motive whatsoever to set up a fake footprint for him right next to the historically Sacred House which happens to be a bow shot away from the marwa hillock - although they did have a criminal motive in not mentioning to their offspring that he made his debut by smashing idols - just as the miscreants up north had a criminal and selfish motive in pretending that Ismail grew up somewhere other than in Makkah.


    Allah's statement,
    ﴿فِيهِ ءَايَـتٌ بَيِّـنَـتٌ﴾
    (In it are manifest signs) ﴿3:97﴾, means, clear signs that Ibrahim built the Ka`bah and that Allah has honored and blessed it. Allah then said,
    ﴿مَّقَامِ إِبْرَهِيمَ﴾
    (the Maqam (station) of Ibrahim) When the building ﴿the Ka`bah﴾ was raised, Ibrahim stood on; the Maqam so that he could raise the walls higher, while his son Isma`il was handing the stones to him. We should mention that the Maqam used to be situated right next to the House. Later, and during his reign, `Umar bin Al-Khattab moved the Maqam farther to the east, so that those who go around the House in Tawaf are able to perform it easily, without disturbing those who pray next to the Maqam after finishing their Tawaf. Allah commanded us to pray next to the Maqam;
    ﴿وَاتَّخِذُواْ مِن مَّقَامِ إِبْرَهِيمَ مُصَلًّى﴾
    (And take you (people) the Maqam (station) of Ibrahim as a place of prayer) ﴿2:125﴾.
    We mentioned the Hadiths about this subject before, and all the thanks are due to Allah. Al-`Awfi said that, Ibn `Abbas commented on Allah's statement,
    ﴿فِيهِ ءَايَـتٌ بَيِّـنَـتٌ مَّقَامُ إِبْرَهِيمَ﴾
    (In it are manifest signs, the Maqam of Ibrahim; )
    "Such as the Maqam and Al-Mash`ar ﴿Al-Haram﴾.'' Mujahid said, "The impression of Ibrahim's feet remains on the Maqam as a clear sign.'' It was reported that `Umar bin `Abdul-`Aziz, Al-Hasan, Qatadah, As-Suddi, Muqatil bin Hayyan and others said similarly.

    http://www.qtafsir.com/index.php?opt...sk=view&id=515
    Last edited by Abz2000; 05-20-2018 at 04:45 PM.
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    Re: Rukn Yamani

    And when you have completed your rites, remember Allah like your [previous] remembrance of your fathers or with [much] greater remembrance. And among the people is he who says, "Our Lord, give us in this world," and he will have in the Hereafter no share.

    But among them is he who says, "Our Lord, give us in this world [that which is] good and in the Hereafter [that which is] good and protect us from the punishment of the Fire."

    Those will have a share of what they have earned, and Allah is swift in account.

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    Re: Rukn Yamani

    We see the turning of thy face (for guidance to the heavens: now Shall We turn thee to a Qibla that shall please thee. Turn then Thy face in the direction of the sacred Mosque: Wherever ye are, turn your faces in that direction. The people of the Book know well that that is the truth from their Lord. Nor is Allah unmindful of what they do.
    - 2:144


    So from whencesoever Thou startest forth, turn Thy face in the direction of the sacred Mosque; and wheresoever ye are, Turn your face thither: that there be no ground of dispute against you among the people, except those of them that are bent on wickedness; so fear them not, but fear Me; and that I may complete My favours on you, and ye May (consent to) be guided;
    - 2:150


    The first House (of worship) appointed for men was that at Bakka: Full of blessing and of guidance for all kinds of beings:
    - 3:96


    Evidence that Bait Allah or Beth El in Jerusalem was built after the time of Ibraheem and Isaac - during Ya'qoob's time - can be found in Genesis 28 (apparently mentions the place from where buraaq would later ascend to the heavens with Allah's final messenger).


    My main reason for referencing previously revealed scripture
    is for the people the book and others to consider despite the many distortions clearly apparent..... just to get that clear.
    Last edited by Abz2000; 05-20-2018 at 10:52 PM.
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