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  1. #1
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    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

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    New study uncovers tobacco industry's attempts to tackle 'threat' of Islam to smoking

    Fri 17 April 2015

    Researchers have found evidence of attempts by the tobacco industry to reinterpret Islamic teaching to make smoking acceptable to Muslims and to help develop markets in countries with large Muslim populations.

    Industry documents studied by a team led by Professor Mark Petticrew from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, show that tobacco companies have perceived Islam as a threat to its attempts to sell more tobacco products in emerging markets in Asia.

    They reveal how the industry attempted to frame anti-smoking views in Islamic countries as fundamentalist and fanatical while lawyers helped develop theological arguments in favour of smoking.

    According to the study, published in American Journal of Public Health, these findings will help tobacco control advocates to implement culturally appropriate measures to control tobacco use in Islamic countries.

    The research team searched the entire Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and analysed 251 documents, dating from the 1970s to 2011, which referred to Islamic views and actions related to tobacco control, and industry actions related to them.

    The study found that the tobacco industry perceived Islamic opposition to smoking as a threat to its business from the 1970s onwards. For example, a 1996 British American Tobacco document described the “Islamic threat” as “a real danger to the industry. This is dependent upon the source of the threat, the divisions within Islam and among Moslems and above all the rapidly emerging fundamentalist influence in Islam, as for instance witnessed in Afghanistan, Iran or Algeria...this amounts to us having to prepare to fight a hurricane”.

    Tactics used to counter the perceived threat included framing Islamic objections to tobacco use as extremism, monitoring debates on Islam and tobacco, recruitment of Islamic scholars and leaders as consultants to adapt messages and ultimately portray smoking as acceptable. Industry lawyers meanwhile sought to reinterpret the Qu’ran to suit tobacco industry ends.

    The study authors make a series of recommendations for tobacco control efforts based on the findings. These include using positive messaging to emphasise the health benefits of non-smoking rather than negative messages of forbidding certain behaviours; countering associations that tobacco use is an expression of freedom, especially among females, with clear health messages and warnings; and promoting shared positions by multi faith communities on the harmful effects of tobacco use on health to shift attention from individual religious beliefs.

    Mark Petticrew, Professor of Public Health Evaluation at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said: “The tobacco industry is rapidly developing its markets in many countries with a large Muslim population, which have a high prevalence of smoking – even though there is a consensus among Muslim scholars that smoking is prohibited by Islam.

    “Despite this, our study shows that the tobacco industry has framed anti-smoking views in Islamic countries as fundamentalist and fanatical, and has attempted to recruit Islamic consultants to portray smoking as acceptable.

    “Tobacco industry lawyers working for Philip Morris even helped develop theological arguments in favour of smoking. As a former US Food and Drug Agency Commissioner, David Kessler, once said, this really is an industry that thought it could buy almost anybody.”

    Co-author Professor Kelley Lee, based at Simon Fraser University, said: "This paper provides further evidence of how the tobacco industry has sought to frame public policy debates in ways that, not only further its commercial interests, but undermine the efforts of public health communities worldwide seeking to reduce the almost six million deaths caused by tobacco use."

    The study’s other co-authors were Rima Nakkash (American University, Beirut) and Haider Ali (Open University Business School).

    This research was funded in part by the National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health.

    Publication:

    M.Petticrew, K.Lee, R.Nakkash, H.Ali: “Fighting a hurricane”: Efforts by the tobacco industry to counter the perceived threat of Islam to the Tobacco industry. American Journal of Public Health

    Source: http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/newsevents/ne...am_threat.html
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    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry


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    If you can read this please remember me in your duas :P

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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Wow these guys would do anything just to fill the market. Very bad practices from the industry. As long as we have our Ulema, daee's etc spreading the message to the mass majority then things like this shouldn't be a problem .
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Seriously?!

    I'm more disgusted by the scholars of the dollars who were acting like Muslims but working with the tobacco companies. And if all this is just for making smoking acceptable, I wonder what else goes on. Must say that I'm not that surprised though.

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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    The real threat to the tobacco industries is healthy lifestyle.

    Tell Muslim smokers that smoking is haram. Then they will start giving argument that smoking is not haram. But educate Muslim smokers about the effect of smoking for health, In Shaa Allah they will aware and start stop smoking.

    In my place, very very few Muslims who stop smoking because religious reason. Mostly of them stop smoking because health reason, same like non-Muslim smokers who decide to stop smoking.

    Cigarette did not exist in the time of salaf, and the haram fatwa for cigarette is a modern time fatwa that issued after ulama got many input from doctors about the effect of smoking for health.

    So why tobacco industries blame Islam, but not dare to blame doctors and heath activists?.

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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    smoking is smoking - if they can smoke shisha in Arab countries - why outlaw tobacco?

    The double standard is sheer hypocrisy.

    If they wanna ban tobacco - then ban the molasses as well, coz smoke is smoke.

    (yeah, I'm saying this as a smoker lol - shoot me)

    Scimi
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry


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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Actually, anything that is known to be bad for us falls under the category of items that should be avoided... smoking definitely has nothing good to offer, hence it should be fairly clear cut, but people are 'tuned' to always argue...
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    As long as my heart does beat, I shall live, not lie
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  9. #7
    فصيح الياسين's Avatar
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    I extremly hate smokings.....
    but smokers also....
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    قال النبي محمد صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم:*الـحياءُ شُعْبَةٌ مِنَ الاِيِمَانِ*
    و قال ايضا:*الحياء لاياتى الا بخير
    و قال ايضا:*اذا لم تستحي،فاصنع ما شئت*

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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Quote Originally Posted by فصيح الياسين View Post
    I extremly hate smokings.....
    but smokers also....
    What does that have to do with the content of this thread? you hate smokers because they smoke? LOL... this thread is about the status of tobacco in Islam - not your personal opinion on smokers - so if you don't have anything to add to the topic itself, keep your opinion to yourself.

    You've all missed the point lol.

    point being - how is it not hypocrisy to allow the sale of shisha tobacco molasses and ban the sale of cigarette tobacco? what kind of hypocrisy is this?

    Can anyone take that on?

    Or are you going to post your own wayward opinions about smokers instead loool - pfft - like the quote above? sheer idiocy.

    What happened to our debate skills? eh?


    Quote Originally Posted by greenhill
    Actually, anything that is known to be bad for us falls under the category of items that should be avoided... smoking definitely has nothing good to offer, hence it should be fairly clear cut, but people are 'tuned' to always argue...
    Bro greenhill, people can't even contextualise their argument lol.... and they seek to push their opinions instead, like the first quote in this post what a fail.

    If people cannot debate - they should avoid making idiots out of themselves and instead - read the responses of those who engage in debate and discussion so they may learn a thing or two. Agree?

    Scimi
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry


  11. #9
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    I find this article more insightful.

    How tobacco firms tried to undermine Muslim countries' smoking ban

    The tobacco industry attempted to reinterpret Islamic teaching and recruit Islamic scholars in a bid to undermine the prohibition on smoking in many Muslim countries, an investigation has shown.

    Evidence from archived industry documents from the 1970s to the late 1990s shows that tobacco companies were seriously concerned about Islamic teaching. In 1996, an internal document from British American Tobacco warned that, because of the spread of “extremist views” from fundamentalists in countries such as Afghanistan, the industry would have to “prepare to fight a hurricane”.

    BAT and other companies, which were losing sales in affluent countries where anti-smoking measures had been introduced, devised strategies to counter this perceived threat to sales in places such as Egypt, Indonesia and Bangladesh, which have large populations of young people who smoke.

    The industry was concerned that the World Health Organisation was encouraging the anti-smoking stance of Islamic leaders. A 1985 report from tobacco firm Philip Morris squarely blamed the WHO. “This ideological development has become a threat to our business because of the interference of the WHO … The WHO has not only joined forces with Moslem fundamentalists who view smoking as evil, but has gone yet further by encouraging religious leaders previously not active anti-smokers to take up the cause,” it said.

    “A Moslem who attacks smoking generally speaking would be a threat to existing government as a ‘fundamentalist’ who wishes to return to sharia law,” says one of the archive documents. It adds: “Our invisible defence must be the individualism which Islam allows its believers … smoking and other signs of modern living should encourage governments to a point at which it is possible quietly to suggest their benefits.”
    It adds: “With Islam we might ask what other aspects of modern living are similarly open to extremist demands for prohibition under strict interpretation of sharia: motion pictures, television, and art depicting the human being? Use of electronic amplification by muezzin calling from a minaret? The education of women?” the document says.

    The earliest fatwa against tobacco was in 1602, but many scholars believed smoking cigarettes or taking tobacco in water pipes or other forms was harmless until evidence of the dangers to health began to emerge in the mid 20th century. Jurists pronounced that tobacco use was makrooh (discouraged). In many Islamic countries, a harder line was taken, with smoking prohibited on the grounds that the Qur’an does not permit self-harm or intoxication.

    The WHO negotiated the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, starting in 1999, in response to what it describes as the “explosive increase in tobacco use”. The convention, which outlines strategies intended to reduce demand, was adopted in 2003.

    A report in 2000 from the Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (Cora) department at BAT after the first international negotiations said: “It appears that the WHO’s efforts to link religion (specifically Islam) with issues surrounding the use of tobacco are bearing fruit … We will need to discuss separately how we might understand and manage this aspect in line with the Cora strategy.”

    The tobacco industry attempted to re-interpret anti-smoking Islamic teachings. A 1996 BAT memo suggests identifying “a scholar/scholars, preferably at the Al Azhar University in Cairo, who we could then brief and enlist as our authoritative advisers/allies and occasionally spokespersons on the issue.

    “We agreed that such scholars/authority would need to be paired up with an influential Moslem writer/journalist … such advice would present the most effective and influential opinion able to counter extremist views, which are generally peddled by Islamic fundamentalist preachers largely misinterpreting the Koran … This is an issue to be handled extremely gingerly and sensitively … We have to avoid all possibilities of a backlash.”

    Tobacco industry lawyers were also involved in this attempt at revision. A presentation from 2000, prepared by the firm Shook, Hardy and Bacon, gave an overview of the background to Islam and smoking, with slides stating that there is no prohibition on smoking in the Qur’an – and that “making rules beyond what Allah has allowed is a sin in itself”.

    Prof Mark Petticrew from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, who led the research, said he was amazed by what researchers had found in the archives. “‘You couldn’t make it up’ comes to mind,” he said. “The thing that jumps out at me from all this is the fact that we had tobacco industry lawyers actually developing theological arguments. That was pretty surprising.”

    A document suggest Philip Morris wanted to try to recruit Islamic scholars at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. A representative of the Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers’ Council “agreed to make exploratory contact”, it says. Petticrew and his team do not know whether they were successful. “We couldn’t find the papers,” he said.The tobacco industry is still heavily promoting smoking in countries such as Bangladesh and Egypt, which are predominantly Muslim and have high proportions of smokers.Its marketing is generally adapted to the “not overly devout”, says the study. The authors call for further research to find out how the industry had approached other faiths.

    “The launch of the Faith Against Tobacco national campaign by Tobacco Free Kids and faith leaders in the US, for example, brings together Christianity, Islam, Judaism and other faiths ‘to support proven solutions to reduce smoking’. Understanding efforts by the industry to undermine the efforts of other faith communities brings to light a broader strategy to marginalize tobacco control in diverse communities, and refocuses the problem on tobacco-related health harms,” says the paper.

    BAT told the Guardian. “This study, which concerns material written nearly 20 years ago, does not represent the views, policies and position of British American Tobacco. We are a global business that holds itself to strict standards of business conduct and corporate governance, manufacturing and marketing our products in accordance with domestic and international laws and observing the cultural and religious beliefs in the 200 countries in which we operate.”

    Philip Morris did not respond to the Guardian’s request for comment.

    Guardian.com
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    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry



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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    you know, all the Muslim countries have to do is ban tobacco advertising as the west have done, and therefore limit the long reach of the 7 dwarves (tobacco giants) in terms of promoting their products... that will quickly make them realise that their long reach and influence has been curbed - just as it has been in the west. In the UK, tobacco advertising is banned, we just cannot advertise it.

    A ban on tobacco advertising in the middle east will be a major blow to the tobacco industry.

    Scimi
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry


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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Quote Originally Posted by Scimitar View Post
    What does that have to do with the content of this thread? you hate smokers because they smoke? LOL... this thread is about the status of tobacco in Islam - not your personal opinion on smokers - so if you don't have anything to add to the topic itself, keep your opinion to yourself.

    You've all missed the point lol.



    point being - how is it not hypocrisy to allow the sale of shisha tobacco molasses and ban the sale of cigarette tobacco? what kind of hypocrisy is this?

    Can anyone take that on?

    Or are you going to post your own wayward opinions about smokers instead loool - pfft - like the quote above? sheer idiocy.

    What happened to our debate skills? eh?




    Bro greenhill, people can't even contextualise their argument lol.... and they seek to push their opinions instead, like the first quote in this post what a fail.

    If people cannot debate - they should avoid making idiots out of themselves and instead - read the responses of those who engage in debate and discussion so they may learn a thing or two. Agree?

    Scimi

    hahaha still i say i hate both. Smoke nd smokers.. poor smokers
    ....
    | Likes OmAbdullah liked this post
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    قال النبي محمد صلى الله عليه وآله وسلم:*الـحياءُ شُعْبَةٌ مِنَ الاِيِمَانِ*
    و قال ايضا:*الحياء لاياتى الا بخير
    و قال ايضا:*اذا لم تستحي،فاصنع ما شئت*

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    ardianto's Avatar
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Singapore has its own way to reduce smoking. Singaporean govt forbid smoking in many places and make cigarette price very expensive. But I never heard tobacco industries lobby the Singaporean govt to reduce cigarette price and allow the people to smoke in more places.

    By the way, people say, Indonesia is the heaven for smokers and Singapore is the hell for smokers. Yeah, cigarette price in non-Muslim country Singapore is almost 7 times higher than cigarette price in the Muslim country Indonesia.

  16. #13
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Quote Originally Posted by ardianto View Post
    Singapore has its own way to reduce smoking. Singaporean govt forbid smoking in many places and make cigarette price very expensive. But I never heard tobacco industries lobby the Singaporean govt to reduce cigarette price and allow the people to smoke in more places.

    By the way, people say, Indonesia is the heaven for smokers and Singapore is the hell for smokers. Yeah, cigarette price in non-Muslim country Singapore is almost 7 times higher than cigarette price in the Muslim country Indonesia.
    Interesting. I found this article, which says that Bhutan is the only country in the world to totally ban the production and sale of tobacco: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/fea...920757761.html

    Bhutan, a small Himalayan nation often called the Land of the Thunder Dragon, is the only country in the world that completely bans the sale and production of tobacco and tobacco products. Under the law, any individual found selling tobacco can face imprisonment for a period of three to five years.
    It does not even seem to be a Muslim country, but Buddhist. Surely Muslim countries could take a leaf out of it's book in that regard.
    Last edited by Insaanah; 05-11-2015 at 07:53 PM.
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry


    Stunningly beautiful adhaan from the Dome of the Rock in Masjid ul Aqsa
    Download (right click and choose "save target/link as").


    This is a clear message for mankind in order that they may be warned thereby, and that they may know that He is only One God, and that those of understanding may take heed (14:52)


    Indeed Allah knows, and you know not (16: 74, part)

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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    The golden principle given to us by our Prophet Muhammad salla Allaho alaihi wa sallam is: لا ضرر و لا ضرار :
    (Allah knows best).

    It means:

    There should neither be harming nor reciprocating harm. (Ibn Majah).

    This hadeeth is given in the context of tobacco and narcotics in the book, "Essentials of Islam".


    The hadeeth means that every such thing is forbidden to eat /or drink /or take in any way which causes harm to the user or to others. At the time of the Prophet salla Allaho alaihi wa sallam there were no such thing as cigarette, cocaine or heroin etc. but, no doubt, that Islam is the Deen of Allah, The All-Knowing and All- Wise. So Allah gave such principles which are getting unfolded day by day till the end of this world. Thus no one should say that we don't have Command against these modern harmful things. Alhamdulillah, we do have clear Commands in our perfect Islam!!!


    Smoking is so much harmful that it doesn't only cause harm to the smoker, but also to his/her innocent children and spouse sitting around him/her. He/she loves them on the one hand and harms them (causing destruction of their respiratory system) on the other hand, what a stupidity!!!
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    I'm just wondering, is tobacco itself harmful or is it the preservative that they put in it, sorry to stray off the main emphasis. I think that smoking have been around for an extremely long while.
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Quote Originally Posted by colinberry1 View Post
    I'm just wondering, is tobacco itself harmful or is it the preservative that they put in it, sorry to stray off the main emphasis. I think that smoking have been around for an extremely long while.
    Great point Colin,

    Here is a list of some of the stuff they put in cigs:

    • Acetanisole
    • Acetic Acid
    • Acetoin
    • Acetophenone
    • 6-Acetoxydihydrotheaspirane
    • 2-Acetyl-3- Ethylpyrazine
    • 2-Acetyl-5-Methylfuran
    • Acetylpyrazine
    • 2-Acetylpyridine
    • 3-Acetylpyridine
    • 2-Acetylthiazole
    • Aconitic Acid
    • dl-Alanine
    • Alfalfa Extract
    • Allspice Extract,Oleoresin, and Oil
    • Allyl Hexanoate
    • Allyl Ionone
    • Almond Bitter Oil
    • Ambergris Tincture
    • Ammonia
    • Ammonium Bicarbonate
    • Ammonium Hydroxide
    • Ammonium Phosphate Dibasic
    • Ammonium Sulfide
    • Amyl Alcohol
    • Amyl Butyrate
    • Amyl Formate
    • Amyl Octanoate
    • alpha-Amylcinnamaldehyde
    • Amyris Oil
    • trans-Anethole
    • Angelica Root Extract, Oil and Seed Oil
    • Anise
    • Anise Star, Extract and Oils
    • Anisyl Acetate
    • Anisyl Alcohol
    • Anisyl Formate
    • Anisyl Phenylacetate
    • Apple Juice Concentrate, Extract, and Skins
    • Apricot Extract and Juice Concentrate
    • 1-Arginine
    • Asafetida Fluid Extract And Oil
    • Ascorbic Acid
    • 1-Asparagine Monohydrate
    • 1-Aspartic Acid
    • Balsam Peru and Oil
    • Basil Oil
    • Bay Leaf, Oil and Sweet Oil
    • Beeswax White
    • Beet Juice Concentrate
    • Benzaldehyde
    • Benzaldehyde Glyceryl Acetal
    • Benzoic Acid, Benzoin
    • Benzoin Resin
    • Benzophenone
    • Benzyl Alcohol
    • Benzyl Benzoate
    • Benzyl Butyrate
    • Benzyl Cinnamate
    • Benzyl Propionate
    • Benzyl Salicylate
    • Bergamot Oil
    • Bisabolene
    • Black Currant Buds Absolute
    • Borneol
    • Bornyl Acetate
    • Buchu Leaf Oil
    • 1,3-Butanediol
    • 2,3-Butanedione
    • 1-Butanol
    • 2-Butanone
    • 4(2-Butenylidene)-3,5,5-Trimethyl-2-Cyclohexen-1-One
    • Butter, Butter Esters, and Butter Oil
    • Butyl Acetate
    • Butyl Butyrate
    • Butyl Butyryl Lactate
    • Butyl Isovalerate
    • Butyl Phenylacetate
    • Butyl Undecylenate
    • 3-Butylidenephthalide
    • Butyric Acid]
    • Cadinene
    • Caffeine
    • Calcium Carbonate
    • Camphene
    • Cananga Oil
    • Capsicum Oleoresin
    • Caramel Color
    • Caraway Oil
    • Carbon Dioxide
    • Cardamom Oleoresin, Extract, Seed Oil, and Powder
    • Carob Bean and Extract
    • beta-Carotene
    • Carrot Oil
    • Carvacrol
    • 4-Carvomenthenol
    • 1-Carvone
    • beta-Caryophyllene
    • beta-Caryophyllene Oxide
    • Cascarilla Oil and Bark Extract
    • Cassia Bark Oil
    • Cassie Absolute and Oil
    • Castoreum Extract, Tincture and Absolute
    • Cedar Leaf Oil
    • Cedarwood Oil Terpenes and Virginiana
    • Cedrol
    • Celery Seed Extract, Solid, Oil, And Oleoresin
    • Cellulose Fiber
    • Chamomile Flower Oil And Extract
    • Chicory Extract
    • Chocolate
    • Cinnamaldehyde
    • Cinnamic Acid
    • Cinnamon Leaf Oil, Bark Oil, and Extract
    • Cinnamyl Acetate
    • Cinnamyl Alcohol
    • Cinnamyl Cinnamate
    • Cinnamyl Isovalerate
    • Cinnamyl Propionate
    • Citral
    • Citric Acid
    • Citronella Oil
    • dl-Citronellol
    • Citronellyl Butyrate
    • itronellyl Isobutyrate
    • Civet Absolute
    • Clary Oil
    • Clover Tops, Red Solid Extract
    • Cocoa
    • Cocoa Shells, Extract, Distillate And Powder
    • Coconut Oil
    • Coffee
    • Cognac White and Green Oil
    • Copaiba Oil
    • Coriander Extract and Oil
    • Corn Oil
    • Corn Silk
    • Costus Root Oil
    • Cubeb Oil
    • Cuminaldehyde
    • para-Cymene
    • 1-Cysteine Dandelion Root Solid Extract
    • Davana Oil
    • 2-trans, 4-trans-Decadienal
    • delta-Decalactone
    • gamma-Decalactone
    • Decanal
    • Decanoic Acid
    • 1-Decanol
    • 2-Decenal
    • Dehydromenthofurolactone
    • Diethyl Malonate
    • Diethyl Sebacate
    • 2,3-Diethylpyrazine
    • Dihydro Anethole
    • 5,7-Dihydro-2-Methylthieno(3,4-D) Pyrimidine
    • Dill Seed Oil and Extract
    • meta-Dimethoxybenzene
    • para-Dimethoxybenzene
    • 2,6-Dimethoxyphenol
    • Dimethyl Succinate
    • 3,4-Dimethyl-1,2 Cyclopentanedione
    • 3,5- Dimethyl-1,2-Cyclopentanedione
    • 3,7-Dimethyl-1,3,6-Octatriene
    • 4,5-Dimethyl-3-Hydroxy-2,5-
    Dihydrofuran-2-One
    • 6,10-Dimethyl-5,9-Undecadien-
    2-One
    • 3,7-Dimethyl-6-Octenoic Acid
    • 2,4 Dimethylacetophenone
    • alpha,para-Dimethylbenzyl Alcohol
    • alpha,alpha-Dimethylphenethyl Acetate
    • alpha,alpha Dimethylphenethyl Butyrate
    • 2,3-Dimethylpyrazine
    • 2,5-Dimethylpyrazine
    • 2,6-Dimethylpyrazine
    • Dimethyltetrahydrobenzofuranone
    • delta-Dodecalactone
    • gamma-Dodecalactone
    • para-Ethoxybenzaldehyde
    • Ethyl 10-Undecenoate
    • Ethyl 2-Methylbutyrate
    • Ethyl Acetate
    • Ethyl Acetoacetate
    • Ethyl Alcohol
    • Ethyl Benzoate
    • Ethyl Butyrate
    • Ethyl Cinnamate
    • Ethyl Decanoate
    • Ethyl Fenchol
    • Ethyl Furoate
    • Ethyl Heptanoate
    • Ethyl Hexanoate
    • Ethyl Isovalerate
    • Ethyl Lactate
    • Ethyl Laurate
    • Ethyl Levulinate
    • Ethyl Maltol
    • Ethyl Methyl Phenylglycidate
    • Ethyl Myristate
    • Ethyl Nonanoate
    • Ethyl Octadecanoate
    • Ethyl Octanoate
    • Ethyl Oleate
    • Ethyl Palmitate
    • Ethyl Phenylacetate
    • Ethyl Propionate
    • Ethyl Salicylate
    • Ethyl trans-2-Butenoate
    • Ethyl Valerate
    • Ethyl Vanillin
    • 2-Ethyl (or Methyl)-(3,5 and 6)-Methoxypyrazine
    • 2-Ethyl-1-Hexanol, 3-Ethyl -2 -
    Hydroxy-2-Cyclopenten-1-One
    • 2-Ethyl-3, (5 or 6)-Dimethylpyrazine
    • 5-Ethyl-3-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-2 (5H)-Furanone
    • 2-Ethyl-3-Methylpyrazine
    • 4-Ethylbenzaldehyde
    • 4-Ethylguaiacol
    • para-Ethylphenol
    • 3-Ethylpyridine
    • Eucalyptol
    • Farnesol
    • D-Fenchone
    • Fennel Sweet Oil
    • Fenugreek, Extract, Resin, and Absolute
    • Fig Juice Concentrate
    • Food Starch Modified
    • Furfuryl Mercaptan
    • 4-(2-Furyl)-3-Buten-2-One
    • Galbanum Oil
    • Genet Absolute
    • Gentian Root Extract
    • Geraniol
    • Geranium Rose Oil
    • Geranyl Acetate
    • Geranyl Butyrate
    • Geranyl Formate
    • Geranyl Isovalerate
    • Geranyl Phenylacetate
    • Ginger Oil and Oleoresin
    • 1-Glutamic Acid
    • 1-Glutamine
    • Glycerol
    • Glycyrrhizin Ammoniated
    • Grape Juice Concentrate
    • Guaiac Wood Oil
    • Guaiacol
    • Guar Gum
    • 2,4-Heptadienal
    • gamma-Heptalactone
    • Heptanoic Acid
    • 2-Heptanone
    • 3-Hepten-2-One
    • 2-Hepten-4-One
    • 4-Heptenal
    • trans -2-Heptenal
    • Heptyl Acetate
    • omega-6-Hexadecenlactone
    • gamma-Hexalactone
    • Hexanal
    • Hexanoic Acid
    • 2-Hexen-1-Ol
    • 3-Hexen-1-Ol
    • cis-3-Hexen-1-Yl Acetate
    • 2-Hexenal
    • 3-Hexenoic Acid
    • trans-2-Hexenoic Acid
    • cis-3-Hexenyl Formate
    • Hexyl 2-Methylbutyrate
    • Hexyl Acetate
    • Hexyl Alcohol
    • Hexyl Phenylacetate
    • 1-Histidine
    • Honey
    • Hops Oil
    • Hydrolyzed Milk Solids
    • Hydrolyzed Plant Proteins
    • 5-Hydroxy-2,4-Decadienoic Acid delta-Lactone
    • 4-Hydroxy-2,5-Dimethyl-3(2H)-Furanone
    • 2-Hydroxy-3,5,5-Trimethyl-2-Cyclohexen-1-One
    • 4-Hydroxy -3-Pentenoic Acid Lactone
    • 2-Hydroxy-4-Methylbenzaldehyde
    • 4-Hydroxybutanoic Acid Lactone
    • Hydroxycitronellal
    • 6-Hydroxydihydrotheaspirane
    • 4-(para-Hydroxyphenyl)-2-Butanone
    • Hyssop Oil
    • Immortelle Absolute and Extract
    • alpha-Ionone
    • beta-Ionone
    • alpha-Irone
    • Isoamyl Acetate
    • Isoamyl Benzoate
    • Isoamyl Butyrate
    • Isoamyl Cinnamate
    • Isoamyl Formate, IsoamylHexanoate
    • Isoamyl Isovalerate
    • Isoamyl Octanoate
    • Isoamyl Phenylacetate
    • Isobornyl Acetate
    • Isobutyl Acetate
    • Isobutyl Alcohol
    • Isobutyl Cinnamate
    • Isobutyl Phenylacetate
    • Isobutyl Salicylate
    • 2-Isobutyl-3-Methoxypyrazine
    • alpha-Isobutylphenethyl Alcohol
    • Isobutyraldehyde
    • Isobutyric Acid
    • d,l-Isoleucine
    • alpha-Isomethylionone
    • 2-Isopropylphenol
    • Isovaleric Acid
    • Jasmine Absolute, Concrete and Oil
    • Kola Nut Extract
    • Labdanum Absolute and Oleoresin
    • Lactic Acid
    • Lauric Acid
    • Lauric Aldehyde
    • Lavandin Oil
    • Lavender Oil
    • Lemon Oil and Extract
    • Lemongrass Oil
    • 1-Leucine
    • Levulinic Acid
    • Licorice Root, Fluid, Extract
    and Powder
    • Lime Oil
    • Linalool
    • Linalool Oxide
    • Linalyl Acetate
    • Linden Flowers
    • Lovage Oil And Extract
    • 1-Lysine]
    • Mace Powder, Extract and Oil
    • Magnesium Carbonate
    • Malic Acid
    • Malt and Malt Extract
    • Maltodextrin
    • Maltol
    • Maltyl Isobutyrate
    • Mandarin Oil
    • Maple Syrup and Concentrate
    • Mate Leaf, Absolute and Oil
    • para-Mentha-8-Thiol-3-One
    • Menthol
    • Menthone
    • Menthyl Acetate
    • dl-Methionine
    • Methoprene
    • 2-Methoxy-4-Methylphenol
    • 2-Methoxy-4-Vinylphenol
    • para-Methoxybenzaldehyde
    • 1-(para-Methoxyphenyl)-1-Penten-3-One
    • 4-(para-Methoxyphenyl)-2-Butanone
    • 1-(para-Methoxyphenyl)-2-Propanone
    • Methoxypyrazine
    • Methyl 2-Furoate
    • Methyl 2-Octynoate
    • Methyl 2-Pyrrolyl Ketone
    • Methyl Anisate
    • Methyl Anthranilate
    • Methyl Benzoate
    • Methyl Cinnamate
    • Methyl Dihydrojasmonate
    • Methyl Ester of Rosin, Partially Hydrogenated
    • Methyl Isovalerate
    • Methyl Linoleate (48%)
    • Methyl Linolenate (52%) Mixture
    • Methyl Naphthyl Ketone
    • Methyl Nicotinate
    • Methyl Phenylacetate
    • Methyl Salicylate
    • Methyl Sulfide
    • 3-Methyl-1-Cyclopentadecanone
    • 4-Methyl-1-Phenyl-2-Pentanone
    • 5-Methyl-2-Phenyl-2-Hexenal
    • 5-Methyl-2-Thiophene-carboxaldehyde
    • 6-Methyl-3,-5-Heptadien-2-One
    • 2-Methyl-3-(para-Isopropylphenyl) Propionaldehyde
    • 5-Methyl-3-Hexen-2-One
    • 1-Methyl-3Methoxy-4-Isopropylbenzene
    • 4-Methyl-3-Pentene-2-One
    • 2-Methyl-4-Phenylbutyraldehyde
    • 6-Methyl-5-Hepten-2-One
    • 4-Methyl-5-Thiazoleethanol
    • 4-Methyl-5-Vinylthiazole
    • Methyl-alpha-Ionone
    • Methyl-trans-2-Butenoic Acid
    • 4-Methylacetophenone
    • para-Methylanisole
    • alpha-Methylbenzyl Acetate
    • alpha-Methylbenzyl Alcohol
    • 2-Methylbutyraldehyde
    • 3-Methylbutyraldehyde
    • 2-Methylbutyric Acid
    • alpha-Methylcinnamaldehyde
    • Methylcyclopentenolone
    • 2-Methylheptanoic Acid
    • 2-Methylhexanoic Acid
    • 3-Methylpentanoic Acid
    • 4-Methylpentanoic Acid
    • 2-Methylpyrazine
    • 5-Methylquinoxaline
    • 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran-3-One
    • (Methylthio)Methylpyrazine (Mixture Of Isomers)
    • 3-Methylthiopropionaldehyde
    • Methyl 3-Methylthiopropionate
    • 2-Methylvaleric Acid
    • Mimosa Absolute and Extract
    • Molasses Extract and Tincture
    • Mountain Maple Solid Extract
    • Mullein Flowers
    • Myristaldehyde
    • Myristic Acid
    • Myrrh Oil
    • beta-Napthyl Ethyl Ether
    • Nerol
    • Neroli Bigarde Oil
    • Nerolidol
    • Nona-2-trans,6-cis-Dienal
    • 2,6-Nonadien-1-Ol
    • gamma-Nonalactone
    • Nonanal
    • Nonanoic Acid
    • Nonanone
    • trans-2-Nonen-1-Ol
    • 2-Nonenal
    • Nonyl Acetate
    • Nutmeg Powder and Oil
    • Oak Chips Extract and Oil
    • Oak Moss Absolute
    • 9,12-Octadecadienoic Acid (48%)
    And 9,12,15-Octadecatrienoic Acid (52%)
    • delta-Octalactone
    • gamma-Octalactone
    • Octanal
    • Octanoic Acid
    • 1-Octanol
    • 2-Octanone
    • 3-Octen-2-One
    • 1-Octen-3-Ol
    • 1-Octen-3-Yl Acetate
    • 2-Octenal
    • Octyl Isobutyrate
    • Oleic Acid
    • Olibanum Oil
    • Opoponax Oil And Gum
    • Orange Blossoms Water, Absolute, and Leaf Absolute
    • Orange Oil and Extract
    • Origanum Oil
    • Orris Concrete Oil and Root
    Extract
    • Palmarosa Oil
    • Palmitic Acid
    • Parsley Seed Oil
    • Patchouli Oil
    • omega-Pentadecalactone
    • 2,3-Pentanedione
    • 2-Pentanone
    • 4-Pentenoic Acid
    • 2-Pentylpyridine
    • Pepper Oil, Black And White
    • Peppermint Oil
    • Peruvian (Bois De Rose) Oil
    • Petitgrain Absolute, Mandarin Oil and Terpeneless Oil
    • alpha-Phellandrene
    • 2-Phenenthyl Acetate
    • Phenenthyl Alcohol
    • Phenethyl Butyrate
    • Phenethyl Cinnamate
    • Phenethyl Isobutyrate
    • Phenethyl Isovalerate
    • Phenethyl Phenylacetate
    • Phenethyl Salicylate
    • 1-Phenyl-1-Propanol
    • 3-Phenyl-1-Propanol
    • 2-Phenyl-2-Butenal
    • 4-Phenyl-3-Buten-2-Ol
    • 4-Phenyl-3-Buten-2-One
    • Phenylacetaldehyde
    • Phenylacetic Acid
    • 1-Phenylalanine
    • 3-Phenylpropionaldehyde
    • 3-Phenylpropionic Acid
    • 3-Phenylpropyl Acetate
    • 3-Phenylpropyl Cinnamate
    • 2-(3-Phenylpropyl)Tetrahydrofuran
    • Phosphoric Acid
    • Pimenta Leaf Oil
    • Pine Needle Oil, Pine Oil, Scotch
    • Pineapple Juice Concentrate
    • alpha-Pinene, beta-Pinene
    • D-Piperitone
    • Piperonal
    • Pipsissewa Leaf Extract
    • Plum Juice
    • Potassium Sorbate
    • 1-Proline
    • Propenylguaethol
    • Propionic Acid
    • Propyl Acetate
    • Propyl para-Hydroxybenzoate
    • Propylene Glycol
    • 3-Propylidenephthalide
    • Prune Juice and Concentrate
    • Pyridine
    • Pyroligneous Acid And Extract
    • Pyrrole
    • Pyruvic Acid
    • Raisin Juice Concentrate
    • Rhodinol
    • Rose Absolute and Oil
    • Rosemary Oil
    • Rum
    • Rum Ether
    • Rye Extract
    • Sage, Sage Oil, and Sage
    Oleoresin
    • Salicylaldehyde
    • Sandalwood Oil, Yellow
    • Sclareolide
    • Skatole
    • Smoke Flavor
    • Snakeroot Oil
    • Sodium Acetate
    • Sodium Benzoate
    • Sodium Bicarbonate
    • Sodium Carbonate
    • Sodium Chloride
    • Sodium Citrate
    • Sodium Hydroxide
    • Solanone
    • Spearmint Oil
    • Styrax Extract, Gum and Oil
    • Sucrose Octaacetate
    • Sugar Alcohols
    • Sugars
    • Tagetes Oil
    • Tannic Acid
    • Tartaric Acid
    • Tea Leaf and Absolute
    • alpha-Terpineol
    • Terpinolene
    • Terpinyl Acetate
    • 5,6,7,8-Tetrahydroquinoxaline
    • 1,5,5,9-Tetramethyl-13-Oxatricyclo(8.3.0.0(4,9))Tridecane
    • 2,3,4,5, and 3,4,5,6-
    Tetramethylethyl-Cyclohexanone
    • 2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine
    • Thiamine Hydrochloride
    • Thiazole
    • 1-Threonine
    • Thyme Oil, White and Red
    • Thymol
    • Tobacco Extracts
    • Tochopherols (mixed)
    • Tolu Balsam Gum and Extract
    • Tolualdehydes
    • para-Tolyl 3-Methylbutyrate
    • para-Tolyl Acetaldehyde
    • para-Tolyl Acetate
    • para-Tolyl Isobutyrate
    • para-Tolyl Phenylacetate
    • Triacetin
    • 2-Tridecanone
    • 2-Tridecenal
    • Triethyl Citrate
    • 3,5,5-Trimethyl -1-Hexanol
    • para,alpha,alpha-Trimethylbenzyl Alcohol
    • 4-(2,6,6-Trimethylcyclohex-1-
    Enyl)But-2-En-4-One
    • 2,6,6-Trimethylcyclohex-2-
    Ene-1,4-Dione
    • 2,6,6-Trimethylcyclohexa-1,
    3-Dienyl Methan
    • 4-(2,6,6-Trimethylcyclohexa-1,
    3-Dienyl)But-2-En-4-One
    • 2,2,6-Trimethylcyclohexanone
    • 2,3,5-Trimethylpyrazine
    • 1-Tyrosine
    • delta-Undercalactone
    • gamma-Undecalactone
    • Undecanal
    • 2-Undecanone, 1
    • 0-Undecenal
    • Urea
    • Valencene
    • Valeraldehyde
    • Valerian Root Extract, Oil
    and Powder
    • Valeric Acid
    • gamma-Valerolactone
    • Valine
    • Vanilla Extract And Oleoresin
    • Vanillin
    • Veratraldehyde
    • Vetiver Oil
    • Vinegar
    • Violet Leaf Absolute
    • Walnut Hull Extract
    • Water
    • Wheat Extract And Flour
    • Wild Cherry Bark Extract
    • Wine and Wine Sherry
    • Xanthan Gum
    • 3,4-Xylenol
    • Yeast





    + Hydrogen Cyanide :scared:

    Scimi
    | Likes colinberry1 liked this post
    The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry


  21. #17
    colinberry1's Avatar
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    Yes isn't it awful Scimi, it is like saying eating beef will give you mad cow disease, but all the time it is what they feed those poor cattle with, it is us to be blamed for all the wrongs that occur in this world for allowing it to happen.
    | Likes Scimitar liked this post

  22. #18
    colinberry1's Avatar
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    I think before anyone condemn tobacco a natural product of mother Earth, you should really be condemning the people who temper and destroyed this product that God created, if anything needs to be done, is the people who temper with the product should be brought to trial.


    Early usages[]



    A carving from the temple at Palenque Mexico depicting a Mayan priest using a smoking tube.

    Smoking has been practiced in one form or another since ancient times. Tobacco and various hallucinogenic drugs were smoked all over the Americas as early as 5000 BC in shamanistic rituals and originated in the Peruvian and Ecuadorian Andes. Many ancient civilizations, such as the Babylonians Indians and Chinese, burnt incense as a part of religious rituals, as did the Israelites and the later Catholic and orthodox Christian churches.
    In Ancient Greece smoke was used as healing practice and the Oracle of Delphi made prophecies while intoxicated by inhaling natural gases from a natural bore hole. The Greek historian Herodotos also wrote that the Scythians used cannabis for ritual mourning purposes and, to some degree, pleasure. He describes how Scythians burned hemp seed (IV, 75):
    At once it begins to smoke, giving off a vapour unsurpassed by any vapour-bath one could find in Greece. The Scythians enjoy it so much that they howl with pleasure.
    James L. Butrica criticized this view, emphasizing that the term "ἀγάμενοι" should be translated as "astounded" or "in mourning", as this is "closer to what one might expect in a ritual connected with death". This type of ritual has been confirmed as a result of archeological discoveries.

    Aztec women are handed flowers and smoking tubes before eating at a banquet, Florentine Codex 16th century.

    Smoking in the Americas probably originated in the incense-burning ceremonies of shamans and was later adopted for pleasure or as a social tool. The Maya employed it in classical times (at least from the 10th century) and the Aztecs included it in their mythology. The Aztec goddess Cihuacoahuatl had a body consisting of tobacco, and the priests that performed human sacrifices wore tobacco gourds as symbols of divinity. Even today certain Tzeltal Maya sacrifice 13 calabashes of tobacco at New Year. The smoking of tobacco and various other hallucinogenic drugs was used to achieve trances and to come into contact with the spirit world. Reports from the first European explorers and conquistadors to reach the Americas tell of rituals where native priests smoked themselves into such high degrees of intoxication that it is unlikely that the rituals were limited to just tobacco. No concrete evidence of exactly what they smoked exists, but the most probable theory is that the tobacco was much stronger, consumed in extreme amounts, or was mixed with other, unknown psychoactive drugs.

    A ceremonial pipe of the

    In North America the most common form of smoking was in pipes, which today are best known as thePeace pipe offered both to other tribes and later European settlers as a gesture of goodwill and diplomacy. In the Caribbean, Mexico and Central and South America, early forms of cigarettes include smoking reeds or cigars were the most common smoking tools. Only in modern times has the use of pipes become fairly widespread. Smoking is depicted in engravings and on various types of pottery as early as the 9th century, but it is not known whether it was limited to just the upper class and priests
    By the time Europeans arrived in the Americas in the late 15th century there was widespread use of tobacco smoking as a recreational activity. At the banquets of nobles, the meal would commence by passing out fragrant flowers and smoking tubes for the dinner guests. At the end of the feast, which would last all night, the remaining flowers, smoking tubes and food would be given as a kind of alms to old and poor people who had been invited to witness the social occasion, or it would be rewarded to the servants.

  23. #19
    umairlooms's Avatar
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    Re: The "threat" of Islam to the tobacco industry

    thank you for making us aware with this, may Allah reward you.
    | Likes Abz2000 liked this post


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